WCC Score
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
$
%
123
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
BCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTU
1
Caterogry : GeneralCaterogry : GeneralCaterogry : GeneralCaterogry : Te TiritiCaterogry : Te TiritiCaterogry : Just TransitionCaterogry : Just TransitionCaterogry : AdvocacyCaterogry : AdvocacyCaterogry : AdvocacyCaterogry : GrowthCaterogry : GrowthCaterogry : GrowthCaterogry : TransportCaterogry : TransportCaterogry : TransportCaterogry : TransportCaterogry : Agriculture
2
diane calvertQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestionQuestion
3
Can you please provide your nameWhat ward are you running for?Do you think urgent action needs to be taken locally and nationally to reduce carbon emissions over the next 12 years? Please provide detail in your response. What types of actions will you support Council taking, to implement the Climate Change Emergency Declaration?What does Council need to do over the next 5 years to improve how the city adapts to climate change?What actions will you take to ensure that Council upholds its obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi?What actions will you take to ensure that Council forms an effective partnership with Iwi, Hapu and Māori ?Please describe what you believe a Just Transition is for Wellington?What steps will you take to support engagement with pacifica, youth, and marginalized groups over the Council's response to climate change?How will you work with other councils on climate change, both in the region and across Aotearoa?What policy changes will you ask the Government to make, in order to address climate mitigation and adaptation challenges?What opportunities will you encourage non-governmental organisations and businesses to take, to reduce their own organisational emissions and support those they work with to do so as well?When making decisions on Wellington’s future growth, to what extent will you consider climate change adaptation and mitigation when making decisions?What will you do to promote better integrated land use and transport planning in Wellington?What role do you see 'urban development' playing in a transition to a zero carbon Wellington? Please outline any specific policies or principles you will support, to enable low carbon urban development.Can you briefly describe what your transport policies and priorities are? How has climate change been factored into them? How will you work with GWRC now, and in the future, to ensure an effective public transport system is delivered to people in Wellington? What actions will you take to support and promote active and public transport?What are your views on the current Lets Get Wellington Moving programme? What projects do you support and not support? What changes will you advocate for?What role do you see Council taking, to reduce emissions from the agriculture sector?
4
Sarah FreeMotukairangi/Eastern WardYes, this is a hugely significant issue facing us nationally and internationally. We have only a decade to turn this around. Transport (air and land) are over half our emissions, we need to move rapidly to electric, affordable, reliable and convenient bus services city wide and continue to build safe connected cycleways and walkways. The other big factor is waste, so we need to reduce, reuse and recycle and aim for zero waste to landfill.We need to be part of a better model for delivering Public Transport, accelerate the delivery of our cycle network, and get to grips with reducing waste because the current landfill will be full in 4 years!Continue to make current partnership with iwi more meaningful, install Kaitiakitanga principles for waterways, ocean and reservesRenew the MOU with iwi each triennium to ensure a genuine partnership, encourage Maori representation around the Council table, become a city where Te Reo and Tikititanga are part of the fabric of everyday life Climate change is a justice issue- those with fewer resources will be disproportionately impacted. Those with power need to ensure there is action so we have a livable planet for the future. Just transition means a basic level of public transport, water and public services are really affordable or even free and that taxation and rates are progressive to even the playing field. There is already a Pacific Advisory Group, Youth Council and Multicultural Group, but Council can do more to ensure their voices are heard. The Council table should be more diverse than it currently is. Through regional committees such as the Regional Transport Committee, Regional Strategy and Regional Waste management and Minimisation, Regional waste Forum;- these committees need to be fit-fo -purpose and ambitious for real change.Review public transport funding and delivery, enhance product stewardship regulation to drive down waste, tighter building standards for new build with sustainability measures and "universal design", develop levers to discourage large houses, land and property bankingAlways good for organisations to consider having an energy audit and waste audit and to consider promoting the use of electric vehicles, bikes and e-bikes and e-scooters . Making buildings "greener" and more sustainable is a higher cost but valuable option too. Our recent "Planning for Growth" engagement specifically asked our communites to conside these things as we look at updating our district plan.There is a frustrating gap in our ability to do this more effectively, which is why we probably need better funding, planning and governance models to do this in a more joined-up wayUrban development is incredibly important. Building a city with reasonably dense compact form will mean much more efficient use of resources, and much lower overall per capita emissions. We've always been a walking city and we still need to do more in that space. My big thing up to now however, has building a network of separated cycleways for the city- I came onto Council six years ago with a determination to see that happen, and it is happening, with a hugely increased budget, thanks to government support. There have been ups and downs but its getting easier. The new big thing is getting the step change in public transport we need.I'm still sad about the loss of the trolleys, but we need to move to the next phase of electric, hopefully light rail. Over the last three years, I have consistently advocated to GWRC for more affordable fares and better bus services. As people know, its been a bit of a mixed bag for Wellington buses, but our two Councils are now working very closely to try to resolve immediate issues with the buses, including better bus priority at intersections, more bus lanes and more shelters, as well as working together on LGWM to get a radical improvement in public transport for the future. For the last three years, I've been the portfolio lead for Walking, Cycling and Public Transport (Infrastructure) at WCC . I've successfully overseen the rollout of our new separated cycleways on Hutt Rd, Oriental Bay Parade, Evans Bay Rd, Crawford Rd, and our network in Kilbirnie, as well as many minor improvements for walking and cycling. I've regularly presented at GWRC committee meetings on the buses to try to get better outcomes for our communities, and I've worked to get progress on bus priority and more bus shelters as well as clear routes for double-deckers. I support the walking cycling and public transport improvements.WCC is a metro council, and as such we have little direct influence on this sector, but we can support other Councils.
5
Bernard O'ShaughnessyMotukairangi/Eastern WardYes: We have to address urgently the need to reduce our emissions from vehicles. We have to move quicker to EV as in Finland. We must have urgently a better public transport system including Trains, Light Rail and busesIf in the Chamber I would be robust in getting others and Council Officers (who have the power) to document a path way ahead and with time frames.The Council has adopted a Climate emergency but I want to see a plan as to how that is achievable. It is impression that Council has adopted "Wellington's Blueprint for a Zero Carbon Capital" and I support many of the findings in that report but want action.I have always had employment that Treaty issues are in the mix. 25 years as a public servant and then 10 years as a Primary teacher make me Treaty aware.
We have travelled a long way, but the journey will never be over. I think Council in the recent has opted out of its treaty obligations but under Lester and Jill Day we are moving to a better place.
There are over 600 Marae in NZ. I have been on more than 300 all around NZ.
Better relations with Iwi, but and also taking the general population with desired outcomesIn teaching in Wellingtons low decile schools like Newtown, Strathmore Park, Petone Central my links to both Pacifica and Maori are fairly well established.

I would work actively with schools, and the Council's Youth Council on issues as well as consulting with the communities I live in.
Wellington City under the present Mayor and the Deputy are progressive and also showing leadership in regards policies on climate change. The Council has recently adopted its "Wellington's blueprint for a zero Carbon Climate"that I support and want to see it actioned further and with haste.I am political active with the Govt and would work across the board to get better action. I think the Coalition Govt show declare a "climate emergency" and develop an action plan. I am a huge fan and supporter of the Green party.Council is involved a lot with small businesses. For instance I support the Living Wage movement and for it to be recognised and implemented by them as well. I do think that in regards emissions the Council could be a strong influencer as well.I am a big supportor of reducing vehicle use so want tarins, light rail and buses to be the future.Land use has to be addressed under the Resource Management Act which I hope the Govt reviews soon as they have suggested. In regards transport planning we need urgently better co operation between Govt, GWRC and WCC. The new bus system has been a disgrace. I actively campaign to have those responsible for the errors to be held accountable and I am actively working in a number of groups to vote out those responsible. I support higher density buildings, but not to remove our Character homes. We should be putting a bigger focus on issues like 'green' buildings, better use of water (grey water), composting, recycling, cycling, walking and less packaging from our super markets.1) Electric trains. 2) Light rail 3) Better bus routes, EV fleet 4) encourage less CBD car use (car tax as in London). Climate change is now rapidly changing our world. So we have to be quicker at addressing those issues.As stated above a number of GWRC and their supporting Council Officers must be cleared out. We have already got rid of some and more to go!
I hope new people coming in will be more responsive to public needs
I sold my car 5 years ago. A) I walk B) I bike C) I am dependant on public transport and I am highly active across a number of groups to bring in progressive change.I support a number of projects in the LGWM programme. But hello the financial small print has not yet be fixed. I support more bike lanes, light rail, better bus management and zero carbon emissions. But I do hope the LGWM doesn't become another book on the shelf.Quite a lot really - the agriculture sector is the biggest area that has reduced our clean green image and they should pay a greater share in the clean up now required. We should reduce of cow herds, and re train the farmers into horticulture! Bastards

The Council, which is one of the biggest and the Capital is a leader and we could influence more the agriculture sector.
6
Brian DawsonPukehīnau/Lambton WardYes. There is no question the situation is urgent and that's why I supported the Climate Emergency Declaration.It begins with ensuring that we look at everything that comes before us through the Climate Change lens. Does this help or hinder? We need to focus primarily on those areas where we can get the biggest 'bangs for our bucks'. Implementing the public transport elements of Lets Get Wellington Moving is an obvious major step.As above, getting mass transit and bus priority sorted is essential. We need to look carefully at our growth plans and what, if any, mitigation will need to be done. In some cases we will need to agree that there are places we should not be allowing intensification. I have strongly supported our partnership with mana whenua and will support the renewal of our existing memoranda of understanding. It needs to be clear that this is about partnership, which gives mana whenua a status above an ordinary petitioner.Our existing memoranda of understanding require us to work in partnership with mana whenua and I support and encourage that. We need to work towards getting more iwi involvement and representation, recognising the cost that places on mana whenua and our responsibility to assist with that.Simply put, leaving no one behind. Many of the measures we need to take and encourage will be hardest for those among our most vulnerable, particularly (but not solely) due to socio-economic circumstances. Those who have more must expect to carry more of the burden. That means ensuring that where we put in place financial penalties they are balanced so as not to unfairly burden those who simply can't afford them. Our existing advisory groups need to be fully engaged in this conversation and process. We also need to be more proactive in this space. I will personally ensure that I continue to make efforts to listen to an engage with these groups.Our relationship with GWRC is key and must be positive and collegial. It's not a place for point-scoring. We do need a more regional approach to our thinking and I will be asking for some gatherings of elected members from all councils in our region.I need to look more closely at this as I'm not currently up to speed with what might be needed. The ongoing conversations around urban planning must include consideration of these points.Council needs to lead by example and encourage others to join us.I will champion that. We also have opportunities through our Grants programmes to encourage - and in some instances require - such moves from recipients.As noted, this needs to be at the forefront of our thinking.I have been actively involved in the conversations around Public Transport and intend to remain engaged in that space. The land use issue is very important - keeping the bulk of our growth close to the CBD will have massive impacts on reducing congestion and the associated emissions - but the downside is much of our CBD is susceptible to sea level rise so care will be required.There will be a need to balance low carbon development with affordability. Obviously this has to be taken seriously and have a place of significance in the conversations around the District Plan review especially.My priority is good, cheap and efficient public transport and pedestrian priority in the CBD. Ensuring that the bus network and any future mass transit options focus on electric vehicles is very important.WCC needs to have a positive, collegial relationship with GWRC to ensure we have a joined up approach to this. That will be my priority.I have been actively involved in this space and will continue to advocate for and support such measures.I am strongly supportive of the mass transit recommendations and bus priority. It remains to be seen what roading changes will be needed.Council needs to support GWRC in this area.
7
Lee OrchardPukehīnau/Lambton WardYes to both. For any significant impact to be made, the approach must be local, national, and global. Everyone plays a role. It starts with revising the ways we live our lives, run our businesses, and govern our towns and countries so that they are built upon ambitious sustainability and environmental goals. While the council has been proactively building the city’s resilience for some decades, it should not take another earthquake to accelerate progress, and for us to learn, the hard way, about the vulnerability of our infrastructure and land. We have to better respond to the vulnerabilities of the capital and its region, and continue to make substantial progress with our resilience.

Lifelines, such as securing our emergency water supplies, strengthening the infrastructure that supports our transport systems, and improving the resilience of the electricity and telecommunications networks are essential to Wellington’s survival.

The Council need to be more proactive in managing the relationship with insurers and the shared ownership of risk. This can be achieved through better land use planning and building design – levers that local and central governments control. The latter requires the council to work better with central government as a unified, national response to climate change.

Decisions on how to fund Te Atakura – First to Zero need to be made. The opportunities to address climate change exist in the city’s growth plans. As a city councillor, I’ll work to make these happen.
The council can do a lot to prevent and mitigate the effects of climate change, especially operationally. Examples include, reducing its own emissions, making low-carbon options easy for people to use: such as better options for recycling and composting; and transport, such as walking, cycling and mass transit and transport; planning for denser living and building strong, resilient buildings. The council can lead by example, and influence local businesses to do the same. Remind others to do so, as it is often overlooked from day one. Work with iwi, hapu, and Māori to ensure obligations are not just met, but are confidently and positively.Again, remind others to do so in their work as it is often overlooked in the planning stages. I will involve and collaborate with Māori, and encourage others to do so too. If they don't, I'll hold them to account. A Just Transition for Wellington is making sure that the council carefully plans with iwi, communities, regions and sectors to manage the impacts and maximise the opportunities of the changes brought about by the transition to a low emissions economy. Communicate, collaborate, and value their input from the outset, not at the end when the decisions are being made. Collaboratively, productively, and from the outset. Many solutions are better this way because many of the problems are shared and resources limited. I will ask for more consultation with council in deciding on direction, and from the beginning. Central government's goals are sometimes not completely aligned with those of local government. There is a need to ensure that centrally mandated actions are relevant, in the interests (and wanted) by local residents, and properly funded. Right now, for example, LGWM has landed WCC with a huge bill for their part and there's no money to pay for it. I'll encourage local businesses to adopt sustainability and environmental practices in their operational plans, and enforce where the the council has control. Penalties can be avoided by working collaboratively from the outset. Developing programmes and resources to assist others to reduce their own emissions will help. There may be the opportunity to use certain incentives to influence behaviour. At every point. Right now, the city is in a poor state. The council need to fix the city, otherwise there won't be any of the forecasted growth because no one will want to move here. By addressing these most critical aspects (e.g poor infrastructure), council will take the first step towards mitigating climate change. Wellington is constrained so we need to maximise our land. At the moment, this is not happening. Urban development is a key mechanism to achieving zero carbon emissions. A lot of what I have mentioned across these questions indicates what I will support. A zero-emission, reliable, coherent, affordable, resilient, and ethically run transport system, whether the council decide on a trackless tram, or electric buses. The process of doing so will factor in climate change impacts but the end result will GWRC have the final say on many aspects of LGWM. I'd ensure that WCC are involved in decisions made by GWRC on public transport at every step of the way. We need to make sure that they public transport is as environmentally friendly as we can, coherent with public transport in the city, is affordable, and offers fair pay and working conditions to those providing the services. Aspects such as these mean public transport will be a more attractive option and public attitudes and habits towards using it will change i.e public transport will be seen as a cheaper, more efficient, sustainable alternative to personal vehicle. Continue with the support of zero emission modes of transport. Initiatives such as Mevo, the e-scooters, e-bike hire etc have been popular. We now need designated lanes for these, so I would factor this into the redesign of the city's roads. I'd make all public transport in the city zero emission to start with. WCC needs to first decide on what of this programme it can fund, what it can actually do, what forms of transport it wants to use, and focus primarily on what it actually has control over. I advocate for zero emission transport options as a start and the design of roads to safely accomodate a variety of transport options, such as bike and scooter lanes, and accessible footpaths. I don't support overpromising, overspending, and not delivering. I'll also advocate for improved relationships between central government and council. A core contributor to our governments' inability to respond to complex, multi-faceted issues such as housing affordability and transport needs, is a culture where central and local government lack trust and in fact often compete with each other. WCC will have little control over this and it is isn't so relevant to its jurisdiction. However, WCC can still advocate for the the environment and the reduction of emissions in its business with the regions.
8
Humphrey HanleyPaekawakawa / Southern WardYes absolutely - in the immediate sense we need to focus our efforts at the local level as this will be a big and direct contributor to the national emissions levels. We need to shift the way we travel to reduce reliance on gas fueled vehicles. We need to reduce the amount of waste we are generating. We need to be smarter with the ways we reduce or recycle the waste we do generate. We should be creating more green spaces in our cities and suburbs, and even ensuring new living complexes include green walls and rooftop gardens. I will support Council moving to 100% electric forms of public transport. Prioritising the movement of non-fossil fuel vehicles within the city and suburbs (bicycles and electric vehicles over gas cars). We should be moving away from building new roads for cars and transitioning existing roads in the city center into shared access for all. Using the extra space created by not needing to park as many cars in the golden-mile, to increase or green spaces. We need to think strongly about how we prioritise the LGWM project to ensure it aligns with our plans for a zero carbon future. We need to introduce better forms of waste management and reduction. We need to carefully consider any coastal developments and begin to plan for how our existing coastal infrastructure can withstand the climate emergency in the event of sea-level rise. I will be advocating for constant, consistent, and meaningful consultation with local Iwi on all issues. Where a conflict between Council plans and Te Tiriti o Waitangi arises, I will be voting in favour of Te Tiriti, and advocating fellow Councillors do the same. I would agree to vote differently, only in the event it was the recommendation of the local, and any other impacted Iwi.At a very basic level we need to ensure those in Council responsible for the bonds of our partnerships with Iwi, Hapu and Māori are people with respect and understanding of the history of the relationship. If nobody on Council has that ability we need to find representatives willing to be educated and take time to gain an understanding of the issues. In any community we wish to consult, or work alongside, we need to have people from those communities represented on board and not just spoken for by others. From my understanding, a Just Transition involves the movement away from fossil-fuel related industry in order to move towards a zero carbon city. In Wellington I believe that construction, transport, and waste management probably make up the bulk of our industries needing to apply Just Transition principles to change for our zero carbon future. We need to look at what the zero carbon future of those industries look like, and then develop plans for how to transition those workforce's accordingly .My reason for standing for council is to ensure marginalised and vulnerable communities are represented and heard at the table. As a disabled person, I am well aware of what it can be like to have decisions that impact your future made by people in positions of power that don't properly consult and engage with you. We need to ensure that people impacted by our decisions, are being heard and participating in making those decisions. I will encourage the frank and open sharing of knowledge and information related to climate change across the board. We need to be showing leadership as the capital, and setting the bar not just for Aotearoa, but for the world, when it comes to meaningful response to the climate emergency. I would ask the Government to be subsidising the shift into a zero-carbon future in any way they can. I would ask them to reduce the building of new road routes, unless a new road can create easier travel for electric and low-emission vehicles (eg, roads that include solar-PV, or electric vehicle charging lanes) I will encourage all business to adopt best practice waste management solutions. Shifting business vehicle fleets to electric or taking advantage of better public transport or ride share options to reduce the need for any business vehicles. Allowing more remote and flexible working conditions so not everyone needs to travel and generate emissions. Doing so often makes businesses more accessible to hiring staff with disabilities as well. Climate change must be at the forefront of our decision making process around the future of Wellington.I believe the Healthy Streets Approach by Lucy Saunders, and adopted by the City of London, provides fantastic advice for creating integrated, inclusive, and people focused city streets and land use. I will be insisting on accessibility being at the heart of any changes to how we use land and provide transport in Wellington as well. All of our options for land use, housing, transport, and a zero carbon future are inherently interconnected - to do this we need to find a way to prioritise and promote low carbon urban development principles. At this stage I do not have specific policies to implement except to say that I will gladly seek the advice and guidance of experts that also believe in a zero carbon future. My transport policy is around ensuring we have a sustainable, environmental, and accessible transport solution that takes into account our most vulnerable communities - as transport that works for them, will be great for everyone. We need to move away from our car focused current transport model, and develop more welcoming shared street solutions. I would see traffic in the city reduced or removed, and priority given to public transport, goods and services, bicycles, walking, and people with accessibility or mobility needs who must travel by car. WCC must push for more accountability from GWRC on the issues currently facing our public transport system. WCC must be an advocate for the needs of the people of Wellington to the GWRC and make sure they deliver a transport solution that actually fits our needs.We need to develop safer streets for those using active transport, and create better shared spaces for all by reducing speed limits in the city and central suburbs. To encourage active transport we need to make our streets and public spaces, places that people feel safe, invited and encouraged to occupy. Public transport needs to be examined with an eye to actually putting the people first. It needs to be made safer, reliable, and more accessible to all. Drivers are currently under a lot of pressure and that needs to change. Drivers must be encouraged to always put the passenger experience first and foremost, so everyone feels welcome and safe using public transport. LGWM contains what appear to be great transport initiatives for Wellington. I support the plan, but have a few concerns or reservations on the application. I will ensure the programme sets out actual information on what accessibility measure will be implemented, and that any disruptions to the travel needs of our communities are communicated and mitigated as much as possible. When transport doesn't work right our most vulnerable communities suffer the most. While I imagine not many farms exist within the WCC area we need to ensure that all agricultural activity takes proper care of our waterways and utilises best sustainable practices. We should be encouraging urban agriculture as a way to reduce our dependence on the transportation of food from elsewhere and improve our resilience by having local produce.

(there's no box for the last question, so I'd just like to add that we should also be encouraging distributed generation such as solar PV, to help reduce emissions, but also improve our resilience during disasters and the impacts of climate change. After the big earthquake in Japan, solar PV on houses and offices was being encouraged to help communities have access to power sooner in the event of future disasters. Wellington would be in a similar situation. )
9
Fleur Fitzsimons Paekawakawa/Southern WardYes. We must make reducing emissions central to all decision making. Implementation of Te Atakura: First to Zero. Implementation of Te Atakura: First to Zero. I will respect Mana Whenua and support enhanced MoU with them. I will respect Mana Whenua and support enhanced MoU with them. Progressive distribution of cost of climate change adaptation. Existing channels and build stronger personal relationships. Existing channels and build stronger personal relationships. Zero carbon bill and reform of RMA. Existing channels and build stronger personal relationships. Full extent. Seek reform of RMA and make it central to District Plan review. Seek reform of RMA and make it central to District Plan review.LGWM - focus on PT and mass transit. Support Regional Transport Authority. LGWM. Support it. Seek reform of RMA.
10
Laurie FoonPaekawakawa/Southern WardYes! The IPCC report, the Paris Agreement and through to our own Zero Carbon Act as well as an already changing climate, are all reasons why I think we must take urgent action to move to a low carbon future that cares for people, supports a low carbon economy and regenerates the environment. But for me personally the reason why we must make these changes is because our young people are asking us to. I have 2 daughters who are part of the climate change movement, along with their peers they are very concerned about their future with that of a changing climate. So I am standing for council as I am in a position to do something to help make the changes we need. But I also think we can thrive through these changes and that is why I am working with the vision that Wellington can be the coolest little SUSTAINABLE capital in the world.
Wellington City Council has declared a Climate emergency to be backed up with the actions in Te Atakura – First to Zero, a blueprint for Wellington becoming a Zero Carbon Capital by 2050.
I will support frontloading all efforts so that we can reduce emissions by 2030.
My priorities include future proofing our city with healthier, multi modal streets to serve more people. I would advocate for all active transport modes including prioritising safer cycling for all ages and world class walking to work experiences.
All new builds must be equipped with water sensitive design, energy efficiency, green roofs, bike parking, and EV infrastructure.
Our city will be a better place to be in becoming climate change ready, with things like urban food farms, green roofs and planting many more trees.
I want Wellington to be a world-leading zero waste, zero carbon, sustainable business city by: doubling investment and support for programs like the Good Food Boost, Zero Carbon Challenge, Climathon and others.
Council can influence businesses to become sustainable with buy local, zero carbon and sustainable procurement policies.
And waste is an important part of the council's own emissions profile so we must move toward a circular economy with systems to reuse resources, not grow landfill.

My priority will be to help Wellington have a resilient local circular food system by creating a Resilience Ready and Sustainable Food Policy.
This will include treating our organic waste as a precious resource that will grow food not landfill, to replenish our soils that will act as a carbon sink.
We also need to free up land for more urban food farms and local compost hubs. These have so many benefits on the community connectedness, wellbeing as well as growing food for those that need it.

We must also be Future-proofing our city by ensuring that we focus any population growth in our central urban area with new builds adopting energy efficiency, water sensitive design, green roofs and much more urban greening to absorb heat and water.

We must also be Future-proofing our city by ensuring that we focus growth into our central urban area with infrastructure that has energy efficiency, water sensitive design, green roofs and much more urban greening to absorb heat and water. Our transport system must serve more people.

We also need to be planning now for areas and communities that will be affected by sea level rise.
I will work with council to be a genuine treaty partner, to work with mana whenua for a Te Tiriti view on all decisions. It will be a priority for me to develop a cultural, social, economic, environmental and carbon impact assessment process to inform all decisions. We should be working with mana whenua and community to install kaitiakitanga principles for all of Wellington’s waterways, food and environment. I will support WCC in its effort to see our use of Te Reo grow and thrive.I believe we need the leadership and wisdom of Iwi, Hapu and the view of Te Ao Maori that will support our transition to a low carbon future. I will support Council to ensure we have an effective partnership with Iwi, Hapu and Māori.

A just transition for Wellington will focus on understanding the impacts that climate change will have on households, communities, and areas and look to include and involve those affected in decisions and policy making on the changes we will need to make. There will need to be support systems for those affected, and our council must understand what it’s roles and responsibilities are. I will take action by understanding from the groups themselves on what they think the best way to engage with them is. This is also an opportunity to work with our artists who are experts in finding different ways to engage with different groups.I will make sure Wellington as the capital is taking a leadership role in demonstrating how action can be taken to move toward zero carbon.
I will support WCC to make all blueprints, tools and resources transparent so that other councils can adopt and adapt projects that have worked for Wgtn to work for them.
I will support collaboration between councils to invest in projects to reduce emissions together.
I will work to make sure we have an open channel of communication with other councils to influence and support them in their own zero carbon journey.
I will make sure WCC is advocating for the Zero Carbon Bill and other policy that supports a nationwide reduction of emissions, energy, plastics and waste.
We must also advocate and support central govt for equality and the wellbeing of our people for when we are well and have access to a good standard of living we can “all” support the changes we need to make to transition to a low carbon future.
We can support businesses to reduce their own emissions by creating procurement policy that invites all suppliers on the zero carbon journey with us.
This will mean that businesses that are local, zero carbon and can demonstrate that they have their own sustainable policies or a positive social impact will be prioritised for supply.
Another opportunity will be working in partnership with organisations like the Sustainable Business Network- to help businesses take a Zero Carbon Pledge that will help them move toward understanding, measuring, reducing and offsetting emissions.
WCC can also work in partnership with big employers to put in systems to incentivise low carbon transport use for employees commutes.
Gamification is another way to help business focus on behaviour change for employees for example the Future Fit app and other active transport initiatives like the Aotearoa Bike Challenge.
I will develop a cultural, social, economic, environmental and carbon impact assessment process to inform all decisions. I will promote a vision for a vibrant people centred city that focuses on the culture of “our spaces are to be shared.” In particular our roads must be shared spaces that are able to move more people.

We must also look to redefine zones like Adelaide Road, Kent and Cambridge Terrace to become inner city living, shopping, art and cafes with promenades that support a world class walking experience and safe cycling all the way to the waterfront.

I will be working to allocate more land for urban food farms and local composting hubs. The benefits are that we will grow more food which will foster wellbeing and connectedness as well as reduced emissions and becoming a carbon sink.

Higher density living should be encouraged on high frequency public transport routes.
Urban development must move to a high and medium density living in our central city to encourage living closer to work, study and amenities.
Higher density living should be encouraged on high frequency public transport routes.
We can create an active transport city that prioritises world class walking experiences, safer cycling for all ages with slow lanes on our streets that support all other active modes.
To provide balance for the increased density living we must have more places that are commons for people to hang out and connect. As well as protected and enhanced green spaces that support connection to nature, community wellbeing and urban biodiversity.
Climate change has been factored into all of my transport policies- this is one of the main reasons why I am standing because I believe we can make these changes and be better off for them.
I support the move to mass transit and a world class public transport system.
I’ll also be supporting infrastructure that supports the e- bike and micro mobility revolution that is hitting us already.
I will also be making sure new builds have EV and bike parking infrastructure.
Wellington is already fast adopting the car share model in favour of buying a new car. I will make sure we are supporting the ease of growth for these new transport systems.
I am excited about these transport solutions that are better for our health, create more space on our streets and will take us to a low carbon future.

My priority will be to have a collaborative communicative relationship with GWRC with the goal to have one of the best public transport systems in the world.
I promote active transport everyday as my mode of transport is by electric bike. I love it so much I want everyone to experience it. I want to see Wellington build on it’s already coveted compact advantage by enabling more great walking experiences, starting with Adelaide Road, the Basin and creating a cycling and walking promenade building local business on Kent and Cambridge terrace! These strips are assets that can be people focused and an exciting gateway to our city!! In principle I support the LGWM, but do not support a second tunnel unless it is to prioritise public transport, mass transit, and active modes like cycling and walking.
I will advocate for at grade changes at the basin and prioritising bus lanes asap.
I have made my position on transport clear on prior questions.
Mass transit and a more walkable liveable city is what we need to focus on getting to.
11
John PetersTakapū/Northern WardYesReduce carbon emission and work towards carbon ZeroReduce Petrol guzzling vehicles and encourage use of Public TransportMore involvement of stake holders.Robust Public TransportCommunity gathering to involve youth and engaging in Plantation and other environment friendly actions.Create healthy competition Work towards zero carbon emission and zero plastic use.IncentivesTop priority Robust Public transport with Adblue use.Transition towards electric vehiclesChange towards electric vehiclesOn time every time.Make Public Transport attractive to both public and drivers.Not sure.Encourage more vegans.
12
Iona PannettPukehīnau LambtonYes, the IPCC has warned us that this is the time we have left to keep global temperatures to a maximum of 1.5C temperature increase over pre industrial levels to avoid the most serious impacts of climate change. To achieve this end, structural change will be necessary to our economic, cultural, social and environmental systems. I have worked for over 20 years to move our city to become more sustainable and to take action on climate change so know it takes time to change public policy and attitudes, cultural practices and economic decisions. I led the Declaration of an Ecological and Climate emergency for Wellington City in partnership with the community so have a very strong commitment to ensuring it is implemented. If re-elected, I would like to take a leading role in working with our Treaty partners and other stakeholders to look at how we take action in implementing the Plan. My top priorities are to:

• support the implementation of light rail for Wellington
• developing and then implementing a Green infrastructure plan to manage stormwater and to increase amenity around the city
• develop a Climate Defence fund
• implementing parking policies that support sustainable transport choices
• electrify our transport fleet
• convert more buildings to be sustainable and energy efficient
• transition to a zero carbon economy
• accelerate our tree planting programme to create more carbon sinks
At the current time WCC only has a mitigation plan, not an adaptation one. We need to develop one in consultation with the community as well as ensuring that the upcoming District Plan review full takes into account the need to adapt. This will mean looking at where people can build and to what standard to manage impacts including sea level rise. We must have an evidence based discussion as a community about where it is safe to build. We also need to undertake some robust analysis on what climate defence mechanisms work i.e. sea walls vs dune systems and so on. We also need to continue in our work to ensure water security for when we have droughts. The Crown, not local government entered into a Treaty partnership but I understand and am committed to honouring Te Tiriti in a local government context as well. This means working in genuine partnership and sharing power between mana whenua and Wellington City Council. It also means recognising that mana whenua have control over natural resources. At a practical level, it means that mana whenua should be able to sit at the council table and make decisions and that our policies should reflect Mātauranga Māori. As above, we must recognise that we need to follow the principles of Te Tiriti. Also, partnership means listening to mana whenua, ensuring that they have power within our democratic institutions and ensuring that they are resourced properly so that they can participate. Often mana whenua have only a few staff to carry a huge workload. Tauiwi could also take some responsibility by learning about Māori culture and Te Reo. A just transition means that Wellington recognises that it has obligations to future generations and other cities around the world that don’t have our advantages to reduce our carbon footprint whilst not causing harm to those most vulnerable, particularly those who are most vulnerable financially. It means acknowledging that some in our community don’t have the resources to lead a low carbon lifestyle i.e. purchasing electric bikes, eating organic food and so on. To do this, we need to ensure housing is affordable and close to community facilities to make it easier to make sustainable transport choices. Subsidies may also be needed to help with public transport fares and to make buildings more sustainable. Recognising that these groups have a right to have a say would be a start as well as acknowledging the knowledge that they have. Giving funding to help with climate advocacy and other environmental projects would help. Genuine partnership can also be achieved by including groups in discussion about how we transition to a zero carbon future through targeted consultation and participatory decision making mechanisms. Currently, I work across the region in terms of climate change on the Wellington Water Committee and as chair of the Regional Waste Governance Committee where I have been a leader in terms of getting climate change onto the agenda Ensuring all regional working groups including on economic development have a strong climate change focus would be helpful. Using participatory models of decision making would help achieve a regional consensus like climate assemblies, town hall meetings and so on could be good as well as ensuring our regional policies and District Plans are consistent. In terms of working across Aotearoa, the best mechanism is to work through Local Government New Zealand to work on common solutions and policies. Working in partnership with other councils as we have also done on waste would be helpful. Some funding assistance for help with providing climate safe infrastructure would be helpful as local government doesn’t have the ability to pay for it all. Policy change will be needed to make that change. More money for walking, cycling and public transport through the National Land Transport Fund would also be helpful. The Fund will need further work also to make that a policy priority. In implementing the Zero Carbon Act (presuming it goes through), it will be important for government to have robust policies in place on how local government can support the Act and provide detailed guidance especially through the policy instruments under the RMA. I would encourage them to adopt travel plans to encourage all members to use sustainable modes of transport where possible. I would also encourage them to do an energy audit of their buildings where appropriate and then take remedial action to make them more energy efficient. I would also suggest that they work towards becoming zero waste, in the first instance dealing with basics like recycling paper and composting food. I would also suggest where appropriate that they look at their own carbon footprint as an organisation and see where they need to improve. I think the council can support this process by providing good quality information, staff to advise and subsidies where appropriate. For me, climate change will be the first consideration given the serious consequences of the climate continuing to heat up. Growth can only happen sustainably within the ecological and infrastructure limits of our city. Growth should only happen in areas where there is little vulnerability to sea level rise. Ensuring that there is a co-ordinated policy response would be helpful amongst the councils in the region. Furthermore, the upcoming review of our District Plan will provide opportunities for integrated land use and transport planning and I hope to play an active role in shaping this plan if re-elected. I would also use my seat around the council table to promote good planning through Let’s Get Welly Moving. Lastly, I have been a long term advocate for this integration for many years and have been pleased to see some progress in this area. It will not be possible to get to a zero carbon Wellington without good urban development. If we are to reduce carbon emissions, it is critical to ensure that people can make fewer trips where possible and that they live in sustainable communities. Enabling people to work from home or close to home where appropriate would be helpful by creating business hubs in the suburbs or working in partnership with other organisations to do this. Intelligent density allows people to live in high quality environments close to public transport which allows them to make good transport choices. Development in the inner city allows people to walk and cycle. We also don’t need so many car parks. The land should be freed up for planting, walk ways and cycle paths. A literal greening of the city by planting more trees and developing green roofs allows us to sequester carbon as well. My priority is to transform our transport system in order to reach net aero emissions as soon as possible. The next 10 years are obviously critical. Changing our transport system will also make our city more liveable. Climate action is at the very heart of my policy. Light rail is top of my list of priorities as well as an electric, functional, reliable and affordable bus system which we can support GW to implement. Cycling infrastructure is also key as well as infrastructure for pedestrians. These are low carbon forms of transport. I do not support additional road capacity to reduce congestion as this runs the risk of inducing traffic. I have worked in the sustainable transport area for many years and consider this is a critical area if we are to become carbon zero. Regional Council is primarily responsible for running our public transport system but we can assist by helping to get light rail built for Wellington, ensuring there are bus priority lanes throughout the city and building more bus shelters. In addition, we should continue to advocate to GWRC for lower fares to make public transport more affordable. In many cases, it is still cheaper to take a car rather than a bus. I have long advocated for more active and public transport as above. Completing the Let’s Get Welly Riding would help as well as 30 km speed limits in the CBD and lower speed limits in the suburbs. Transport must not be divorced from good urban form and amenity. Providing safe and attracting public places and good pathways for walking is also a good way to encourage walking. We should also advocate to the government to allow E-scooters to go in bike lanes and accelerate our cycling programme. I think this is a good start to getting Wellington to be more sustainable given it prioritises public transport and active modes vs private vehicles. The priority on light rail and early wins in terms of cycling and lower speed limits are to be welcomed. I also am pleased by the trigger on a possible 2nd Mt Vic tunnel (i.e. it will only be built after public transport has been tried out). I’m glad that priority will be given to the Basin Reserve but will only support a solution that respects the heritage of the Reserve and is climate friendly. I’m pleased to see that a second Terrace Tunnel did not make it to the immediate package or undergrounding Karo Drive which were unnecessary and expensive. I will always advocate for options to be included that put the climate first. Given Wellington’s economic base, agricultural emissions are not generated here to a significant degree. However as Gen Zero will know, a major issue is that emissions are measured at source rather than the consumption point. I believe that we do need to measure what we are consuming. As a relatively wealthy city, it is likely that in some cases, consumption is quite high. WCC could support efforts to educate people about their dietary choices and their impact on emissions. Advocating to the regional council to use their land to be used to regenerate forests would be helpful as well as advocating for the production of plant based proteins would be helpful.

19. Are there any other policies or initiatives that you will support that will reduce carbon emissions or help the city to adapt to climate change?
• Engaging in a public campaign to give people ideas and choices about things that can do to help the climate would be helpful.
• Giving WellingtonNZ (the region’s economic development agency) a very specific mandate to work on climate change would be beneficial.
• Working in partnership with GW on a blue belt plan for Wellington would be great as “sea forests” are good at capturing carbon.
13
Peter GilberdTakapū/Northern WardThe Inter-governmental Panel for Climate Change has advised that global, human-induced carbon dioxide emissions will need to decrease by 45% from the levels in 2010, if we are to be on track for zero such emissions by 2050. Only then do we have a chance of keeping the temperature change from pre-industrial levels to +1.5°C. Currently, we are at +1°C and already seeing increases in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events. It is possible than, even with strong action, we will overshoot +1.5°C and reach +2°C, raising the prospect of having to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide to avoid mass extinctions, crop failures, sea-level rise in excess of 1 m, life-threatening levels of ocean acidification, and more extreme weather.There can be a whole suite of measures that Council can take, for both mitigation and adaptation. The challenge is to choose measures that are significant and cost effective. Transport contributes 58% of Wellington’s carbon emissions, so it is imperative to improve public transport markedly so as to achieve a major shift in the way people travel and a consequent reduction in carbon emissions. Related to this, we need to plan to house our growing numbers of people in a way that will minimise travel by private vehicles; that is, we need to increase housing stock within the CBD and along transport spines. Council can promote active modes of travel, electric vehicles, and car sharing. Beyond transport, Council can promote energy efficiency, waste disposal that reduces methane emission, green business, etc. Council also needs to ensure that its own house is in order; Council must increase its adoption of monitoring, transport, fuel, energy conservation, procurement, waste disposal and environmental practices that are an example to society in achieving its zero carbon aims.We need to engage the community so that the community has buy-in to the solutions that we will adopt. An Adaptation Strategy for local communities will be included in Wellington's District Plan. Our town planning through Planning for Growth and the District Plan must reflect an approach that minimises carbon emissions; growth needs to occur along existing or proposed public transport routes, and green field developments requiring a whole new infrastructure should be discouraged. New buildings and other infrastructure must be designed to take climate change, and particularly sea-level rise, into account. In Wellington, the CBD is particularly vulnerable, and economically vital, so adaptation planning is already occurring, and must increase.Council will strengthen its MOU’s with Mana Whenua. Mana Whenua will be entitled to representation on key committees and organisations associated with Council that consider climate-related issues.Council has strong relationships that are becoming more important with time. Indicators are the Te Tauihu Policy, the new Naming Policy, the Matariki Festival, and support for economic initiatives by Iwi. Partnership is critical for the city’s future and is built on discussion, trust, and mutual support.A Just Transition requires that the required changes to our economy are fair to everyone, and that working people and the less well-off will not bear an unfair burden as a result of the changes. Every initiative should take this into account.In the last three years, Council has taken many steps to further build an inclusive society. Council supports its Pacific Advisory Group, and the Youth Council. Consultation with marginalised groups is fundamental to a Just Transition.Council already has a joint Climate Change committee with other councils in the Greater Wellington region. Interactions with other councils occur through Local Government New Zealand. It is likely that other joint council committees (for example, those that consider water and the environment) will bring an increasing focus on climate change to their work. And, of course, discussions will occur with central government.Council has submitted on the Zero Carbon Bill but the response to climate change encompasses issues like town planning and development, and public transport, where support from government is required. For example, government is committing $3.4 billion to transport improvements in Wellington. The proposed development of a UDA (urban development authority) with the ability to integrate properties so that development can occur in existing built-up areas, will provide a way of housing people that has a low carbon footprint. Council cannot put rate-payers money directly into such businesses but it can provide advisory services, coordination, and education, to support businesses to reduce emissions. In Council services for such businesses, such as waste disposal, opportunities exist to drive low emission outcomes (for example, by increasing waste disposal fees and using the increased revenue to build better waste disposal systems).TThis will be a fundamental consideration.“Planning for Growth”, a two-year programme for exactly this purpose, is well advanced. In turn, this will inform the District Plan.A critical role. Principal development should occur around existing town centres and the CBD.A step change in public transport is required, so that public transport becomes more competitive in convenience and journey time with private motoring. These changes will be driven by efficiency (avoiding congestion) and, of course, the need to reduce carbon emissions. The number of electrically-powered will have to increase markedly. However, we do need to be aware of the embodied content of new vehicles, so it does not mean the dumping of serviceable petrol-driven vehicles. It does mean that as much of the new fleet as possible should be electrically powered.The key role for Wellington City Council at the moment is to work with GWRC to give effect to bus priority. This will make the use of buses more attractive to the public.Support Let’s Get Welly Moving, bus priority, more bus shelters, and completion of a cycleway/scooter network. Of course, walking is the most active form, with additional benefits, and walking routes need to be easier and quicker.Totally support it as it stands, as it is a once in a generation opportunity that could be lost if we dither. It has priority for mass transit, and supports completion of a second Mt Victoria tunnel and a Basin reserve solution. Currently, the road is inadequate and leads to wasteful use of fuel.The agriculture sector in Wellington is tiny and it is unlikely that the Wellington City Council would take specific measures over and above those imposed at a national level.
14
Jill DayTakapū/Northern WardYes, urgent action is required. We know that we don’t have much time to reduce the effects of climate change and we need to do everything we can to reduce negative impacts on the environment. Locally we have seen the impacts of severe weather events with regards to flooding increasing over the past 3 years.Because transport contributes to 58% of our carbon emissions in Wellington, we must prioritise active transport and public transport, which will reduce the need for private car use. We can also reduce carbon emissions by providing infrastructure that supports electric vehicle use. Other actions would be significant improvements in waste reduction and recycling, support of the Whaitua process - to improve the health of our waterways (which are affected by climate change) - significantly increase the numbers of native trees being planted and continue to be creative and look for new opportunities to reduce our carbon emissions.Council needs to factor the effects of climate change into all decision making. We need to be planning ahead and work with communities so that people are empowered to make and support the changes needed. The District Plan review will provide opportunities to improve design standards, which will improve the standard of living and also adaptation to climate change. I would like to see high standards achieved through the District Plan review with regards to water-sensitive urban design, for example.
Population growth needs to be managed through intensification of the CBD and suburban centres where infrastructure and amenities (eg public transport routes) exist.
New buildings need to be designed with climate change in mind, particularly in the CBD and in coastal areas.
We also need to help people plan for lifestyle changes. We know that people find change hard, so we need to help people plan how they can make practical life changes.
Over the past 3 years, I have spent a lot of time building the WCC relationship with Mana Whenua and I will continue to make sure we look for ways to strengthen these partnerships and to build capacity within Council to make this a reality. We will continue to develop an MOU that represents these important partnerships for our city. Mana Whenua need to be represented on Council committees. I acknowledge that Mana Whenua have many local authorities they work with and we (as local authorities) need to work together to reduce the burden, particularly of time commitment on Mana Whenua. The Whaitua process is a good example of collaboration where Mana Whenua and multiple councils are working together.As the Portfolio holder for Māori partnerships for Wellington City Council over the past 3 years, I have been very focused on building our capacity to be able to work in true partnership with Mana Whenua. I will continue to advocate for our interactions in any area to start early. In the past, the lack of understanding and capacity has meant that Mana Whenua have often been brought into the process far too late, which means the pathway has often already been determined.
Making sure that we have actions and solutions which are fair for everyone and that people who are less well off should not be disadvantaged in the process.
Making sure that our solutions improve outcomes for the environment and the people who live here. No one should need to be unfairly worse of.
It’s important to work with the networks that already exist and to make sure all can have access to Council.
Council’s advisory groups provide unique perspectives which are greatly improved through strong ties with Council staff working on climate change.
Over the past 3 years, I have been the Council representative on the Youth Council and have been impressed with the way Council staff reach out to this group to understand the youth perspective. I have watched the Youth Council develop relationships with other youth action groups and would like to see these develop further. Many on Youth Council have gone on to join other groups, which is very encouraging. Council has supported many groups by hosting events, which helps to gather the wider community voice. This has informed submissions on Planning for Growth and Te Atakura.
We need to continue to look for ways to diversify the voices and minds that inform Council decision making processes.
Working with other Councils is very important. Climate change and our communities aren't concerned about local authority boundaries and we shouldn’t be limited by this. Whilst some issues around Aotearoa may be different, there are many that are the same and we don’t all need to re-invent the wheel. It’s important that we work together to share our success (and failures) and come up with new solutions. Larger cities also have the ability to support other areas. An example of this is a recent decision to bring South Wairarapa District Council into Wellington Water.
There is a joint Climate Change Committee in the Greater Wellington region and I know that many of the other joint committees are discussing climate change (for example the water committee).
A collective voice across Aotearoa helps Councils to ask for changes nationally where we have issues in common.
Advocate for action on product stewardship.
Advocate to central government to improve waste minimisation. Councils cannot achieve the required results on our own. To achieve this we need economies of scale, which will require the government to support us at a national level.
This year Council submitted on the Zero Carbon Bill. We know we will need to support the Government to achieve the big changes, for example in urban planning and transport. I am pleased the Government investment of $3.4 billion focuses on transport solutions that provide a step change in approach.
We can provide support through expertise and also through grants (eg Waste minimisation seed fund) to organisations who are taking steps to reduce emissions. We need to look at ways that we can incentivise waste minimisation for businesses and also be realistic about the charges for disposing of waste (which can’t continue to be as cheap as it is now).Considering Climate change adaptation and mitigation is very important and every decision needs that consideration.I support Let’s Get Wellington Moving with the early priorities being a focus on active and public transport.
It is important that we support people to make the necessary lifestyle changes. Many people find change very challenging and stressful. It is important we communicate well with people, so that they understand why the changes are required and also help people with the practical steps for the changes they will need to make.
I support mass transit from the railway station through to the airport. This allows for urban uplift along the transit route, which makes it possible for people to not need to own a car, and also leads to efficiencies in transport.
We also need to increase public transport patronage in suburban areas. I would also like to see car-share provision increased in the outer suburbs. We know that cars spend most of the time parked. Sharing cars makes sense for so many reasons, not least the environmental footprint!
The District Plan review will also address how land is used and what must be provided for.
Urban development needs to happen in places where there is easy access to public transport and local amenities.
The District Plan review is an important opportunity for Council to address both climate mitigation and adaptation. The Planning for Growth engagement with the community showed that people would like to see urban development in areas with good infrastructure and public services (eg. public transport) rather than building new suburbs in greenfield areas, for which the new infrastructure has a high carbon cost.
Wellingtonians need to change the way we think about getting around. When public transport is frequent, fast, reliable and affordable it will have a competitive advantage over the private car. As a council we need to do all we can to improve public transport. We can support this through bus priority and providing good bus shelters.
I would like to see continued investment in walking and cycling infrastructure. Lowering the speed limit in the CBD and suburban centres would make our city more friendly for people on foot or bike.
A second Mt Vic tunnel is required and I would like to see it prioritising walking, cycling and public transport. I’ve walked through the Mt Vic tunnel and it is not a pleasant experience. People will still drive places and we want to make sure that traffic congestion is minimal. Traffic congestion adds to our carbon emissions.
It is GWRC’s responsibility to deliver an effective public transport system. However WCC is able to offer support through our road management function. It is important that Wellington City Council works with GWRC so we provide roads that work for effective public transport. It is essential that WCC addresses bus priority in the city to improve travel times for public transport users. People use public transport when it is convenient and reliable and WCC has the opportunity to help with that.I support Let’s Get Wellington Moving. I would like to see our central city spaces improved for pedestrians and cyclists. Bus priority, better bus shelters and slower moving vehicles in the central city would make a huge difference. We have agreed to a significant programme of investment from the Government with Let’s Get Wellington Moving and it’s important that we get on with it. We’ve waited for a long time and I believe that we need to align our transport challenges with transport solutions that put people and the environment first.
As I have stated before, I support mass transit from the central city rail station, through to the south and east, an improved cycling network throughout the city, lowered speed limits in the central city and suburban centres, an improved layout at the Basin Reserve, and a second Mt Vic tunnel.
Wellington city doesn’t have a significant agriculture sector. I certainly support a national approach to reducing emission from the agricultural sector. Supporting people to consume local produce would be helpful. We have many community gardens around the city - I would like to see even more of these.
15
Teri O'NeillTe Motu/Kairangi -WCCYes. Absolutely! Even if Wellington gets down to carbon zero city, we know that the rest of the country will need more support to catch up. Both in local and central govt policy, we need to be carbon neutral, by 2030 – not 2050. Wellington comes from a place of privilege in comparison to the rest of New Zealand. We have more mailable leavers to pull – and an example to set. I’d love to wellington go above and beyond all targets and be not just nationally leading in climate justice action but world-leading.

In central govt – The Zero carbon act needs to be far more ambitious in adaptation I’m eagerly awaiting opportunities for other key pieces of regulatory policy to be overhauled to suit the current crisis, e.g the RMA review.
I was fortunate enough to lead a petition with the wellington School strikes team to bring a petition to WCC – since then we’ve been able to work closely alongside Cr Iona Pannet, ZR and GZ for WCC to declare a climate emergency under conditions of just transition, effective action and partnership with Hapu, mana whenua, and iwi.

A large part of my non paid work is with climate justice sector, And a large part of acting for the environment is to ensure a just transition with considering social welfare, impacts, and indicators with any changes to the sectors around climate change legislation.

There can be a whole suite of measures that the Council can take, for both mitigation and adaptation. The challenge is to choose measures that are significant and cost-effective. Related to this, we need to plan to house our growing numbers of people in a way that will minimize travel by private vehicles; that is, we need to increase housing stock within the CBD and along transport spines. Council can promote active modes of travel, electric vehicles, and car-sharing. Beyond transport, Council can promote energy efficiency, waste disposal that reduces methane emission, green business, etc.
We need to drastically reduce our emissions. Not just individual change, or just as a council – but as a city, we need to go above and beyond what’s required. WCC has a carbon-neutral target in 2050, we need to bring this forward to 2030 – preferably making the target legally binding.

Set the right example on the forefront of accepting no more developments that will contribute to emissions. Broader than council investing in sustainable bluishness models; See Laurie Foon’s Mahi as a fantastic example. Behavioral engagement with our community to promote the current amazing projects going on the ground. Kai Cycle, community gardens, predator-free, etc.

In policy - an Adaptation Strategy for local communities will be included in Wellington's District Plan. Our town planning through Planning for Growth and the District Plan must reflect an approach that minimizes carbon emissions; growth needs to occur along existing or proposed public transport routes, and greenfield developments requiring a whole new infrastructure should be discouraged. New buildings and other infrastructure must be designed to take climate change, and particularly sea-level rise, into account. In Wellington, the CBD is particularly vulnerable, and economically vital, so adaptation planning is already occurring, and must increase.
With every action, not just in climate- the structure, down to our representatives need to work on decolonizing their minds, the way we do things and create a policy on the council. A larger part over the last few years has been getting to know my local iwi members, it's incredibly important to place the special weight in acknowledging the hurt that white institutions and structures like our local councils have done in the past. Beyond the taught, we need to do more in partnership with Māori - we shouldn’t be sacrificing the wishes of Tangata Whenua for wellington gain too.

A large example of this comes to mind the airport extension. I’ve placed a significant ownness on acknowledging TOWA in the triennium plan for the Labour team. What this looks like, with a member of local iwi – is giving more land back, its acknowledging iwi leaders and giving them a seat at the table. It's making sure when we designing Climate polices that this is in Partnership not just consultation with iwi. There’s a lot more to do.
A just transition for me is looking at all climate reform in a social context. I know that I’m willing to make great sacrifices to reduce my footprint, but a lot of members in our community will need support. A just transition looks like supporting rate rebates or other discounts with the local councils for groups and individuals building in net-zero ways. It means investing in skill changes where industries need to be changed. Most importantly it means engaging with people of all walks of life to figure out how we can best support our communities as we transition.Acknowledge Te Triti o Waitangi as a founding document. Strengthen iwi – council relationships with a partnership, and formulate large financial and community support for Tangata Whenua. With Māori for Māori.

Council needs to strengthen its MOU’s with Mana Whenua. Mana Whenua will be entitled to representation on key committees and organizations associated with the Council that considers climate-related issues. More than that though – creating accessible spaces at the table. If our democracy was working well we wouldn’t currently have a whole bunch of white people on everything.
Before asking for others to listen, you need to support our groups first. We know our current system is a broken democracy that often only promotes to the most privileged in society. That’s why Over the last 3-4 years in all streams of activism those relationships have been instrumental to community building for me. ‘engagement’ isn’t enough when the councils mostly just do tokenistic stuff and don’t value what other communities need the other way round. You’ve got to start by showing up with them.

Engagement looks like having people underrepresented given a seat at the table. As a representative, I’ll make sure we are supporting those communities first, building up those relationships and making politics accessible. I’ve been able to We can engage over 300 young people on LGWM with a bunch of popsicles on a crocodile bike in oriental, and if a bunch of teenagers and young 20 something’s can do that, why can’t our council?
Encouraging stronger action behind the climate emergency declarations. We worked hard on this kaupapa with school strikes and Cr Pannett – lets bridge it out more. For example, some excellent nationwide campaigns like freeze the fares can be bought on to GWRC. There’s currently a joint Climate Change committee with other councils in the Greater Wellington region, though as currently, councils across the region could be working far more effectively. Equally – working from WCC, we can be a lot stronger on things like accessibility around PT, AT and look at things like fare reduction for the busses and train services.

Wellington is perfectly placed to be the most ambitious and innovative with climate change, we can take the opportunity to show Aotearoa how it's done. With all policy, at its core we need an importance of Tikanga Māori, Te Tiriti O Waitangi, and Māori interests. It needs to ensure a plan for a just transition of the country and NZ’s workforce to a zero carbon economy. It needs to centre the rights of climate-induced migrants, and the particular vulnerability of Pacific Islands to the effects of climate change. We need enforceable targets, that a are legally binding on all local authorities.
Be ambitious, we need a government that contractures more to the regions throughout NZ that are struggling to transition. Larger than declaring a climate emergency. Our govt also needs to step up Partnership (not just engagement) with iwi, hapu, and manu whenua should be apart of everything we work on.

Govt also need to support manu whenua in community ground-up to support, not top-down. For a lot of places the people are there and willing to change, we need to support them more. Both the govt and WCC have a target for net-zero emissions by 2050- we need to bring this forward to 2030. Tikanga Māori, Te Tiriti O Waitangi, and Māori interests need to be held above others - each action that we take, needs to ensure a plan for a just transition of the country’s workforce to a zero carbon economy

On the ZCA : I think the target of this Bill must be to limit warming to 1.5ºC. the IPCC report puts this target at the absoulute bare minumum level of abtion. NZ needs to make sure we go above and beyond carbon reduction targets of the 'fare share'. A 2050 methane target that is consistent with the 1.5ºC target (we can work within GWRC to implimnet this at a local level). Targets also need to be legally enforceable in order to hold central govt to account. There’s a lot more to to.
We’ve started by transitioning WCC into a net-zero council, that’s great but we need to bring things citywide. I’m in awe of Council candidate Laurie Foon who’s successfully rolled out sustainable business models for a lot of Wellingtonian business’. I’d love to see a lot more support for innovation like with what Laurie's done. 100% of any new developments in wellington need to be completely carbon neutral, non-negotiable. We need to build up, not out, protect our green spaces completely separately. Protect places of cultural significance on, especially areas of Tangata Whenua. (stop making white people townhouses ‘heritage’ ) Protect our beautiful ecology, our awa and reduce emission in every step wellington takes for all future developments. I’m all about shared collective green space rather than privatized green space. A fantastic example of this is the tree revitalization project operating across Mt Vic to Hataitai (where I live) we get together once every few weeks to check on over 1000 native tree’s planted throughout the year. community building -shared space and getting the locals involved in land use is incredible.

We’ve got a few options too – we can build homes along the transport spine proposed in LGWM – we need PT to bee the most accessible form of getting around the city too. PFG, the district plan need drastic improvements.
Urban development needs to be community-minded, working with many Whenua and local kaitiaki. I'd love to see district plans placing a much larger influence returning green and urban space to Māori is a huge priority.

Principal development should occur around existing town centres and the CBD, transport networks and up not out growth.

1. Effective: Work with Greater Wellington, WCC and Wellington employers to ensure the transport network is pumped with resources until working incredibly effectively. Fixing the network, getting good active and public transport is essential before investing in larger infrastructure.
2. Accessible: A huge focus needs to be put on mode shift - All public and active transport modes should feel safe and accessible – Protected cycle lanes and accessible infrastructure in line with Access matters and Auckland’s world-class accessibility standards for people struggling with impairments. In line with accessibility – PT needs to be cheaper, I can commit to campaigning for a fares decrease within GWRC’s triennium plan
3. Sustainable: Wellingtons PT makes up almost half of our emissions, and bar is the easiest sector to change in line with going straight to net-zero emissions. PT, AT is the #1 priority, alongside opposing any new roads being build before we have strong PT and AT.
Approaching an idea of a regional transport authority, that hold a larger governance response beyond GWRC’s elected members. This allows buy-in from Central govt, focus groups, unions ( especially important for the crap conditions and underpayment of our current drivers + driver shortages ) as well as WCC. We know that the council's atm haven’t been communicating effectively. Completed cycle network! Separated protected cycle lanes are great, reducing the number of carparks in CBD and finding more places for innovation to use those spaces. I’d love to see a completely walkable and accessible Wellington – with more living streets opening up. I will 100% ensure road safety and ‘bikes in schools’ projects, are fully funded by WCC and encourage the use of rideshare, public transport is used. Lots more to do!I support the current LGWM plan, but I think it should be more ambitious. We need to bring forward the projects that can most effectively and safely reduce traffic congestion and increase accessibility to the city. My top priority is to get public transport moving again, alongside promotion for active and public transport before more roads and tunnels. I’d like to see mass rapid transit bought forward in the plan. Keeping emissions down, Community safety, accessibility, and efficient networks are more important to me, than building more roads and tunnels.

For those that need to rely on private vehicles, like those with access issues, The number of electrically-powered will have to increase markedly. However, we do need to be aware of the embodied content of new vehicles, so it does not mean the dumping of serviceable petrol-driven vehicles. It does mean that as much of the new fleet as possible should be electrically powered.
Wellington is almost perfectly placed to advocate for GWRC, Kapiti coast to make good on their promises for climate action in the Agriculture sector. I’d love to see a just transition in Agriculture, will more support of our regional communities to go carbon zero.
16
Tamatha PaulPukehīnau LambtonAbsolutely. I made an oral submission alongside School Strikes 4 Climate movement organiser Raven Maeder on behalf of Victoria University Students’ Association supporting the Zero Carbon Bill with additional recommendations at a National Level for:

Zero Carbon by 2040, rather than 2050, with emissions halved by 2030
Also supporting a further target for a reduction of methane emissions to a reduction of at least 47% by 2050 – thus reflecting New Zealand’s ability and responsibility as a developed nation to do more than the bare minimum.
A Youth Climate Coalition as part of an independent climate commission to guide transition to zero carbon
The provision of Māori representation on the commission by way of an advisory committee or dedicated seats on the commission, as the indigenous people of Aotearoa and as kaitiaki (guardians) of both our whenua (land) and of mātauranga Māori
In terms of Local Government:

Transport is the biggest emitter of carbon in Wellington – so I support investment into sustainable, reliable and affordable modes of transport. This will need to be a collaboration between WCC and GWRC. In terms of urban planning and City infrastructure, I want to supports and prioritise pedestrians, cyclists, and people taking other forms of micromobility, such as e-scooters.
People are quite concerned about e-scooters being on the footpaths. I would support more dedicated and segregated lanes for scooters and bikes (including the electric variants of both of those), and less lanes for private transport.
I will support Wellington becoming a Zero Waste City to further decrease our emissions which would include investing in community composting and recycling initiatives, such as Kaicycle Urban farm in Newtown which acts as a source of food, a carbon sink and as a hub for community wellbeing. I think we should replicate this model in all neighbourhoods across Wellington where there is space and capacity to do so.
In order to become Zero Waste, we also need to be making our recycling systems accessible and ensure that newcomers to our City are aware of how to dispose of their waste. Currently, there are 2000 properties backlisted from recycling because they were mixing things like food-contaminated waste and glass in with their recycling. We should be resourcing an educational campaign to make sure everyone has got basic things such as recycling down. Will proper recycling save us from the Climate Crisis? No. Do we need to figure out how to live sustainably from here on out, even if we do make the necessary changes to mitigate life-threatening climate change? Absolutely.
We should also offer social, sustainable procurement to environmentally ethical businesses to green our local economy.
Everything I’ve said above, but I also think that declaring a climate and ecological emergency requires that the environment and our climate is at the forefront of every single decision made. For example:

Extending the Airport Runway – I do not support this.
A second Mt Vic Tunnel – I do not support this.
And with the low-lying areas of Wellington projected to be underwater by 2100, we also need to be proactively planning ahead to higher grounds.
Absolutely. I made an oral submission alongside School Strikes 4 Climate movement organiser Raven Maeder on behalf of Victoria University Students’ Association supporting the Zero Carbon Bill with additional recommendations at a National Level for:

Zero Carbon by 2040, rather than 2050, with emissions halved by 2030
Also supporting a further target for a reduction of methane emissions to a reduction of at least 47% by 2050 – thus reflecting New Zealand’s ability and responsibility as a developed nation to do more than the bare minimum.
A Youth Climate Coalition as part of an independent climate commission to guide transition to zero carbon
The provision of Māori representation on the commission by way of an advisory committee or dedicated seats on the commission, as the indigenous people of Aotearoa and as kaitiaki (guardians) of both our whenua (land) and of mātauranga Māori
In terms of Local Government:

Transport is the biggest emitter of carbon in Wellington – so I support investment into sustainable, reliable and affordable modes of transport. This will need to be a collaboration between WCC and GWRC. In terms of urban planning and City infrastructure, I want to supports and prioritise pedestrians, cyclists, and people taking other forms of micromobility, such as e-scooters.
People are quite concerned about e-scooters being on the footpaths. I would support more dedicated and segregated lanes for scooters and bikes (including the electric variants of both of those), and less lanes for private transport.
I will support Wellington becoming a Zero Waste City to further decrease our emissions which would include investing in community composting and recycling initiatives, such as Kaicycle Urban farm in Newtown which acts as a source of food, a carbon sink and as a hub for community wellbeing. I think we should replicate this model in all neighbourhoods across Wellington where there is space and capacity to do so.
In order to become Zero Waste, we also need to be making our recycling systems accessible and ensure that newcomers to our City are aware of how to dispose of their waste. Currently, there are 2000 properties backlisted from recycling because they were mixing things like food-contaminated waste and glass in with their recycling. We should be resourcing an educational campaign to make sure everyone has got basic things such as recycling down. Will proper recycling save us from the Climate Crisis? No. Do we need to figure out how to live sustainably from here on out, even if we do make the necessary changes to mitigate life-threatening climate change? Absolutely.
We should also offer social, sustainable procurement to environmentally ethical businesses to green our local economy.
Well, because I am Māori (Ngāti Awa, Waikato-Tainui) I will always make sure that mana whenua are involved in any and all decision-making processes that they wish to be involved in, while also acknowledging that within Taranaki Whānui o te Ūpoko o te Ika a Māui there is a diversity of opinion so making sure there is comprehensive and robust engagement with mana whenua is paramount. I also acknowledge that although I am tangata whenua, I am not mana whenua, and I will never endeavour or attempt to speak on behalf of mana whenua. A Just Transition for Wellington means our most vulnerable communities, who have contributed the least to the climate crisis, are not left behind and further disadvantaged due to the wide, sweeping changes we need to make in order to face climate change head on.Well, because I am Māori (Ngāti Awa, Waikato-Tainui) I will always make sure that mana whenua are involved in any and all decision-making processes that they wish to be involved in, while also acknowledging that within Taranaki Whānui o te Ūpoko o te Ika a Māui there is a diversity of opinion so making sure there is comprehensive and robust engagement with mana whenua is paramount. I also acknowledge that although I am tangata whenua, I am not mana whenua, and I will never endeavour or attempt to speak on behalf of mana whenua. A Just Transition for Wellington means our most vulnerable communities, who have contributed the least to the climate crisis, are not left behind and further disadvantaged due to the wide, sweeping changes we need to make in order to face climate change head on.Absolutely. I made an oral submission alongside School Strikes 4 Climate movement organiser Raven Maeder on behalf of Victoria University Students’ Association supporting the Zero Carbon Bill with additional recommendations at a National Level for:

Zero Carbon by 2040, rather than 2050, with emissions halved by 2030
Also supporting a further target for a reduction of methane emissions to a reduction of at least 47% by 2050 – thus reflecting New Zealand’s ability and responsibility as a developed nation to do more than the bare minimum.
A Youth Climate Coalition as part of an independent climate commission to guide transition to zero carbon
The provision of Māori representation on the commission by way of an advisory committee or dedicated seats on the commission, as the indigenous people of Aotearoa and as kaitiaki (guardians) of both our whenua (land) and of mātauranga Māori
In terms of Local Government:

Transport is the biggest emitter of carbon in Wellington – so I support investment into sustainable, reliable and affordable modes of transport. This will need to be a collaboration between WCC and GWRC. In terms of urban planning and City infrastructure, I want to supports and prioritise pedestrians, cyclists, and people taking other forms of micromobility, such as e-scooters.
People are quite concerned about e-scooters being on the footpaths. I would support more dedicated and segregated lanes for scooters and bikes (including the electric variants of both of those), and less lanes for private transport.
I will support Wellington becoming a Zero Waste City to further decrease our emissions which would include investing in community composting and recycling initiatives, such as Kaicycle Urban farm in Newtown which acts as a source of food, a carbon sink and as a hub for community wellbeing. I think we should replicate this model in all neighbourhoods across Wellington where there is space and capacity to do so.
In order to become Zero Waste, we also need to be making our recycling systems accessible and ensure that newcomers to our City are aware of how to dispose of their waste. Currently, there are 2000 properties backlisted from recycling because they were mixing things like food-contaminated waste and glass in with their recycling. We should be resourcing an educational campaign to make sure everyone has got basic things such as recycling down. Will proper recycling save us from the Climate Crisis? No. Do we need to figure out how to live sustainably from here on out, even if we do make the necessary changes to mitigate life-threatening climate change? Absolutely.
We should also offer social, sustainable procurement to environmentally ethical businesses to green our local economy.
Absolutely. I made an oral submission alongside School Strikes 4 Climate movement organiser Raven Maeder on behalf of Victoria University Students’ Association supporting the Zero Carbon Bill with additional recommendations at a National Level for:

Zero Carbon by 2040, rather than 2050, with emissions halved by 2030
Also supporting a further target for a reduction of methane emissions to a reduction of at least 47% by 2050 – thus reflecting New Zealand’s ability and responsibility as a developed nation to do more than the bare minimum.
A Youth Climate Coalition as part of an independent climate commission to guide transition to zero carbon
The provision of Māori representation on the commission by way of an advisory committee or dedicated seats on the commission, as the indigenous people of Aotearoa and as kaitiaki (guardians) of both our whenua (land) and of mātauranga Māori
In terms of Local Government:

Transport is the biggest emitter of carbon in Wellington – so I support investment into sustainable, reliable and affordable modes of transport. This will need to be a collaboration between WCC and GWRC. In terms of urban planning and City infrastructure, I want to supports and prioritise pedestrians, cyclists, and people taking other forms of micromobility, such as e-scooters.
People are quite concerned about e-scooters being on the footpaths. I would support more dedicated and segregated lanes for scooters and bikes (including the electric variants of both of those), and less lanes for private transport.
I will support Wellington becoming a Zero Waste City to further decrease our emissions which would include investing in community composting and recycling initiatives, such as Kaicycle Urban farm in Newtown which acts as a source of food, a carbon sink and as a hub for community wellbeing. I think we should replicate this model in all neighbourhoods across Wellington where there is space and capacity to do so.
In order to become Zero Waste, we also need to be making our recycling systems accessible and ensure that newcomers to our City are aware of how to dispose of their waste. Currently, there are 2000 properties backlisted from recycling because they were mixing things like food-contaminated waste and glass in with their recycling. We should be resourcing an educational campaign to make sure everyone has got basic things such as recycling down. Will proper recycling save us from the Climate Crisis? No. Do we need to figure out how to live sustainably from here on out, even if we do make the necessary changes to mitigate life-threatening climate change? Absolutely.
We should also offer social, sustainable procurement to environmentally ethical businesses to green our local economy.
Absolutely. I made an oral submission alongside School Strikes 4 Climate movement organiser Raven Maeder on behalf of Victoria University Students’ Association supporting the Zero Carbon Bill with additional recommendations at a National Level for:

Zero Carbon by 2040, rather than 2050, with emissions halved by 2030
Also supporting a further target for a reduction of methane emissions to a reduction of at least 47% by 2050 – thus reflecting New Zealand’s ability and responsibility as a developed nation to do more than the bare minimum.
A Youth Climate Coalition as part of an independent climate commission to guide transition to zero carbon
The provision of Māori representation on the commission by way of an advisory committee or dedicated seats on the commission, as the indigenous people of Aotearoa and as kaitiaki (guardians) of both our whenua (land) and of mātauranga Māori
In terms of Local Government:

Transport is the biggest emitter of carbon in Wellington – so I support investment into sustainable, reliable and affordable modes of transport. This will need to be a collaboration between WCC and GWRC. In terms of urban planning and City infrastructure, I want to supports and prioritise pedestrians, cyclists, and people taking other forms of micromobility, such as e-scooters.
People are quite concerned about e-scooters being on the footpaths. I would support more dedicated and segregated lanes for scooters and bikes (including the electric variants of both of those), and less lanes for private transport.
I will support Wellington becoming a Zero Waste City to further decrease our emissions which would include investing in community composting and recycling initiatives, such as Kaicycle Urban farm in Newtown which acts as a source of food, a carbon sink and as a hub for community wellbeing. I think we should replicate this model in all neighbourhoods across Wellington where there is space and capacity to do so.
In order to become Zero Waste, we also need to be making our recycling systems accessible and ensure that newcomers to our City are aware of how to dispose of their waste. Currently, there are 2000 properties backlisted from recycling because they were mixing things like food-contaminated waste and glass in with their recycling. We should be resourcing an educational campaign to make sure everyone has got basic things such as recycling down. Will proper recycling save us from the Climate Crisis? No. Do we need to figure out how to live sustainably from here on out, even if we do make the necessary changes to mitigate life-threatening climate change? Absolutely.
We should also offer social, sustainable procurement to environmentally ethical businesses to green our local economy.
To the very fullest extent. Although I value both people and planet, it is clear that without Planet we cannot have People at all. So, adaption and mitigation of climate change is my biggest priority. Because I am young and have our future at the forefront of my mind at all times, I will always support bold, courageous action on climate change and my decisions will always have our future as the main rationale, no matter what.To the very fullest extent. Although I value both people and planet, it is clear that without Planet we cannot have People at all. So, adaption and mitigation of climate change is my biggest priority. Because I am young and have our future at the forefront of my mind at all times, I will always support bold, courageous action on climate change and my decisions will always have our future as the main rationale, no matter what.To the very fullest extent. Although I value both people and planet, it is clear that without Planet we cannot have People at all. So, adaption and mitigation of climate change is my biggest priority. Because I am young and have our future at the forefront of my mind at all times, I will always support bold, courageous action on climate change and my decisions will always have our future as the main rationale, no matter what.See above. We undoubtedly need more reliable, sustainable modes of public transport but we should also incentivise active forms of transport such as walking and cycling, and e-mobility, so I commit to collaborating with the Regional Council to ensure this happens. Sea-level rise is another factor when expanding public transport from the railway station to the airport.See above. We undoubtedly need more reliable, sustainable modes of public transport but we should also incentivise active forms of transport such as walking and cycling, and e-mobility, so I commit to collaborating with the Regional Council to ensure this happens. Sea-level rise is another factor when expanding public transport from the railway station to the airport.See above. We undoubtedly need more reliable, sustainable modes of public transport but we should also incentivise active forms of transport such as walking and cycling, and e-mobility, so I commit to collaborating with the Regional Council to ensure this happens. Sea-level rise is another factor when expanding public transport from the railway station to the airport.See above. We undoubtedly need more reliable, sustainable modes of public transport but we should also incentivise active forms of transport such as walking and cycling, and e-mobility, so I commit to collaborating with the Regional Council to ensure this happens. Sea-level rise is another factor when expanding public transport from the railway station to the airport.
17
Rohan BiggsWharangi/Onslow-Western WardYes. There are roles for individuals exercising their personal judgement, Councils, and Central Government. We need to be clear about what role each of these actors plays. Central Government is responsible for international commitments and the legislative frameworks required to implement them. Council needs to play its part in reducing its carbon footprint without financially crippling ratepayers. I think there is a win:win there which I outline below. Individuals must account to their conscience.My key policy platform is “Less Debt, Lower Rates”. There is unlikely to be any candidate that has a policy prescription that will lower the Council’s carbon footprint better than mine. In general terms, lower rates means less activity and thus less carbon. It’s not flashy but it’s very practical. Those advocating more expenditure are almost certainly promoting an increase in the Council’s carbon footprint.
I would cancel the convention centre which is both costly and relies on international travel for its viability.
I would like to reduce the Council's travel budget by 40%. Again, it's not a flashy policy, but it is practical and achievable. The Mayor does not need a junket to China to look at trackless trams!!
In a very practical sense, it needs to gradually amend the District Plan as our understanding of the impacts of climate change improve. While we need to play our part in reducing carbon emissions (whether directly, or paying someone else to reduce carbon emissions who is better placed to do so efficiently), the frightening reality is that nothing we do is likely to make a material impact on this global issue on its own. This means we have to plan to adapt.Section 4 of the Local Government Act 2002 (“Treaty of Waitangi”) requires the Council to facilitate Maori involvement in decision making processes. Given the existing legislative requirement noted above it’s not clear there is a gap to be filled here in existing Council processes.The Just Transition framework illustrates the major trade-offs faced in reducing carbon emissions and economic well being. Many of the relevant policy settings, such as active labour market interventions are the responsibility of central government. I’m skeptical of the idea of the Council ‘planning' the Wellington economy differently. My preference would be for central government policies to price carbon emissions and for businesses to adapt accordingly. However, I think the Council could do a far better job in consulting with the public and interested parties in a transparent manner on what actions it will or could take to support those transitions and to minimise social dislocation.I do not have any specific plans in this area. I would be very happy to engage with any of these groups to discuss: the inherent trade-offs in reducing carbon emissions (less activity generally means less financial resource to spend on things we value); the respective roles of individuals, Councils, and central government; and the importance of individual autonomy in ultimately determining carbon emissions.I do not have any specific plans in this area although I expect there will be lessons learned that can be shared between councils as they develop responses and adapt their District Plans and other planning documents. There may be a role for more structured engagement at the Wellington Regional level.I do not have any plans to seek policy changes from central government. I think we need to acknowledge the different roles and responsibilities of Councils and central government, where policy expertise resides, and not over-promise. I could imagine identifying issues that arise as a result of Wellington’s adaptation that would warrant a discussion with central government in the future as specific issues crystallize.I don't see this as a core role for the Council.Wellington needs more houses. The District Plan governs where that development occurs. It is important that Plan adapts to ensure we do not invest in costly infrastructure in inappropriate areas. We need to make sure the evidence and scenarios relied upon to amend the Plan are credible. There has been a tendency in some quarters to advocate planning to “worst case” scenarios. That comes with its own costs and some balancing of these costs with the likelihood of a worst case scenario unfolding is warranted.I support the proposed central government National Policy Statement on Urban Development that would enable increased housing supply along key transport corridors.I'm not a big fan of central 'planning' to remedy issues. I think if carbon is priced accurately then individuals and businesses will adapt accordingly, and in positive ways that planners simply couldn't anticipate.Funding transport infrastructure is a core function of the Council. Whatever your views on whether we should be prioritising roads or public transport, Wellington is facing some large bills. My key focus is to stop the Council frittering your money away on vanity and virtue signaling to ensure that we have the financial fire power we need without doubling your rates bills over ten years.
The Council must show leadership in advocating for ratepayers with the Regional Council to restore the credibility of the Capital’s bus network. A model that relies on commuters switching buses is doomed with the current frequency of services and over-crowding. I support working with the Regional Council to get the Airport Flyer into the Metlink system to reduce the cost of the service, and enable the use of Snapper and realtime information.
I strongly support the delivery of cost-effective infrastructure to improve the convenience, reliability and efficiency of public transport. Extending bus lanes, and park and ride facilities are key examples I support. I do not support the cost-ineffective $2.2 billion on rapid mass transport proposed in Let’s get Wellington Moving.
I support enticing those who can to use public transport with the provision of a credible service, rather than punishing those whose circumstances require them to continue to use cars.
The Council's role is somewhat limited, but a strong advocacy role is required and appropriate.Outlined above. I generally jog to work, but I had a dose of pneumonia this year and found myself on the bus. Investing in infrastructure to improve convenience and reliability would be priorities for me. I think it is extremely unfortunate that the Island Bay cycle way and GWRC amendments to the bus network have generated large perception issues to overcome.Wellington is in desperate need of transport infrastructure investment. LGWM is short on many important details so it is hard to offer firm judgements. I can't imagine a future for Wellington that doesn't include a clear route from the airport to the motorway heading north, so I support the second Mt Victoria tunnel. Perhaps the cars on the route will all be self-driving and electric. I am a big fan of public transport and support bus priority lanes, priority light phasing and improved park and ride facilities. However, I do not support the $2.2b in rapid mass transit as it is both cost ineffective and unaffordable. I do not see this as a role for the WCC.
18
Richard McIntoshWharangi/Onslow-Western WardYes. Council needs to require emissions reductions where it can and use its capability to facilitate emissions reductions in areas outside its direct control.Any actions which unify us, no actions that divide us.Begin the managed retreat of coastal settled areas and industrial infrastructure.Kia mohiotia kia tautokohia e matou te kaunihera te tino rangatiratanga o Taranaki Whanui raua ko Ngatitoa ki Te Upoko o Te Ika a Maui.Na te kaunihera e whakamana ai te atikara tuarua o Te Tiriti o Waitangi.Council actions will actively protect the interests of the most vulnerable residents.Margins are part of the whole. Actions taken by Council to address climate change must be intelligible and effective throughout the city's many communities.Unify Wellington's councils to have the PTOM overturned.Council must act to protect all its communities. Central government needs to be lobbied to act the same way and not to respond merely to the loudest or best-organised voices.Cut fleet & plant emissions. Purchase locally-produced carbon credits.It needs to be a factor in most decisions made by Council.Value rural areas for the ecological services they provide. Integrate economy of rural and urban areas with supply- and demand-side carbon financing.Low-carbon construction materials prioritised. Local energy generation enabled.Cut fossil fuel use with expanded, more frequent public transport. Enable the evolving use of roads by personal electric transport.Form a Wellington City Transport Corporation to co-ordinate the public transport system in our city.LGWM still seems to have lots of room to move within it. Green priorities are to get serious about establishing mass transit corridors for rail.WCC has no industry or agriculture to speak of - but must not as a result merely trumpet its concomitant relative low emissions profile. The city must push for the integration of its rural areas into public-good carbon financing, and push for the Region's rural areas to be similarly integrated into the regional economy. The city should oppose large-scale agricultural water storage in the region as being contrary to these goals.
19
Rebecca MatthewsWharangi/Onslow-Western WardYes - committed to make Wellington a Carbon Zero City as soon as possible. Reducing emissions needs to be central to all decision making.Implementation of Te Atakura First To Zero - supporting infrastructure for electric cars, planting thousands of trees, encouraging public transport and active modes of transport, Council internally being Carbon Zero, higher standard homes etc.Ensure that no development occurs in vulnerable areas. Make adaptation plans for all local communities, including relocation plans for vulnerable dwellings. Build resilience for storms and extreme weather events by investing in key infrastructure.Strengthen Memorandum of Understanding with Taranaki Whanui and Ngati Toa, the two recognised Mana Whenua organisationsWork with Iwi leaders group and through them develop more local relationships.One where working people don't suffer as a result of the changes we need to make - where jobs are paid the Living Wage as a minimum. Where workers have opportunities to re-train and where sustainable jobs are created. Where the burden of becoming carbon neutral and adapting to climate change is shared equitably.Through the current advisory groups that exist and again develop those relationships in my ward. I have attended Climate Strike and those groups are great starting point for working with youth, as is your organisation.There are good opportunities to do this through Local Government New Zealand and through all our relationships with interested business and community groups.Support strong Carbon Zero legislation, good support and legislation for Councils to take action. We need to change the way we do all government.WCC to lead by example, and work with community and business, and provide incentives where necessary.Again, needs to be central to decision making about where development takes place.tDistrict Plan review - working with central government to ensure appropriate n measures are in place to ensure we can deliver the housing people need, public transport all can use to deliver a compact, carbon neutral city.We need intensified housing to be along public transport routes.Transport is the biggest contributor to emissions - we need to support infrastructure for electric vehicles, cheap, reliable and convenient public transport with low emissions, greater support for walking and cycling. Keen to shift to a regional public transport authority to get around the table and be part of decision making.It's my number one priority. Keen to support more infrastructure for walking and cycling and to advocate for cheap. convenient and reliable public transport.I support LGWM, especially mass public transit in the form of light rail or trackless trams - I will advocate for business case to be made for mass transit to Karori.Working with Regional Council and farmers in our ward to progress
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
Loading...