BIOMS Seminars
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DateDaySpeakerSpeaker AffiliationTitle/TopicLocationTimeType of Talk Faculty HostHost's DepartmentAbstract
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9/7/17Thursday
Karin Gravare Silbernagel
UD PTresearch summary for tenureAtrium
12:00-1:00
PT
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9/13/17WednesdaySTAR 231
12:30-1:30
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9/20/17WednesdaySTAR 231
12:30-1:30
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9/27/17WednesdayCharalambos ‘’Bobby” C. Charalambous, PhDUD PTExercise Priming and Locomotor Memory: Mechanisms and Clinical ApplicationsSTAR 231
12:30-1:30
Darcy ReismanPTPeople post-stroke can learn a novel locomotor task, but require more practice to do so. Implementing an approach that can enhance locomotor learning may therefore improve post-stroke locomotor recovery. Recent work in healthy adults demonstrated that an acute high-intensity exercise bout before or after an upper-extremity motor skill task may “prime” the nervous system and improve motor learning. Therefore, it has been suggested that this movement-based type of priming could be potentially used to improve motor learning in neurorehabilitation. However, it is unclear whether an acute high-intensity exercise bout, which stroke survivors can feasibly complete in a neurorehabilitation session, would generate comparable results in locomotor learning. This presentation will focus on our recent work investigating the effect of a single bout of high-intensity exercise on locomotor learning in chronic stroke survivors. To quantify exercise-induced changes and locomotor learning gains, we collected neurophysiological and behavioral measures, respectively. Similar to our recent report in healthy adults, results indicated that an acute high-intensity exercise bout coupled with a locomotor adaptation task does not influence retention of what was learned from one session to another in those post-stroke. Together these results suggest that a short high-intensity exercise bout may have different effects on different forms of learning (e.g. motor skill learning vs motor adaptation) or in those with neurologic damage.Brief Bio: Bobby is a post-doctoral researcher under the supervision of Dr. Darcy Reisman in the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Delaware. His research interests focuses on: 1) the neurophysiological, biomechanical, and behavioral mechanisms of the control and learning of human walking, both normal and impaired, and 2) the use of non-invasive brain stimulation as an assessment (single and paired pulse TMS) and modulatory (rTMS and tDCS) tool to probe neural plasticity in neurologically intact and impaired adults. Bobby attended the California State University Northridge as an undergraduate and graduate, majoring in kinesiology with concertation in exercise science and adapted physical activity, respectively, and participating in clinical research through the Center of Achievement. He then received another master’s degree in Biokinesiology from the University of Southern California, using fundamental principles of motor control theories to investigate the decision making of stepping limb use, the motor planning, and execution of goal-directed stepping actions. Bobby received his PhD degree from the Medical University of South Carolina, using neurophysiological and biomechanical approaches to investigate the relationships between the ipsilesional descending drive and task-specific neuromechanics of ankle muscles after stroke. Since his arrival to the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Delaware, his research has mainly focused on the role of behavioral priming in contributing to locomotor learning.
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10/5/17ThursdayRegina Harbourne, FAPTA, PhD & Stacey Dusing, PT, PhD
Duquesne & VCU
Assuring & Measuring Fidelity in Clinical ResearchSTAR Atrium
12:30-1:30
Michele LoboPT
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10/11/17WednesdayMeg SionsUD PTUsing Imaging to Evaluate Muscle to Enhance Rehabilitative OutcomesSTAR 231
12:30-1:30
PT
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10/18/17WednesdayÚrsula Guillén, MDCCHSParental counseling aids at the limits of viability – what are they and do we need them?
STAR Atrium
12:30-1:30
Michele LoboPTObjectives: 1) Review the barriers in antenatal counseling at the limits of viability. 2) Discuss strategies to improve antenatal counseling at the limits of viability. 3) Discuss our teams’ approach to facilitate communication between physicians and parents facing extreme premature delivery.Úrsula Guillén, MD, is a neonatologist at Christiana Care Health Systems, Newark, DE and Bayhealth Medical Center-Kent General Hospital, Dover, DE; Dr. Guillén is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She completed her residency program at Yale/New Haven Children’s Hospital, New Haven, CT and the neonatal-perinatal fellowship program at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Guillén is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics. She is an expert in parental counseling at the limits of viability.
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10/25/17WednesdayDan White GroupUD PT
abstract presentations
STAR 231
12:30-1:30
Dan WhitePT
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11/1/17WednesdaySTAR 231
12:30-1:30
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11/10/17FridayJonathan Wolpaw, MDNY State Department of HealthAtrium
10:00-11:00
Jeremy Crenshaw
KAAP, maybe CHS distinguished speaker
Director of the National Center for Adaptive Neurotechnologies, Professor, School of Public Health, NY State Department of Health, Wadsworth Center
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11/15/17WednesdayRandall Duncan
UD Biological Sciences
Ion channel regulation of skeletal development and onset of osteoarthritisSTAR 231
12:30-1:30
BISC
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11/22/17WednesdayKlayton GalanteSTAR 231
12:30-1:30
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11/29/17WednesdayHendrik Reimann, PhD, post doc with John JekaUD KAAPSTAR 231
12:30-1:30
John Jeka
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12/6/17WednesdayJim RichardsUD KAAPSingle Subject Data Analysis using Simulation Modeling AnalysisSTAR 231
12:30-1:30
methodsKAAPAn overview of single-subject research design and statistical analysis of data using simulation modeling analysis. Reference paper: Jeffrey J. Borckardt & Michael R. Nash (2014) Simulation modelling analysis for small sets of single-subject data collected over time, Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 24:3-4, 492-506, DOI: 10.1080/09602011.2014.895390
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