CS2 Rubrics
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Problem Solving With Software
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Level Number:12345678
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Mastery Nomenclature:NoviceApprenticePractitionerProfessionalProfessionalProfessionalProfessionalProfessional
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Estimated Numeric:0 to 557085100100100100100
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Estimated Letter:FCB+A+A++A+++A++++A+++++
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Required Entry Point:Entry point not acceptable for credit.Student(s) who performed at level 1 or lower for previous pathway project AND were observed to be working for ENTIRE scheduled class time AND attended extra help may submit for this level.Student(s) who performed at level 1 or lower for previous pathway project AND were observed to be working for ENTIRE scheduled class time may submit for this level.Standard entry point for high school students.Standard entry points for exceptional high school students or students performing at college level.Target entry point for students who have been permitted this project for a second time by teacher and have already achieved level 4.Target entry point for students who have been permitted this project for a third time by teacher and have already achieved level 5.Target entry point for students who have been permitted this project for a fourth time by teacher and have already achieved level 6.
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General Level Descriptions:Understanding of programming mastery has yet to be demonstrated. Submitted work is missing or is a copy of previously created code. Original work is trivial such as a copy of an example except with color updates. The student is not yet marketable with the desired skills. Students may be novices on the subject before entering class and will work towards higher levels of achievement. Any plagiarism will be marked at this level. Some understanding of programming mastery is shown. Submitted work may be a spinoff from the teacher's example with non-trivial program upgrades. Spin-offs show at least some student implemented upgrades to function, not just aesthetics. No part of the program may be acquired from a peer for this or any higher level of achievement unless otherwise directed by teacher.Significant understanding of programming mastery is shown. Submitted work may be a spinoff from the teacher's example. However, the student's work goes beyond given examples. Most code is not based on a copy of previously created work or class example. The program has at least partial originality in look, feel and function that is not like the teacher's version or any other previously written software.Student has a strong understanding of concepts and has demonstrated an ability to be ready for internships, college or careers performing the required tasks. The program is original and does not resemble any given examples that have been used during instruction. No part of the program has been done before by anyone. The program expresses class concepts to solve a problem in a unique, insightful way.Create a working program or app that can be used to perform a useful service to a real target audience even if that target audience has not yet begun using the created software.Create a program or app that is proven to be useful, for free, to a real target audience.Create a program or app that is proven to be useful and has been purchased by a real target audience or generates revenue through any chosen business model.Pull a "Mark Zuckerberg" or "Bill Gates" by inventing something so awesome that you can leave school and continue self created success on your billion dollar yacht. Don't forget 5% goes to your teacher!
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CS Department Universal Mastery Rubric
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Mastery Nomenclature:ProfessionalPractitionerApprenticeNovice
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General Level Descriptions:The student produces evidence of extended higher order thinking including analysis, synthesis, and iteration. The student employs strategic thinking process over a period of time.The student produces evidence of higher order thinking processes to solve a problem. Several small problems where solved independently by the student and combined to perform a unique solution, requiring the synthesis of several skills or pieces of content that were not given to them ahead of time.The student can make use of the class content in a slightly different context from the original instruction. The student is able to formulate rudimentary explanations of why or how a procedure is used. The student performs a transformation by applying a concept beyond mere recall.The students can recall or reproduce content covered during class. The student is able to make factual statements about content and can apply simple procedures.
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CS Department Skill Descriptions
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Skill:Short DescriptionDescriptionExample
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CSMS-A:1. use tools,Given a contract/tool/API generate and/or identify examples. Given examples, generate and/or identify the contract/tool/API. That is, map between the contract and the examples.Draw a turtle line at 45 degrees.
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CSMS-B:2. read programs,Given a program, predict the output/behavior.Draw a picture of this program.
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CSMS-C:3. build tools,Given a problem statement, translate/map the statement into a language of whatever technology you are using, e.g. “Here’s the real world. If I had the solution it would look like this.”Define a tool to draw a circle with the radius of your choosing.
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CSMS-D:4. breakdown problems,Given a problem statement, identify sub-problems.Here is a picture. What tools do you wish you had?
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CSMS-E:5. solve large problems by doing the aboveGiven an output and/or problem statement and a set of primitive contracts/tools/APIs, use the contracts/tools/APIs to produce the output.Given a castle, draw it in 45 minutes.
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Computer Science Department Skills Rubric
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Skill Level:Skill DescriptionNoviceApprenticePractitionerProfessional
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CSMS-A:A. Contract/tool/api ←→ examples.

Given a contract/tool/API generate and/or identify examples. Given examples, generate and/or identify the contract/tool/API. That is, map between the contract and the examples.
Students are unable to reproduce teacher's examples.Students are able to solve the examples that are similar and/or the same as shown in class.Students are able to apply strategies shown in class to solve similar, but different problems, using only the same tools shown in class..Students are able to apply strategies shown in class to solve different problems than those demonstrated and that require independent research to understand tools that have NOT been specifically shown in class.
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CSMS-B:B. Given Program Code → predict output

Given a program, predict the output/behavior.
The student is unable to reproduce basic examples. Students can predict short length programs with few variables.Students can predict medium length programs with more variables.Students can predict longer length programs with a larger number of variables.
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CSMS-C:C. What does the tool look like that solves the problem (student creates function headers)

Given a problem statement, translate/map the statement into a language of whatever technology you are using, e.g. “Here’s the real world. If I had the solution it would look like this.”
Student is able to only partially quantify the required input and output for the solution to problem.Student is able to define a problem's input and output structure for an example that is similar or the same as one previously demonstrated in class. Student is able to define a problem's input and output structure for a problem that is not similar to examples previously studied in class. Student is able to design a problem's input and output structure for a problem that introduces different levels of complexity and requires strategies that have not been previously shown in class.
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CSMS-D:D. Problem → sub problems

Given a problem statement, identify sub-problems.
The students can recall or reproduce content covered during class. The student is able to make factual statements about content and can apply simple procedures.The student can make use of the class content in a slightly different context from the original instruction. The student is able to formulate rudimentary explanations of why or how a procedure is used. The student performs a transformation by applying a concept beyond mere recall.The student produces evidence of extended higher order thinking including analysis, synthesis, and iteration. The student employs strategic thinking process over a period of time.The student produces evidence of higher order thinking processes to solve a problem. Several small problems where solved independently by the student and combined to perform a unique solution, requiring the synthesis of several skills or pieces of content that were not given to them ahead of time.
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CSMS-E:E. Given an output/problem and contracts produce the program

Given an output and/or problem statement and a set of primitive contracts/tools/APIs, use the contracts/tools/APIs to produce the output.
Student is able to only partially make use of previously demonstrated contracts to solve problems that are similar to problems previously demonstrated in class. Student is able to make use of previously demonstrated to contracts to solve problems that are similar or the same to problems previously demonstrated in class. Student is able to make use of previously demonstrated contracts to solve problems that are different than the problems previously demonstrated in class. Student is able to make use of previously demonstrated contracts AND independently research new relative contract to solve problems that are different than the problems previously demonstrated in class.
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Course Specific Required Skills
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NoviceApprenticePractitionerProfessional
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Professional ConductStudent is able to work on assignments for only part of the class. Student is able to work on assignments for entire class for most of the days assigned to the project.Student is able to to work on assignments for entire scheduled class time.Student is able to work on assignments for entire scheduled class time and takes a leadership role in the class.
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Communication - Technical WritingStudent wrote part of of the required information.Student completes the technical writing based on the teacher's example.Student completes the technical writing and is able to use the technical information to participate in a class discussion.Student completes the technical writing and is able to use the technical information to participate in a class discussion and adds additional, relevant information based on their own research. This writing may be, but is not limited to, reflection on previous attempt at skill, planning, language contract/syntax information, questions to ask to the class and outlines. The student created information should contain the teacher's example and as much again in overall information.
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Solving Problems With Web CodingUnderstanding of techniques for web coding has yet to be demonstrated. Submitted work is missing or is a copy of previously created code. Original work is trivial such as a copy of an example except with color updates. The student is not yet marketable with desired skills. Students may be novices on the subject before entering class and will work towards higher levels of achievement. Some understanding of techniques for web coding is shown. Submitted work may be a spinoff from the teacher’s example with non-trivial code upgrades. Spin-offs show at least some student implemented upgrades to function, not just aesthetics. No part of the program may be acquired from a peer for this or any higher level of achievement unless otherwise directed by teacher. Significant understanding of techniques for web coding is shown. Submitted work may be a spinoff from the teacher’s example. However, the student’s work goes beyond given examples. Code is not based on a copy of previously created work or class example. The page has originality in look, feel and function that is not like the teacher’s version or any other previously written page.
Student has a strong understanding of web coding concepts and has demonstrated an ability to be ready for internships, college or careers performing the required tasks. The web page is original and does not resemble any given examples that have been used during instruction. No part of the page has been done before by anyone. The page expresses class concepts to display information in a unique, insightful way.
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Solving Problems With PythonUnderstanding of Python coding mastery has yet to be demonstrated. Submitted work is missing or is a copy of previously created code. Original work is trivial such as a copy of an example except with color updates. The student is not yet marketable with desired skills. Students may be novices on the subject before entering class and will work towards higher levels of achievement. Some understanding of Python coding mastery is shown. Submitted work may be a spinoff from the teacher’s example with non-trivial code upgrades. Spin-offs show at least some student implemented upgrades to function, not just aesthetics. No part of the program may be acquired from a peer for this or any higher level of achievement unless otherwise directed by teacher. Significant understanding of Python coding mastery is shown. Submitted work may be a spinoff from the teacher’s example. However, the student’s work goes beyond given examples. Code is not based on a copy of previously created work or class example. The page has originality in look, feel and function that is not like the teacher’s version or any other previously written page.
Student has a strong understanding of Python concepts and has demonstrated an ability to be ready for internships, college or careers performing the required tasks. The web page is original and does not resemble any given examples that have been used during instruction. No part of the page has been done before by anyone. The page expresses class concepts to display information in a unique, insightful way.
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Solving Problems With ScratchUnderstanding of Scratch programming mastery has yet to be demonstrated. Submitted work is missing or is a copy of previously created code. Original work is trivial such as a copy of an example except with color updates. The student is not yet marketable with desired skills. Students may be novices on the subject before entering class and will work towards higher levels of achievement.Some understanding of Scratch coding mastery is shown. Submitted work may be a spinoff from the teacher’s example with non-trivial code upgrades. Spin-offs show at least some student implemented upgrades to function, not just aesthetics. No part of the program may be acquired from a peer for this or any higher level of achievement unless otherwise directed by teacher. Significant understanding of Scratch coding mastery is shown. Submitted work may be a spinoff from the teacher’s example. However, the student’s work goes beyond given examples. Code is not based on a copy of previously created work or class example. The page has originality in look, feel and function that is not like the teacher’s version or any other previously written page.
Student has a strong understanding of Scratch concepts and has demonstrated an ability to be ready for internships, college or careers performing the required tasks. The program is original and does not resemble any given examples that have been used during instruction. No part of the page has been done before by anyone. The page expresses class concepts to display information in a unique, insightful way.
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Solving Problems With Communication TechnologyUnderstanding of application based data communication systems has yet to be demonstrated. Submitted work is missing or is a copy of previously created text or media. Original work is trivial such as a copy of an example with wording changed. The student is not yet marketable with desired skills. Students may be novices on the subject before entering class and will work towards higher levels of achievement.Some understanding of data based communications systems is shown. Submitted work may be based on the teacher’s example, but the document contains authentic, original student work. No part of the program may be acquired from a peer for this or any higher level of achievement unless otherwise directed by teacher. Significant understanding of data based communication systems is shown. The format may be based on a teacher's example, but the content is an original design and implementation based on student original work. The student’s work goes beyond given examples. Code is not based on a copy of previously created work or class example. The work has originality in look, feel and function that is not like the teacher’s version or any other previously written page.
Student has a strong understanding of application based data communication system concepts and has demonstrated an ability to be ready for internships, college or careers performing the required tasks. The document is original and does not resemble any given examples that have been used during instruction. No part of the page has been done before by anyone. The page expresses class concepts to display information in a unique, insightful way.
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Technical WritingStudent did not prepare by writing required technical data.Student completes the technical writing based on the teacher's example.Student completes the technical writing and is able to use the technical information to participate in a class discussion.Student completes the technical writing and is able to use the technical information to participate in a class discussion and adds additional, relevant information based on their own research. This writing may be, but is not limited to, reflection on previous attempt at skill, planning, language contract/syntax information, questions to ask to the class and outlines. The student created information should contain the teacher's example and as much again in overall information.
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The InternetStudent has not yet demonstrated an understanding of Internet systems and Internet security.Student is able to summarize and explain how the Internet works as a communication tool.Student is able to summarize and explain how the Internet works as a communication tool. Student is able to explain the details of the technical aspects of data transfer standards on the Internet and explain how to protect themselves from inadvertent data exposure.Student is able to summarize and explain how the Internet works as a communication tool. Student is able to explain the details of the technical aspects of data transfer standards on the Internet and explain how to protect themselves from inadvertent data exposure. Student is able to predict how system changes will produce differences in data transfer function and security.
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Number SystemsStudent has not yet demonstrated an understanding of differing base systems in use by modern CS.Student is able to convert and count in binary and decimal number base systems.Student is able to convert and count in binary and decimal number base systems. Student is able to make numerical calculations with binary, decimal, hex and ASCII. Student can explain how differing resources for numerical data storage can change the availability of a programmer to solve different problems.Student is able to convert and count in binary and decimal number base systems. Student is able to make numerical calculations with binary, decimal, hex and ASCII. Student can explain how differing resources for numerical data storage can change the availability of a programmer to solve different problems. Student can apply strategies of alternate base number system use to base numbers that they have not yet practices.
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TracingStudent has not yet demonstrated practices that show the work of predicting the output of a computer program.Student is able to show the steps and predict the output of simple algorithms. Student is able to show the steps and predict the output of complex algorithms that contain abstraction such as with sub-procedures and functions. Student is able to show the steps and predict the output of complex algorithms with sub-procedures and functions. Student is able to suggest changes to an algorithm to adapt to the changing needs of a problem.
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Problem Solving With ProgrammingStudent is unable to apply modern programming techniques to solve communication based problems. Student is able to select an appropriate programming toolset and apply to solve non-trivial problems with simple algorithms. Student is able to select an appropriate programming toolset and apply to to solve non-trivial problems with complex algorithms (algorithms with multiple levels of abstraction). Student is able to select an appropriate programming toolset and apply to to solve non-trivial problems with complex algorithms. Student is able to research and acquire additional programming tools and resources to independently improve the solution's effectiveness and scalability.
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Research in Computer ScienceStudent is unable to produce an academically credited summary of media explaining recent innovations in computer related fields. Student is able to produce text with academic citations to summarize recent innovations in the CS and technology fields. Student is able to produce text with academic citations to summarize recent innovations in the CS and technology fields. Student is able to present evidence from multiple sources to explain differing points of view on the impact of the innovations on people and the scientific field. Student is able to produce text with academic citations to summarize recent innovations in the CS and technology fields. Student is able to present evidence from multiple sources to explain differing points of view on the impact of the innovations on people and the scientific field. Student is able to produce graphical presentations to summarize the concepts on a technical innovation and explain differing potential impacts to a target audience that does not have prior knowledge of the specific issue.
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Basic Studying TechniquesStudent was unable to write information previously supplied by instructor.Student was able to write most of the information previously supplied by instructor.
Student was able to write all information supplied by instructor.
Student was able to write all information supplied by instructor and additional information that was not specifically noted as being relevant.
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Web Coding Rubric Example
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Novice - 55%Student creates and submits a web page demonstrating any of the tags demonstrated in class materials.

Understanding of programming mastery has yet to be demonstrated. Submitted work is missing or is a copy of previously created code. Original work is trivial such as a copy of an example except with color updates. The student is not yet marketable with desired skills. Students may be novices on the subject before entering class and will work towards higher levels of achievement.
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Apprentice - 70%Novice requirements and the web pages contains most of the demonstrated tags, html, head, body, ol, li, ul, hr, br, b, i, u, div align, h1, img, and p. The content shown on the page has at least two paragraphs written in the student's own words. The page makes sense towards presenting a specific topic of information.

Some understanding of coding mastery is shown. Submitted work may be a spinoff from the teacher’s example with non-trivial code upgrades. Spin-offs show at least some student implemented upgrades to function, not just aesthetics. No part of the program may be acquired from a peer for this or any higher level of achievement unless otherwise directed by teacher.
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Practitioner - 85%Apprentice requirements with a total of 5 paragraphs. At least one heading and one picture is shown that adds to the page overall presentation.

Significant understanding of coding mastery is shown. Submitted work may be a spinoff from the teacher’s example. However, the student’s work goes beyond given examples. Most code is not based on a copy of previously created work or class example. The page has originality in look, feel and function that is not like the teacher’s version or any other previously written page.
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Professional - 100%Practitioner requirements with an overall inclusion of information that is both functionally useful to a target audience and aesthetically pleasing.

Student has a strong understanding of concepts and has demonstrated an ability to be ready for internships, college or careers performing the required tasks. The web page is original and does not resemble any given examples that have been used during instruction. No part of the page has been done before by anyone. The page expresses class concepts to display information in a unique, insightful way.
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Unit Overall Grade Breakdown (deprecated)
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Summative GradeThe project will represent half of the summative assessment which is weighted at 50% for a total impact of 25% towards the unit average.

A quiz will makeup the remaining summative credit for the unit. It will have an impact of 25% towards the unit average.
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Formative GradeThe teacher will make available technical data to assist the student on their journey. The technical information will be shown in class and made available on the course website. Students may either write the information before getting to class or during class. The teacher will inspect student journals for completeness. Complete journals will receive full credit. Incomplete journals may be resubmitted when complete up to one week after due (so long as time extension does not go past end of semester). The journal grade will have an impact of about 30% of the unit.
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Participation GradeStudents will be required to participate each day in class and will receive a grade for each day. Students will receive either a full score or no credit. Students may make an appointment with the teacher to gain credit at extra help if absences have been officially excused. Students who go above basic requirements may receive additional credit beyond a perfect score. For example, a student may be assigned by the teacher to tutor a peer on subject material and the student is compensated for their time with double participation credit.

Students who are not present for any part of class, refuse to follow rules or spend any part of the class doing anything that is not assigned may not earn the credit.
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Class Website:
http://www.scottbunin.com
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Scratch Coding Rubric Example
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Novice - 55%Student creates and submits a Scratch Program using any of the ideas lectured/demonstrated in class.

Understanding of programming mastery has yet to be demonstrated. Submitted work is missing or is a copy of previously created code. Original work is trivial such as a copy of an example except with color updates. The student is not yet marketable with desired skills. Students may be novices on the subject before entering class and will work towards higher levels of achievement.
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Apprentice - 70%Novice requirements and the program introduces the student and explains at least one thing about themselves in a way that is understandable to the reader.

Some understanding of coding mastery is shown. Submitted work may be a spinoff from the teacher’s example with non-trivial code upgrades. Spin-offs show at least some student implemented upgrades to function, not just aesthetics. No part of the program may be acquired from a peer for this or any higher level of achievement unless otherwise directed by teacher.
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Practitioner - 85%Apprentice requirements with a total of at least 4 separate ideas of who the author is as a professional student. The student may choose which parts of themselves to represent and keep other parts of their lives private.
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Professional - 100%Practitioner requirements with at least 8 different separate ideas on who the student is. The program should be functionally useful to a target audience (college recruiters, employers etc.) and aesthetically pleasing.

Student has a strong understanding of concepts and has demonstrated an ability to be ready for internships, college or careers performing the required tasks. The web page is original and does not resemble any given examples that have been used during instruction. No part of the page has been done before by anyone. The page expresses class concepts to display information in a unique, insightful way.
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Unit Overall Grade Breakdown (deprecated)
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Summative GradeThe project will represent half of the summative assessment which is weighted at 50% for a total impact of 25% towards the unit average.

A quiz will makeup the remaining summative credit for the unit. It will have an impact of 25% towards the unit average.
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Formative GradeThe teacher will make available technical data to assist the student on their journey. The technical information will be shown in class and made available on the course website. Students may either write the information before getting to class or during class. The teacher will inspect student journals for completeness. Complete journals will receive full credit. Incomplete journals may be resubmitted when complete up to one week after due (so long as time extension does not go past end of semester). The journal grade will have an impact of about 30% of the unit.
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Participation GradeStudents will be required to participate each day in class and will receive a grade for each day. Students will receive either a full score or no credit. Students may make an appointment with the teacher to gain credit at extra help if absences have been officially excused. Students who go above basic requirements may receive additional credit beyond a perfect score. For example, a student may be assigned by the teacher to tutor a peer on subject material and the student is compensated for their time with double participation credit.

Students who are not present for any part of class, refuse to follow rules or spend any part of the class doing anything that is not assigned may not earn the credit.
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Class Website:http://www.scottbunin.com
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Unit Overall Grade Breakdown (deprecated)
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Novice - 55%Student creates and submits a PowerPoint or Google Slides presentation. The slide show has some evidence that the student attempted to make a presentation about themselves.

Understanding of communication mastery has yet to be demonstrated. Submitted work is missing or is a copy of previously created code. Original work is trivial such as a copy of an example except with color updates. The student is not yet marketable with desired skills. Students may be novices on the subject before entering class and will work towards higher levels of achievement.
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Apprentice - 70%Novice requirements with 10 slides that each include a picture and a title on the subject topic (such as the student themselves).

Some understanding of communication is shown. Submitted work may be a spinoff from the teacher’s example with non-trivial upgrades. Spin-off show at least some student implemented upgrades to function, not just aesthetics. No part of the program may be acquired from a peer for this or any higher level of achievement unless otherwise directed by teacher.
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Practitioner - 85%Apprentice requirements with a total of at least 4 separate ideas of who the author is as a professional student. The student may choose which parts of themselves to represent and keep other parts of their lives private.
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Professional - 100%Practitioner requirements with at least 8 different separate ideas on who the student is. The program should be functionally useful to a target audience (college recruiters, employers etc.) and aesthetically pleasing.

Student has a strong understanding of concepts and has demonstrated an ability to be ready for internships, college or careers performing the required tasks. The web page is original and does not resemble any given examples that have been used during instruction. No part of the page has been done before by anyone. The page expresses class concepts to display information in a unique, insightful way.
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Unit Overall Grade Breakdown (deprecated)
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Summative GradeThe project will represent half of the summative assessment which is weighted at 50% for a total impact of 25% towards the unit average.

A quiz will makeup the remaining summative credit for the unit. It will have an impact of 25% towards the unit average.
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Formative GradeThe teacher will make available technical data to assist the student on their journey. The technical information will be shown in class and made available on the course website. Students may either write the information before getting to class or during class. The teacher will inspect student journals for completeness. Complete journals will receive full credit. Incomplete journals may be resubmitted when complete up to one week after due (so long as time extension does not go past end of semester). The journal grade will have an impact of about 30% of the unit.
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Participation GradeStudents will be required to participate each day in class and will receive a grade for each day. Students will receive either a full score or no credit. Students may make an appointment with the teacher to gain credit at extra help if absences have been officially excused. Students who go above basic requirements may receive additional credit beyond a perfect score. For example, a student may be assigned by the teacher to tutor a peer on subject material and the student is compensated for their time with double participation credit.

Students who are not present for any part of class, refuse to follow rules or spend any part of the class doing anything that is not assigned may not earn the credit.
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Class Website:http://www.scottbunin.com
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Introduction to Computer Science Mastery Skill Grading Rubrics
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ProfessionalPractitionerApprenticeNovice
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MS 1: I can use examples of using procedures to generate their contracts and I can use the contract of a procedure to generate examples.Students are able to apply strategies shown in class to solve different problems than those demonstrated and that require independent research to understand tools that have NOT been specifically shown in class. Students are able to apply strategies shown in class to solve similar, but different problems, using only the same tools shown in class..Students are able to solve the examples that are similar as shown in class.Student is able to reproduce teacher's examples.
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MS 2: I can predict the output of a program.Students can predict longer length programs with a larger number of variables.Students can predict medium length programs with more variables.Students can predict short length programs with few variables.Student can reproduce a prediction discussed in class.
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MS 3: I can take a problem statement and use it begin to design a function that solves the problem by creating and appropriate function header.Student is able to design a problem's input and output structure for a problem that introduces different levels of complexity and requires strategies that have not been previously shown in class. Student is able to define a problem's input and output structure for a problem that is not similar to examples previously studied in class. Student is able to define a problem's input and output structure for an example that is similar or the same as one previously demonstrated in class. Student is able to partially quantify the structure of the input and output data for the given examples, but the input and output structure remain incompletely defined.
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MS 4: I can identify computatble sub-problems given a complex problem.The student produces evidence of higher order thinking processes to solve a problem. Several small problems where solved independently by the student and combined to perform a unique solution, requiring the synthesis of several skills or pieces of content that were not given to them ahead of time.The student produces evidence of extended higher order thinking including analysis, synthesis, and iteration. The student employs strategic thinking process over a period of time.The student can make use of the class content in a slightly different context from the original instruction. The student is able to formulate rudimentary explanations of why or how a procedure is used. The student performs a transformation by applying a concept beyond mere recall.The students can recall or reproduce content covered during class. The student is able to make factual statements about content and can apply simple procedures.
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MS 5: I can use the contracts, tools, and APIs available to me to produce a complex output or to solve a complex problem.Student is able to make use of previously demonstrated contracts AND independently research new relative contract to solve problems that are different than the problems previously demonstrated in class. Student is able to make use of previously demonstrated contracts to solve problems that are different than the problems previously demonstrated in class. Student is able to make use of previously demonstrated to contracts to solve problems that are similar to problems previously demonstrated in class. Student is able to make use of previously demonstrated contracts to solve problems that are the same as problems previously demonstrated in class.
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Computer Science Principles Mastery Skill Grading Rubrics
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ProfessionalPractitionerApprenticeNovice
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MS 1: I can effectively use contracts and examples to solve problems and debug programs, and utilize test cases to explore the space of a computational problem in the process of design and evaluation of solution correctness.The student produces evidence of extended higher order thinking including analysis, synthesis, and iteration. The student employs strategic thinking process over a period of time. The student has created a suite of test cases to design and a series of functions to solve a complex problem. The test cases explore the entire domain of the function including critical points. The student has articulated an understanding of using test cases to explore the shape of a computation in order to effectively solve unique problemsThe student produces evidence of higher order thinking processes to solve a problem. Several small problems where solved independently by the student and combined to perform a unique solution, requiring the synthesis of several skills or pieces of content that were not given to them ahead of time.The student can make use of function contract that is similar to one demonstrated in class. The student formulated a rudimentary explanations of why or how a function is used. The student performed an application of the function to produce an output.Students can reproduce demonstrated contracts or examples or follow step by step instructions to apply simple functions.
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MS 2: I can predict the output of a program by evaluating expressions and by tracing a reactive system.The student produces evidence of extended higher order thinking including analysis, synthesis, and iteration. The student employs strategic thinking process over a period of time. The student has read a complex program and evaluated all expressions on their own without a computer. The student has traced the state of reactive program as it changes over time. The student has described the behavior or output of a complex program without using a computer.The student produces evidence of higher order thinking processes to solve a problem. Several small problems where solved independently by the student and combined to perform a unique solution, requiring the synthesis of several skills or pieces of content that were not given to them ahead of time.The student can make use of the class content in a slightly different context from the original instruction. The student is able to formulate rudimentary explanations of why or how a procedure is used. The student performs a transformation by applying a concept beyond mere recall.The students can recall or reproduce content covered during class. The student is able to make factual statements about content and can apply simple procedures.
95
MS 3: I can design functions to solve problems by following a design recipe.The student produces evidence of extended higher order thinking including analysis, synthesis, and iteration. The student employs strategic thinking process over a period of time.The student produces evidence of higher order thinking processes to solve a problem. Several small problems where solved independently by the student and combined to perform a unique solution, requiring the synthesis of several skills or pieces of content that were not given to them ahead of time.The student can make use of the class content in a slightly different context from the original instruction. The student is able to formulate rudimentary explanations of why or how a procedure is used. The student performs a transformation by applying a concept beyond mere recall.The students can recall or reproduce content covered during class. The student is able to make factual statements about content and can apply simple procedures.
96
MS 4: I can break down large problems into computable subproblems.The student produces evidence of extended higher order thinking including analysis, synthesis, and iteration. The student employs strategic thinking process over a period of time. I independently generate my own helper function headers with thoughtful purpose statements. These helper functions are called by other functions in order to solve vague, complex problem statements. I can design data structures to address a real world senario.The student produces evidence of higher order thinking processes to solve a problem. Several small problems where solved independently by the student and combined to perform a unique solution, requiring the synthesis of several skills or pieces of content that were not given to them ahead of time.The student can make use of the class content in a slightly different context from the original instruction. The student is able to formulate rudimentary explanations of why or how a procedure is used. The student performs a transformation by applying a concept beyond mere recall.The students can recall or reproduce content covered during class. The student is able to make factual statements about content and can apply simple procedures.
97
MS 5a: I can reproduce a complex output by writing a program or design a program to solve a complex problem. The student has iteratively developed a complex program to solve a vague, complex problem. The program was developed in a verified independent setting, and produced an output that the student had not seen before.The student produces evidence of higher order thinking processes to solve a problem. Several small problems where solved independently by the student and combined to perform a unique solution, requiring the synthesis of several skills or pieces of content that were not given to them ahead of time.The student can make use of the class content in a slightly different context from the original instruction. The student is able to formulate rudimentary explanations of why or how a procedure is used. The student performs a transformation by applying a concept beyond mere recall.The students can recall or reproduce content covered during class. The student is able to make factual statements about content and can apply simple procedures.
98
MS 5b: I can evaluate a proposed solution to a problem, locate and correct errors, explain how an artifact functions, and justify appropriateness and correctness. [P4]The student has produced a written analysis of several program artifacts. The student has located and correct errors in a program. The student has explained how the program relates to the original problem and justifies that the program is an appropriate solution.The student produces evidence of higher order thinking processes to solve a problem. Several small problems where solved independently by the student and combined to perform a unique solution, requiring the synthesis of several skills or pieces of content that were not given to them ahead of time.The student can make use of the class content in a slightly different context from the original instruction. The student is able to formulate rudimentary explanations of why or how a procedure is used. The student performs a transformation by applying a concept beyond mere recall.The students can recall or reproduce content covered during class. The student is able to make factual statements about content and can apply simple procedures.
99
MS 6: I can identify impacts of computing, describe the connections between people and computing, and explain connections between computing concepts. [P1]The student has applied the concept of a function contract to explore the impact of computing on society. The student has articulated on understanding of computing process found in a real world application by explaining, illustrating, and representing a computing innovations purpose, function and effect. The student has produced evidence of extended higher order thinking including analysis, synthesis, and iteration. The student employs strategic thinking process over a period of time.The student produces evidence of higher order thinking processes to solve a problem. Several small problems where solved independently by the student and combined to perform a unique solution, requiring the synthesis of several skills or pieces of content that were not given to them ahead of time.The student can make use of the class content in a slightly different context from the original instruction. The student is able to formulate rudimentary explanations of why or how a procedure is used. The student performs a transformation by applying a concept beyond mere recall.The students can recall or reproduce content covered during class. The student is able to make factual statements about content and can apply simple procedures.
100
MS 7: I can create an artifact with a practical, personal, or societal intent, select appropriate techniques to develop a computational artifact, and use appropriate algorithmic and information-management principles. [P2]The student produces evidence of extended higher order thinking including analysis, synthesis, and iteration. The student employs strategic thinking process over a period of time. The student has produced a sophisticated computational artifact and explained the process for creating that artifact as an iterative problem solving process. The student has employed sophisticated problem solving strategies to develop an artifact independently.The student produces evidence of higher order thinking processes to solve a problem. Several small problems where solved independently by the student and combined to perform a unique solution, requiring the synthesis of several skills or pieces of content that were not given to them ahead of time.The student can make use of the class content in a slightly different context from the original instruction. The student is able to formulate rudimentary explanations of why or how a procedure is used. The student performs a transformation by applying a concept beyond mere recall.The students can recall or reproduce content covered during class. The student is able to make factual statements about content and can apply simple procedures.
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