ABCDEFGHI
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SeminarDescription
STEM: Math
STEM: Science
Civic Engagement
Communication Arts
Design Thinking
Future Readiness
Electives
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2D Installation Art: Calling All ArtistsContemporary artists are disrupting the norm and making bold statements in public spaces. Artists use color, texture, sound, images and so much more to change the world for the better by spreading joy, provoking thought or creating awareness. In this seminar, we will examine how this is being done and delve into creating our own unique installation art at Pathways! We will practice drawing, painting and mixed media techniques and execute various art making methods in our installation artworks. Some of our creative efforts will be individual and some will be collaborative. Let’s transform our school!
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3D Installation Art: The Message is the MaterialDo you envision a more beautiful or unique educational space at Pathways? Do you want to disrupt the norm? In this seminar, we will look at different ways in which contemporary artists are disrupting the norm and making bold statements in public spaces. Artists use color, texture, sound, images and so much more to change the world for the better by spreading joy, provoking thought or creating awareness. In this seminar, we will examine how this is already being done and delve into creating our own unique installation art at Pathways! We will learn different sculpture techniques and manipulate various materials in our installation artworks. Let’s transform our school!
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A Zero Waste Future at PHThere is no more pressing issue in the world today than Climate Change, and every method of reducing our carbon footprint is essential. Indeed, the Milwaukee Area landfill is scheduled to be capped in 2025, and there is no new site planned to accept our garbage. In this seminar, we will begin to address this issue by learning the chemistry of recycling and why it is the last element of “reduce, reuse, and recycle.” Then, students will study different forms of waste reduction, including recycling, composting, etc and produce a proposal for Pathways High to reduce its waste. That proposal will be presented to the staff and students, and if approved, be executed. This seminar will engage with STEM science and engineering standards, as well as informative writing standards.
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Advanced Math StudioThis course is intended for students who are currently enrolled in, or have already completed, Integrated Math 3 or are almost finished with Integrated Math 2 (Aleks). The course allows students the opportunity to choose advanced work in one of three tracks, Functions, Trigonometry, or Statistics/Analytic Geometry. Students will receive personalized instruction in their chosen track and be given guidance as they develop projects that demonstrate their mastery of their chosen topics. Students are allowed to take this course multiple times as they pursue completion of the three tracks. Math Studio is designed to provide a flexible environment for students to develop their mathematical understanding and skills in a supportive setting. Instructional interactions will be structured to provide students needed knowledge ‘just in time” rather than “just in case.” Another important aspect of this design is to allow students exposure to and input on other student’s work and projects.
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African-American Theater/FilmThink of all the plays you’ve seen and read. How many were from African-American writers? Why is this? If African-American authors are not well-represented in American Theater, what have we missed? In this seminar we will read, watch, act out, and discuss important plays by African-American authors in the last one hundred years. We are tentatively reading August Wilson’s Fences, Spike Lee’s Do The Right Thing, Moonlight, For Colored Girls (play and movie) and an analysis of John Singleton’s Boyz in the Hood.
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ArabicThe goal of this course is to begin developing reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. The course stresses communication using both formal and informal Arabic. Language-workshop time is an essential component of the course, allowing us to unpack Arab culture and talk about our language skills. We will devote other in-class time to communicating in the language itself, activating new vocabulary, and receiving immediate feedback on language skills daily. Students will be evaluated on attendance and class participation, daily language-workshop assignments, quizzes, skits, presentations, and culture-focused projects.
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Arabic for FreedomThis seminar is designed to be a soft introduction to Arabic language, culture, and history. Students will learn about civil liberties throughout the Arab world while going over some basic reading, writing, and speaking skills in the Arabic language. Students will go on to compare civil liberties in Arab countries to the liberties they enjoy (or don’t enjoy) here in the United States. The course stresses communication using both formal and informal Arabic. Language-workshop time is an essential component of the course, allowing us to unpack Arab culture and talk about our language skills. We will devote other in-class time to communicating in the language itself, activating new vocabulary, and receiving immediate feedback on language skills daily. Students are also evaluated on their critical analysis of liberty through class discussions, written reflections, and a final project that involves the Arabic language.
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Arabic for Planet EarthThis seminar is designed to help language learners of all levels hone their Arabic skills while learning about biological systems on Earth. Please note that this is a semester-long seminar. During our first quarter, we will be learning how to communicate about animals and ecosystems. In the second quarter of this class, we will transfer our understanding of ecosystems to systems of anatomy and physiology, helping us better understand how to apply our knowledge of Arabic to biological systems in different contexts. Students will develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. The course stresses communication using both formal and informal Arabic. Language-workshop time is an essential component of the course, allowing us to unpack Arab culture and talk about our language skills. We will devote other in-class time to communicating in the language itself, activating new vocabulary, and receiving immediate feedback on language skills daily.
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Arabic for the CityThis seminar is designed to help language learners of all levels hone their Arabic skills while learning how to navigate an Arab city. Students will develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. The course stresses communication using both formal and informal Arabic. Language-workshop time is an essential component of the course, allowing us to unpack Arab culture and talk about our language skills. We will devote other in-class time to communicating in the language itself, activating new vocabulary, and receiving immediate feedback on language skills daily. Students will be evaluated on attendance and class participation, daily language-workshop assignments, quizzes, skits, presentations, and culture-focused projects.
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Arabic For the City: Comics EditionThis seminar is designed to help language learners of all levels hone their Arabic skills while learning how to navigate an Arab city. Students will develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. The course stresses communication using both formal and informal Arabic. Language-workshop time is an essential component of the course, allowing us to unpack Arab culture and talk about our language skills. We will devote other in-class time to communicating in the language itself, activating new vocabulary, and receiving immediate feedback on language skills daily. Students will be evaluated on attendance and class participation, daily language-workshop assignments, quizzes, skits, presentations, and culture-focused projects.
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Arabic for the Kitchen Table This seminar is designed to help language learners of all levels hone their Arabic skills while learning more about table manners, ordering food, and even making food. Students will develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. The course stresses communication using both formal and informal Arabic. Language-workshop time is an essential component of the course, allowing us to unpack Arab culture and talk about our language skills. We will devote other in-class time to communicating in the language itself, activating new vocabulary, and receiving immediate feedback on language skills daily. Students will be evaluated on attendance and class participation, daily language-workshop assignments, quizzes, skits, presentations, and culture-focused projects.
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Arabic for the Whole Family Family ties hold a special place in Arab culture and language. This seminar is designed to help language learners of all levels hone their Arabic skills while learning how to discuss family and friends. Students will develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. The course stresses communication using both formal and informal Arabic. Language-workshop time is an essential component of the course, allowing us to unpack Arab culture and talk about our language skills. We will devote other in-class time to communicating in the language itself, activating new vocabulary, and receiving immediate feedback on language skills daily. Students will be evaluated on attendance and class participation, daily language-workshop assignments, quizzes, skits, presentations, and culture-focused projects.
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Arabic for Your Daily ScheduleHaving a plan for your days is crucial for surviving in any society, and to be truly competent in a language you need to be able to communicate your plans to others. This seminar is designed to help language learners of all levels hone their Arabic skills while learning how to discuss daily schedules and/or daily happenings. The main grammatical focus of this seminar will be the use of past, present, and future tense verbs in Arabic. Students will develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. The course stresses communication using both formal and informal Arabic. Language-workshop time is an essential component of the course, allowing us to unpack Arab culture and talk about our language skills. We will devote other in-class time to communicating in the language itself, activating new vocabulary, and receiving immediate feedback on language skills daily. Students will be evaluated on attendance and class participation, daily language-workshop assignments, quizzes, skits, presentations, and culture-focused projects.
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Argue! With Statistics!Do you have any strong opinions? Of course you do! We all do! In this seminar, students will choose a hot topic and take a stance. Students will use statistics to support their arguments and to support arguments against their opponents. Students will create a final product of either an argumentative essay or a speech, and deliver this final product to members of their community (students/staff at Pathways High, family members, etc.) In the end, students will not only have learned more about their own opinions, but of the opinions of positions they might not have necessarily agreed with at the beginning of the seminar.
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Art in the Name of ScienceThis is an introduction to the physics of sound and light, with applications to music and visual arts. Through hands-on activities, students will learn how science and art are deeply interconnected--how scientific principles are used in art and how art is hidden in science. The seminar will end with a two-week investigation that results in the creation of an expressive piece of artwork reflective of what they have learned.
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Artistic Expression Through GeometryIn Artistic Expression through Geometry, students will be creating an art piece informed by two-dimensional geometric shapes. Within your art piece, you will have created a variety of mathematical shapes and the principles of similarity, congruence, and equivalence. In the end, you will present your wonderful art piece to our Pathways High Community, and explain in written or verbal form all of the mathematical influences within your piece.
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Artists Books: Beyond Two CoversA book does NOT have to be a collection of numbered pages with words between two covers. Have you ever thought that a book could have no covers, pages, or words at all? This seminar will challenge your understanding of what a book is and what physical form it can take. In this seminar, we will explore several ways in which artists are redefining books. You will create some artist books of your own!
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Autonomous Drones Drones are popping up everywhere! From Amazon same day to pizza delivery, autonomous machines are blending the fields of robotics and artificial intelligence. This course will utilize Minds-I 6x6 and UAV drones in order to teach students the basics of drone design, construction, programming and operation. Students will learn to prepare drones to operate via radio and work toward autonomous operation using sensors and gps telemetry. Students will learn to write basic programs using Arduino C++, and will work through a series of labs that lead them to successful completion of drone construction and utilization of a dashboard monitoring system. This class, though dealing with complex technology, is ideal for students with backgrounds in programming and robotics, or those with an intense interest in the topic.
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Avoid It Like the Plague!In the literature of pestilence and plague, the greatest threat isn’t the loss of human life but the loss of what makes us human. When something threatens our world, what do we as a society cling to? How do people respond to plague? In this seminar we will take a look at deadly plagues both real and fiction. You will be asked to find connections through time in how daily life was affected and how governments responded. Together we’ll read science fiction tales of plague times to determine themes and analyze how authors choose to develop characters, setting, mood, and motifs. What pressures do characters face? How do characters respond to the times they live in? How does the author use history to shape a fictitious plague? 700 years ago in medieval Europe, 50% of the population died a gruesome death. Half of every family, city, and country died. Today, a pandemic rages across the world. How are we responding? How is it shaping our lives? Does the saying, “Avoid it like the plague” still hold true today?
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Bias, Bias as Far as the Eye Can SeeBias is everywhere. In this seminar we will define what bias is, where to find it, and how it got there. We will learn popular advertising techniques and design our own advertisements. We will also take a critical look at media outlets from a variety of perspectives in order to analyze news coverage for bias. The standard sets that will be covered in this class are Communication Arts and Civic Engagement. In the end, you will be able to take your knowledge of media and its manipulation techniques and turn it on those around you. You will have the option of creating your own newscast to persuade others, or create an ad campaign designed to make your product a need for the consumer. Get ready to be open with yourself and the world around you because you may start to question everything.
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Biology and You“Healthy Lives: Biology and You” will provide foundational and some advanced biology content; best explored utilizing a variety of different instructional tools, including – but not limited to: interactive computer based technology, laboratory explorations, active class discussion, and analysis of current scientific literature and research. Students will learn basic cell structure, molecular biology, cellular transport systems, some biochemistry, human anatomy/physiology, and data analysis/interpretation. The overarching themes of the seminar include human physical health, diseases/injury prevention, and nutrition. This seminar provides a foundation for students wanting to expand their vocabulary and learn about the human body and its levels of organization, as well as the cooperation required between those levels. Students will end the seminar with a dissection unit where they observe structures closely analogous to the human body. The primary units of study for the quarter include the human respiratory system, blood/circulatory system, skeletal system, digestive system, and the reproductive system. Lastly, students will gain proficiency in standards by creating a detailed daily journal/notebook filled with science content/drawings, reading various research articles, analyzing data in scientific research, and technical writing of science content.
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BOOM! POW! ZAP! Story-Telling Through Graphic Novels & ComicsIf you are interested in character development, illustration, storyboarding and animation...this seminar is for you! Pathways High has been selected to participate in the MIAD Future Designers program and we will be working alongside Drew Maxwell, the head of the Innovation and Design Department at MIAD, to develop characters and eventually create a 6-page comic! Additionally, we will visit MIAD in early May for an in-progress critique, campus/facilities tour and catered lunch. Lastly, you will have the opportunity to exhibit your work as part of the Future Designers Exhibition at MIAD from May 22nd - June 6th!
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Bringing into the Spotlight: Profiles of Community ChangersHave you ever met someone, expected to love or hate them, but it turns out the opposite? What gives us our first impressions of one another? How do we decide if we like or dislike a person, especially a public figure or celebrity? Often, our views of public figures are shaped on the stories which others have told us, especially the media. Using a critical approach to understanding emotive language and its effect on an audience, we will write the profiles of community changers. No, not online dating or Facebook profiles, but journalistic pieces sharing the interests and impacts of your chosen community changer. We will interview, draft, review, edit, and publish the profile pieces in an online zine. Is there someone making a difference and people need to know about it? Share their impact with the community and honor their work through a thorough and effective profile piece, published for all to read.
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Build Your Own World: Writing FictionOver the last half century, the investments into NASA have created countless benefits for mankind. In this seminar, the Pathways Aeronautics and Space Administration will develop unique rocket designs and repeatedly test them, finishing with a collaborative team competition for rockets. Students will develop their rockets and test them according to strict scientific strictures, with all students beginning with a similar structure then changing one feature of their rocket at a time. Each rocket flight will be analyzed and judged based on its time aloft, distance travelled, and height achieved.
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Build-A-Boat Do you like to build things? Are you ready to use the Makerspace to its fullest potential? In this seminar, a group of students will work with Mr. Sasveld and the partner organization All Hands Boatworks to build a wooden boat with a capacity of 3 persons. Twice a week, All Hands Boatworks will come to Pathways High and work with the students on the physical building of the boat. On the other days of the week, students will work to sharpen their math skills as they relate to the building of the boat. Math concepts like measurement, scale drawing, and geometry will be explored and used to help build the boat. Students have the capacity to earn both mathematical standards and design thinking standards in this seminar co-taught with a partner organization.
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Building Religious Literacy Reaching back to the roots of three major world religions, this course will examine the revolutionary thought behind the beginnings of Judaism, Christianity, abd Islam. We will examine these religions in their own historical contexts and explore their interconnected nature. We will also look at how these religions are represented in dominant social narratives. This course is meant to give us perspective on how religious beliefs interact with individual lives and whole societies. It will challenge us to understand one another in an ever-diversifying world while exploring and understanding our own beliefs more deeply.
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Can We Talk...For A Minute?: Crucial Conversations through EmpathyIn this seminar, students will explore counseling and communication strategies to empathize with the stories of others while critically thinking about how your own stories have impacted your processing. By learning the art of motivational interviewing, practicing conversation “counseling” sessions, and learning reflective listening skills; students will know how to facilitate a healthy and helpful conversation that would be able to assist their peers with processing their thoughts and feelings through problem-solving. Students will track their communication habits progress by taking a pre and post-test of the communication habit assessment (CHA), and will explore their personal history to discover factors of their identity; questioning how those factors have allowed them to receive, reject and interpret others. Additionally, students will become familiar with Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and the impact of untreated trauma on the body. Moreover, students will practice and discover strategies to compact stress and trauma.
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Computer ProgrammingAs the role of computers in modern life continues to expand, understanding the theory, design, development and applications of software and software systems becomes increasingly important to those who wish to understand the world we live in. Students interested in Computer Science can transfer this interest into careers in artificial intelligence, computer systems and networks, security, database systems, human computer interaction, vision and graphics, numerical analysis, data analytics, programming languages, software engineering, bioinformatics and theory of computing.
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Conspiracy TheoriesLearning how to design and write programs is just one aspect of computer science. Using the CodeHS curriculum platform, students in this seminar will also learn how to design and analyze algorithms to solve programs and study the performance of computer hardware and software and to use these skills to solve problems using a variety of approaches and platforms.
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Creating for a Client: The Ceiling Tile ProjectLook up. Have you ever thought about making art on the ceiling? Michelangelo transformed the ceiling of the Sistene Chapel in the Vatican during the 1500’s, so why can’t we transform our ceilings here at Pathways in 2019? Answer: we can! By treating each teacher as a client, we will ask questions, research, brainstorm, sketch and plan customized artworks that relate to specific content areas. Once our designs are approved by our clients, we will be painting ceiling tiles and installing them in our classrooms! This seminar will open up the opportunity to earn standards in Science, History, Math, English, and other content areas depending on the client you work for and the content you are passionate about.
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Data Analytics We live in a data-driven world. Data is collected everywhere and is used in increasingly sophisticated ways to construct detailed models of behavior, actions, motivations, and even predict system failure. The ability to access, analyze, assemble and apply information gleaned from sound analysis gives us the ability to better understand the world we live in and define ways that we can work more effectively and efficiently. This advanced level course is intended for students who have already completed a statistics or coding class and will focus on practical applications of data analysis and will give the student application based skills. Moving beyond small, carefully planned data sets, this course will explore the world of “Big Data” and make it relevant to students' lives through labs, simulations and exploration of computer coding skills necessary to find the meaning behind the numbers and to prepare themselves to thrive in the world of Industry 4.0.
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Data: Believe it OR Not “Data: Believe it OR Not” is a seminar that allows you to answer: How do you “know”? What do you “know”? What can I really “know”? What does it really mean to “know”? Students will learn to ask questions, analyze data and interpret results to understand how to determine what is truth in science and statistical research. In science, students will learn foundational and some advanced chemistry content; best explored utilizing a variety of different instructional tools, including – but not limited to: interactive computer based technology, laboratory explorations, active class discussion, and analysis of current scientific literature and research. This seminar provides a foundation for students wanting to expand their vocabulary and learn about how atoms create molecules and how atoms and molecules interact and organize to make every material thing that is. (Including US!!) In math, students will also learn basic statistics which involves how to interpret quantitative data, categorical data and summarize, represent and interpret various data groups. In addition, students in this course receive an overview of statistical methods from an experimental design perspective. Students will review statistical sampling, variance, correlation and other related skills. Rather than calculations, the course focuses on interpretation, analysis and communication of the results and ethics of statistical analysis. Truth through Science.
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Don't Be a Phony“It’s partly true, too, but it isn’t all true. People always think something’s all true.” So says Holden Caulfield, the main character in JD Salinger’s American novel, The Catcher in the Rye. Holden Caulfield is a character you will never forget. Some love him and some hate him, but we are all, in part, him. Our way into this text, as well as the text The Perks of Being a Wallflower, is through the psychoanalytic literature lens. By exploring the General Human Concerns, based in Freud’s work on human and sexual development, we will discuss and gather evidence of how Holden responds to the events in his life, namely death, identity, innocence, conformity, sexuality, and what he is searching for. In this seminar we will get into the thoughts of a character, collecting evidence, and using some armchair psychology to understand what is behind his actions and words. We will also explore why this book has been banned and used as motive for crimes against public figures. Throughout the story we will explore the character development for your use in either an evidence-based or a creative writing, where you will explore using psychoanalytic critique in your own writing. You’ll become comfortable discussing your findings, if you choose, as online discussion sessions are available as part of the learning. You’ll never read another character again without thinking of their response to the General Human Concerns and the psychology behind actions. Buckle up for a new take on two classics.
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Don't Waste Water: Preserving the Great Lakes The Earth’s climate and ecosystems are changing quickly due to the way humans are using resources, causing havoc for plants, animals and other organisms. However, none of us would like to go back to a time when people did not have access to lightbulbs, flushing toilets, or smartphones. In this seminar, we will measure the amount of energy and water being used by the people in your own home and design an experiment to reduce the use of those resources. Then, we will present the findings to the class and beyond. We will also investigate other forms of human impact on the environment.
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Entrepreneurship - Business and Math Lots of people have dreams of starting their own business. In this seminar students will get to turn those dreams into reality! In this seminar, students will dive deep into the process of starting their own business. Students will create their own investment portfolio, develop a business plan to market their product, and participation in a business convention where they will display their business along with how they will market and advertise that business. These businesses will be created in teams of 4. Teams will dive deep into the process of creating a business, and can use this knowledge to start a business after they graduate from Pathways High.
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Entrepreneurship - Marketing & AdvertisingThe focus of this seminar is Entrepreneurial and Design Thinking through the business model canvas and IDEO’s innovation process. Through this seminar we will be working with UWM’s Lumbar Entrepreneurship Center throughout the process of creating a startup idea.
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Everyday AlgebraHave you ever thought about why you need to learn algebra and why math is important? Come and learn algebra math skills by planning a road trip. You will be competing with your to win the road trip of a lifetime - SORRY, you won’t really win your $15,000 road trip but there may be a small prize at the end. During the course of this project, you will work on solving, writing and graphing linear equations and systems of equations. You will need to be creative, persuasive and able to explain the mathematics you have learned to win this competition! But don’t worry, even those who don’t “win” will learn a lot of mathematics and its connections to the real world.
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Evicted, Exploited & the Urban Housing EpidemicIf you or your family have ever experienced eviction, you know that it is an extremely hard time. The realization that you and your family have minimal time to vacate your current home. Pack all of what you own into a U-Haul truck and hope you can store it at a loved ones home, while you continue your search for the next place. The uncertainty of losing any one of the key needs as determined by Maslow’s Hierarchy creates a ripple effect on a young brain for many years to come. The instability that follows an eviction can also send a family down a dark trajectory further into poverty by forcing them to live in and settle for substandard housing, in tough neighborhoods that are often food deserts, only to have a harder time getting a quality education and finding decent jobs. Through an exploration of the book, Evicted by Matthew Desmond, we will learn that there is so much more at work in the current eviction epidemic that plagues urban housing in Milwaukee and so many cities like it. In this seminar, students will be exposed to the systemic issues surrounding urban housing, particularly in communities of color through a thorough examination of the aforementioned text. Students will then be asked, “what needs to be done today in order to proactively and equitably address this issue?”
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Financial Planning We need money to survive, and this seminar is focused entirely on how to manage all of the money that you’ve spent countless hours working hard to earn! This seminar is broken down into six interconnected but distinct aspects of financial planning, which are: Money Management, Borrowing, Earning Power, Investing, Financial Services, and Insurance. Throughout the seminar, students will be creating and adding to a financial portfolio that is separated into these six sections. At the conclusion of the seminar, students will have all of the knowledge that they need in order to go out into the real world and be a smart, self-interested consumer.
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For the Death Curious What a time to be alive!? Or rather, dead. For those of us who are death curious, we have more information available to us than ever before and there is a lot to talk about. Through this seminar we will examine what physically happens in death, the impact death has on the planet, and a few of the superstitions surrounding death. We will survey a variety of death rites and rituals from around the world, learn about what the dead can teach us, explore death as inspiration for creative expression, examine careers in death work, and discuss the importance of support during the grieving process. This class will challenge you to be open-minded and push your boundaries. Emotions may surface and we have the responsibility to create a safe space to support everyone in their unique ways of processing towards becoming death positive.
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From Yoga to Break DancingIn this seminar we will explore ways to be healthier, happier humans through daily practices such as yoga, meditation and even dancing. How can you be mentally and physically healthy through daily activities, being mindful and finding the fun in life. Physical activity and eating healthy are a good start but how do we sustain this into our lifestyle through balance, mindfulness and physical health. How does your current and past experiences and lifestyle interfere with our mental and physical well being. We will explore how Trauma affects the brain and how yoga can help heal and ground you. Sign up to learn the basics you will need for a healthier, happier life. We will also investigate the science of wellness through healthy eating and exercise for science credit. Each day for yoga and physical activity you will need proper clothing: yoga pants, sweat pants, tight fitting shirt or able to be tucked in well. No loose shorts.
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Geometry at HomeHow can we do mathematics while stuck at home doing online learning? Let’s use the geometric design of our homes! In this newly adjusted seminar for online learning, students will learn concepts of geometric design and scale drawing in order to replicate the place that they’re stuck in for the foreseeable future! Students will measure their homes, draw both a rough draft and final draft accurate drawing of their homes, and re-design a geometric model of their homes! Math is everywhere!
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Give Me Votes or Give Me DeathThis year we have seen more power in the voting process than ever before. That power works differently for the two parties and creates different emotions in those representatives. Some legislators fear the voting process and who should get to? Some see it as a strength of democracy and want to see it increased and the rules loosened. Do you know the current election laws in place? What about the ones that are currently being debated that will make severe changes? The creation of policy and law in America is often called “the sausage making” of politics. It is a long, difficult, frustrating process that often deals more with deception, manipulation, and concessions than doing what is right for the people. In this seminar we will take the legislative floor and bring it to the classroom. Students will take on the roles of legislators to draft bills dealing with elections and voting, and they will challenge the bills of their peers in simulated houses of government. This seminar will allow students to see exactly what the people we elect to run our country do. You get a chance to get to know yourself and your own political beliefs and defend them on the floor of Congress.
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Global Challenge ProjectHave you ever wanted to help end world hunger? What about poverty? Do you think you have some good ideas for solving global security issues? Get involved with some real-world efforts through this class that will prepare you to present a paper at the Wisconsin Youth Institute of UW-Madison! In this seminar we will sharpen our writing skills and work with real scholars and professionals to try to solve these very real problems. We will explore the history of some of these global issues, and we will ask ourselves critical questions about whether or not “helping” with these issues is always a good thing. If you participate in the Wisconsin Youth Institute after the seminar, you will become recognized as a Borlaug Scholar (a title that comes with plenty of perks). Want to know more? Check out this resource from UW-Madison, and/or contact Mr. Wieber and Katie
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Global CitizenshipIn a time of political divides and violent border clashes, what does it mean to “belong” somewhere? In Global Citizenship, students will grapple with the foundational ideas of community building, citizenship, and justice. Focusing on our school, city, and our nation, students will investigate how to build the world they would like to be a part of, then act on their conclusions.
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Going ViralIn 2020, the word viral has dramatically different connotations ranging from restrictions put in place to combat Covid-19, to the latest social media phenomenon trending online, to the spread of fashion and style around the globe. In this course we are going to look at the common trait to all of these examples: rapid, sometimes uncontrolled, spread. What can we learn about the spread of disease and ideas that can inform and inspire innovative means of spreading a positive message? In this seminar, students will help plan, design, model a multimodal campaign to communicate a message.
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Graduation and Post-Graduation PrepWhat does it take to be the person you want to be? How can you reach your goals to have the career of your dreams? Highly successful people are driven by goals, have a plan and follow their passions. We will use your distinct personality analysis, career surveying, and academic strengths to define your future self. Through this process we will investigate many possible career paths, post secondary training, colleges, and more. You will create independent projects that align with your passions, future career aspirations and current credit needs. This deep dive into independent project building will the be the foundation for future large scale projects at the high school and/or post secondary levels as well as for many careers.
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Green Building & DesignIn a time when Climate Change is impacting the world in an ever increasing way and where official action is taking place less and less, it is up to citizen scientists, green businessmen, and others to make a difference. A huge amount of our waste and energy use goes into the construction of buildings and other structures that protect us from the environment and create one favorable to humans. In this course, students will tackle this problem head on, creating a model building using sustainability principles, and test the models for their ability to retain heat.

In groups, students will design, build, and test their model building as well as write/present on its environmental impact.
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HAMILTON Has Its Eyes on HistoryDon't "miss [your] shot" at digging deep and rapping hard with your peers as you study the revolutionary period in American history. We will look at the controversies, personal life, politics, and poetry of modern music is embedded into this Tony Award winning musical, Hamilton. This seminar will look at history with a new lens, as portrayed by many modern retellings. We will listen to the music from the musical, create listening journals and compare our notes with what really happened in Alexander Hamilton’s life as well as our other founding fathers. We will investigate duels, friendships, social and economic class, and government documents such as the constitution and the federalist papers. Through this journey we will dig deeper into artistic endeavors and plan our own “show”. Students in the seminar will lead the way on this project taking on roles in acting, singing, rapping, costuming, hair/makeup design, set design and more. You will be able to use your interests and passions to help put the "show" on. This seminar will be team taught with Jayla, Liv and Sophia. Come join our cast!
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Human Rights: Past or Present?Did you know that everyone in today’s world is born with a set of rights that all governments are supposed to give them? That even in war, which shows man at its worst, there is a code that must be adhered to? It’s when these rights aren’t given, that’s when someone or some country makes it into the history books. These rights as we know them are called Human Rights. But what does that mean and why does it matter today? This is still an ongoing issue that affects millions today, and how the world is responding leaves a lot of questions to be answered. In this class we will cover the worst of humanity from the likes of Stalin’s Russia, to Hitler’s holocaust, and from Palestine to Syria. We’ll discover what went wrong, how the world responded, and eventually figure out what we can do today to solve today’s problems. You will get to voice your opinions and debate with your classmates on sensitive topics as well as construct something at the end to be displayed for the community.
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Illustrated Songs: Using song lyrics as Inspiration for Visual Art How many times this week have you had a song stuck in your head? Are there lyrics running through your mind right now? Music is such an important part of who we all are and this seminar will provide you with an opportunity to use your favorite songs as inspiration for visual artworks! As a whole group collaboration, we will take a deep look into the lyrics of a few different songs and come up with creative ways to express the lyrics as imagery. We will learn how to seamlessly incorporate written words, color, and imagery to create eye-catching and expressive designs! You will have the opportunity to take your final project design to large-scale print and display in a public venue where art and music thrive!
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In Just Three Easy Steps: Technical Writing for Online TutorialsFix your sink with Ramen noodles! Can’t dunk? Here’s how! Turn that ripped pair of jeans into a new purse! Cake decorating 101! You can learn almost anything online through quick 5-minute videos by Tasty or Creative Hacks. But does it work? We will put it to the test in the first half of the seminar. Through analyzing and running real tests of online tutorial videos, we will determine the successes and failures to apply to our own online manual and tutorial. The second half of the seminar, you will be teaching an audience a skill or creation by first writing a technical manual and then filming the process in the style of those we have analyzed. Get ready to get messy while you fail, succeed, and share your talent with the community. Your final projects will be published online so others can learn from you. The subject of the tutorial will be all your own, with support from professionals, so don’t be afraid to choose something you haven’t perfected yet. Fixing a flat bike tire. Jumping rope. Doing hair. The opportunities are endless. What will you teach us?
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Infection is Life: Cells, Viruses, & the Immune SystemWe are currently living in the midst of a Global Pandemic, and fear is rampant across our world. In a time like this, Knowledge is Power, and in this seminar we are going to explore the truth behind the microscopic lifeforms that both create us and kill us. Viruses and Bacteria are minuscule little packets of DNA, but they impact people so much. How do they do that? What does it actually mean to “get sick?” What does it mean to get better, and how does the immune system work. We will explore the basics of cell biology in order to understand what the immune system actually does, and how we can actively help it do its job and stay healthy. The final project in this seminar will be students making recommendations about how to deal with past, present, or future pandemics.
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Instruments of ChangeHave you ever wondered: “Why is that thing doing that?” Would you like to have the power to accurately predict what things will do, and what things will NOT? Do you keep playing the game Mousetrap even though you have no idea how to actually play the GAME of Mousetrap? Then this seminar is for you. In Instruments of Change, you will experience the magic and the wonder of Newtonian Mechanics (and ride on a hovercraft!). We will break down complex physical problems into the manifestation of a handful of simple laws, and then flip the script by inventing and constructing a machine which solves the simplest physical problem in as complex (and funny) a way as possible--a.k.a. A Rube Goldberg Machine.
Example: Selfie Stick, Shmelfie Stick!!
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Intergenerational Storytelling: Generations of Memory When I was younger, my dad vacuumed my hair and screwed my foot to the floor. That’s a story you’ll want to hear, isn’t it? Storytelling has a way of bringing people together. Why not expand our community by reaching out to those who hold memories and imagination to add to our own? When it comes to memories, we immediately think of those who have lived through many life events, namely, elders. And no one has more imagination than a child before they start kindergarten! In this seminar, we will be assessing how storytelling builds community and the effects of sharing memory. To do so, students will have the option of working with an older or younger collaborator, either a community elder or a preschool child. We will begin by studying the elements of stories, and then, working with our collaborator, create a story to share out through a visual, audio, or mixed media product. Through biweekly meetings, students and their collaborator will share stories about memories or create stories together, creating an anthology of stories and sharing. For a final project, students will write or record one story, real or fiction, with the assistance of the collaborator. If working with a child, perhaps the child will draw or color the pictures for a picture book, while the student will write the story on the pages. If working with an adult, photographs may enhance the story. In the end, we will reflect on the bonds created over the storytelling, and share the memories with one another in a readathon event. Because, as author Philip Pullman once said, “After nourishment, shelter and companionship, stories are the thing we need most in the world.”
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Intro to Health SciencesIntroduction to Health Sciences is a semester long seminar which provides foundational and advanced science content for many Health Science pathways and introduces students to a variety of healthcare careers as they develop the basic skills and science content required in various health and medical sciences. Students will learn medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, basic chemistry, biochemistry, mathematics associated with science, data interpretation, and medical diagnostics. The chemistry will be learned using a combination of ALEKS and teacher lead lectures/discussions. This seminar will enable students to receive initial exposure to the many Health Science careers as well as employability, communication, and technology skills necessary in the health science industry. In addition, this seminar will provide students with a competitive edge to be the better candidate for either entry into the health science global marketplace and/or the post-secondary institution of their choice to continue their education and training. Lastly, students will gain proficiency in standards by completing ALEKS chemistry, creating a medical illustration book filled with science drawings/content, technical writing of science content, and various quizzes/examinations during the semester.
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Introduction to College CalculusAre you ready to earn college credit for your math ability but are scared of the words “Calculus?” Have you attempted a Calculus course in the past but found it was too difficult? In this seminar, students will spend 1 quarter preparing for a Calculus class at MATC or at another partner college. Over the course of 4th quarter, we will move through the first few weeks of a collegiate Calculus curriculum, but we’ll take the time needed to slow down and master the material instead of speeding through like we would in a college setting. This seminar is perfect for students who are ready to take a Calculus course at MATC in the fall
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Introductory Robotics (Seaperch)Students will design, build and compete with submersible Remote Operated Vehicle designated with the completion of a specific task. Students will also participate in the design of another, larger submersible designed to collect samples, data, and video from bodies of water. Milwaukee is positioned at the delta of a large river basin and Lake Michigan. This unique position is poised to become a cornerstone of future Milwaukee development. In this seminar, students will also learn how water has played a large (and not always positive) role in Milwaukee’s past and how innovators, educators and entrepreneurs are using this natural resource to shape Milwaukee’s future.
SeaPerch is an innovative underwater robotics program that equips teachers and students with the resources they need to build an underwater Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) in an in-school or out-of-school setting. Students build the ROV from a kit comprised of low-cost, easily accessible parts, following a curriculum that teaches basic engineering and science concepts with a marine engineering themes.
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It Starts with a QuestionSeminars at Pathways High start with a driving question. In this seminar, however, you will be the one to ask the questions that drive an independent project that will span the full 8 weeks of class. You will choose the standards you want to earn. You will plan out the type of project you want to create. You will build a portfolio of documentation that makes your thinking visible. And! Peer and teacher feedback will support your work all along the way. So, have you ever wanted to make a series of paintings, write a collection of poems, conduct a long-term experiment, or engage in a community service project that lasts more than an afternoon? Any of those options (and more) could be yours, all you have to do is ask a good question.
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Killer FabricLearn how to dye fabric with fiber reactive procion dyes including ancient Japanese shibori techniques. We will begin by analyzing diseases and investigating why some diseases are more prevalent in certain locations such as cities, in certain ethnicities, or related to certain diets and lifestyles. We will also be learning the basics of how bacteria, viruses, and diseases look, change, multiply and/or effect your body. You will use this knowledge, historical research and art/fashion history to design and build a wearable piece of fashion based off a disease, condition, or virus. You will also learn basic clothing alterations, printmaking techniques and more to customize an existing piece of clothing into a unique runway piece. The final runway show will be held at our Open House (insert date). You must be available for the open house to model your fashion.
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Knowledge & ArgumentWhat does it mean “to know?” How are we able to communicate what we know logically, effectively, and with supports? This seminar will examine logic, philosophy and other types of knowledge with an emphasis on communicating knowledge and ideas in the written form. In order to understand what it means “to know,” students must wrestle with concepts that are abstract and at times, unusual. This can be difficult at times, but the process is also exciting, enlightening and empowering as students develop the ability to evaluate, construct, organize, structure and share knowledge.
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Latino Culture in the United StatesLatinos are the fast growing population in America; so why do so many of us know so little about Latino culture? This class (co-designed by Juan And Xio) will focus on the facts, myths, and most of all, culture of Latinos. We will focus on areas as diverse as movies, art, music, and food, and extend to present-day controversies around immigration, undocumented workers, “the wall”, and Narco culture. Get to know the culture that’s intricately woven, but often overlooked, in our city, state, and country. It’s a new America.
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Layer it Up: The Art of CollageMusic, memories, friends, food...this seminar will provide you an opportunity to make art about your life! We will learn how to create collages by building up layers of information and imagery while you will be encouraged to bring in personal materials that you can incorporate into your work (photographs, magazines, concert tickets, sheet music, etc.). In this seminar, we will learn about Surrealism and compare the work of three master collage artists, Sammy Slabbinck, Ben Lewis Giles, and Rebeka Elizegi.
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Let's Figure It Out: Parternship With LaunchIn this seminar students will partner with students from Launch, an organization that is made up of students from Wauwatosa and Elmbrook school districts, to attempt to solve problems that local companies/organizations have proposed for us to enhance their organization. The hope is that students of both Pathways High and Launch will use their diverse skill set to make creative solutions and gain real-world experience.
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LGBTQIA+ History Through Literature How can we explore historical literature to acknowledge a more inclusive American history?
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Lines of Class and Social Justice in LiteratureIn this seminar we’ll look at issues of class and social justice in fiction texts, and then learn to represent these issues using mathematical equations, graphs, and tables. We’ll read and analyze the classic book Animal Farm to unpack the choices and tools authors use to create allegory and symbolism in stories. We’ll read several other short stories to compare themes and author’s choice, and to learn to examine fiction through a critical lens of class. Students will choose a social justice issue to research and will then represent their issue with mathematical modeling and through a piece of creative writing.
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Make America Protest AgainAll around the world, there have been feelings, statements, songs, pieces of art, marches, etc… generated in response to controversial political actions. This has happened with past generations, and it is happening again today. Throughout this seminar, students will work either independently or alongside peers to research and study examples of protest art, the time period and actions which they were protesting, and any potential impact of the protests. After studying a certain time period of protests or artist, students will choose a path for their final project.
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Map Your World: A Mixed-Media Approach to Self Expression What do you think about when you hear the word map? Geography, topography, road maps? This seminar will expand your understanding of mapping to include your past, present and future ideas, dreams, goals, passions...the things that you can’t easily see. The invisible parts of who you are and what you are about can be mapped! We will take a mixed-media approach, using several different types of wet and dry media, in order to layer meaning into our maps. You are a complex person, with many ideas to express. This seminar will provide you with a unique opportunity to create an artwork that expresses who you are, moving beyond what you look like.
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MAPS of Insulin “MAPS of Insulin” will provide foundational advanced biology content. MAPS stands for Modeling a Protein Story. In this active learning modeling seminar, small groups of students use hands-on modeling activities and online digital resources to discover basic protein folding concepts and then use them to develop an understanding of important structure-function relationships of a particular protein important in biology. Through this process, students will learn basic cell structure, protein production, modeling of molecules, polarity of molecules, and the complexity of proteins. The main “Protein Story” being studied is insulin. Students will read research papers, use protein structure data to design a model of a protein that will help them tell their structure-function story using 3D visualization software, and ultimately print a physical model of their design. Lastly, students will gain proficiency in standards by creating a detailed daily journal/notebook filled with science content/drawings, reading various research articles, analyzing data in scientific research, technical writing of science content through lab and modeling experiences/investigations, and creating various protein models.
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Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary, How does your Garden Grow?This seminar will address how you can beautify our outdoor spaces by creating edible gardens, controlling weeds and more. We will investigate topics in science that relate to gardening ecology, biology, and chemistry while implementing designs in the courtyard and our green space outside the front door. We will start by learning about garden design concepts for vegetable gardens and color design with flower gardens that are appropriate for each space while integrating science topics such as pollination, soil health, plant health, weed control, perennials vs. annuals, invasive species and more. Students will design labs and inquiry based research project through growing vegetables. In addition, we will document the process of the plants growing through field journal drawing. There is a possibility we will build new tables for the courtyard.
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Mastering Probability through Games The theory of probability was developed in the 17th century, primarily to answer questions posed by gamblers. Mathematicians of the time saw that strategies can be developed to optimize the chances of success, even in situations involving luck. Today, probability is used in a variety of applications, ranging from scientific research to making practical business decisions.

In this seminar, students will explore the world of probability by experiencing it first hand by playing games of chance and skill. Eventually, students will use the knowledge gained through these experiences to create their own game of chance!
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Material Mash Up! Exploring Surrealism Through AssemblageSurrealism is beyond reality, bizarre, unusual, dream-like and limitless! Assemblage is a form of sculpture that is all about combining objects and materials in unique ways to tell a story or create an interesting statement. Artists have been exploring the surreal for decades to transform the things that exist only in our minds or dreams into a physical reality. We will study the surrealist assemblage art of Joseph Cornell and contemporary artist Catherine Nash in order to gain understanding and inspiration for our assemblage artworks!https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Mdh0RqrtQMxR7IKfE2_-cXFA9kZwfPna9fCRwR2WLao/edit
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Math Studio: Advanced Topics in MathThis course is intended for students who are currently enrolled in, or have already completed, Integrated Math 3 (Aleks). The course allows students the opportunity to choose advanced work in one of three tracks, Functions, Trigonometry, or Statistics/Analytic Geometry. Students will receive personalized instruction in their chosen track and be given guidance as they develop projects that demonstrate their mastery of their chosen topics. Students are allowed to take this course multiple times as they pursue completion of the three tracks. Math Studio is designed to provide a flexible environment for students to develop their mathematical understanding and skills in a supportive setting. Instructional interactions will be structured to provide students needed knowledge ‘just in time” rather than “just in case.” Another important aspect of this design is to allow students exposure to and input on other student’s work and projects.
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Mind of a World LeaderCome along as we dive into the minds of the world’s most influential leaders. Why do people follow and adore one person, but ignore others? The Nazi soldiers’ response to their horrible crimes was, “we were following orders.” Hitler commissioned the deaths of millions, and a large part of the population adored him. Many people fought for Civil Rights in the United States, why was MLK Jr. the one to unit the nation? Napoleon almost conquered Europe, does he have the same mental traits of a psychopath? In this class we will look at leaders throughout history and today, diving into the psychology of their mental state, discussing what makes a good leader, and the links to mental conditions.
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Muddy WaterIn this class we will learn to navigate the “muddy water” surrounding presidential campaigns so that we may be better able to separate the narrative from the facts. We will spend time learning the techniques, the coded language, and implied messages that can appear in political advertising and news coverage. We will practice our skills through the analysis of presidential campaign advertising and a variety of media outlets. You will even have a chance to try your hand at creating your own campaign using what you learned to sway our vote. While this seminar will focus on the context of politics the skills are easily transferable to all forms of media and the narratives they spin.
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Murals and Street Art: Transforming Pathways HighIn this seminar, students will work collaboratively to design, plan, sketch and paint meaningful murals to transform and beautify the walls of Pathways High! We will examine the function of public art. Students will work alongside local painter and mural artist, Jenny Anderson, and benefit from observing her creative process and unique mark making. Students will utilize the elements and principles of art and gain practical knowledge of paint mixing, color theory, brush techniques and a variety of mark-making approaches that will inform and enhance their painted imagery. Daily and weekly in-process critiques will provide students with critical feedback on progress in order to elevate and refine the artwork. Students are responsible for documenting their process.
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Order vs. ChaosWhat if small things really matter? The overlooked, the insignificant, the numbers that get rounded off? What if considering the cumulative effect of underestimated measurements revolutionized the way we observe the world, and that this very observation was enough to change it even more? So much of mathematics, science, statistics and modeling depend upon our ability to generalize, to average, to normalize, and to order. Chaos Theory allows us to explore the tiny variations that make the world unpredictable and allow us to search for new patterns. As the writer Aaron Sorkin stated, ““There (is) order and even great beauty in what looks like total chaos. If we look closely enough at the randomness around us, patterns will start to emerge.” In this seminar we will explore these margins of measurement, look for patterns in the randomness, and strive for new understanding of how we can more effectively interact with the world of Physics.
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Parabolas for ProfitEntrepreneurial spirit is strong in young people, and many will appreciate learning the business strategy behind the cost of local goods and services. As teens develop their buying power, it is also important for them to understand how businesses turn a profit and the role consumers play in a company’s success. As market research analysts working for locally owned companies, students will determine the most profitable price point for one of their goods or services. They will gather and analyze data to establish suggested prices and develop and present their reports to the company’s owners.
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Personal FinanceFirst things first, This is a seminar for students with jobs or who have had paid jobs in the past. We need money to survive, and this seminar is focused entirely on how to manage all of the money that you’ve spent countless hours working hard to earn! This seminar is broken down into six interconnected but distinct aspects of financial planning, which are: Money Management, Borrowing, Earning Power, Investing, Financial Services, and Insurance. Throughout the seminar, students will be creating and adding to a financial portfolio that is separated into these six sections. At the conclusion of the seminar, students will have all of the knowledge that they need in order to go out into the real world and be a smart, self-interested consumer.
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Physical Education and WellnessPhysical Education and Wellness emphasizes acquiring knowledge and skills regarding lifetime nutrition, health, and physical fitness; content will include related topics such as nutrition, healthy eating, and exercise. A portion of the learning will include students watching and studying documentaries that assess the current average American’s diet and the impact that the food that we eat has on both ourselves and the environment. Students will develop and implement a personal nutrition and fitness plan, log their progress, and monitor goal achievement. Students in this class are expected to, no matter their fitness level, participate in all exercise activities (long distance runs, sprint training, strength training, agility training).
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Picnic Table Design ChallengeHave you seen our new student-built picnic tables in the courtyard? Picnic Table Design Challenge will give you the opportunity to design and paint a portion of one table and complete an entire overall design for the second table! We will explore two different themes for the two tables: Diverse By Design and Our Milwaukee! Creating visually impactful and meaningful designs can be very challenging so we will learn about what makes good design, how to use symbolism to express an idea or emotion, and how to use imagery to tell a story. We will take a bus tour field trip to look at examples of symbolic artworks around Milwaukee to increase our understanding of the role public art plays in our community. Additionally, we will have a local visiting artist share his work and discuss how he uses symbols of identity, culture and geographic location. Once our overall designs are complete, students will present their refined designs to each other in class and vote on their favorite design! The top five designs from class will present in a Town Hall, where the final design will be decided by our Pathways High students and staff! Depending on time, the “winning” overall design will be executed by a team of painters OR completed by the artist as a special project or independent study after the seminar ends.
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Planning Your FutureIn this seminar we will start planning out what we want to do after high school and prepare to take the ACT. We will learn how to prepare for large tests, how to study, how to read questions and how to best tackle the material. We will also begin planning out what we want to do after high school and exploring different career and college options.
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Poetry SlamWe are all poets! Speak, poet! The Pathways Poetry Slam seminar focuses on writing and performing poems, slam-style. We will watch slam poets, analyze their style, write slam poems, perform our poems, and tell our stories within the conventions of the slam framework. This seminar is a precursor to the first Pathways Poetry Slam team, although you do not have to join the team to take the seminar. Take a chance, have fun, and slam!
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Printmaking for Social Justice (UWM Partnership) Do you have a passion for civil rights, LGBTQ issues, immigration issues, or other social causes? Join us in creating visuals that help your cause. We will design images and use printmaking techniques to express our visual narratives. This seminar will cover the basics of printmaking to create a final print that could be reproduced through print in many forms. The reason the invention of printmaking techniques and technologies was so valuable was to educate others and distribute imagery and information. Modern printmaking goes beyond the print and crosses into the public arena through street art, sticker art, guerilla art, modern propaganda posters and more. Are you interested in learning how to create your own prints? Are you interested in making change in our world? If you said yes to either question this seminar is for you. In this seminar, we will learn and practice several different printmaking methods, including but not limited to monotype, collograph, linocut and screen printing. Each student will create one final image that sends a message about your cause. We will be working with professional artists and professors from UWM who create massive banners out of visual messages for social justice issues. It’s possible yours could be chosen for a community wide public art piece!
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Probability and Games of ChanceHow can we use math to make money? Can the same concepts used to make money be used to make better decisions? The concept of probability can help us in both of these areas! In this seminar, students will explore the world of probability by experiencing it first hand by playing games of chance and skill. Each day, students will be presented with a different probability scenario involving dice, cards, drawing rocks, or coins, and will place a “bet” (with fake money of course!) on one of the outcomes. The event will then be performed live and students will track their fake money throughout the seminar, where one student will come out on top and win a prize! Additionally we will discuss how gambling and other addictive activities affect the brain and how these activities affect each brain differently.
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Quilting Connection: Building Community Through Shared Creative ExperienceThis seminar will be an introduction to the creative process of quilting and how community is built through shared creative experience. We will learn about the history and legacy of the Gee’s Bend quilters, visit the Wisconsin Museum of Quilting and Fiber Arts, and learn directly from a visiting quilt artist! Additionally, we will investigate how mathematical principles are involved in quilt design. You will have the opportunity to learn some quilting techniques, design and create a 12” x 12” section of our collaborative quilt, as well as design a queen-size quilt of your own! Although we will not have time to construct our own individual quilts, you may have the opportunity to create your design as an independent project or an EMPOWER hour project in the future! Based on student interest, a follow up seminar could provide time to pursue your personal quilt design.
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Rebranding Pathways High: Who Are We?In this seminar, students will work collaboratively and use the design process to develop a new mascot and logo for Pathways High! With the guidance and support of industry professionals at Omnivore (a local Milwaukee advertising agency specializing in rebranding), students will develop several possible mascot and logo options. Students will rethink, redesign and refine their options. Students will present their polished mascot and logo options to Pathways students, staff and stakeholders. We will collectively decide upon a final design. Once a consensus has been reached, students will have options for what they want to make containing the new Pathways logo. Options could include (but are not limited to) screen printing t-shirts, vinyl cutting stickers, handmade reduction printing, large scale mural or mosaic of the logo, etc.. Additionally, Students taking this seminar will develop a video that tells our story: who are we? What makes Pathways High different and more desirable than other schools? Lastly, students will have the opportunity to develop their own personal brand. We will look at what it means to be self aware, how we can tell our own personal story, and how we may start to deepen our relationships in order to develop our personal brand.
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Rebuilding MilwaukeeHave you ever sat in math class and wondered “when am I going to use this?” Well, the answer is now. We will be researching the history of Milwaukee with emphasis on segregation, gentrification and the new arena while learning about lines, angles and planes in order to build our own maps of parts of Milwaukee
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Revolution on Trial: Court is in Session The Haitian Revolution gave the world the first free black state, but was the revolution efficient in make life better for the citizens? We all know why revolutions happen. When a country reaches its breaking point between the governing body and the citizens they govern, change will happen, it’s just a matter of how. Revolution’s have been bloody, revolutions have been powerful and they have played a huge role in the world today, but have they always helped the citizens as best they could? Now, it’s your turn to put revolutions on trial! In this mock trial class you will learn about the effectiveness of the revolutions of the world, as well as, how to conduct a trial and researching for an argument. It is your group's job to determine if the citizens who began the revolution were better off for it. Did their lives improve? Was the bloodshed and strife worth it? Call witnesses to the stand, cross examine your opponent, and give opening and closing speeches to a panel of judges. Take the stand, defend your revolution, court is in session.
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Rockets!Over the last half century, the investments into NASA have created countless benefits for mankind. In this seminar, the Pathways Aeronautics and Space Administration will develop unique rocket designs and repeatedly test them, finishing with a collaborative team competition for rockets. Students will develop their rockets and test them according to strict scientific strictures, with all students beginning with a similar structure then changing one feature of their rocket at a time. Each rocket flight will be analyzed and judged based on its time aloft, distance travelled, and height achieved.
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Scanalytics Smart Floor: Intro to Data AnalyticsWork with Scanalytics and Northwestern Mutual to design long term projects using the SMART floor. Students will work on basic coding and advanced coding if they already have coding skills. Students will work on concepts of using Big Data in companies and future careers. Students will be designing projects to support the use of the SMART floor and future seminars.
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Seeing SegregationEver heard that Milwaukee is the most segregated city in the United States? Stopping Segregation will delve into the history of this city and how immigration and racial tension shaped the city we live in. We will take a look at the different neighborhoods in the city and how cultures and people collide, and why certain areas don’t. Students can pair up or work on their own as they research individual neighborhoods piecing together cause and effects of how it promotes or stymies cohesion. As students finish their individual research, they will come together and create a map of the city, highlighting good and bad factors. After classwide debates and discussions, they will build presentations to be seen by local governments or communities presenting possible solutions to these problems.
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Shapes of AlgebraWhat do Bungee Jumping, Pay It Forward Activities, Disappearing M&Ms, and Cell Phone Bacteria have in common? MATH! This seminar will be most beneficial to students enrolled in the ALEKS course titled Integrated Math 1. You should expect to engage in many types of activities. YOU will be doing math and solving problems daily! We will take some notes as in a traditional classroom (just so you a reference when you forget); however, the majority of the time YOU will be discovering that there is so much more to math than ALEKS. I can’t wait to see you develop into young mathematicians...
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Shouts From Tomorrow: Science Fiction Short StoriesScience Fiction has been a driving force in literature since writing began, and many of the most important movies (like Stars Wars) and television series (like Star Trek) have revolved around space, time, and who we, as a human race, will be in the future. This seminar will focus on some of the most important short stories in Science Fiction history, from the pulp fiction of the 50s to the current stories’ focus on the environment, diversity, and the way technology changes us.
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Sirens of Titan: Exploring Life on Other Planets Space. It’s the final frontier. These are the voyages of the Starship: Pathways. It’s continuing mission: to explore strange new worlds and the life that may exist upon them. In this seminar, we will explore what the definition of life is, and what life on other worlds could potentially look like. We will explore nearby planets and moons such as Mars, Europa, and Titan to explore what life could look like there, and identify what extra-terrestrial life could look like and what the chemical limits of it are.
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Spaceship Earth: The Pale Blue Dot“Spaceship Earth: the Pale Blue Dot” is a seminar that allows you to clarify your understanding of Earth’s position in the cosmos. Topics covered will include: Universal Gravitation, Satellite Motion,The Earth/Moon System, Kepler’s Laws of Planetary Motion, Our Solar System, Our Galaxy and beyond. Emphasis will be placed on scaled models and conceptual understanding. Physics formulas will be taught as guides to thinking rather than math problems to solve. Students will learn through a variety of different instructional tools, including – but not limited to: interactive computer based technology, laboratory explorations, active class discussion, and analysis of current scientific literature and research.
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Statistical AnalysisHave you ever had a question that you weren’t able to answer? Have you wondered something about the population of your school or community but just didn’t know how to figure out how to find it? In this introductory Statistics Seminar, students will create their own driving question to study and embark on a statistical journey to figure out the answer as it relates to a population of at least 50 people. An ideal project would be the result of a student question that is important to their lives, but a bank of questions will also be provided to students who are having trouble creating their own. Students will complete mini projects on their way to completing their seminar project, and all ranges of students are welcome, as those that work ahead can learn advanced topics in statistics, such as conducting observational studies and experiments.
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Stereotypical Representation of Native Americans in Imagery Through Media and MascotsLooking to work on high level research and writing skills to prepare you for other seminars and/or college? Look no further. Florida State University. The Washington NFL franchise. Mukwonago High School. Marquette University. One of these things is not like the other. At one point, all four had American Indian nicknames and mascots. Florida State, Washington, and Mukwonago all still do. Marquette changed their mascot. But why? Why were these nicknames used in the first place? Who are and who were the people who are used as these mascots and nicknames? Why might there be a problem with this representation? What is their real story? In this seminar, students will research these questions and more, learning an introduction to journalism and podcasting, and creating real world-ready products. Students will write episode scripts and record a podcast series that will be posted and shared on all major podcast platforms. Students will meet and interview experts in the field, preparing them for interactions with professionals across a range of careers.
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TED Can Talk to AnyoneNo matter what path you take in your life, you will have to talk to people. Whether you are casually talking to your friends, presenting information to your work peers, or meeting new people. Often times, how you speak is the first impression someone has of you. When you walked in to your dream job interview, did you look them in the eye when you said hello? Or do you remember mumbling and looking at the table as they rejected you? In this class you will be tested and put in an uncomfortable spot, you will speak in front of a group of people. This is a crucial skill that needs to be developed before you set off for college or career. You will give a total of four speeches and one short interview. We will be going over what makes a good speech, why it’s important, and how you can improve on this important life skill.