MACT-eligible courses - last updated August 2016
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Courses are approved as MACT-eligible at the discretion of the MACT director and Executive Committee. To be eligible for credit toward the certificate, a course 1) must be taught in a CAS department or program, 2) must engage in critical inquiry through the lens of the arts and humanities (for example, courses in the practice of physical science would be precluded), 3) must significantly address intersections of media, art, culture, and technology, 4) must be open to enrollment by students outside the listing department/program, 5) cannot be a required course for a departmental degree. Courses are approved with specific topics and instructors because MACT relies largely on "topics" courses whose subjects and approaches vary. Courses may have their own pre-requisites, and are open to MACT students by permission of the instructor. Any Stony Brook faculty member can request a course be listed here as MACT-eligible by submitting a description and syllabus to mediaartculturetechnology@gmail for Executive Committee vote no later than one month before enrollment opens for the term. Students may count a maximum of 2 courses (6 credits) prior to enrollment in MACT toward the 5 courses (15 credits) required.
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YEARTERM
Instructor (last, first)
Dept Abbreviation
No.Bulletin TitleTopic/SubtitleOptional description (double-click cells below to show full text)
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2017SpringDavidson, CynthiaWRT614Digital Rhetorics
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2017FallVernon, KathleenSPN64320th Century Spanish Literature (in this case film)Buñuel, Ripstein, Almodóvar(Course conducted in Spanish.) This course will focus on the films and careers of three of the most provocative and influential Hispanic directors of the last 90 years, Luis Buñuel, Arturo Ripstein and Pedro Almodóvar. In analyzing each of their distinctive film universes, we will also consider a series of shared concerns: their participation in a model of hybrid, transnational cinema; their pursuit of socially and sexually transgressive themes; and their creative if conflictive relation to various traditions of both Hispanic and wider global cultures.
The course will be conducted in Spanish but all films will have English subtitles and the readings will be available in English.
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2017FallTausig, BenMUS 546EthnomusicologyBodies and Sex in Electronic Music
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2017SpringBelisle, BrookeARH554Topics in Visual CultureComparative MediaPhotographic/Cinematic/Digital Aesthetics - historical and theoretical texts and close analysis of examples
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2017Spring Mather, David ARH546Topics in 20th Century Art AutomatismWhile automatism is closely associated with the French surrealists and their method for composing texts and images via psychic automatism, the term likewise refers to a centuries-old concept connoting a spectrum of self-directed, mechanical, or uncontrollable processes across varied historical, social, and cultural contexts. This interdisciplinary seminar focuses on iterations of the deeply rooted concept of automatism, including mechanical automation, psychological and physical disorders, and spontaneous social and political disruptions, while also examining specific practices such as Parisian café concerts of the fin-de-siècle; the inventions of photography, chronophotography, and film; the Uncanny; Modernist and contemporary architecture and dance; and media theories rooted in spectacle, simulacra, and the apparatus. We will analyze the results/works by Étienne-Jules Marey, Loïe Fuller, the Italian futurists, Marcel Duchamp, Dziga Vertov, André Breton and the surrealists, Oskar Schlemmer, Karel Čapek, Fritz Lang, Charlie Chaplin, Kurt Schwitters, Le Corbusier, Leni Riefenstahl, Guy Debord, and Andy Warhol, among others. Through in-depth textual and visual analysis as well as cultural and intellectual histories, the resulting typology of automatism provides a useful intellectual framework for describing, explaining, and assessing creative and critical engagements with automatic processes, while fostering a greater appreciation for the myriad fears and desires such engagements inspire.
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2017SpringTausig, BenMUS541
Topics in the Cross-Cultural Study of Music
Mutiny by Ear: Theories of Aural Refusal
How do political actors both express dissent and generate socialities through acts of non-listening? How does the closing of the ear become an affiliative act?
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2017SpringUroskie, AndrewARH 546Topics in 20th Century Art The Movement ImageThe Kinetic Imaginary: Animation of Postwar Art
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2016FallTan, E.K. CLT/CST609
Advanced Topics in Comparative Literature/Cultural Studies
Traveling People, Traveling Cultures
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2016FallKaplan, E. A.WST610Global Women's Cinema
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2016FallLutterbie, JohnARH551Theories of Performance
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2016FallBogart, MicheleARH549Topics in American Visual CulturePublic Art
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2016FallPatterson, ZabetARH552Topics Contemporary ArtMedia Aesthesis
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2016FallSmith, StephenMUS555Topics in 20th-Century MusicCritical Theory for Music Studies
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2016SpringSmith, StephenMUS555Topics in 20th-Century MusicCritical Theory for Music Studies
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2016SpringDavidson, CynthiaWRT614Digital Rhetorics
Reading/Writing/Culture Across Networks
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2016SpringMather, DavidARH546Topics in 20th Century ArtEmbodiment
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2016SpringPatterson, ZabetARH552Topics in Contemporary Art Art and Technology
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2016Spring Lee, SohlARH 550Topics in Criticism and TheorySocialist Aesthetics
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2016SpringGraham, ElyseEGL555Studies in Irish LiteratureDigital Ulysses
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2015FallLutterbie, JohnARH551Topics in PerformanceTheories of Performance
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2015FallTausig, BenMUS 536EthnomusicologyMusic, Tension, and Conflict
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2015FallBogart, MicheleARH549Topics in American Visual CultureArts of Commercial CultureThis course will examine the impact of commercial culture in twentieth century America by focusing on the development of advertising and graphic design, along with other select design forms. Highlighting both the visual and semiotic aspects of advertising, readings will focus on two related areas of inquiry, the first being representations of gender identity and the second, rhetorics of desire--erotic, consumer, or both. We will examine varied and shifting styles of advertising iconography and form; the organizational frameworks and professional dimensions of advertising and graphic design activity; and the differences between “mass versus class” when it came to design and promotion. Weekly topics will run chronologically, emphasizing case studies and familiar historical flashpoints (open to debate, of course), like the post-World War I “Jazz Age,” the post-World War II 50s, and the 60‘s moment of “counterculture.” By probing how commercial art operated aesthetically, psychologically, and ideologically--and for whom--students will gain insights into the operations and influences of this mass cultural form, into gender formation, into sex and desire in a specific historical period; and ultimately, into relationships and meanings of both visual culture and life in America.
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2015SpringBelisle, BrookeARH/CST
552/609
Topics in Contemporary Art/ Advanced Topics in Comp Lit and Cultural Studies
NetworksThis seminar will traverse intersections of media theory, philosophy, aesthetics, and politics to engage the idea of connection and the figure of the network. Held in Manhattan, it will require in-person encounters with contemporary media art at museums, galleries, and screenings. Graduate students will draw on interdisciplinary readings to develop an article- or chapter-length piece addressing the question of connection and the figure of the network through the lens of their own research interests. Readings may include: T Terranova Network Culture, A Munster An Aesthesia of Networks, N Bourriaud Relational Aesthetics, J. Derrida Différence, JL Nancy Being Singular Plural. Some questions we will consider in this course: How do we think about the forms of interconnectedness that integrate us as individual subjects and bind us into communities? How do new technologies shift both material and ideological possibilities of connection? How do popular media and aesthetic experiments explore changing ideas of connectivity? How do we imagine the singularity of a moment within the continuity of history, or the specificity of a node within the abstraction of a network? How do we relate the concrete infrastructures, virtual flows, and material forms of traffic that coordinate global communication, economic, and political systems?
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2015SpringGaboury, JacobCST 609
Topics in Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies
Media TheoryThis seminar will introduce students to the study of media theory as it has grown and transformed over the course of the 20th and 21st centuries. Drawing heavily on contemporary debates over the materiality of technical media, the course will track a range of methods and contemporary debates in the discipline. What are the limits of media theory? How does media theory engage contemporary research on new materialism and speculative realism? What can media studies add to the study of film and literature? What does media theory tell us about the body and identity? Readings will include: Marshall McLuhan, Harold Innis, Friedrich Kittler, Villem Flusser, Bernhard Siegert, Martin Heidegger, Gilbert Simondon, Lisa Gitelman, Jonathan Crary, Katherine Hayles, Claude Shannon, Lynn Hershman, Miriam Hansen, Bruno Latour, and Jane Bennett, among others. The course will offer a foundational framework for students interested in working with and studying media theory, as well as specific approaches to a wide range of media practices, including visual media, performance, sound, text, and computation.
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2015SpringAugust, TimCST 609
Topics in Comparative Literature and CUltural Studies
Refugee Literature and Film This seminar will take refugee literature and film as its object. The study of refugees has, up until now, been overwhelmingly dominated by those in the social sciences, due to the commonplace assumption that the refugee is a political category rather than a subjectivity. In this class we will employ a humanistic methodology to study how the term refugee can be used to project a distinct sense of self and/or community. Specifically we will query the strategy of naming oneself a refugee, while evaluating the ethics of claiming this position in artistic works. This will involve considering how refugee expression varies through different geographical spaces and political conflicts, such as the civil wars in Africa, the boat exodus in Southeast Asia, and the contemporary refugees of Syria and Palestine. More broadly we will engage the intellectual history of the refugee position, tracking its currency alongside other worldly ideas like cosmopolitanism, diaspora, globalization, and transnationalism. Key thinkers to be examined will include: Giorgio Agamben, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Hannah Arendt, Yen Le Espiritu, Paul Gilroy, Stuart Hall, and Edward Said, as well as writers Reinaldo Arenas, Bao Phi, Kao Kalia Yang and Benjamin Zephania.
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2015Spring Tausig, BenMUS 541
Topics in the Cross-Cultural Study of Music
The Music of Protest"Music at its most potent," writes critic Alex Ross, "creates the feeling that the world is about to undergo a vague but tremendous change, which is how political energies become attached to it." In the past decade, what kinds of vague but tremendous changes have been envisioned by major protest movements around the world, and how has music functioned in relation to these political projects? This seminar engages an ideologically and geographically diverse array of recent case studies in protest music, about which much has been written since the late 2000s, with a spate of new publications appearing in the past few years. Undoubtedly, music has been linked to key concepts of protest, including solidarity and sacrifice, for a great long time. However, recent events raise fresh questions about the role of protest music in a milieu of digital communications, about the transformation of music into new forms of weaponry, and about modes of composition and performance in the face of technologically sophisticated censorship. In addition to musical case studies from Istanbul, Tunisia, Brazil, Thailand, the United Kingdom, Cairo, Missouri, numerous sites during the Arab Spring, and both the American right and left after the financial crisis, we will take on a healthy portion of theory: LaClau and Mouffe on populism, Habermas on social movements, Hardt and Negri on the multitude, and Arendt on revolution, among others. Students will produce weekly responses and a significant final project.
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2015SpringSmith, StevenMUS 555Topics in 20th CenturyCritical Theory for Music Studies
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2015Spring Patterson, ZabetARH552Topics in Contemporary Art Utopia and its Discontents
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2015SpringMather, DavidARH 546Topics in 20th Century ArtAutomatismWhile automatism is closely associated with the French surrealists and their method for composing texts and images via psychic automatism, the term likewise refers to a centuries-old concept connoting a spectrum of self-directed, mechanical, or uncontrollable processes across varied historical, social, and cultural contexts. This interdisciplinary seminar focuses on iterations of the deeply rooted concept of automatism, including mechanical automation, psychological and physical disorders, and spontaneous social and political disruptions, while also examining specific practices such as Parisian café concerts of the fin-de-siècle; the inventions of photography, chronophotography, and film; the Uncanny; Modernist and contemporary architecture and dance; and media theories rooted in spectacle, simulacra, and the apparatus. We will analyze the results/works by Étienne-Jules Marey, Loïe Fuller, the Italian futurists, Marcel Duchamp, Dziga Vertov, André Breton and the surrealists, Oskar Schlemmer, Karel Čapek, Fritz Lang, Charlie Chaplin, Kurt Schwitters, Le Corbusier, Leni Riefenstahl, Guy Debord, and Andy Warhol, among others. Through in-depth textual and visual analysis as well as cultural and intellectual histories, the resulting typology of automatism provides a useful intellectual framework for describing, explaining, and assessing creative and critical engagements with automatic processes, while fostering a greater appreciation for the myriad fears and desires such engagements inspire.
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2015SpringUroskie, AndrewARH546Topcis in 20th Century Art Expanded CinemaWhile histories of modern and contemporary art have always appreciated cinema as general point of reference, it is only recently that art history and criticism has begun to understand the centrality of moving image practices to many of the artistic movements that defined the century. This will not be a course on “video art” or “experimental film” as those domains have been reductively understood, but embarks upon a more wide-ranging reconceptualization of the history and theorization of moving-image technologies and their relation to the evolution of postwar visual and performing arts.
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2015SpringGraham, ElyseEGL608
Reationship of Literature and Other Disciplines
Storytelling with DataThis course introduces students to a selection of digital methods and tools for working with large data sets in literature, history, and the arts. In recent years, a series of revolutions in our ability to mine and explore data has raised new challenges across many fields of cultural studies. Methods of “distant reading” are raising questions about what it means to interpret literary history. Data-driven news sites represent an increasingly influential brand of journalism, focused on making meaning of quantitative analysis. Museums are reconceiving aspects of curation and research in the context of crowdsourcing platforms. This course teaches students how to use data to tell meaningful stories and how to ask questions of data sets that point in useful directions. In a series of classes and workshops, we will explore data acquisition and storytelling, visualizing data, and designing digital humanities spaces through rapid prototyping, as well as some foundational readings in the digital humanities. The course is intended for a mixed class of students from across the humanities. It will integrate theoretical concepts with hands-on project development in the digital humanities.
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