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NameContactContact2Contact3"Hi Dan"?Omits Resume?No attachments?Q1 widget mindshareQ2 widget disintermediationQ3 widget disruptorsQ4 widget equity-invested paradigms?Concise?Asked Questions?AvailabilityNotes1Notes2
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Jessica McJobbersteinjm@email.yup523-232-4343321 Any St
Anyberg, US
90210
YesYesNo2 yrs experience1 yr.17 of them?!? Wow. So disrupty.Familiar withNot really. But friendly.Yes. So many.20/wkTouched on seamless supply chain widget disintermediation. The only one to do so.
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Johnny Middlerjm2@etc.etcN/AN/AYesYesYesHas a widget mindshare blog. Excellent stuff.Touches on in blog, also 2yrs exp93 yrs experienceFor the most part.Nope.Full - but lives in Tuvalu time zone
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Froderich Freunderff@ff.ff487-867-5309N/ANoNoNo4 yrs exp4 yrsOny two.Familiar withVery.Yes. Some good.FullHis website flux capacitor is overclocked to 11.Seems a bit mechanical vis-a-vis communication
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Fran Fiddlerffff@ffffff.comN/AN/AYesNoNoMinored in it, but no work expDisintermediates all the widgets in the yard5N/AToo much so.Yes. Some good.15/wkFran forgot to put her last name in the email. It was part of the message headers, though.Maybe no WEIP experience??
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Alrighty then. What is this chart? It's a quick, basic demo of the hiring optimization system described in this blog post. Your chart would likely include more candidates, and other, different, real criteria in some of the columns.

In this hypothetical example, we couldn't use any single knockout criteria because any one would've eliminated far too many or too few job-seekers. So, we’ve whittled out all candidates who failed all three of these knockout tests: Column C: No secondary contact info. Column E: Didn’t greet the person they’re contacting. Column F: Included a resume when we told them not to. ...As long as they did at least one of those correctly, they’re still in the hunt. You’ll want to adjust your knockout criteria to get your candidate pool down to a manageable size, whatever that means for you.

Questions? Hit up the comments of the blog post. Thanks for reading.
GreenDenotes good stuff
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WhiteThis is fine.
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OrangeDefinitely not good.
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RedThis is bad.
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YellowIs this good? Bad? Maybe neither. It's perhaps noteworthy. Yellow means alert. Not necessarily on the good/bad scale.
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Before color-coding, I always ask if any sheet stakeholders are unable to discern between colors like red/green, and adjust the color theme accordingly. But I like red/green for its obvious skeuomorphic-stoplight value when color blindness doesn't prohibit its use.
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If it were down to these four candidates, and I had to offer job to somebody without more extensive interviews for some time-crunchy reason, I'd probably offer the spot to Jessica first. Fran last.
They're already in order. How? Why? Count the Greens first. Then count the reds. Then the rest. But really, you'd do this to choose who to interview more, not to choose who got the job. Right?
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