BIOMS Seminars
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DateDaySpeakerSpeaker AffiliationTitle/TopicLocationTimeType of Talk Faculty HostHost's DepartmentAbstract
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9/7/17Thursday
Karin Gravare Silbernagel
UD PTresearch summary for tenureAtrium
12:00-1:00
PT
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9/13/17WednesdaySTAR 231
12:30-1:30
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9/20/17WednesdaySTAR 231
12:30-1:30
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9/27/17WednesdayCharalambos ‘’Bobby” C. Charalambous, PhDUD PTExercise Priming and Locomotor Memory: Mechanisms and Clinical ApplicationsSTAR 231
12:30-1:30
Darcy ReismanPTPeople post-stroke can learn a novel locomotor task, but require more practice to do so. Implementing an approach that can enhance locomotor learning may therefore improve post-stroke locomotor recovery. Recent work in healthy adults demonstrated that an acute high-intensity exercise bout before or after an upper-extremity motor skill task may “prime” the nervous system and improve motor learning. Therefore, it has been suggested that this movement-based type of priming could be potentially used to improve motor learning in neurorehabilitation. However, it is unclear whether an acute high-intensity exercise bout, which stroke survivors can feasibly complete in a neurorehabilitation session, would generate comparable results in locomotor learning. This presentation will focus on our recent work investigating the effect of a single bout of high-intensity exercise on locomotor learning in chronic stroke survivors. To quantify exercise-induced changes and locomotor learning gains, we collected neurophysiological and behavioral measures, respectively. Similar to our recent report in healthy adults, results indicated that an acute high-intensity exercise bout coupled with a locomotor adaptation task does not influence retention of what was learned from one session to another in those post-stroke. Together these results suggest that a short high-intensity exercise bout may have different effects on different forms of learning (e.g. motor skill learning vs motor adaptation) or in those with neurologic damage.Brief Bio: Bobby is a post-doctoral researcher under the supervision of Dr. Darcy Reisman in the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Delaware. His research interests focuses on: 1) the neurophysiological, biomechanical, and behavioral mechanisms of the control and learning of human walking, both normal and impaired, and 2) the use of non-invasive brain stimulation as an assessment (single and paired pulse TMS) and modulatory (rTMS and tDCS) tool to probe neural plasticity in neurologically intact and impaired adults. Bobby attended the California State University Northridge as an undergraduate and graduate, majoring in kinesiology with concertation in exercise science and adapted physical activity, respectively, and participating in clinical research through the Center of Achievement. He then received another master’s degree in Biokinesiology from the University of Southern California, using fundamental principles of motor control theories to investigate the decision making of stepping limb use, the motor planning, and execution of goal-directed stepping actions. Bobby received his PhD degree from the Medical University of South Carolina, using neurophysiological and biomechanical approaches to investigate the relationships between the ipsilesional descending drive and task-specific neuromechanics of ankle muscles after stroke. Since his arrival to the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Delaware, his research has mainly focused on the role of behavioral priming in contributing to locomotor learning.
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10/5/17ThursdayRegina Harbourne, FAPTA, PhD & Stacey Dusing, PT, PhD
Duquesne & VCU
How do we know our interventions are carried out as planned? Assuring fidelity in clinical researchSTAR Atrium
12:30-1:30
Michele LoboPT
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10/11/17WednesdayMeg SionsUD PTLow Back Pain in Older Adults: Exploring Trunk Muscle Morphology as a Target for RehabilitationSTAR 231
12:30-1:30
PTAbstract: Prevalence of low back pain, the most common musculoskeletal pain reported in the United States, is increasing among older adults, who experience the greatest back pain-related disability. Yet, among older adults with low back pain, little research has explored modifiable factors that may be addressed to mitigate pain, improve physical function, and minimize resultant disability. Trunk muscle morphological changes, such as reduced size and increased intramuscular fat, which occur with both aging and longstanding, i.e. chronic, low back pain, may be modifiable factors that could be clinical intervention targets. Trunk morphological changes can be evaluated using reliable and valid, age-adapted ultrasound imaging and magnetic resonance imaging protocols. Evidence will be provided that muscle changes occurring with chronic low back pain exceed age-related changes and that greater intramuscular fat is associated with worse self-reported and performance-based physical function in older adults with chronic low back pain. Clinical interventions targeting muscle morphology will be discussed, including exercise-based training and neuromuscular electrical stimulation. Examples of imaging utilization to directly assess muscle when evaluating clinical trials efficacy and to tailor clinical interventions will be presented.Short Bio: Dr. J. Megan Sions, PhD, DPT, PT, received her Masters in Physical Therapy from West Virginia University, her Doctor of Physical Therapy from Temple University, and her PhD from the University of Delaware's Biomechanics and Movement Science interdisciplinary program, where her research training focused on evaluation and treatment of older adults with chronic low back pain. She subsequently completed her post-doctoral training in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) through a joint collaboration between the University of Delaware and Northwestern University. She currently holds a tenure-track Assistant Professor position at the University of Delaware in the Department of Physical Therapy with a secondary faculty appointment in the interdisciplinary Biomechanics and Movement Science program. Her research uses novel imaging approaches to evaluate trunk muscle morphology in patients with chronic health conditions, specifically those with chronic low back pain and lower-limb amputation, with the long-term goal of enhancing clinical outcomes. She is a licensed physical therapist, a board-certified orthopedic specialist, and is on the University of Delaware's MRI steering committee.
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10/18/17WednesdayÚrsula Guillén, MDCCHSParental counseling aids at the limits of viability – what are they and do we need them?
STAR Atrium
12:30-1:30
Michele LoboPTObjectives: 1) Review the barriers in antenatal counseling at the limits of viability. 2) Discuss strategies to improve antenatal counseling at the limits of viability. 3) Discuss our teams’ approach to facilitate communication between physicians and parents facing extreme premature delivery.Úrsula Guillén, MD, is a neonatologist at Christiana Care Health Systems, Newark, DE and Bayhealth Medical Center-Kent General Hospital, Dover, DE; Dr. Guillén is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She completed her residency program at Yale/New Haven Children’s Hospital, New Haven, CT and the neonatal-perinatal fellowship program at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Guillén is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics. She is an expert in parental counseling at the limits of viability.
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10/25/17WednesdayDana Matthews, PT, DPT, MS; Dan White GroupUD PTThe Relation of Cumulative Load to Prevalent Cartilage Damage in the KneeSTAR 232
12:30-1:30
Dan WhitePTCartilage damage, which is a precursor and feature of knee osteoarthritis (OA), has been linked to both obesity and excessive joint loading. However, the combined effect of obesity and repetitive joint loading on knee cartilage remains unclear. The concept of cumulative load can quantitatively estimate this combined effect, using measures of body mass index (BMI) and steps walked per day. Our study examined the relation of cumulative load to prevalent cartilage damage in the tibiofemoral (TF) and patellofemoral (PF) joints in a cohort of older adults with or at high risk of knee OA. This may provide additional insights into the risk for cartilage pathology in OA.
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11/1/17WednesdayKlayton Galante SousaZika Virus Outbreak in Brazil: Consequences and RehabilitationSTAR 231
12:30-1:30
Michele LoboPTIn this talk, Dr. Sousa will discuss his work with children born after maternal Zika infection in a region of Brazil with a high incidence of related microcephaly. Dr. Sousa is a physical therapist working at the Federal University of Rio Grande Do Nort, currently visiting at UD as a Fulbright Scholar.
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11/10/17FridayJonathan Wolpaw, MDNY State Department of HealthCNS Plasticity: Basic Science to Clinical Therapy
STAR Atrium
1:00-2:30 PM
Jeremy Crenshaw
KAAP, maybe CHS distinguished speakerOne of the most important neuroscience advances of the past half-­century has been the recognition that the CNS changes throughout life, that activity-­dependent plasticity occurs continually everywhere in the CNS. This ubiquitous plasticity complicates the problem of how the CNS performs its principal function – the acquisition and maintenance of behaviors that serve the needs of the individual. At the same time, it introduces new therapeutic possibilities. Over the past 40 years, we have used operant conditioning of the spinal stretch reflex or its electrical analog, the H-­reflex, to explore the CNS substrate of a simple motor behavior. Animal and human studies show that a larger (up-­conditioned) or smaller (down-­conditioned) H-­reflex rests on a complex hierarchy of brain and spinal cord plasticity;; the plasticity in the brain creates and maintains the plasticity in the spinal cord. Because the spinal cord is the final common pathway for all motor behaviors, H-­reflex conditioning affects other behaviors such as locomotion. The ongoing interactions among the many behaviors that share the spinal cord lead to a new model of spinal cord function. According to this model, these interactions maintain spinal neurons and synapses in a state of “negotiated equilibrium,” a balance that ensures the satisfactory performance of all the behaviors in the individual’s current repertoire. When motor function is impaired by spinal cord injury or another disorder, the acquisition of an appropriately selected new motor behavior, such as a smaller H-­reflex, can target beneficial plasticity to a key site in the spinal cord. By modifying the ongoing interactions among behaviors, this focused plasticity can trigger wider beneficial plasticity that markedly improves impaired behaviors such as locomotion. In this way, “targeted-­plasticity” therapies may complement standard less specific rehabilitation methods and enhance functional recovery.Biography: Dr. Wolpaw is a board-certified neurologist who has spent the past 40 years exploring and modulating spinal cord plasticity and its functional correlates in animals and more recently in humans. He earned his M.D. at Case Western Reserve University in 1970 and did postdoctoral training at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He has been at the Wadsworth Center since 1980. His lab originated and validated the basic protocol for operant conditioning of spinal proprioceptive reflexes. His group has conducted extensive physiological and anatomical studies in primates and rats revealing the complex plasticity in spinal cord and brain associated with reflex conditioning and with other interventions. In recent years, his group has focused on the functional impact of spinal cord plasticity in health and disease, and has shown that appropriate reflex conditioning can improve walking in rats with incomplete spinal cord injuries. In collaboration with clinical researchers, they have shown that reflex conditioning can also improve walking in people with spinal cord injuries. In addition, over the past 30 years, he has been deeply involved in brain-computer interface (BCI) research and its clinical applications. His Wadsworth BCI group first demonstrated the usefulness of EEG sensorimotor rhythms for BCIbased communication and control, and extended this to multi-dimensional movement control. He also led the first clinical trial of BCI technology for home use by people with severe disabilities. Furthermore, his group developed BCI2000, a general-purpose BCI software platform, and has provided it to more than 1200 research groups throughout the world. Members of his group contributed substantially to the first comprehensive BCI textbook (Wolpaw & Wolpaw 2012). Most recently, he served as the first president of the new BCI Society. The Wadsworth spinal cord plasticity and BCI groups have been consistently supported by grants from the NIH, other Federal agencies, and private foundations; and they have received a number of national and international awards.
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11/15/17WednesdayRandall Duncan
UD Biological Sciences
Ion channel regulation of skeletal development and onset of osteoarthritisSTAR 231
12:30-1:30
BISC
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11/22/17NO CLASSES
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11/29/17WednesdayHendrik Reimann, PhD, post doc with John Jeka CANCELLED DUE TO GRAD STUDENT RALLY - TO BE RESCHEDULED FOR SPRING SEMESTERUD KAAPControl of balance during walkingSTAR 231
12:30-1:30
John JekaThe upright human body is mechanically unstable. Yet we manage to move it around seemingly without effort. How does the brain solve this difficult control problem? While balance control has been studied extensively in standing, much less is known about walking. The biomechanics of the walking body allow different mechanisms to affect balance at different phases in the gait cycle in response to a perturbation, such as modulating the location of the next foot placement or lateral roll of the stance foot during single stance. In our research, we probe how the CNS uses these different mechanisms for balance control. We use different sensory perturbations to induce the sensation of falling in walking human subjects and observe how the motor patterns change in response to these perceived falls. In two recent studies, we used these techniques to study how the brain coordinates the available mechanisms to control lateral balance during walking. Our data also showed evidence indicating additional, previously unstudied mechanisms for balance control.
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12/6/17WednesdayJim RichardsUD KAAPSingle Subject Data Analysis using Simulation Modeling AnalysisSTAR 231
12:30-1:30
methodsKAAPAn overview of single-subject research design and statistical analysis of data using simulation modeling analysis. Reference paper: Jeffrey J. Borckardt & Michael R. Nash (2014) Simulation modelling analysis for small sets of single-subject data collected over time, Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 24:3-4, 492-506, DOI: 10.1080/09602011.2014.895390
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