BAPG VII, 02/02/13 @ Stanford
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NameTitleLabUniversityShort decription (optional)Email
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NOTE: Sign up here if you would like to give a poster or talk at the Stanford BAPGVII Conference on 02/02/13
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LOCATION:Stanford University ~ Clark
auditorium at Clark Center directions are at
http://biox.stanford.edu/clark/directions.html
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FREE Parking since it is a weekend ~Available at Lomita Drive, Palm Drive, Museum Way, the Oval
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20 minute talks (TALKS HAVE BEEN CHOSEN; PLEASE SIGN UP ONLY FOR THE POSTERS)
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1Josh SchraiberTheory and application of Wright-Fisher Diffusion BridgesSlatkinBerkeleyI will present joint work with Bob Griffiths and Steve Evans in which we simulated and characterized the trajectories of Wright-Fisher paths when the end points are tied down. I will then showcase the usage of these bridge paths for the inference of selection from allele frequency time series and allele frequencies at the tips of a population phylogenyjgschraiber@berkeley.edu
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2Ben CallahanThe Experimental Evolution of Niche ConstructionFisherStanfordNiche construction - environmental modification by living organisms that affects their fitness - has the potential to profoundly alter population and ecological dynamics. We investigate whether this potential is realized during the experimental evolution of microbes.
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3Kirk LohmuellerExome sequencing and heterogeneity of complex traitsNielsen/LohmuellerBerkeley/UCLAWhat do negative results in exome sequencing studies tell us about the architecture of compex traits?k.lohmueller@berkeley.edu
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4Anand BhaskarExact comparisons between Kingman's coalescent and the discrete-time Wright-Fisher model for large sample sizesSongBerkeleyShould one use the Wright-Fisher model instead of the coalescent when inferring demography using large sample sizes?bhaskar@eecs.berkeley.edu
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5Hunter FraserGene expression drives local adaptation in humansFraserStanfordRecently, many putative “local adaptations” have been shown to differ between human populations. We have found that these local adaptations are over 10-fold more likely to affect gene expression than amino acid sequence. In addition, a novel population-genetic approach identifies the first examples of polygenic gene expression adaptations in humans. hbfraser@stanford.edu
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6Nandita GarudEvidence that selection in D. melanogaster is primarily driven by soft sweepsPetrovStanfordIn our paper (with Philipp Messer, Erkan Buzbas, and Dmitri Petrov), we propose two novel statistics to identify hard and soft sweeps with similar power and to distinguish them from one another. We apply these statistics to the DGRP data set and find that adaptation is abundant in N. Carolina and that soft sweeps seem to be the primary signature left behind by these adaptive events. ngarud@stanford.edu
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7Qi ZhouAtlas of avian sex chromosome evolutionBachtrogBerkeleyWe investigated 48 newly sequenced genomes spanning the entire avian phylogeny for their sex chromosomes, and found a complicated pattern of evolutionary strata not shared by related species. zhouqi@berkeley.edu
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8Pleuni PenningsPetrovStanfordpleuni@stanford.edu
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9Jeremy RoopRare variants drive common traits in S. paradoxusBremBerkeleyWe identify a suite of rare genetic variants that underlie hundreds of common morphological, stress-resistance, and growth phenotypes in isolates from a natural yeast population. Each distinct variant mapped to one of two paralogous master regulator genes, raising the possibility that such loci may provide a mechanism for rapid phenotypic evolution. jroop@berkeley.edu
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POSTERS
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1Roy labMany different solutions to the same problem: subcellular targeting of MDH genes in fungiRoySFSUIn different fungal organisms, many different forms of alternative splicing and gene duplication lead to targeting of MDH proteins to the peroxisome, mitochondrion and cytosol.scottwroy@gmail.com
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2Joel ThompsonEvolutionary Dynamics and Diversity in Microbial PopulationsFisherStanfordjrt45@stanford.edu
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3Rajiv McCoyEvaluating methods of demographic inference using genomic data from the checkerspot butterfly Euphydryas gillettiiPetrov + BoggsStanfordIn the absence of previous genomic resources, we used RNA-seq to discover SNPs and perform demographic inference in the case of known demographic history of an isolated butterfly population.rmccoy@stanford.edu
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4Alan BerglandTBDPetrovStanfordbergladn@stanford.edu
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5David LawrieStrong Purifying Selection at Synonymous Sites in D. melanogasterPetrovStanfordWe use site frequency spectra from DGRP data to show that, contrary to expectation, 22% of four-fold synonymous (4D) sites in D. melanogaster evolve under very strong selective constraint while few, if any, appear to be under weak constraint. The function underlying the inferred strong constraint appears to be separate from splicing enhancers, nucleosome positioning, and the translational optimization engendering canonical codon bias. dlawrie@stanford.edu
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6Sandeep VenkataramEpistasis and Repeatability of evolution in Fisher's Geometric ModelPetrovStanfordsvenkat1@stanford.edu
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