Nectar Sources of North America - 2018 Local Sightings for Centre County and Surrounding areas
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1
Plant typeNonscientific nameScientific nameBegin Bloom MonthEnd Bloom Month
Locally Sited (Date/Location)
Monofloral honeyAvailability
Source for honey bees / pounds of honey per acre
2
TMapleAcer24noferalmajor but temperature usually too cold
3
TRed Maple[2]Acer rubrum24noferal
major but temperature usually too cold for bees to fly
4
TWillowSalix24no
feral, ornamental
major but outside temperatures are usually too cold for bees to fly. 100–150 pounds honey per acre; 1,500 pounds pollen
5
TAmerican ElmUlmus americana24noferalminor
6
TCrab Apple
Malus sylvestris; Malus coronaria[3]
36noornamentalminor
7
TPussy WillowSalix discolor34no
feral, ornamental
major but temperature usually too cold for bees to fly
8
TOhio Buckeye[3]Aesculus glabra45noferalminor
9
SShadbushAmelanchier arborea45noferalminor
10
SCommon HackberryCeltis occidentalis45noferalminor
11
SHawthornCrataegus45noferalminor – 50–100 pounds/acre
12
SAmerican HollyIlex opaca46noferalminor, important in southeastern US
13
TApple[4]Malus domestica45
No, the nectar is mostly used for spring brood raising and not stored for surplus. see Monofloral honey[5]
cultivatedminor
14
TCherry[3][4]Prunus cerasus45no
feral, cultivated
minor
15
TPearPyrus communis45nocultivatedminor
16
TBlack CherryPrunus serotina45no
feral, cultivated
minor
17
TPlumPrunus45no
feral, cultivated
minor
18
TRedbudCercis44State College - early Mayno
cultivated, ornamental
minor
19
SRed Chokeberry
Aronia arbutifolia, Photinia pyrifolia
56noferalminor
20
SBlack Chokeberry[4]Aronia melanocarpa56noferalminor
21
THoney LocustGleditsia triancanthos56noferalminor
22
TTulip-tree[6], PoplarLiriodendron tulipifera56
yes, see Monofloral honey
feralmajor in southern Appalachians and Piedmont
23
SCommon BuckthornRhamnus cathartica56noferalminor
24
TBlack locust[4][5]Robinia pseudoacacia56Lewistown - end of May
yes, see Monofloral honey
feral
major – 800–1200 pounds/; short bloom period of about 10 days
25
SRaspberryRubus56
yes, see Monofloral honey
feral, cultivated
major in some areas
26
SBlackberryRubus spp.56
yes, see Monofloral honey[3]
feral, cultivated
major in some areas[4]
27
SBlueberry
Vaccinium corymbosum, Vaccinium angustifolium, Vaccinium pennsylvanicum
56
no. Honey amber and of good flavor.
cultivated
minor in most areas. Strong colonies may store 50–90 pounds of surplus from it.[3]
28
SBlack haw[4]Viburnum prunifolium56
29
T
Catalpa, Indian Bean[3][4][5]
Catalpa speciosa67no
feral, ornamental
minor
30
SHoneysuckle[3]Diervilla lonicera68minor
31
TSumac[3]Rhus glabra67
mixed with other honeys
feralmajor
32
TBasswood[4][5]Tilia americana, Tilia cordata67
yes, short flow up to 14 days; Honey white; aromatic[3] see Monofloral honey
feral, ornamental Produces a high volume of honey on a cycle of every five to eight years, with lower volume of nectar other years[citation needed]
major – 800–1,100 pounds honey
33
S, TDevils-walkingstickAralia spinosa78noferalminor
34
SButtonbush[3]Cephalanthus occidentalis78
Honey is light in color and mild in flavor.
feral
35
TBee bee treeTetradium79ornamentalmajor
36
Flowers, Crops, Herbs and Grasses[edit]
37
Nectar Production
38
minor (1858-2787kg/ha)[7]
39
minor
40
minor
41
minor
42
minor
43
major – 120–250 pounds honey, depending on soil and if good fertilization Asclepias syriaca has the highest honey yield.
44
minor
45
minor
46
minor
47
major[4]
48
minor, but can be major on cultivated area 200 pounds honey per acre; 60–160 pounds pollen
49
minor
50
major
51
minor
52
53
minor
54
major
55
56
minor
57
minor
58
minor
59
minor
60
minor
61
minor
62
minor
63
64
major – 300–1,000 pounds honey/acredepending on soil. 500–2000 lbs of dark blue pollen.
65
major
66
major
67
100–200 pounds honey
68
minor
69
minor
70
minor; Strong hives can collect up to 100 pounds.[3]
71
major
72
minor – 30–100 pounds/acre
73
minor
74
minor but valuable due to earliness/frost hardiness
75
minor
76
minor
77
major up to 200 pounds per hive
78
major up to 200 pounds per hive
79
major
80
major – up to 500 pounds per acre in a good year[3]
81
150–250 pounds honey per acre; 50–120 pounds pollen
82
83
minor
84
minor
85
minor – 20–30 pounds/acre
86
minor
87
180–1,500 pounds honey per acre, depending on soil quality and depth; 300–1000 pounds of pollen.[8]
88
[9]
89
major
90
minor
91
minor
92
minor
93
minor
94
minor
95
96
major
97
minor
98
minor
99
major
100
minor
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