Thomas Paine: Rights of Man
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Thomas Paine17371809Paine was born on February 9th 1737 in Thetford, Norfolk, Great Britain. He was a revolutionary, ploitical theorist, and an Enlightenment idealist. He is best known for his poltical writings "Common Sense" and "Rights of Man" which were instrumental in both the American and the French Revolution.<br /><br /><a
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wikimediahttps://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Thomas_Paine_rev1.jpg
Portrait 1880 by Auguste Millière

<a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Thomas_Paine.jpg">Wikimedia Commons</a>
Thetford, Norfolk, England
52.41286, 0.75166
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The Publicatation of "Reflections on the Revolution in France"
1790In 1790, Political Conservative Edmund Burke wrote "Reflections on the Revolution in France". In it, Burke attacked the French Revolutionaries and the British Citizens who supported them. He accused the revolutionaries of being too ideological and supported the change of government through gradual reform.<br /><br /><a
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Portait circa 1767-69 by Joshua Reynolds
<a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:EdmundBurke1771.jpg">Wikimedia Commons</a>
London, England
51.50735, -0.12776
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The Publication of "Rights of Man"
1791Thomas Paine published "Rights of Man" as a response Burke's "Reflections on the French Revolution". Throughout the text, Paine supports the French Revolution using Enlightenment ideas. He argues that human rights are inherent and that in taking these rights away, the French monarchy has lost its authority to rule; thus justifying the revolution.<br /><br /><a
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"Rights of Man" Title Page
<a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:PaineRightsOfMan.png">Wikimedia Commons</a>
London, England
51.50735, -0.12776
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"Rights of Man" Published in Dublin
1791Paine's work was available throughout the British Isles. <br /><br /><a
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Dublin Castle by Jame Malton
<a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dublin_Castle_1792.jpg">Wikimedia Commons</a>Dublin, Ireland
53.34981, -6.26031
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"Rights of Man" Published in Boston
1791"Rights of Man" also reached the United States. Paine was well known and respected in America because he wrote the Revolutionary pamphlet "Common Sense" which helped spur the war for independence.<br /><br /><a
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View of the Town of Boston from Breed's Hill in Charlestown from The Massachusetts Magazine
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Boston. United States
42.35849, -71.06010
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The Publication of "Rights of Man, Part the Second, Combining Principle and Practice"
1792Despite much controversy over "Rights of Man", Paine produced a "Rights of Man, Part the Second" in 1792. It advocated for progressive governmental reform not only in France but in England as well. The text was widely read and spurred many reform movements in Geat Britain.<br /><br /><a
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http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d2/Thomas_Paine_1791_by_William_Angus.jpg
Engraved 1791 by William Angus
<a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Thomas_Paine_1791_by_William_Angus.jpg">Wikimedia Commons</a>
London, England
51.50735, -0.12776
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Paine's Departure from England
1792Paine was charged with seditious libel for writing "The Rights of Man, Part the Second". He fled to Paris to escape his trial and he was deemed guilty in his absence. Despite his conviction, both part 1 and 2 of "Rights of Man" continued to be circulated throughout Britain and Paine's ideas managed to reach a global audience. <br /><br /><a
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A caricature created in 1792 by an unknown author
<a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Thomas_Paine_caricature.tif">Wikimedia Commons</a>Paris, France
48.85661, 2.35222
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