Cooloola Research Bibliography
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Research PublicationsAbstract
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Chang, Jie Christine, Woodward, Craig and Shulmeister, James (2017)Reconstructing terrestrial temperatures in the Australian sub-tropics and tropics: a chironomid based transfer function approach. Quaternary International, 449 136-148. doi:10.1016/j.quaint.2016.11.006
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da Silva, Graziela Miot and Shulmeister, James (2016)A review of coastal dunefield evolution in Southeastern Queensland. Journal of Coastal Research, 1 Special Issue No. 75: 308-312. doi:10.2112/SI75-062.1
The Southern Queensland subtropical coastline represents a major depositional system containing 3 of the largest sand islands in the world. The surface of these sand masses comprises foredune ridges and predominantly large transgressive dunefields, deposited episodically during the Quaternary. The chronological sequence of these dunefield phases, however, is still poorly understood. This paper summarizes the information available regarding dunefield transgression events on the southern coast of Queensland and indicates that both marine and climate effects are important controlling factors for dunefield evolution but that an understanding of the relative thresholds of each factor as the main trigger of dune emplacement phases remains a challenge .
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Ellerton, Daniel, Rittenour, Tammy, Miot da Silva, Graziela, Gontz, Allen, Shulmeister, James, Hesp, Patrick, Santini, Talitha C. and Welsh, Kevin J.(2018)Late-Holocene cliff-top blowout activation and evolution in the Cooloola Sand Mass, south-east Queensland, Australia. Holocene, 28 11: 1697-1711. doi:10.1177/0959683618788679
Cliff-top dunes are a locally important geomorphic features of sedimentary coasts. They are traditionally interpreted as being sourced by (or with) sand derived from the beach below the cliff. This paper presents the results of a stratigraphic and geochronological study of Carlo Sand Blow, a coastal blowout that has developed on top of a high sandy cliff in the Cooloola Sand Mass, south-east Queensland. We use a combination of sedimentological, pedological and geophysical techniques along with optically stimulated luminescence dating to determine the depositional history and evolution of the blowout. We demonstrate that the blowout is dominantly nourished by sand eroded from its floor rather than the adjacent beach. The original dune surface dates to the first half of the last glacial period (c. 40–70 ka) and this dune was deflated in the late-Holocene. Dune activity is directly associated with cliff undercutting because of coastal retreat in the late-Holocene, but coastal erosion on its own is not capable of maintaining aeolian activity. Blowout activity occurred between 2.6 and 2.3 ka and again at 0.3 ka with aeolian sand burying palaeosols. Both soil surfaces contained charcoal and tree stumps in growth position and our study suggests that fire is the immediate trigger for blowout reactivation. It is likely that these fires were anthropogenic in origin, because the site is somewhat protected from natural fire and the ages coincide with intensification of human use of coastal sites in the area.
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Gontz, Allen M., McCallum, Adrian B., Moss, Patrick T. and Shulmeister, James (2016)Ground Penetrating Radar Observations of Present and Former Coastal Environments, Great Sandy National Park, Queensland, Australia – Focus on Moon Point, Fraser Island. Journal of Coastal Research, 1 Special Issue No. 75: 730-734. doi:10.2112/SI75-147.1
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McSweeney, Sarah and Shulmeister, James (2018)Variations in wave climate as a driver of decadal scale shoreline change at the Inskip Peninsula, southeast Queensland, Australia. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 209 56-69. doi:10.1016/j.ecss.2018.04.034
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Other Publications
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Seymore, John. The Dunes of Cooloola. (1981) ECOS Magazine. CSIRO. 30:pp3-11.
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