Forces checklist
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVW
1
AQA TRILOGY Physics: Forces Checklist
2
6.5.1 Forces and their interactions Identify and describe scalar quantities and vector quantities
3
Identify and give examples of forces as contact or non-contact forces
4
Describe the interaction between two objects and the force produced on each as a vector
5
Describe weight and explain that its magnitude at a point depends on the gravitational field strength
6
Calculate weight by recalling and using the equation: [ W = mg ]
7
Represent the weight of an object as acting at a single point which is referred to as the object's ‘centre of mass’
8
Calculate the resultant of two forces that act in a straight line
9
HT ONLY: describe examples of the forces acting on an isolated object or system
10
HT ONLY: Use free body diagrams to qualitatively describe examples where several forces act on an object and explain how that leads to a single resultant force or no force
11
HT ONLY: Use free body diagrams and accurate vector diagrams to scale, to resolve multiple forces and show magnitude and direction of the resultant
12
HT ONLY: Use vector diagrams to illustrate resolution of forces, equilibrium situations and determine the resultant of two forces, to include both magnitude and direction
13
6.5.2 Work done and energy transfer Describe energy transfers involved when work is done and calculate the work done by recalling and using the equation: [ W = Fs ]
14
Describe what a joule is and state what the joule is derived from
15
Convert between newton-metres and joules.
16
Explain why work done against the frictional forces acting on an object causes a rise in the temperature of the object
17
6.5.3 Forces and elasticity Describe examples of the forces involved in stretching, bending or compressing an object
18
Explain why, to change the shape of an object (by stretching, bending or compressing), more than one force has to be applied – this is limited to stationary objects only
19
Describe the difference between elastic deformation and inelastic deformation caused by stretching forces
20
Describe the extension of an elastic object below the limit of proportionality and calculate it by recalling and applying the equation: [ F = ke ]
21
Explain why a change in the shape of an object only happens when more than one force is applied
22
Describe and interpret data from an investigation to explain possible causes of a linear and non-linear relationship between force and extension
23
Calculate work done in stretching (or compressing) a spring (up to the limit of proportionality) by applying, but not recalling, the equation: [ Ee= ½ke2 ]
24
Required practical 18: investigate the relationship between force and extension for a spring
25
6.5.4 Forces and motion Define distance and displacement and explain why they are scalar or vector quantities
26
Express a displacement in terms of both the magnitude and direction
27
Explain that the speed at which a person can walk, run or cycle depends on a number of factors and recall some typical speeds for walking, running, cycling
28
Make measurements of distance and time and then calculate speeds of objects in calculating average speed for non-uniform motion
29
Explain why the speed of wind and of sound through air varies and calculate speed by recalling and applying the equation: [ s = v t ]
30
Explain the vector–scalar distinction as it applies to displacement, distance, velocity and speed
31
HT ONLY: Explain qualitatively, with examples, that motion in a circle involves constant speed but changing velocity
32
Represent an object moving along a straight line using a distance-time graph, describing its motion and calculating its speed from the graph's gradient
33
Draw distance–time graphs from measurements and extract and interpret lines and slopes of distance–time graphs,
34
Describe an object which is slowing down as having a negative acceleration and estimate the magnitude of everyday accelerations
35
Calculate the average acceleration of an object by recalling and applying the equation: [ a = Δv/t ]
36
Represent motion using velocity–time graphs, finding the acceleration from its gradient and distance travelled from the area underneath
37
HT ONLY: Interpret enclosed areas in velocity–time graphs to determine distance travelled (or displacement)
38
HT ONLY: Measure, when appropriate, the area under a velocity– time graph by counting square
39
Apply, but not recall, the equation: [ v2 – u2 = 2as ]
40
Explain the motion of an object moving with a uniform velocity and identify that forces must be in effect if its velocity is changing, by stating and applying Newton’s First Law
41
Define and apply Newton's second law relating to the acceleration of an object
42
Recall and apply the equation: [ F = ma ]
43
HT ONLY: Describe what inertia is and give a definition
44
Estimate the speed, accelerations and forces of large vehicles involved in everyday road transport
45
Required practical 19: investigate the effect of varying the force on the acceleration of an object of constant mass, and the effect of varying the mass of an object on the acceleration
46
Apply Newton’s Third Law to examples of equilibrium situations
47
Describe factors that can effect a drivers reations time
48
Explain methods used to measure human reaction times and recall typical results
49
Interpret and evaluate measurements from simple methods to measure the different reaction times of students
50
Evaluate the effect of various factors on thinking distance based on given data
51
State typical reaction times and describe how reaction time (and therefore stopping distance) can be affected by different factors
52
Explain methods used to measure human reaction times and take, interpret and evaluate measurements of the reaction times of students
53
Explain how the braking distance of a vehicle can be affected by different factors, including implications for road safety
54
Explain how a braking force applied to the wheel does work to reduce the vehicle's kinetic energy and increases the temperature of the brakes
55
Explain and apply the idea that a greater braking force causes a larger deceleration and explain how this might be dangerous for drivers
56
HT ONLY: Estimate the forces involved in the deceleration of road vehicles
57
6.5.5 Momentum HT ONLY: Calculate momentum by recalling and applying the equation: [ p = mv ]
58
HT ONLY: Explain and apply the idea that, in a closed system, the total momentum before an event is equal to the total momentum after the event
59
HT ONLY: Describe examples of momentum in a collision
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
Loading...
Main menu