Inventory Template
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[This template was created by the Society of American Archivists's Tragedy Response Initiative Task Force to assist with the management of material acquired in response to a tragic event. Please edit or alter as your situation dictates. DATE CREATED: 20190508. DATE EDITED: 20190630.]
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These Inventory Guidelines are for the specific purpose of making a quick inventory of the items recovered from [location] after the [event]. Consistency is of the utmost importance. The instructions below will be of assistance when completing an inventory. The recorder should read the forms and instruction sheet carefully prior to beginning.An inventory should include the following fields, including the date packed and the box number. Each box should have its own inventory. An inventory can be in any preferred format - handwritten, word document, spreadsheet, etc.
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A. BOX #:B. DATE:C. LOCATION:D. DESCRIPTION:E. ASSOCIATION:F. CONDITION:G. NOTES:H. INITIALS:
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Numbering and identification system should be established before gathering material, if possible. Avoid repeating numbers if at all possible, or if you do, include location short names to differentiate between boxes. Ex. Park 01, Park 02 and School 01, School 02, etc.Record the date the item was collected from the [location], YYYY-MM-DD. If the date is unknown, record “undated.”
Enter the location name of where the item was recovered.
Write a brief description of the physical characteristics of the item(s). The description should contain an object title, material (if known), color, and shape. For example: “Animal, Stuffed: bear, plush, brown, with baseball hat”; or, "Candle: wax, yellow, round glass container".Record the association from the list below as the item relates to a specific person, a group of individuals or to the incident in general.Use the following letters to denote the current condition of the object. See also the descriptions below.This is an "open” field. It may be used for remarks or comments that might be an additional identifier specific to that object. It can also be used to cross-reference materials. You can, for example, note enclosures or in the instance of photographic items, indicate whether they are mounted/unmounted, cased or uncased. How detailed you want to be will depend on your circumstances--just try to be consistent.Enter the initials of the person who recorded the information for the corresponding object.
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Description
Condition
Codes
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Ex., First Name Last Name
No physical damage, but used,clearly handled item, or faded.
GoodG
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Ex., Building NameHaving some slight degree of physical damage, but not sufficient to keep it from being preserved. No evidence of dampness or mold.SlightS
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Ex., Public park
Obvious physical damage - torn corner or cracked glass. Damp or burned.
Moderate
M
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Ex., NW corner of North Street and West Street
In perfect condition with no damage (brand new, or recently created)
ExcellentE
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Broken, torn, wet items.ExtremeX
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