Fall 2015 Undergraduate English and Film Courses (ALWAYS CHECK BANNER FOR UP-TO-DATE SCHEDULE)
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CRNSubjCourseSecInstructorTitleDaysTimeDescriptionSelected Texts
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83038ENGL10001TBAAppreciating Literature -- GUMWF08:00 am-08:50 am
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83039ENGL10003Ronald W Hoag (P)Appreciating LiteratureTR09:30 am-10:45 amLecture and discussion. "Close reading" explorations in the genres of fiction (10 short stories), poetry (20-30 brief poems), drama (TRIFLES, a one-act play), and film (WITNESS, a great movie) with attention to the aims and techniques of the writer's craft and to the approaches and tools of the interpreter's pursuit. Manageable reading assignments, four tests and one optional extra-credit essay, attendance not taken but very important. For many students this course is an enjoyable eye-opener. Only one, bargain-priced text to buy--LITERATURE: THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE (Shorter Ninth Edition), Abcarian & Klotz editors, Bedford/St. Martin's publisher. Think of this anthology as a collection of "greatest hits," which it definitely is.
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83042ENGL10004Marame Gueye (P)Appreciating LiteratureTR11:00 am-12:15 pm
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83044ENGL10005Jessica Dawn Bardill (P)Appreciating LiteratureTR12:30 pm-01:45 pmThis course introduces students to a wide range of literary texts and ways of reading to enhance their enjoyment and understanding of literature. These texts come from a variety of cultural backgrounds, as well as multiple genres. Students will learn multiple interpretive strategies to apply to their readings in and out of the classroom of literature and narrative film.Bloodchild and Other Stories by Octavia Butler
The Truth about Stories by Thomas King
Green Grass, Running Water by Thomas King
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83045ENGL1000601Helena M Feder (P)Appreciating Literature -- DEOnlineThis ONLINE introductory course will examine poems, fiction, and a play through podcasts of a face-to-face section of the course; you will hear a mini-lectures and student presentations, as if you are in a face to face course on campus.
Glengarry Glen Ross, by David Mamet. Grove Press
Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry vol.1
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep

A number of poems, short stories, and other course materials have been scanned to the course Blackboard site.
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83475ENGL20001Marianne Montgomery (P)Interpreting Literature: Frankenstein's Monster -- WITR09:30 am-10:45 amWhen the monster in Mary Shelley’s novel _Frankenstein_ finds a bag of books, he records their powerful effect on him: “They produced in me an infinity of new images and feelings…I applied much personally to my own feelings and condition.” In this course, we’ll read along with Frankenstein’s monster, studying books he found (or could have found) in the bag. We’ll encounter works in a variety of genres: novel, lyric poetry, epic, tragic drama, and biography. These various texts will prepare you to read _Frankenstein_ itself at the end of the semester.Shelley, _Frankenstein_
Marlowe, _Doctor Faustus_
Goethe, _The Sorrows of Young Werther_
Shakespeare, _Sonnets_ (selections)
Plutarch, _Lives_ (selections)
Milton, _Paradise Lost_ (selections)
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83478ENGL20002Marianne Montgomery (P)Interpreting Literature: Frankenstein's Monster -- WITR11:00 am-12:15 pmWhen the monster in Mary Shelley’s novel _Frankenstein_ finds a bag of books, he records their powerful effect on him: “They produced in me an infinity of new images and feelings…I applied much personally to my own feelings and condition.” In this course, we’ll read along with Frankenstein’s monster, studying books he found (or could have found) in the bag. We’ll encounter works in a variety of genres: novel, lyric poetry, epic, tragic drama, and biography. These various texts will prepare you to read _Frankenstein_ itself at the end of the semester.Shelley, _Frankenstein_
Marlowe, _Doctor Faustus_
Goethe, _The Sorrows of Young Werther_
Shakespeare, _Sonnets_ (selections)
Plutarch, _Lives_ (selections)
Milton, _Paradise Lost_ (selections)
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83480ENGL20003James W Kirkland (P)Interpreting Literature -- WITR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
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83482ENGL2000601Reginald Wade Watson (P)Interpreting Literature -- WI, DEOnlineThis course is designed to help the student analyze and critique major works of fiction. In this course, through journal and essay writing, you will learn to closely analyze the different literary devices and symbols that are inherent in most literary works. As a result, it is hoped that you will gain a better appreciation for the aesthetic and philosophical qualities of the text.Title: Literature: Approaches, ETC.
Author: Diyanni
2nd edition, 2008
ISBN # 9780073124452
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83485ENGL21001Thomas L Herron (P)Major British Writers -- WITR02:00 pm-03:15 pm
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83487ENGL22001Thomas E Douglass (P)Major American Writers -- WITR11:00 am-12:15 pmCourse Description: English 2200 is an introduction to some of the influential writers in American letters. In fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama, the American voice has become singular in its power and presence in the world. Six individual works present a vision and model for the American sense of longing in LIFE – that is, to be unique, individual, free from tradition and the past, and empowered to create and re-create in the world. The irony of this longing is often a central conflict in the literature that it produces, which is the difficulty of forging a nation of common interest beyond self-interest. This course uses the Paideia approach for reading and seminar discussions. ENGL 2200 is also a WI course.*

Great American Short Stories: From Hawthorne to Hemingway
Frederick Douglass. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845)
Henry David Thoreau. Walden and Civil Disobedience (1854)
Walt Whitman. Leaves of Grass (1855)
Willa Cather. My Antonia (1918)
Ernest Hemingway. In Our Time (1925)
Jack Kerouac. On the Road (1957)
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83489ENGL22002Thomas E Douglass (P)Major American Writers -- WITR12:30 pm-01:45 pmEnglish 2200 is an introduction to some of the influential writers in American letters. In fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama, the American voice has become singular in its power and presence in the world. Six individual works present a vision and model for the American sense of longing in LIFE – that is, to be unique, individual, free from tradition and the past, and empowered to create and re-create in the world. The irony of this longing is often a central conflict in the literature that it produces, which is the difficulty of forging a nation of common interest beyond self-interest. This course uses the Paideia approach for reading and seminar discussions. ENGL 2200 is also a WI course.* Great American Short Stories: From Hawthorne to Hemingway
Frederick Douglass. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845)
Henry David Thoreau. Walden and Civil Disobedience (1854)
Walt Whitman. Leaves of Grass (1855)
Willa Cather. My Antonia (1918)
Ernest Hemingway. In Our Time (1925)
Jack Kerouac. On the Road (1957)
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83494ENGL22301Margaret D Bauer (P)Southern LiteratureTR09:30 am-10:45 amSurvey of Southern literature, including writers from the antebellum, Southern Renascence, and contemporary periods.We use UNC's Documenting the American South, an online repository of early Southern literature, for early readings.
Unit 2, Southern Renascence, I sometimes teach a Faulkner novel like _As I Lay Dying_ and often teach _The House of Connelly_ by NC playwright Paul Green.
Unit 3, contemporary Southern writers, always includes a novel by Ernest Gaines, an African American writer from Louisiana
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83497ENGL24201Su-Ching Huang (P)The Short StoryMW02:00 pm-03:15 pmThis course introduces students to close readings of short fiction representing a variety of time periods and nationalities. The class consists of group discussions, analysis and application of literary terms and thematic issues, consideration of cultural contexts, and examination of narrative construction. Requirements include contributing to group discussions, submitting daily written vocabulary assignments, writing interpretive papers, making class presentations, and passing frequent exams.Imagining America: Stories from the Promised Land. Ed. Wesley Brown and Amy Ling. Revised Edition. 2003. (ISBN 978-089255-277-1)
* PDF files of other short stories downloadable from Blackboard.
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83501ENGL25701Andrea Kitta (P)The SupernaturalTR11:00 am-12:15 pmWe'll study various supernatural traditions, such as Slender Man, sleep paralysis, ghosts, fairies, poltergeists,and others, looking at how people interact with these traditions online, face-to-face, and in popular culture. David Hufford - The Terror That Comes in the Night

Goldstein, Grider, and Thomas - Haunting Experiences

Primiano “I Wanna Do Bad Things With You: Fantasia on Themes of American Religion from the Title Sequence of HBO’s True Blood”

Selected readings from Vampire: A Casebook ed, Alan Dundes
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83502ENGL27001Solveig Jana Bosse (P)Introduction to Language StudiesTR02:00 pm-03:15 pmWe're investigating a large variety of topics related to language: the building blocks of language (sounds, words, sentences), how language differs from animal communication systems, how humans use language in their culture and society, how children acquire their native language, how language changes over time and by region, and a few others. Language Files (Ohio State University)
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83503ENGL27101Michael J Aceto (P)English GrammarTR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
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83509ENGL27401Michael J Aceto (P)Language in the USATR11:00 am-12:15 pm
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83510ENGL28151J Luke Whisnant (P)Introduction to Creative WritingTR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
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83511ENGL28152Robert J Siegel (P)Introduction to Creative WritingTR03:30 pm-04:45 pmThe course will explore the major genres of writing: fiction, creative non-fiction, playwriting, screenplay writing, and poetry. We will look at narrative structure, dramatic structure, voice, writers’ tools such as irony, understatement, misdirection, imagery, etc.

The course will ask students to explore writing in all of the major genres and by the end of the course, students will hopefully become more skillful in at least one of these genres. The course will also ask students to read in each genre with the goal of making them better writers.
Points of View—A collection of short stories
Collected Stories—A play by Donald Marguiles
In Short: A Collection of Brief Creative Non Fiction.
The Trouble With Poetry, Billy Collins
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83512ENGL28153John Hoppenthaler (P)Introduction to Creative WritingTR02:00 pm-03:15 pmENGL 2815 provides an introduction to creative writing in four major genres—poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, and drama—and to practice in the basics of image, metaphor, line, form, sound, plot, characterization, and voice. It focuses specifically on literary genres as they appear on the page. The course also acknowledges the important relationship between creative writing and the practice of literary critique and explication by requiring students to read, analyze, discuss, pass informed judgment upon, and write about contemporary literary genres. Furthermore, ENGL 2815 serves as a core course for the new English Minor in Creative Writing.The New York Writers Workshop. The Portable MFA in Creative Writing. Writer's Digest Books, 2006.
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83513ENGL30001Jeffrey Stephens Johnson (P)History of British Literature to 1700MWF02:00 pm-02:50 pmThe course focuses on literature from the Middle Ages and Early Modern periods, from Beowulf to Milton. The goals are to gain a working knowledge of the history of English literature from the 10th through the 17th centuries and to use the literary study to help you think critically about culture and literature, both in the past and in the world today. Understanding the past is essential for making sense of the present.The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volumes A and B (Eighth Edition)
William Shakespeare, The Tempest (packaged with the anthology)
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83514ENGL30101Anne Mallory (P)History of British Literature 1700-1900MW02:00 pm-03:15 pm
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83515ENGL30201Edgar Thomson Shields (P)History of American Literature to 1900TR02:00 pm-03:15 pmA course specifically for English majors and minors examining the periods of American literature from the first European/Native American contacts to 1900. Emphasis on how the historical context of a time influences writing and interpretation of texts. A variety of texts will be examined, from traditional literary genres such as poetry and fiction to various forms of nonfiction, such as explorers' reports, political essays, etc. Basic research skills for historically-based literary and cultural study will also be taught.There is no required textbook for this course. All readings are available through library databases, open-web sources, or will be posted on the class Blackboard site.
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83516ENGL30401Kirk St Amant (P)Introduction to Professional WritingTR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
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83517ENGL32601Reginald Wade Watson (P)African American LiteratureTR11:00 am-12:15 pmThe Black American Literature tradition has, in the past, been largely overlooked on all levels of education. It has only been recently that efforts have been made to increase public and educational awareness of the African-American’s contributions to literature. This course is designed to present a few of the many black-authored works so that a thorough and critical analysis can be made. In this course you will learn how to read, write, and think critically so that you can respond competently through either written or verbal expression. The goal of this course is to help you gain a full appreciation and understanding of the African-American tradition.Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave Written by Himself
Frederick Douglass
Their Eyes Were Watching God Zora Neale Hurston
Native Son Richard Wright
Beloved Toni Morrison
Black Voices: An Anthology of Afro-American Literature Chapman (optional)
A Turbulent Voyage Floyd W. Hayes, III
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83518ENGL32602Reginald Wade Watson (P)African American LiteratureTR12:30 pm-01:45 pmThe Black American Literature tradition has, in the past, been largely overlooked on all levels of education. It has only been recently that efforts have been made to increase public and educational awareness of the African-American’s contributions to literature. This course is designed to present a few of the many black-authored works so that a thorough and critical analysis can be made. In this course you will learn how to read, write, and think critically so that you can respond competently through either written or verbal expression. The goal of this course is to help you gain a full appreciation and understanding of the African-American tradition.Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave Written by Himself
Frederick Douglass
Their Eyes Were Watching God Zora Neale Hurston
Native Son Richard Wright
Beloved Toni Morrison
Black Voices: An Anthology of Afro-American Literature Chapman (optional)
A Turbulent Voyage Floyd W. Hayes, III
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83519ENGL33001Marame Gueye (P)Women and LiteratureTR09:30 am-10:45 am
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83520ENGL33002Nicole Nolan Sidhu (P)Women and LiteratureMWF11:00 am-11:50 am
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83521ENGL33301Robert J Siegel (P)Early Twentieth-Century DramaTR11:00 am-12:15 pmThe course will explore drama in the U.S., Great Britain, and the Continent up until WWII. We will examine characters in conflict with their country, their community, their family, their God, and their conscience.Arms and the Man, Shaw
Six Characters in Search of an Author, Pirandello
Galileo, Bertolt Brecht
Awake and Sing, Odets
The Hairy Ape, O’Neill
Antigone, Jean Anouilh
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83522ENGL34101Anne Mallory (P)Introduction to PoetryMW03:30 pm-04:45 pmPoetry is all around us. Even if we don’t read it, most of us listen to the poetry of song lyrics every day. Many cities line subway walls with poems, and poetry has even appeared in the corridors of our local airport. With an eye toward understanding how poems work and how poetry changes our perception of the world, we’ll read a variety of poems from different historical periods and sample the work of a culturally diverse group of writers.The Seagull Reader: Poems. Edited by Joseph Kelly. Third edition.
9780393938227
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83523ENGL34801Kenneth M Parille (P)Science FictionTR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
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83525ENGL35701Andrea Kitta (P)American Folklore -- WITR09:30 am-10:45 am
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83526ENGL35702James W Kirkland (P)American Folklore -- WITR02:00 pm-03:15 pm
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83527ENGL36001David Wilson-Okamura (P)Classics from Homer to DanteMWF11:00 am-11:50 am
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85793ENGL37401Solveig Jana Bosse (P)The Structure of English: Syntax & Semantics -- wENGL6527TR03:30 pm-04:45 pmIn this course, we'll study two major aspects of language: meaning and sentence. We'll look at what words mean, how we can dissect the meaning and how words (and sentences) relate to one another based on their meaning. With respect to sentences, we'll look at how words are combined structurally to form a grammatical sentence. We will also look at sentences without subjects, subordinate sentences and questions and how they differ structurally from one another.
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83530ENGL37601Solveig Jana Bosse (P)Linguistic Theory for Speech and Hearing CliniciansTR11:00 am-12:15 pm
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83532ENGL38101Joyce I Middleton (P)Advanced CompositionTR11:00 am-12:15 pm
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83534ENGL38201Donna Jean Kain (P)Scientific WritingMWF09:00 am-09:50 am
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83536ENGL3820601Erin Anne Frost (P)Scientific Writing -- DEOnline
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83539ENGL38351Wendy Sharer (P)Persuasive WritingTR02:00 pm-03:15 pmAre you thinking about applying to law school? Med school? Any kind of advanced study?
Do you care about your words having an impact on the people and the world around you?

If so, then you want the power of persuasion. In English 3835: Persuasive Writing (WI), you will explore how successful writers use words and images to move readers to respond in particular ways, and you will develop methods of writing persuasively for personal, popular, and professional audiences.
From Critical Thinking to Argument, Barnet and Bedau, ISBN-13: 978-1-4576-4995-0. MacMillan. Estimated retail price: $25
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83543ENGL38501J Luke Whisnant (P)Introduction to Fiction WritingTR11:00 am-12:15 pm
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83546ENGL38701Donna Jean Kain (P)Introduction to Editing and PublishingMWF10:00 am-10:50 amYou will learn to use several methods of marking documents including hard-copy and electronic editing; to distinguish between grammatical and stylistic choices; to apply principles of contextual editing; to analyze, critique, and revise manuscripts for different audiences; and to create successful writer/editor dialogues. The class will develop these hands-on skills by editing and publishing the second issue of The Lookout, a journal of undergraduate research at ECU. You’ll improve your writing and editing too. http://www.ecu.edu/lookout/Amy Einsohn, The Copoyeditor's Handbook, 3rd Edition. ISBN-13: 978-0520271562

The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition ISBN-13: 978-0226104201
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83585ENGL40201Nicole Nolan Sidhu (P)ChaucerMWF10:00 am-10:50 amWe will read most of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales in this class. Influencing writers from Shakespeare to the present day, Chaucer is one of the greatest authors in the English language. The Canterbury Tales is his masterwork and includes an amazing variety of literary styles, including funny obscene stories and daring romances, as well as tales of religious virtue, moral struggle, and the devastation wrought by those with a relentless drive for power. As a writer, Chaucer has a greater interest in marginal voices than any writer before the nineteenth century. Students of gender, race, religion and social justice will find the Canterbury Tales a fascinating window onto the tumultuous fourteenth century as well as our own (also rather tumultuous) twenty-first century.Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales
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83587ENGL40701Marianne Montgomery (P)Shakespeare: The HistoriesTR12:30 pm-01:45 pmIn this course, we’ll read a representative sample of Shakespeare’s English history plays. This is primarily a course in learning to read Shakespeare with close attention to both dramatic form and thematic content. We’ll consider the plays as historical documents of early modern England and as dramatic fictions whose concerns—from political authority to war to family—still speak to us today. Richard III, Richard II, Henry IV, Henry V
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83588ENGL40801Thomas L Herron (P)Shakespeare: The ComediesTR03:30 pm-04:45 pm
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83590ENGL40901David Wilson-Okamura (P)Shakespeare: The TragediesMWF03:00 pm-03:50 pm
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83591ENGL43701Helena M Feder (P)Literature and the Environment -- wENGL6270MW02:00 pm-03:15 pmAmerican Literature and Environment Seminar

How has American literature shaped and been shaped by ideas of landscape and environment,? What role might cultural critique play in environmental awareness and the long road to sustainability? This course will consider these among other questions in relation to canonical and non-canonical works of twentieth-century American literature. Students will read a variety of important texts – including realist novels, postmodern fiction, science writing, and science fiction.
Selected Texts
Land of Little Rain, Mary Austin
White Noise, Don DeLillo
A Small Place, Jamaica Kincaid
Tender Is the Night, F. Scott Fitzgerald
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, Philip K. Dick
Turn of the Screw, Henry James
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83593ENGL4720601Ludmila Cope (P)Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers -- wENGL6529OnlineThe purpose of the course is to introduce you to the field of applied linguistics through the lens of its largest subfield, language teaching. We’ll look at the research done and methodologies used in the essential areas of inquiry in this large field, including second language acquisition, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, and the focus on the language learner (motivation, learning styles and learning strategies). We will also look at the contributions of discourse analysis, pragmatics, and corpus linguistics, specifically the ways in which these important areas of study enhance both theories and practice of language teaching and language learning; at the development of specific language skills; and at the role of grammar and vocabulary development in language learning. Last but not least, we’ll study some important issues in bilingualism & language maintenance. Required:
Schmitt, N. (Ed.) (2010). 2nd ed. An Introduction to applied linguistics. Hodder Education.

& the following e-book available through the Joyner Library:
Davies, A., & Elder, C.(eds.) (2005). The Handbook of applied linguistics. Blackwell Reference Online http://www.blackwellreference.com.jproxy.lib.ecu.edu/subscriber/uid=934/book?id=g9781405138093_9781405138093

Selected Articles will be available on the course Bb site.
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83983ENGL48501Liza A Wieland (P)Advanced Fiction Writing -- wENGL6850TR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
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83986ENGL48601Donald Alexander Albright (P)Advanced Nonfiction Writing -- wENGL6868W06:30 pm-09:30 pm
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83988ENGL48901Margaret D Bauer (P)Practicum: Careers in Writing: NC Literary ReviewOnlineMy section of 4890 is an internship with ECU's award-winning North Carolina Literary Review (http://www.nclr.ecu.edu). Students enrolled in this course set a 10-hour/week schedule around their other class/work obligations. Interns learn how to prepare content for publication and also participate in the production, management, and marketing of the journal.
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83990ENGL49501Laureen Tedesco (P)Literature for ChildrenMWF01:00 pm-01:50 pm
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83996ENGL49991Erin Anne Frost (P)English Professional SeminarM02:00 pm-02:50 pmIn this 1-credit course designed for graduating seniors, you'll explore career and graduate school options; prepare resumes, cover letters, writing samples, and your senior portfolio; practice marketing yourself in digital contexts; and reflect on the skills you've developed as an English major.Brooks, Katharine. You Majored in What?: Mapping Your Path from Chaos to Career. New York, NY: Viking, 2009. Print.

Curran, Sheila J., and Suzanne Greenwald. Smart Moves for Liberal Arts Grads: Finding a Path to Your Perfect Career. Berkeley, CA: Ten Speed, 2006. Print.
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83999ENGL52801David Wilson-Okamura (P)Topics in Poetry: YeatsMWF01:00 pm-01:50 pmWilliam Butler Yeats had a long career, but (unlike Wordsworth, who had one Great Decade which he spent the next four decades trying to relive and revise), Yeats gained in power as he got older. He was arguably the last of the Romantics and the first of the great Modernists. This course will be an opportunity to study a single author in detail, from the dreamy mythology of his early writings to the articulate rage of his fiery last decades. We will treat the class as a seminar, which does not just mean “a small class,” but a seminary or seedbed for original research and papers.
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84054ETHN20011TBAIntro to Ethnic Studies -- GHUTR08:00 am-09:15 am
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84051ETHN3501601Su-Ching Huang (P)ST Ethnic Studies -- Hum, DEOnlineThis course explores the assimilation or unassimilability of various ethnic groups in the US through both independent and Hollywood cinema. We will compare Hollywood representation of various ethnic groups (such as African American, Native American, Asian American, Latino/as, Arab Americans, etc.) with works by filmmakers from these ethnic backgrounds and consider how the “ethnic” filmmakers challenge or revise those ethnic images with their own. By reexamining the definitions of “ethnic” and “American,” we will explore the tensions between the two and consider how such categories have changed over time.*Textbook : America on Film: Representing Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality at the Movies. 2nd ed.
*Articles downloadable from Blackboard. 
*Selected Films:
Aladdin (1992, Ron Clements & John Musker), Amreeka (2009, Cherien Dabis), The Butler (2013, Lee Daniels), Crash (2005, Paul Haggis), Eat a Bowl of Tea (1989, Wayne Wang), The Lion King (1994, Roger Allers, Rob Minkoff), The Night Catches Us (2010, Tanya Hamilton), The Only Good Indian (2009, Kevin Willmott), Shanghai Noon (2000, Tom Dey), The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (2005, Tommy Lee Jones), Winter in the Blood (2013, Alex Smith)
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84055FILM29001Amanda A Klein (P)Introduction to Film StudiesTR11:00 am-12:15 pmThe goal of this course, as its title suggests, is to “introduce” you to the broad field of film studies, including formal analysis, genre studies, film history and theory. By the end of the semester you will have the basic critical tools necessary for understanding and analyzing the language of motion pictures. Ideally, this course will enable you to not only gain a richer understanding of the films you watch but also the television shows, You Tube videos, commercials, and other media you encounter on a daily basis.Upstream Color (2013, Shane Carruth), Casablanca (1942, Michael Curtiz), Touch of Evil (1958, Orson Welles), The Virgin Suicides (1999, Sofia Coppola), Winter’s Bone (2010, Debra Granik), Stagecoach (1939, John Ford), The Queen of Versailles (2012, Lauren Greenfield), Killer of Sheep (1977, Charles Burnett)
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Amanda A Klein (P)Introduction to Film Studies (Screenings)T06:30 pm-09:30 pm
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84059FILM29002TBAIntroduction to Film StudiesMWF01:00 pm-01:50 pm
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TBAIntroduction to Film Studies (Screenings)M06:30 pm-09:30 pm
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84061FILM49101Amanda A Klein (P)Film Styles: Introduction to Reality TVTR09:30 am-10:45 amThis course, ECU’s first ever television history and criticism course, is a broad survey of reality television, from early examples of the genre, like Queen for a Day (1956) to modern incarnations like MTV’s Catfish (2012). We will trace the historical development of the genre, with its roots in documentary cinema, as well as the way social, economic and industrial factors shape its content and distribution. The final weeks of the course will be case studies of several prominent trends in contemporary reality television: neoliberalism, globalization, and identity formation. Each week students will watch several selected episodes from a variety of series. Students are encouraged, however, to watch more than this. Yes, I am encouraging you to watch more television. This semester, at least, you can call it “studying.”Queen for a Day, Candid Camera, The Real World, Survivor, Here Comes Honey Boo Boo, The Bachelor, Catfish
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Amanda A Klein (P)Film Styles: Introduction to Reality TV (Screenings)T06:30 pm-09:30 pm
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