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PHY 2030 Evidences (up through Q10)
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Fall 2016
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Warning: currently being edited to reflect textbook updates from 2nd to 3rd edition
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Active?ChapterNameStandard / EvidenceProblems
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YESL A BLApparatusI can use a lab apparatus with appropriate technique to make measurements accurately and precisely.
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YESLReportI can write a lab report in LaTeX in a style consistent with a journal article that describes the experiment, measurements, and conclusions.
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YESLJournalI can review a journal article and write a summary of the article that describes the experimental setup, analysis, and conclusions.
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YESLFermiI can solve mathematical problems (e.g., "Fermi" problems) in my head and on paper without the use of a calculator (to within an order of magnitude of the correct answer).
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YESR E L A T I V I T YR1RelI can state the Principle of Relativity and can apply it to non-relativistic motion
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YESRel.1I can design a test for whether a reference frame is inertial or not and can identify inertial reference frames.
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YESRel.2I can state the Principle of Relativity.
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YESRel.3I can derive the Galilean transformation equations for position and velocity and can use them to make predictions of what an observer in a particular inertial reference frame would measure.
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YESRel.4I can describe how clocks are synchronized in Newtonian Relativity and what measurements observers in inertial reference frames will agree on.
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YESR1,R2SRI can provide evidence for Special Relativity and can apply SR to relativistic motion
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YESSR.1I can explain the "problem with electromagnetic waves" and the experiment(s) that showed the non-existence of the ether.
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YESSR.2I can describe how clocks are synchronized in Special Relativity.
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YESSR.3I can convert between SI units and SR units.
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YESSR.4I can sketch and interpret worldlines on a spacetime diagram.
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YESR2, R3, R4TimeI can measure or calculate position, coordinate time, proper time, and spacetime interval, and I know what quantities are invariant.
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YESTime.1I can define coordinate time, proper time, and spacetime interval and can describe how each quantity is measured. I can use a geometric analogy with spacial coordinates to describe each quantity, thus comparing plane geometry and spacetime geometry.
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YESTime.2I can explain why events that are simultaneous in one inertial frame are not simultaneous in another frame.
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YESTime.3Use the metric equation to calculate spacetime interval.
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YESTime.4I can explain the Twin Paradox using a spacetime diagram and a calculation of spacetime interval for each twin.
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YESTime.5I can calculate the number of muons remaining after x number of half-lives, and I can explain, using the metric equation, why fewer muons decay than is predicted by classical physics.
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YESTime.6I can calculate the proper time along a curved worldline traversed by an inertial clock moving at constant speed.
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YESTime.7I can derive and use the bionomial approximation.
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YESTime.8I can describe and give examples to explain the relationship between coordinate time, spacetime interval, and proper time.
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YESR5LTI can calculate (and compare) spacetime coordinates of an event for observers in different inertial frames.
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YESLT.1I can draw a two-observer diagram, with correctly sloped t' and x' axes and correctly calibrated scales, and can plot and read the spacetime coordinates of events.
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YESLT.2I can use a two-observer diagram to transform coordinates of an event from one frame to another frame and can use the two-observer diagram to solve problems and make predictions.
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YESLT.3I can use the Lorentz Transformation Equations (and Inverse Lorentz Transformation Equations)
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YESR6LCI can calculate (and compare) length measurements for observers in different inertial frames.
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YESLC.1I can state an operational definition for the length of an object.
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YESLC.2I can use a two-observer diagram to determine the length of an object as measured in an Other frame.
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YESLC.3I can calculate the Lorentz contraction of an object
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YESR7VI can calculate (and compare) velocity measurements for observers in different inertial frames.
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YESV.1I can use the Einstein velocity transformation equations to calculate the velocity of an object measured by an observer in an Other frame (or alternatively, the Home frame).
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YESR7CausalityI can determine whether two events are causally related.
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YESCausality.1I can determine whether the interval between events is timelike, lightlike, or spacelike and can describe how each interval is measured.
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YESCausality.2I can determine whether two events are causally related.
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YESCausality.3I understand The Cosmic Speed Limit and that it results from Causality being consistent with the Principle of Relativity
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YESR8, R94MomI can calculate mass, momentum, energy, and 4-momentum for a particle, and I know which quantities are invariant and which quantities are conserved.
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YESR9ConsI can apply conservation of 4-momentum to a system.
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YESQ U A N T U M - M E C H A N I C SQ1, Q2WSI can describe the modes of a standing wave (whether transverse or longitudinal) whether it is fixed at both ends or free and fixed at each end.
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YESWS.1I can derive equations Q1.12a and Q1.12b.
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YESWS.2I can state the superposition principle and can add waves graphically and algebraically.
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YESWS.3I can describe the shape of a reflected wave at an interface between two media or at a boundary with a fixed or free end.
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YESWS.4I can derive equation Q1.9 and can use it to describe the motion of various pieces of the medium for a standing wave.
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YESWS.5I can identify the boundary conditions and can calculate the frequency of the normal modes of a standing wave.
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YESQ3WII can use path difference to predict the interference of two sources of waves at a location.
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YESWI.1I can calculate the path difference at a given location from two sources and can predict whether it will result in total constructive interference or total destructive interference or something in between.
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YESWI.2I can calculate the locations of bright fringes in a double-slit experiment, and I can describe how fringe spacing depends on wavelength and slit spacing.
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YESWI.3I can calculate the locations of dark fringes in a single-slit experiment.
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YESWI.4I can use the Rayleigh Criterion to describe whether two point sources can be resolved.
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YESWI.5I can use a single-slit interference apparatus to determine the wavelength of a light source, including uncertainty.
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YESQ4,Q5WPI can provide evidence for wave-particle duality and can apply a particle model or a wave model to a quanton, depending on the experiment.
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YESWP.1I can describe the photoelectric effect experiment and can use the photon model for light to explain the results, explain and interpret a graph of maximum kinetic energy vs. frequency, and make predictions.
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YESWP.2I can use a photoelectric effect apparatus to conduct an experiment to measure Planck's constant and the work function of the metal.
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YESWP.3I can calculate the energy of a photon and relate energy to frequency (or wavelength) of light.
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YESWP.4I can relate the number of photons per second incident on a surface and intensity of light for a given power of a light source. I also understand the difference between a point source of light and a beam of light in terms of how its intensity varies with distance.
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YESWP.5I can compute the deBroglie wavelength of a particle.
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YESWP.6I can apply conservation of energy to a charged particle traveling between two charged plates to compute the particle's deBroglie wavelength.
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YESWP.7I can interpret results of the double-slit experiment for particles by treating them as waves.
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YESWP.8I can compute the angles for constructive interference in the Davisson-Germer experiment.
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YESQAMQI can use the mathematics needed to describe the state of a quanton, including complex algebra, the inner product of two complex vectors, probability, and normalization.
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YESMQ.1I can do complex algebra.
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YESMQ.2I can compute the intensity required to have a single photon traverse a given distance with a certain probability that there will only be one photon (at any instant) within the given range.
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YESMQ.3I can find the inner product of two complex vectors.
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YESMQ.4I can normalize a complex vector.
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YESQ6, Q7,Q9QrulesI can recite and apply the "rules of the game" of quantum mechanics.
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YESQrules.1I can look at a series of Stern-Gerlach devices and can predict the probability of an electron being aligned or anti-aligned with a given axis (x, y, z, theta) based on observations of various SG experiments. (Note: this involves understanding how making a measurement affects the electron's state and how recombining electrons of different spins affects the probability of a measurement.)
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YESQrules.2I can write each of the "rules of the game" of quantum mechanics.
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YESQrules.3I can apply the Outcome Probability rule to the spin of an electron.
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YESQrules.4I can apply the Superposition rule to the spin of an electron.
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YESQrules.5I can apply the Time-Evolution rule to the spin of an electron.
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YESQrules.6Given a wavefunction, I can calculate the probability of measuring the position of an electron within a given range Delta x.
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YESQrules.7Given a graph of a wavefunction, I can calculate the probability of measuring the position of an electron within a given range Delta x.
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YESQrules.8I can calculate a normalization constant so that a wavefunction is normalized.
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YESQrules.9I can identify whether a wavefunction is valid.
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YESQ10, Q11QenergyI can derive energy eigenvalues for various systems and can relate energy eigenvalues to a spectrum of photons emitted or absorbed.
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YESQenergy.1I can derive the energy eigenvalues for a particle in a box and can sketch an energy diagram showing the eigenvalues.
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YESQenergy.2I can derive the energy eigenvalues for an electron in a hydrogen atom using the Bohr model.
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YESQenergy.3I can derive energy eigenvalues for other hydrogen-like systems.
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YESQenergy.4I can use Conservation of Energy to calculate the wavelength (and energy) of a photon emitted or absorbed by a particle in a box.
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YESQenergy.5I can sketch a spectrum diagram that shows the photon energies associated with certain transitions for a particle in a box.
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YESQenergy.6I can use Conservation of Energy to calculate the wavelength (and energy) of a photon emitted or absorbed by a quantum oscillator.
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YESQenergy.7I can derive the energy eigenvalues and the energies of photos emitted and absorbed for a single-electron atom.
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YESQ12TISEDerI can derive the time-independent Schroedinger Equation (TISE)
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YESNot in bookTISEI can demonstrate that a given wavefunction is consistent with the TISE, and I can solve the TISE for very simple potential functions.
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Q12QpsiI can determine whether a wavefunction satisifes the Schroedinger equation. I can write a VPython program to calculate Psi numerically for a given value of E and graph Psi(x). I can use this program to find the energy eigenvalues of a system.
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Qpsi.1I can find the energy eigenvalues for a hydrogen atom.
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Qpsi.2I can find the energy eigenvalues for a harmonic oscillator.
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Qpsi.3I can find the energy eigenvalues for a quanton in a well.
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N U C L E A RQ12, Q13NucleiI can use simple principles to estimate the sizes of nuclei and calculate their binding energies.
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Q13, Q14DecayI can describe the main types of radioactive decay and calculate decay rates.
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A S T R OH1GRI can state the the Principle of Equivalence and can use it to make predictions concerning the behavior of light and other objects in gravitational wells. I can derive the Schwarzschild radius of an object from first principles. I can calculate the gravitational redshift and time dilation expected for objects in gravitational wells.handouts in class
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H2DMI can derive equations for the rotation curves of simple galaxies and justify the existence of dark matter using observations from the literature.handouts in class
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H3COSI understand Hubble's law and can derive the critical density of the universe using simple Newtonian assumptions. I can discuss how the true density compares to this value and what this implies concerning the structure and future of our universe. handouts in class
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H4DEI can use arguments from first principles and observations in the literature to justify the existence of dark energy.
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