Lesson plans AP Comp Sci Principles
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AB
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TeacherMr. Wiessmann
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SubjectAP Computer Science Principles
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Emailedwiessmann@philasd.org
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Cell Phone215-900-8742
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School Phone215-351-7618
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Hangout Codehttps://hangouts.google.com/group/9xAXLhgCUv7rMZCN2
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Google Classroom Codefgd6cm
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Course DescriptionThe AP Computer Science Principles course is designed to be equivalent to a first- semester introductory college computing course. In this course, students will develop computational thinking skills vital for success across all disciplines, such as using computational tools to analyze and study data and working with large data sets to analyze, visualize, and draw conclusions from trends. The course engages students in the creative aspects of the field by allowing them to develop computational artifacts based on their interests. Students will also develop effective communication and collaboration skills by working individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and will discuss and write about the impacts these solutions could have on their community, society, and the world.
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AssessmentsStudents will be assessed on a variety of Projects, Written Assessments, and Formal Assessments. Students are required to participate during class time.
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Grading Policy10% Homework
20% Classwork
30% Performance Based Learning
40% Tests
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Period Length (minutes)47
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Materials ListPen or Pencil for Writing
Notebook for Journal Entries, Notes, and Constructive Response Questions
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Books:Computer Science Illuminated 3rd Addition
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https://runestone.academy/runestone/default/user/login?_next=/runestone/default/index
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Class Rules:Students must obey the school wide rules of the Academy @ Palumbo at all times.
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TutoringAfter School Tuesday & Thursday 3:00-6:00 by appointment
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AP Computer Science Principles Course Homepage:http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/teachers_corner/231724.html
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AP CSP College Board:https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-computer-science-principles?course=ap-computer-science-principles
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Classroom Website:phillycomputerscience.com
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AP Stat Exam Date:May 11 Afternoon
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AP Exam Schedule:https://professionals.collegeboard.com/testing/ap/about/dates
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Code.org Resourceshttps://studio.code.org/courses/csp-2018
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Crash Course Resourceshttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8dPuuaLjXtNlUrzyH5r6jN9ulIgZBpdo
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The Concept Outline
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Big Idea 1: Creativity
(0 days, 0 minutes)
[CR2a]
Computing is a creative activity. Creativity and computing are prominent forces in innovation; the innovations enabled by computing have had and will continue to have far-reaching impact.
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Big Idea 2: Abstraction
(14 days, 658 minutes)
[CR1a][CR1f][CR2a][CR2b]
Abstraction: Abstraction reduces information and detail to facilitate focus on relevant concepts. It is a process, a strategy, and the result of reducing detail to focus on concepts relevant to understanding and solving problems.
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Big Idea 3: Data and Information
(14 days, 658 minutes)
[CR1a][CR1f][CR2a][CR2c]
Data and information facilitate the creation of knowledge. Computing enables and empowers new methods of information processing, driving monumental change across many disciplines — from art to business to science.
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Big Idea 4: Algorithms
(15 days, 705 minutes)
[CR1a][CR1f][CR2a][CR2d]
Algorithms are used to develop and express solutions to computational problems. Algorithms realized in software have affected the world in profound and lasting ways.
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Big Idea 5: Programming
(15 days, 705 minutes)
[CR1a][CR1f][CR2a][CR2e]
Programming enables problem solving, human expression, and creation of knowledge. Programming and the creation of software has changed our lives. It results in the creation of software, and facilitates the creation of computational artifacts, such as music, images, and visualizations.
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Big Idea 6: The Internet
(10 days, 470 minutes)
[CR1a][CR1f][CR2a][CR2f]
The Internet pervades modern computing. The Internet and the systems built on it have had a profound impact on society. Computer networks support communication and collaboration.
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Big Idea 7: Global Impact
(8 days, 376 minutes)
[CR1a][CR1f][CR2a][CR2g]
Computing has global impact. Our methods for communicating, collaborating, problem solving, and doing business have changed and are changing due to innovations enabled by computing.
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Create
(30 instructional and assessment days, 1410 minutes, a minimum of 12 hours are earmarked for the assessment)
[CR1b][CR1f][CR2a][CR4]
Abstraction, Algorithms, Programming
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Explore
(20 instructional and assessment days, 940 minutes, a minimum of 8 hours are earmarked for the assessment)
[CR1b][CR3]
Data, Internet, Global Impact
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Computational Thinking Practices
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Connecting Computing
[CR1a]
Students learn to draw connections between different computing concepts.
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Creating computational artifacts
[CR1b]
Students engage in the creative aspects of computing by designing and developing interesting computational artifacts as well as by applying computing techniques to creatively solve problems.
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Abstracting
[CR1c]
Students use abstraction to develop models and simulations of natural and artificial phenomena, use them to make predictions about the world, and analyze their efficacy and validity.
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Analyzing problems and artifacts
[CR1d]
Students design and produce solutions, models, and artifacts, and they evaluate and analyze their own computational work as well as the computational work others have produced.
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Communicating
[CR1e]
Students describe computation and the impact of technology and computation, explain and justify the design and appropriateness of their computational choices, and analyze and describe both computational artifacts and the results or behaviors of those artifacts.
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Collaborating
[CR1f]
Students collaborate on a number of activities, including investigation of questions using data sets and in the production of computational artifacts.
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AP Computer Science Principles Exam Structure
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Assessment Overview This assessment comprises two parts: performance tasks and the end-of-course AP Exam and the through-course AP assessment.
The AP Computer Science Principles Exam will be a multiple-choice, paper and pencil exam.
The two performance tasks require students to explore the impacts of computing and create computational artifacts through programming.
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Format of Assessment AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES EXAM: 2 HOURS (60% of AP Exam score)
• Multiple Choice (single- and multiple-select) | 74 Questions | 120 minutes | 60% of assessment score
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AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES THROUGH-COURSE PERFORMANCE TASKS (2) (Combined 40% of AP Exam Score):
• Explore – Impact of Computing Innovations | 8 hours (classroom time) | 16% of assessment score
• Create – Application to Ideas |12 hours (classroom time) | 24% of assessment score
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Computational ArtifactsComputational artifacts must provide an illustration, representation, or explanation of the computing innovation’s intended purpose, its function, or its effect. The computational artifacts must not simply repeat the information supplied in the written responses and should be primarily nontextual.
Submit a video, audio, or PDF le. Use computing tools and techniques to create one original computational artifact (a visualization, a graphic, a video, a program, or an audio recording). Acceptable multimedia le types include .mp3, .mp4, .wmv, .avi, .mov, .wav, .aif, or .pdf format. PDF les must not exceed three pages. Video or audio les must not exceed 1 minute in length and must not exceed 30MB in size.
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