EdReady Montana English Glossary
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

View only
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZAAABACADAEAFAGAHAIAJAKALAMANAOAPAQARASAT
1
TermDefinitionUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and TopicUnit and Topic
2
abstractA summary of an article often written by the author and reviewed by the editor of the article. The abstract provides an overview of the contents of the reading, including its main arguments, results, and evidence, allowing you to compare it to other sources without requiring an in-depth review. 6 - Understanding Reading and Writing Differences Across Disciplines10 - Relating Different Viewpoints
3
academic essayA formal writing that the author composes using research, a strong thesis, and supporting details in order to advance an idea or demonstrate understanding of a topic.1 - Author, Audience, Purpose3 - Developing an Implied Thesis Statement and Topic Sentences 4 - Adjectives and Adverbs
4
academic journalA scholarly periodical that publishes peer-reviewed research in a particular area of study.10 - Finding and Evaluating Sources
5
acronymA word that is an abbreviated form of a phrase, term, or organization that is made up of the first letter of each word in the item. Example: NASA is the acronym for National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 10 - Capitalizing Words and Punctuating Titles
6
actionA thing that is done, or the process of doing it.8 - Writing an Essay Showing Cause and Effect Pattern8 - Creating an Outline for a Cause and Effect Essay
7
action verbA word that tells the reader what the subject of a sentence is doing. Example: Martha washed the dishes. In this sentence, washed is what Martha was doing, so it is the action verb.1 - Subjects and Verbs
8
active voiceOne of two styles of writing that compares the relationship between the subject and the verb in a sentence. In the active voice, the action described by the verb is done by the subject. These sentences have a clear subject taking a clear action. Example of the active voice: The girl broke the plate.6 - Understanding Reading and Writing Differences Across Disciplines7 - Active and Passive Voice9 - Writing Concise Sentences
9
adjectiveWords that modify and describe a noun. Examples: old,tall, leafy.4 - Adjectives and Adverbs9 - Recognizing the Main Idea and Source Bias in a Complex Reading
10
adverbWords that modify and describe a verb, adjective, or other adverb. Examples: quickly, awkwardly, lovingly.4 - Commas with Transitions4 - Adjectives and Adverbs6 - Apostrophes9 - Writing Concise Sentences9 - Recognizing the Main Idea and Source Bias in a Complex Reading
11
alphanumerical outlineAn outline that uses Roman numerals, letters, and Arabic numerals to signify different levels of organization. 10 - Relating Different Viewpoints
12
American Psychological Association - APA Style
A set of guidelines for citing sources used in literary and academic writing. APA style is most commonly used in the social sciences.8 - Numbers9 - Blending Source Material into an Essay9 - MLA Citation Styles9 - APA Citation Styles9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay9 - Using Effective Evidentiary Support 9 - Evaluating Credible Sources Used Within a Reading10 - Formatting a College Essay - APA Style10 - Formatting a College Essay - MLA Style10 - Avoiding Plagiarism10 - Writing a Persuasion Essay Using Evidence
13
analogyA comparison of two things based on similarity.4 - Commas with Transitions
14
analysisTo analyze is to make a thoughtful and detailed study of something. An analysis is the end result of analyzing.6 - Creating an Effective Conclusion for a Multi-paragraph Essay6 - Creating an Outline for an Analysis Essay6 - Developing Support in an Analysis Essay6 - Understanding Reading and Writing Differences Across Disciplines7 - Developing an Outline for a Compare and Contrast Essay7 - Writing a Compare and Contrast Essay7 - Developing a Thesis for a Compare and Contrast Essay7 - Paraphrasing Reading Passages8 - Logical Fallacies and Causal Relationships8 - Writing an Essay Showing Cause and Effect Pattern9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay9 - Using Effective Evidentiary Support 9 - Paraphrasing vs. Direct Quotations9 - Creating a Thesis and an Outline for a Critical Analysis Essay9 - Recognizing the Main Idea and Source Bias in a Complex Reading10 - Developing a Thesis and Outline for a Persuasion Essay10 - Evidentiary Support10 - Finding and Evaluating Sources10 - Relating Different Viewpoints
15
analysis essayA written evaluation of a topic, such as an article, piece of art, person’s life, etc. An analysis essay may include a summary of the subject, but is mostly used to evaluate and discuss: Is it good? Is it bad? Is it poorly written? Was the author misguided or very accurate?6 - Creating an Effective Conclusion for a Multi-paragraph Essay6 - Creating an Outline for an Analysis Essay6 - Developing Support in an Analysis Essay6 - Writing a Multi-paragraph Analysis Essay8 - Responding Effectively to Essay Assignments9 - Logical Fallacies and Analysis9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay
16
analyzeTo make a thoughtful and detailed study of something. 7 - Writing a Compare and Contrast Essay9 - Logical Fallacies and Analysis9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay9 - Logical Fallacies and Analysis
17
anecdoteA brief, interesting story that writers often use to demonstrate a point within a work.2 - Supporting Details5 - Creating an Effective Introductory Paragraph for an Essay5 - Writing and Revising a Multi-paragraph Definition Essay5 - Identifying Types of Definitions8 - Writing an Essay Showing Cause and Effect Pattern10 - Evidentiary Support
18
anecdotal evidenceA brief, interesting story that supports a claim in a critical analysis or persuasion essay.9 - Creating a Thesis and an Outline for a Critical Analysis Essay9 - Recognizing the Main Idea and Source Bias in a Complex Reading9 - Evaluating Credible Sources Used Within a Reading10 - Finding and Evaluating Sources10 - Relating Different Viewpoints
19
annotateMaking notes within the text of a reading.2 - Annotating a Reading
20
antonymA word or phrase that has the opposite meaning from another word. Example: huge is an antonym for small.1 - Using Context Clues3 - Coherence5 - Identifying Denotation and Connotation5 - Identifying Types of Definitions
21
apostropheA punctuation mark that has two uses. Apostrophes show where letters are taken out to make a contraction, as in shortening cannot to can't. Apostrophes also show possessive relationships between people or things. For example, the apostrophe in the phrase Emily's book means the book belongs to Emily.6 - Apostrophes
22
Arabic numeralsArabic numerals are the ten digits: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. 8 - Numbers
23
archaicOld and outdated.6 - Understanding Reading and Writing Differences Across Disciplines
24
argumentA set of statements or reasons making a case for or against something.8 - Logical Fallacies and Causal Relationships9 - Logical Fallacies and Analysis9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay9 - Using Effective Evidentiary Support 9 - Recognizing the Main Idea and Source Bias in a Complex Reading9 - Logical Fallacies and Analysis10 - Formatting a College Essay - APA Style10 - Formatting a College Essay - MLA Style10 - Evidentiary Support10 - Finding and Evaluating Sources10 - Finding and Evaluating Sources
25
argument essayA writing that takes a position for or against something and tries to convince the reader to accept the same view. Also called a persuasion essay.10 - Writing a Persuasion Essay Using Evidence
26
articleIn grammar, there are three articles in English: a, an, and the. These words define the specificity of a noun. For example, contrast the meanings of the following sentences: Get in the car. Get in a car.10 - Capitalizing Words and Punctuating Titles10 - Relating Different Viewpoints
27
articleA non-fiction, often informative writing that forms a part of a publication, such as a magazine or newspaper.1 - Author, Audience, Purpose1 - Responding to a Reading1 - Using Context Clues2 - Writing a Summary-Response2 - Stated Main Ideas2 - Writing a Summary3 - Author's Point of View and Cultural Context3 - Major and Minor Supporting Details6 - Creating an Outline for an Analysis Essay6 - Creating an Effective Conclusion for a Multi-paragraph Essay6 - Understanding Reading and Writing Differences Across Disciplines7 - Identifying a Comparison Made in a Reading7 - Paraphrasing Reading Passages9 - Blending Source Material into an Essay9 - Creating a Thesis and an Outline for a Critical Analysis Essay9 - Recognizing the Main Idea and Source Bias in a Complex Reading9 - Evaluating Credible Sources Used Within a Reading10 - Finding and Evaluating Sources10 - Writing a Persuasion Essay Using Evidence
28
Associated Press - AP StyleA punctuation and grammar guide used mainly in journalism, public relations, and advertising.8 - Numbers
29
assumeTo take for granted that something is true.8 - Logical Fallacies and Causal Relationships
30
attributive phraseA short introduction to source material that identifies the author and often the title of a work that will be quoted or discussed in an essay or research paper. 9 - Blending Source Material into an Essay9 - MLA Citation Styles9 - APA Citation Styles9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay9 - Using Effective Evidentiary Support 9 - Evaluating Credible Sources Used Within a Reading10 - Formatting a College Essay - APA Style10 - Formatting a College Essay - MLA Style10 - Avoiding Plagiarism10 - Capitalizing Words and Punctuating Titles10 - Writing a Persuasion Essay Using Evidence
31
audienceThe group of people a writer expects to read a text. Writers use specific language, details, and examples to speak directly to their intended audience. For example, you would write and organize your work differently if your audience was a group of experts in the field of your work than if it was a group of undergraduate students being introduced to the topic.1 - Revising, Editing, Proofreading1 - Author, Audience, Purpose1 - Responding to a Reading1 - Fact and Opinion4 - Writing a Multi-Paragraph Essay9 - Using Effective Evidentiary Support 10 - Finding and Evaluating Sources
32
authorA person who wrote a text.1 - Responding to a Reading (appears as "author's")1 - Topic Sentences (appears as "author's")1 - Fact and Opinion (appears as "author's")1 - Author, Audience, Purpose2 - Stated Main Ideas2 - Writing a Summary-Response (appears as "author's")2 - Writing a Summary3 - Implied Main Ideas3 - Developing an Implied Thesis Statement and Topic Sentences 3 - Major and Minor Supporting Details3 - Author's Point of View and Cultural Context4 - Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions5 - First-, Second-, and Third-Person Pronouns6 - Creating an Outline for an Analysis Essay7 - Developing an Outline for a Compare and Contrast Essay7 - Paraphrasing Reading Passages9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay9 - Creating a Thesis and an Outline for a Critical Analysis Essay10 - Avoiding Plagiarism10 - Evidentiary Support
33
autobiographyA form of writing where the author writes a story about his or her own life and experiences.3 - Author's Point of View and Cultural Context (appears as "autobiographical")
34
backgroundInformation that describes the history or circumstances of a topic. 6 - Creating an Outline for an Analysis Essay6 - Writing a Multi-paragraph Analysis Essay7 - Developing an Outline for a Compare and Contrast Essay7 - Writing a Compare and Contrast Essay7 - Identifying a Comparison Made in a Reading8 - Writing an Essay Showing Cause and Effect Pattern9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay9 - Creating a Thesis and an Outline for a Critical Analysis Essay10 - Developing a Thesis and Outline for a Persuasion Essay10 - Finding and Evaluating Sources10 - Writing a Persuasion Essay Using Evidence
35
biasIn writing, bias indicates a writer's personal prejudice for or against an idea, person, activity, or object. Being objective, or displaying no tendency toward a preference, is the opposite of showing bias.1 - Fact and Opinion1 - Author, Audience, Purpose6 - Understanding Reading and Writing Differences Across Disciplines7 - Developing a Thesis for a Compare and Contrast Essay9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay9 - Evaluating Credible Sources Used Within a Reading10 - Finding and Evaluating Sources
36
block quotationA copy of a long section of a text or speech, set off from the rest of a text. Block quotations, like direct quotations, are exact repeats of wording, but because of their length they are indented or printed in a different font rather than placed inside quotation marks.8 - Semicolons, Colons, and Commas9 - MLA Citation Styles9 - APA Citation Styles10 - Formatting a College Essay - APA Style10 - Formatting a College Essay - MLA Style
37
blogA website that hosts a series of articles, photos, and other postings, sometimes by a single writer (blogger) or by a community of contributors.2 - Stated Main Ideas2 - Writing a Summary-Response2 - Writing a Summary4 - Adjectives and Adverbs5 - Creating an Effective Introductory Paragraph for an Essay9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay10 - Finding and Evaluating Sources10 - Writing a Persuasion Essay Using Evidence
38
bodyThe main portion of a writing that contains the main ideas and supporting details of the writing. This is where the author's purpose and thesis statement are supported and/or developed.2 - Writing a Summary-Response2 - Developing a Thesis Statement and Supporting Ideas3 - Major and Minor Supporting Details4 - Writing a Multi-Paragraph Essay5 - Writing and Revising a Multi-paragraph Definition Essay6 - Creating an Effective Conclusion for a Multi-paragraph Essay6 - Writing a Multi-paragraph Analysis Essay7 - Writing a Compare and Contrast Essay9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay10 - Developing a Thesis and Outline for a Persuasion Essay
39
body paragraphsThe part of an essay that comes after the introduction and before the conclusion. Body paragraphs lay out the main ideas of an argument and provide the support for the thesis. All body paragraphs should include these elements: a topic sentence, major and minor details, and a concluding statement. Each body paragraph should stand on its own but also fit into the context of the entire essay, as well as support the thesis and work with the other supporting paragraphs. 6 - Creating an Outline for an Analysis Essay6 - Developing Support in an Analysis Essay6 - Creating an Effective Conclusion for a Multi-paragraph Essay6 - Understanding Reading and Writing Differences Across Disciplines6 - Writing a Multi-paragraph Analysis Essay7 - Developing an Outline for a Compare and Contrast Essay7 - Writing a Compare and Contrast Essay7 - Identifying a Comparison Made in a Reading8 - Writing an Essay Showing Cause and Effect Pattern8 - Creating an Outline for a Cause and Effect Essay9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay9 - Creating a Thesis and an Outline for a Critical Analysis Essay10 - Developing a Thesis and Outline for a Persuasion Essay10 - Evidentiary Support10 - Relating Different Viewpoints10 - Writing a Persuasion Essay Using Evidence
40
brainstormA prewriting technique where the author lists multiple ideas as he or she thinks of them, not considering one more than another until all ideas are captured. The objective is to create one great idea, or many ideas, on which to base a writing.3 - Developing an Implied Thesis Statement and Topic Sentences 4 - Writing a Multi-Paragraph Essay6 - Writing a Multi-paragraph Analysis Essay7 - Developing an Outline for a Compare and Contrast Essay7 - Writing a Compare and Contrast Essay8 - Writing an Essay Showing Cause and Effect Pattern10 - Avoiding Plagiarism
41
capitalizeTo use capital letters.8 - Semicolons, Colons, and Commas10 - Quotation Marks10 - Capitalizing Words and Punctuating Titles10 - Quotation Marks
42
causalDescribing or suggesting a cause.8 - Logical Fallacies and Causal Relationships
43
causal chainA series of events, each triggered by the one before. Causal chains have three parts: the initial cause, the final consequence, and all the steps that link the cause to the effect. Also called "the domino effect."8 - Creating an Outline for a Cause and Effect Essay8 - Listing Causes and Effects in a Reading8 - Writing an Essay Showing Cause and Effect Pattern
44
cause and effectAn examination of the relationship between why and/or how something happened. Causes, which are usually events or actions, lead to effects, or the consequences of those causes.4 - Using Transitional Words
45
cause and effect essayAn essay that covers why and/or how something happened. This type of essay requires that an event or action led to one or more consequences.8 - Responding Effectively to Essay Assignments8 - Responding Effectively to Essay Assignments8 - Listing Causes and Effects in a Reading8 - Writing an Essay Showing Cause and Effect Pattern
46
central pointThe main issue on which an author focuses a writing.3 - Implied Main Ideas
47
centuryA period of one hundred years. Example: the twentieth century includes the years from 1901 to 2000.8 - Numbers
48
citeTo give credit to the source of ideas or information.7 - Paraphrasing Reading Passages9 - MLA Citation Styles9 - APA Citation Styles9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay9 - Using Effective Evidentiary Support 10 - Avoiding Plagiarism10 - Capitalizing Words and Punctuating Titles10 - Writing a Persuasion Essay Using Evidence
49
citationA reference within a text to an outside source of ideas, quotes, or information. Citations can be placed within sentences or in a separate works cited or reference section, as specified by the style guide in use.1 - Revising, Editing, Proofreading7 - Paraphrasing Reading Passages8 - Responding Effectively to Essay Assignments9 - MLA Citation Styles9 - APA Citation Styles9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay9 - Evaluating Credible Sources Used Within a Reading10 - Avoiding Plagiarism10 - Capitalizing Words and Punctuating Titles
50
claimA statement that something is true, such as the thesis of an essay. A successful writer must present evidence to prove his/her claim.6 - Developing Support in an Analysis Essay9 - Creating a Thesis and an Outline for a Critical Analysis Essay9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay9 - Using Effective Evidentiary Support 9 - Paraphrasing vs. Direct Quotations9 - Creating a Thesis and an Outline for a Critical Analysis Essay9 - Recognizing the Main Idea and Source Bias in a Complex Reading9 - Evaluating Credible Sources Used Within a Reading10 - Avoiding Plagiarism10 - Developing a Thesis and Outline for a Persuasion Essay10 - Evidentiary Support10 - Finding and Evaluating Sources10 - Writing a Persuasion Essay Using Evidence
51
clauseA group of words in a sentence that contains a subject and a predicate.2 - Sentence Fragments2 - Run-on Sentences (appears as "clauses")3 - Past, Present, and Future Tense3 - Subject-Verb Agreement 4 - Faulty Parallel Structure4 - Commas with Introductory Phrases4 - Commas with Transitions6 - Commas with Relative Pronouns7 - Mistakes with Modifiers7 - Parenthetical Expressions
52
clichéA word, phrase, or situation that has been used so often that it has become dull and meaningless.7 - Figurative Language9 - Writing Concise Sentences
53
clusteringA prewriting technique where the author creates an informal visual layout of possible ideas, grouping them together. The objective is to create visual clusters of information on which to base a writing.3 - Developing an Implied Thesis Statement and Topic Sentences 5 - Writing and Revising a Multi-paragraph Definition Essay6 - Writing a Multi-paragraph Analysis Essay8 - Writing an Essay Showing Cause and Effect Pattern
54
coherenceThe quality of a writing that is well-organized and where events make sense. Coherence occurs when the ideas in a passage or in an entire piece “stick together,” allowing the reader to make sense of the information.3 - Coherence3 - Past, Present, and Future Tense3 - Subject-Verb Agreement
55
cohesiveIn writing, ideas and evidence that work together to create a unified statement.4 - Using Transitional Words and Phrases5 - First-, Second- and Third-Person Pronouns6 - Developing Support in an Analysis Essay
56
colloquialInformal language.10 - Finding and Evaluating Sources
57
colon(:) A punctuation mark that is used in three common cases: before a series of items; between an independent clause and an explanation, rule, or example; and before a quote.8 - Semicolons, Colons, and Commas9 - Blending Source Material into an Essay
58
comma(,) A punctuation mark used to group and separate information in sentences.2 - Comma Splices4 - Commas with Introductory Phrases4 - Commas with Transitions5 - Comma Use in a Series5 - Understanding the Four Sentence Types6 - Coordinating and Subordinating Conjunctions6 - Commas with Relative Pronouns7 - Parenthetical Expressions8 - Semicolons, Colons, and Commas9 - Blending Source Material into an Essay10 - Quotation Marks
59
comma spliceType of run-on sentence that occurs when two independent clauses (two complete sentences) are joined with a comma instead of a period, semicolon, or comma with a conjunction.2 - Comma Splices5 - Understanding the Four Sentence Types6 - Coordinating and Subordinating Conjunctions
60
common expressionA common word or phrase that is set apart from the rest of a sentence by commas, parentheses, or dashes and that does not contain essential information. Like all parenthetical expressions, common expressions can be removed without changing the meaning of sentences. Yeah, I guess, I think, you know, and of course are all examples of common expressions.
Example: You know, I'd rather see a movie instead of going to the party.
7 - Parenthetical Expressions
61
compareTo draw similarities between people, objects, or concepts.4 - Faulty Parallel Structure4 - Using Transitional Words and Phrases (appears as "comparison")6 - Understanding Reading and Writing Differences Across Disciplines7 - Developing an Outline for a Compare and Contrast Essay7 - Figurative Language
62
comparisonA discussion of two or more things based on the categories of characteristics they share. Written comparisons must include both the subjects being compared and the similarities and/or differences between the subjects.7 - Identifying a Comparison Made in a Reading
63
compare and contrast essayA written discussion of both the similarities and differences between people, objects, or ideas. This type of essay shows how things are alike in some ways (compare) as well as how they are different in other ways (contrast).7 - Developing an Outline for a Compare and Contrast Essay7 - Writing a Compare and Contrast Essay7 - Developing a Thesis for a Compare and Contrast Essay8 - Responding Effectively to Essay Assignments
64
complex sentenceOne of the four sentence types that is composed of an independent clause and a dependent clause.5 - Understanding the Four Sentence Types6 - Coordinating and Subordinating Conjunctions
65
compound subjectThe subject of a sentence when two or more persons or items are joined by a conjunction such as and, or, nor, and but. For example, in the sentence Mike and Tom like to play basketball, the combination of the two boys, Mike and Tom, is a compound subject.3 - Subject-Verb Agreement
66
compound sentenceOne of the four sentence types that is composed of two or more independent clauses joined together using proper punctuation.5 - Understanding the Four Sentence Types6 - Coordinating and Subordinating Conjunctions
67
compound-complex sentenceOne of the four sentence types in which one or both of the independent clauses has a subordinating clause, relative clause, or both.5 - Understanding the Four Sentence Types
68
comprehensionThe ability to understand a subject, reading, or idea.1 - Author, Audience, Purpose (appears as "comprehend")1 - Topic Sentences1 - Using Context Clues1 - End Punctuation7 - Figurative Language
69
conceptThe idea of how something works or exists.4 - Outlining a Reading
70
conciseDescribes writing that only uses words that are necessary for clarity, meaning, and interest.2 - Writing a Summary-Response2 - Writing a Summary8 - Responding Effectively to Essay Assignments9 - Writing Concise Sentences9 - Paraphrasing vs. Direct Quotations
71
concluding paragraphThe end portion of a writing that contains a summary or synthesis of the ideas in the work. This includes a recap of key points and reminders of the author's purpose and thesis statement.2 - Writing a Summary-Response4 - Writing a Multi-Paragraph Essay6 - Creating an Effective Conclusion for a Multi-paragraph Essay6 - Developing Support in an Analysis Essay6 -Writing a Multi-paragraph Analysis Essay7 - Developing an Outline for a Compare and Contrast Essay7 - Writing a Compare and Contrast Essay7 - Identifying a Comparison Made in a Reading8 - Writing an Essay Showing Cause and Effect Pattern8 - Creating an Outline for a Cause and Effect Essay9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay9 - Creating a Thesis and an Outline for a Critical Analysis Essay10 - Developing a Thesis and Outline for a Persuasion Essay10 - Relating Different Viewpoints
72
conclusionThe end portion of a writing that contains a summary or synthesis of the idea in the work. This includes a recap of key points and reminders of the author's purpose and thesis statement.9 - Creating a Thesis and an Outline for a Critical Analysis Essay9 - Recognizing the Main Idea and Source Bias in a Complex Reading10 - Writing a Persuasion Essay Using Evidence
73
conjugateListing the different forms of a verb, including number, tense, and person. For example, to run is conjugated as I run, you run, he or she runs, we run, they run.3 - Subject-Verb Agreement (appears as "conjugated")
74
conjunctionPart of speech that joins two or more words, phrases, or clauses. Examples of conjunctions include: and, but, if, because 2 - Comma Splices2 - Run-on Sentences
75
conjunctive adverbA type of parenthetical expression; adverbs that join ideas together. Examples: also, first, however, next.4 - Commas with Transitions5 - Understanding the Four Sentence Types7 - Parenthetical Expressions8 - Semicolons, Colons, and Commas
76
connotativeThe meaning of a term that departs from the literal meaning. It conjures up other ideas based on how it is used. Connotations can be either negative or positive. 5 - Identifying Denotation and Connotation
77
contentThe text in a writing that includes facts, thoughts, and ideas. The information that forms the body of the work.1 - Responding to a Reading2 - Annotating a Reading3 - Developing an Implied Thesis Statement and Topic Sentences 4 - Adjectives and Adverbs4 - Outlining an Essay4 - Using Transitional Words and Phrases5 - Writing and Revising a Multi-paragraph Definition Essay6 - Creating an Outline for an Analysis Essay6 - Writing a Multi-paragraph Analysis Essay9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay10 - Formatting a College Essay - APA Style10 - Formatting a College Essay - MLA Style
78
contextThe larger setting in which something happens; the "big picture."6 - Writing a Multi-paragraph Analysis Essay7 - Writing a Compare and Contrast Essay9 - Blending Source Material into an Essay9 - MLA Citation Styles9 - APA Citation Styles9 - Creating a Thesis and an Outline for a Critical Analysis Essay10 - Developing a Thesis and Outline for a Persuasion Essay10 - Relating Different Viewpoints10 - Writing a Persuasion Essay Using Evidence
79
context cluesHints that appear in a text that help readers discover the meaning of an unknown word, usually based on how it is used in a sentence or paragraph.1 - Using Context Clues1 - Identifying Word Parts
80
contractionA word that is a shorter form of a longer word or group of words that is made by leaving out sounds and/or letters. Example: can't is a contraction for cannot.5 - Creating an Effective Introductory Paragraph for an Essay6 - Apostrophes
81
contrastTo identify what is different between people, objects, or concepts.4 - Faulty Parallel Structure4 - Using Transitional Words and Phrases
82
contrasting expressionContrasting expressions are parenthetical expressions that tell the reader that you are referring to one thing and not another. Example: Funnel cake, not cotton candy, is my favorite food at the fair.7 - Parenthetical Expressions
83
controlling ideaThe specific idea that controls a paragraph, including the purpose, subject, and the writer's point of view.1 - Topic Sentences5 - Creating an Effective Introductory Paragraph for an Essay
84
coordinating conjunctionPart of speech that connects words, phrases, and independent clauses. The acronym FANBOYS—for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so—can help you remember coordinating conjunctions.2 - Comma Splices2 - Run-on Sentences5 - Understanding the Four Sentence Types6 - Coordinating and Subordinating Conjunctions10 - Capitalizing Words and Punctuating Titles
85
counterargumentIdeas, data, or discussion in opposition to a viewpoint. 10 - Developing a Thesis and Outline for a Persuasion Essay10 - Evidentiary Support10 - Writing a Persuasion Essay Using Evidence
86
cover letterA letter that is sent along with a resume that provides context and more information for the reader.1 - Revising, Editing, Proofreading2 - Writing a Summary-Response4 - Outlining an Essay4 - Writing a Multi-Paragraph Essay4 - Faulty Parallel Structure5 - First-, Second-, and Third-Person Pronouns5 - Creating an Effective Introductory Paragraph for an Essay6 - Creating an Outline for an Analysis Essay8 - Numbers8 - Semicolons, Colons, and Commas9 - Writing Concise Sentences10 - Writing a Persuasion Essay Using Evidence
87
cover pageA page that comes before an essay or article and contains basic information about the work, including its title and author. The format of a cover page (also called the title page) will vary depending on the style guide in use.10 - Formatting a College Essay - APA Style10 - Formatting a College Essay - MLA Style
88
credibleDescribes a person who is trusted and able to be believed; reliable.1 - End Punctuation1 - Identifying Word Parts (appears as "credibility")5 - Recognizing Subjective and Objective Language7 - Figurative Language7 - Paraphrasing Reading Passages8 - Semicolons, Colons, and Commas9 - Using Effective Evidentiary Support 9 - Evaluating Credible Sources Used Within a Reading10 - Evidentiary Support10 - Finding and Evaluating Sources10 - Writing a Persuasion Essay Using Evidence
89
criteriaThe standards or rules used to decide or judge something.7 - Identifying a Comparison Made in a Reading
90
critical analysis essayA written evaluation of a topic, such as an article, piece of art, person’s life, etc. A critical analysis essay analyzes and evaluates the content or ideas of a work as well as how the author presents his or her ideas or arguments.9 - Writing a Multi-page Critical Analysis Essay9 - Creating a Thesis and an Outline for a Critical Analysis Essay
91
critical readingA thorough examination of a text to understand and evaluate not just what it says but also its purpose, meaning, and effectiveness. In this context, critical means careful and thoughtful, not negative.6 - Understanding Reading and Writing Differences Across Disciplines
92
cultural contextInformation about the setting, time, place, community, customs, and beliefs that surround a writing. Thinking about the cultural context helps readers understand what is happening and why.3 - Author's Point of View and Cultural Context
93
dangling modifierA modifier gives extra information about a subject. A dangling modifier occurs when that subject is missing from a sentence. For example, in the sentence Driving home, the roads were slippery., the phrase driving home is left dangling and almost seems to suggest that the roads were behind the wheel of the car instead of a person.7 - Mistakes with Modifiers
94
dataFacts, numbers, or information.8 - Logical Fallacies and Causal Relationships9 - Recognizing the Main Idea and Source Bias in a Complex Reading
95
debatableOpen to doubt and differing views. An argument or claim is debatable when reasonable people might disagree with it.10 - Developing a Thesis and Outline for a Persuasion Essay
96
decadeA period of ten years. Example: the decade of the nineteen-nineties includes the years from 1990 to 1999.8 - Numbers
97
decimalA number that is written with a dot between the whole number and the part of the number that is less than one. Examples: 3.75 grade point average; 8.5 ounces.8 - Numbers
98
decipherTo figure out something confusing or complicated.1 - Identifying Word Parts (appears as "deciphering")1 - End Punctuation8 - Responding Effectively to Essay Assignments8 - Writing an Essay Showing Cause and Effect Pattern
99
deduceTo use logic to come to a conclusion about something unknown.1 - Identifying Word Parts
100
definition essayA writing that explains a term or concept using a variety of techniques such as research, statistics, historical and popular references, comparisons, abstractions, and other ideas.5 - Writing and Revising a Multi-paragraph Definition Essay
Loading...