WAM 2020 Session Connections
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This spreadsheet is provided as an informal tool to connect individuals who are seeking ideas and/or collaboration on session proposals for the 2020 Western Archivists Meeting (WAM). It is not monitored by the 2020 WAM Program Committee and is not part of the official submission process. To submit a proposal please visit: https://forms.gle/VMA4Eg7Bwz6dj9Y26
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Name: Session ProposerContact InformationTopic PresentationldeaName(s) of interested partiesContact InformationRegional Organization Affiliation
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Berlin Loa (University of Arizona) and Pam Nett Kruger (CSU Chico) Patrisia Prestinary (CSU Fullerton)berlin@arizona.edu; pkruger@csuchico.edu; pprestinary@fullerton.eduCommunities of Practice as related to Challenges and benefits to collaboration/collective action (i.e. consortia, grassroots work, etc.); collective responsibility and solidarity in archives; Labor, staffing, and the history/future of work in archives; other suggestions welcome.Communities of practice are groups of people who share a concern or a passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly (Wenger-Trayner, 2015). Archivists share inherent interests and concerns, but can be isolated by space, time, function, or otherwise. We will focus on the aspects of developing, coordinating, and maintaining a community of practice. Ideally, we would begin with a panel that delivers an overview of your community of practice and then move into a workshop to help attendees in a guided think-tank to identify and develop their own (planning on how to do so). Alternatively we are open to just doing a panel presentation. Other suggestions welcome!SCA and Intermountain
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Claire Williamsclaire.williams@ubc.ca 604-822-6430Collective responsibility and solidarity in archives/memory work; Community-based archives/memory work; Balance of power and representation in archives; Challenges and benefits to collaboration/collective action; related specifically to records of natural resources and resource extraction The history of the west coast is inextricably tied together through the historical uses of lands, minerals, and water. Dams, pipelines, and highways connect the histories of Southern-most California to the northern reaches of British Columbia. The story of how, where, when, and why land and water rights were gained and exploited is especially relevant during the current climate crisis. As a forestry archivist working in British Columbia, but originally from Santa Rosa, I would like to co-present with other archivists working with records related to Natural Resources /Natural Resource extraction, and interested in exploring what it means to be responsible for these records during times of climate change. The records of natural resources and their use often represent various divides: between labour and capital; betwen environmentalists and resource barons, between the state and the private sector, between settler-colonists and Indigenous peoples/Native Americans. How can the documentary history of land and water on the west-coast become actionable, potentially serving a new united cause as we learn to adapt to a changing climate? Thanks and open to more related ideas too! Claire WilliamsACA, SCA and University of British Columbia
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Lara MIchelslmichels@berkeley.eduFrom Evidence to Archives: Archival Labor and the Afterlife of CrimeA panel on the role of archival labor (physical, intellectual, and emotional) in transitioning the records of crime and criminal evidence from their role in the criminal justice system to their afterlife in archives. Lara Michels would like to talk about her own role in the creation of the Edward Oscar Heinrich papers. Kim Hayden is looking to talk about her labor with the Dorothea Puente collection. We would like to talk about what it was like to "labor" in these collections. What it is like to encounter criminal evidence as an archivist? What our labor means for this evidence? Looking for another panelist to join us!!Lara Michels; Kim Haydenlmichels@berkeley.eduSCA
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Sharon Mizotasharon.mizota@disneyanimation.comOutreach projects in support of diversity and inclusion initiativesThis panel will focus on outreach projects that leverage archival materials and/or research to promote diversity and inclusion initiatives. We would like it to represent a broad range of projects and types of archives. From the perspective of corporate archives, Sharon Mizota & Jill Breznican will discuss a series of short employee biographies circulated on the Studios' intranet that explore historical diversity at the Walt Disney Animation Studios. We welcome presentations on similar projects from all types of archives. Please get in touch!Sharon Mizota; Jill Breznicansharon.mizota@disneyanimation.comSCA
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Patty Rettig and David Kellerpatricia.rettig@colostate.eduThe Colorado River Compact and Its Influence on the WestThis panel will take a look at the history of the Colorado River Compact, the documentation available, and the impact of the compact on institutions, groups, water, and the environment in the West. We're thinking of this as early prep for the 2022 centennial of the compact. We want to consider the omission of Native Americans and Mexico as part of the history. We are seeking a multi-state perspective - with Colorado and California already committed.SRMA; SCA
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Steven Bingosbingo@ewu.eduThe City Bus Scenario: Building Resilience to the Loss of Institutional Memory in the ArchivesArchives serve as a backstop against the loss of institutional memory. Nonetheless, most archival units depend upon a certain level of institutional memory to run smoothly. We’re looking for presenters who have been faced with challenges arising from the loss of institutional memory due to the sudden departure of a staff member whether as a result of layoff, death, retirement, or the procurement of better work. Specifically, we would like presenters who can speak to the vulnerabilities presented by reliance on institutional memory and steps taken to make their archival unit more resilient to transition. The goal of the panel is to address how knowledge can be shared without diminishing the value of individuals who possess a wealth of institutional memory.Steven Bingo; Brianna Webb; Elena Colon-Marreroecolon-marrero@computerhistory.orgNWA
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Stephanie Milne-Lanesmilnelane@willamette.eduRiding Out the Wave: What To Do When Your Supervisor DepartsWhether we like it or not, change is inevitable. Sometimes, change in the archival profession comes in the form of a supervisor departing for any number of diverse reasons. This panel will look at the strategies and techniques that archivists have implemented after the departure of a supervisor. Special emphasis will be placed on exploring contextual elements such as balancing interim positions and added work duties, long and complex hiring processes, deciding on whether or not to apply for the supervisor's position, cultivating relationships with new supervisors and/or direct reports, navigating conflicting priorities, and managing expectations. In short, this session will provide insight into how archivists have successfully rode out the wave they unexpectedly found themselves on. We encourage anyone who have experienced similar situations to reach out!
Stephanie Milne-Lane, Steven Duckworthsmilnelane@willamette.edu
duckwors@ohsu.edu
NWA
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Rachael Woodyconsulting@rachaelcristine.comThe Devaluation of the Archivist: Labor Trends and Advocacy EffortsUsing local and national statistics as a foundation, this session will critically evaluate trends regarding the value of archival labor and its place within related crises: the decline of history majors, the increase in crippling student loan debt, and the stagnation of wages across industries. The session will pinpoint practices that need to change and review the grassroots effort of archivists and regional organizations demanding salary transparency, limiting term positions for permanent work, and ceasing unpaid internships. The session will end with a summary of actions we can take to advocate for our value and challenge our professional organizations to better support membership (and not their bottom line).Rachael Woody; Erin Hurleyerhurley@gmail.comNWA; SCA (Society of California Archivists)
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Beth McDonaldemcdonald@csudh.eduCreating oral History programs for community representation, inclusion, and engagementOral history serve as both studies of the human experience and a way of engaging educational and community groups. Archival and other cultural institutions with roots in smaller, underrepresented communities are looking to oral history programs as a way to document those communities. We are seeking anyone at any stage in oral history program development to join us in talking about their experiences!Beth McDonald, Summer Espinoza, Heather Lanctot, Kurtis Bullchild (Nisqually Indian Tribe), Josh Schneider, Medellee Antonioliemcdonald@csudh.eduSCA
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Alex Bisiobisio@uoregon.eduMLIS graduate student labor in archivesA lightning round that addresses MLIS graduate student labor in archives. We would like to touch on issues related to hosting MLIS students as interns, and the internship experience itself. We would ideally like to have the panel represent supervisors, current interns, and recent interns. Supervisors on this panel would like to touch on how they have worked to provide meaningful learning experiences for their graduate students, how they have addressed the needs of multiple students attending different remote, online programs, and how they have funded internships to offer students a wage while in school. Interns and former interns have expressed the desire to touch on issues related to paid/unpaid status, and moving from internships to fulltime/part-time positions.
Gayle O'Hara
NWA
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Stella Castillostellaca@usc.eduDiscussion on the Lifecycle of Community Archives (not official title)LA as Subject published a print directory of "Less-Visible Archives and Collections in the Los Angeles Region" in 1999. This past year through a member audit we discovered that 41% of the original membership is no longer in the directory, and often, no longer in existence. This panel would be a discussion of the life cycle of independent archival collections including community organizations, individual collections, smaller historical societies and museums. Why do they disappear? What happens to them? Is there a way that we can work together to lower the attrition rate of collections? This session would ideally discuss instances of why/how an archives or collection disappeared and discuss what can be done to extend and aid in the life of smaller and independent archives. I am seeking anyone who has witnessed or directly experienced the end of an archives, community collection, or other cultural heritage collection in some way. It would be great to discuss reasons/ways this has occurred and work on a discussion on how to impede or deter these disappearances.Medellee AntonioliSCA
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Lara Michelslmichels@berkeley.edu20 years of grant-funded archival work and its affects on the archivists, the archival profession, and archival intitutionsFish Bowl session looking at how the era of hidden collections, dominated by CLIR collections survey and processing grants, has affected archival labor and how archival labor is seen by stakeholders. Lara Michels will provide a historical overview of the “hidden collections era” and then 5 or so people will participate in a fishbowl to discuss the good, the bad, and the ugly of the era of hidden collections and the dominance of grant-funding in employing archival labor. Open discussion will follow. Send me an email and let me know if you would like to participate in the fish bowl and why Lara Michelslmichels@berkeley.eduSCA
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Kate Schlesinger kschlesinger@email.arizona.eduUnintended Consequences: Trauma and Archival Labor. Trauma informed archival labor; trauma-informed practice, trauma-informed archival practice & vicarious trauma. Harm minimisation policies, and self care.Panel or traditional session presenting various aspects, professional experiences, research, or case studies related to trauma informed archival labor, institutional and self care, and potential future research areas especially as related to archives addressing social justice or human rights issues. Send me an email if you are interested in addressing this important topic. Medellee Antonioli
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Amanda Lanthorne and Anna Culbertsonalanthorne@sdsu.eduArchival ethics; critical librarianship; bending/breaking the rules to better the historical record? (not official title)The modern archive no longer fits into the cookie cutter shape molded by its founding theory. Now that our profession is more widely embracing the idea that the historical record is preserved by those in power, we have come to understand our principles more as guidelines begging flexibility. Documentation of marginalized voices and movements requires a willingness to make ethical, philosophical and practical adjustments in the name of inclusivity rather than rule adherence. Examples might include atypical redactions, selective availability, honoring offbeat requests by representative subjects - any experience where we've found we had to change our policies and practices to accommodate non-traditional needs or issues. Archivists participating in this panel would ideally bring case studies for a roundtable discussion.
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