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TERMDESCRIPTION / DEFINITIONREFERENCESOURCESUBMITTER
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digital environment
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community currency
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public sector
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time traders
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Facebook
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G20
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Ooooby www.ooooby.ning.comwww.ooooby.ning.comJess Maher
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WorkNow WorkNow is a time trading iniatitive from New Zealand www.worknow.co.nzwww.worknow.co.nzJess Maher
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21 hour work weekProposed scheme for economic reform to redirect productivity from economic activity into other kinds of community activities, in order to enable transition towards a sustainable economy that will be viable indefinitely, as opposed to the current system which relies on constant growth, in a world with finite resources which are starting to become depleted (and therefore will not be able to sustain constant growth for much longer)New Economics Foundation (2010)http://neweconomics.org/sites/neweconomics.org/files/21_Hours.pdf
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3B Syndrome
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ADSLAsymmetric Digital Subscriber Line. A technology for delivering a high bit rate link to customers over ordinary copper wire. Data rates can reach 8Mbps from the exchange to the customer and 640bps in the other direction.MED, (2006) , Appendix 2: Glossary, Digital Strategy: A Draft New Zealand Digital Strategy for Consultationhttp://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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AgentUsed by economists to describe the likely results of the interaction between an individual entity and their choices. Agents can be individual persons, as well as firms or governments, make their decisions based on preferences and maximise utility subject to constraints on resources.Mayer (2009) Online Social Networks in Economics. Decision Support Systems 47: 169-124.
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Auckland Super City
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AuthenticationDetermines a user's identity, as well as determining what a user is authorised to access, such as secure electronic information held in financial databases. The most common form of authentication is user name and password, although this also provides the lowest level of security. For further explanation see www.e.govt.nzMED, (2006) , Appendix 2: Glossary, Digital Strategy: A Draft New Zealand Digital Strategy for Consultationhttp://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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Baby Boomerlabel is drawn from the great spike in fertility that began in 1946, right after the end of World War II, and ended almost as abruptly in 1964, around the time the birth control pill went on the market.Pew Research Center. (2010). Millenials: a portrait of generation next.http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdfJess Maher
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Bachelor of Business and Information Management
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Biosphere EconomyEconomic model where the financial value of natural environments, infrastructures and services such as breathable air, soil capable of producing crops, water supplies etc are taken into account in terms of both their economic and "actual" value to humans.www.volans.com/pathways/projects/biosphere-economy/
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BroadbandHigh-speed data transmission capability. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) defines broadband as a transmission speed in excess of 256,000 bits per second in both directions. The term is commonly used to refer to Internet access via cable modems, DSL (JetStream, for example) and increasingly, wireless technologies (WiFi).MED, (2006) , Appendix 2: Glossary, Digital Strategy: A Draft New Zealand Digital Strategy for Consultationhttp://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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Business lifecycle model
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Cloud ComputingNetwork-based computing where system resources, memory and data are all distributed across the entire network and supplied to an individual computer on an "as-needed" basis for the task at hand. Usually features a central data source.Wikipedia.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloud_computing
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Collaboration
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CommunityThere are a number of ways of defining communities and together they make up the interconnected systems of society. Some approaches include:
geographic communities, such as suburbs or towns that are often referred to as "the local communities", communities of interest, identity, or circumstance, such as the business and its various industry sectors and the research communities, the non-profit and voluntary sectors, which are also known as the community sector; ethnic and cultural communities, communities of interest such as those for hobbies, sports or politics, communities of circumstance, such as youth, parenthood, senior citizens or the disabled.
MED, (2006) , Appendix 2: Glossary, Digital Strategy: A Draft New Zealand Digital Strategy for Consultationhttp://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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ConnectivityThe ability to use an electronic network to send and receive information between any locations, devices or business services.MED, (2006) , Appendix 2: Glossary, Digital Strategy: A Draft New Zealand Digital Strategy for Consultationhttp://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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Couch Surfing
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Creative CommonsAccording to Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Creative Commons is a non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative work available for others to legally build upon and share. MED, (2006) , Appendix 2: Glossary, Digital Strategy: A Draft New Zealand Digital Strategy for Consultationhttp://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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Data information knowledge continuum
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Digital divideThe term "digital divide" was coined in the 1990s to describe the perceived growing gap between those who have access to and the skills to use ICT and those who, for socio-economic and/or geographical reasons, have limited or no access. There was a particular concern that ICT would exacerbate existing inequalities. A number of areas of specific concern were identified both here and abroad, namely that people could be disadvantaged by their geographic location, age, gender, culture and/or economic status.MED, (2006) , Appendix 2: Glossary, Digital Strategy: A Draft New Zealand Digital Strategy for Consultationhttp://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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digital environment'Since the late 1980s it has become accepted wisdom that we are living in a 'digital environment', Jess Maher
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Digital Evironment
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Digital literacyThe ability to use digital technology, communication tools or networks to locate, evaluate, use and create information.MED, (2006) , Appendix 2: Glossary, Digital Strategy: A Draft New Zealand Digital Strategy for Consultationhttp://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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Digital Social Environments (DSE)widely accepted as social network service focuses on building and reflecting of social networks or social relations among peopleWikipedia, 2010Jess Maher
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Digital StrategyThe Digital Strategy is about creating a digital future for all New Zealanders, using the power of information and communications technology (ICT) to enhance all aspects of our lives. The Ministry led a whole-of-government approach to developing the strategy and is now leading the implementation of the strategy. This is a strategy for ensuring New Zealand is a world leader in using information and technology to realise our economic, environmental, social and cultural goals. The Digital Strategy isn't just about technology ... it's about people and their ability to connect to the things that matter to them.
http://www.med.govt.nz/templates/StandardSummary____5264.aspx
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Digital Strategy Advisory GroupThe Digital Strategy Advisory Group are a panel of experts drawn from both within government and from the private sector, to assist the government with the strategic direction and areas of focus for the Digital Strategy.Beehive.gotv.nz press release, 2006.http://www.beehive.govt.nz/node/24770
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Disruptive technologyThis term was coined by Clayton M. Christensen to describe a new, low-cost, often simpler technology that displaces an existing sustaining technology. Disruptive technologies are usually initially inferior to the technology that they displace, but their low cost creates a market that induces technological and economic network effects that provide the incentive to enhance them to match and surpass the previous technology. They create new industries, but eventually change the world. Examples include the internal combustion engine, transistors and the Internet. Source: "Disruptive Technology" at Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia.
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E-governmentE-government is about delivering better results by adapting government to the information age and increasing use of the Internet. E-government is about making ongoing improvements to the design, operation, and culture of the public sector, so that it can respond to the changing needs of New Zealanders.NZ Governmenthttp://www.e.govt.nz/resources/research/ready-access-2004/chapter1.1.html
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E-government Interoperability Framework (e-GIF)
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E-government Interoperability Framework (e-GIF)Successful e-government depends upon the development and sharing of a wide variety of standards. The New Zealand e-government programme depends on a number of standards, collectively termedhttp://www.e.govt.nz/standards/web-guidelines/index.html
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E-learningLearning that is facilitated by the use of digital tools and content. Typically, it involves some form of interactivity, which may include online interaction between the learner and their teacher or peers.MED, (2006) , Appendix 2: Glossary, Digital Strategy: A Draft New Zealand Digital Strategy for Consultationhttp://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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egovt
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Egregious verbosityUnnecessary use of excessively complex or technical language to try and impress the audience, without making the point any more clearly.
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eLancing
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Entrepreneur
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ICTSInformation and communication technologies (ICTs) are typically defined as any technologies used to "store, receive, transmit, and algorithmically transform any type of information that can be digitised - numbers, text, video, music, speech, programs, and engineering drawings, to name but a few" (Brynjolfsson and Hitt, 2002: 2). Currently, the term "ICT" generally refers to electronic information processing technologies such as computers and the Internet.
Overview of the case studies prepared by Bronwyn Howell, Lawrence Corbett, Veena Mishra and Lisa Ryan for the Ministry of Economic Development.
http://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentTOC____878.aspx
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G20(a) New Zealand government initatives working towards an integrated e-government by 2020, (b) G20 labour and employment ministers internetional group, through OECD.
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GDPGross domestic product is a measure of the size of the economy of a particular territory. It is defined as the total value of all goods and services produced within that territory during a specified period (most commonly, per year). Source: "Gross Domestic Product" at Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia.Jess Maher
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Generation Xpeople born from 1965 through 1980, often depicted as savvy, entrepreneurial lonersPew Research Center. (2010). Millenials: a portrait of generation next.http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdfJess Maher
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GIFThe Growth and Innovation Framework was released in February 2002 to set out the government's sustainable economic growth objectives. The framework laid out what the government and the private sector must do to achieve higher sustainable economic growth.Source: Ministry of Economic Development, Growth and Innovation Framework. Jess Maher
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GO Government Online - interesting report on the use of it from 2003 in slide form MED page
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groupthinkWhat happens when its members check their individuality and ideas at the door and succumb to the will of the group. When individual creativity, uniqueness, differences, and independent thinking is secondary to the group’s cohesiveness and mission. The stronger and tighter the group, the easier it is for groupthink to rear its ugly head. Risks of stifle creativity and foster narrow-mindedness if you’re not careful when using SNSsPagliarini (2010, Feb 20) Is Social Networking Bad for you? http://www.pickthebrain.com/blog/is-social-networking-bad-for-you/Jess Maher
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Growth ManagementActions involved in understanding your business and overseeing the steps and procedures that yield morerevenue, profit, market share and least expense.Harris (2009) Balancing Cost, Growth, Innovation and Risk, p12http://imagesrv.gartner.com/pdf/july8_balancing_cost_growth_innovation_risk.pdfJess Maher
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Homophily"love of the same", used to describe the tendency of individuals to associate with other individuals with whom they share common characteristics, important in the study of social networks and their economic implications.Mayer (2009) Online Social Networks in Economics. Decision Support Systems 47: 169-124.
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Human Agency
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Human Resource Management
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HyperconnectivityHaving too much connectivity, leading to frequent interruption and information overload. Kolb, Collins & Lind (2008) Requisite Connectivity: Finding Flow in a Not-So-Flat World.ARTICLEJ Williamson
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HypoconnectivityHaving not enough connectivity to be able to effectively accomplish the job at hand.Kolb, Collins & Lind (2008) Requisite Connectivity: Finding Flow in a Not-So-Flat World.ARTICLEJ Williamson
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ICTICT stands for "information and communications technology". The term includes electronic information-processing technologies such as computers and the Internet, as well as fixed-line telecommunications, mobile phones and other wireless communications, networks, broadband, and various specialised devices ranging from barcode scanners to global positioning systems (GPS).' Ministry of Economic Development (2006) Digital Strategyhttp://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____14432.aspxJess Maher
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ICT sectorIn New Zealand, the ICT sector is an agglomeration of the communications sector, including telecommunications providers, and the information technology sector, which ranges from small software development firms to multi-national hardware and software producers. Source: Ministry of Economic Development, Growth and Innovation Framework.http://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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ICT TaskforceThe ICT Taskforce was established in response to the government's Growth and Innovation Framework. It has four related goals, which are to enhance the existing innovation framework, develop skills and talent, increase global connectedness and focus effort for maximum gain. The Taskforce comprised a tightly focused group of New Zealand ICT business leaders with relevant commercial experience. It reported into the growth potential of New Zealand ICT and identified the collective private sector and government contributions needed to achieve this potential. Source: ICT Taskforce, Breaking through the Barriers Published June 2003.http://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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In work povertyBeing in poverty despite having at least one wage earner in a householdOECD Policy Brief (2009)OECD
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Industrial RevolutionThe industrial revolution was a period in the 18th and 19th centuries where the introduction of mechanised devices became profitable enough to spur intensive research and investment into similar new technologies, leading to diverse developments of new technologies along with their rapid adoption, which in turn resulted in profound social and economic changes throughout the world. One major consequence of this was the "production-line" model of compartmentalised work, the legacy of which continues to this day.Wikipediahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_Revolution
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InformationThis term has many meanings depending on the context. For example, it is often related to such concepts as meaning, knowledge, communication, truth, representation, and mental stimulus. See also Information Society.Source: "Information" at Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia.http://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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Information & Communication Technologies
(ICT)
ICT stands for information and communications technology. The term includes electronic information-processing technologies such as computers and the Internet, as well as fixed-line telecommunications, mobile phones and other wireless communications, broadband, and various specialised devices ranging from barcode scanners to global positioning systems (GPS). ICT devices can be embedded in other machines and appliances, from watches and washing machines to cars, to increase their functionality.MED 2006http://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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Information literacyThe life-long ability to locate, evaluate, use and create information.
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Information SocietyA term for a society in which the creation, distribution and manipulation of information has become the most significant economic and cultural activity. An Information Society may be contrasted with societies in which the economic underpinning is primarily industrial or agrarian. The machine tools of the Information Society are computers and telecommunications, rather than lathes or ploughs.Source: Information Society - A Whatis Definitionhttp://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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InnovationThe creation, development and implementation of a new product, process or service, with the aim of improving efficiency, effectiveness or competitive advantage. Innovation may apply to products, services, manufacturing processes, managerial processes or the design of an organisation. It is most often viewed at a product or process level, where product innovation satisfies a customer's needs and process innovation improves efficiency and effectiveness. Innovation is linked to creativity and the creation of new ideas, and involves taking those new ideas and turning them into reality through invention, research and new product development.MED, (2006) , Appendix 2: Glossary, Digital Strategy: A Draft New Zealand Digital Strategy for Consultationhttp://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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Integration
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Intellectual propertyVery broadly means the legal rights that result from intellectual activity in the industrial, scientific, literary and artistic fields. Countries have laws to protect intellectual property, for two main reasons: to give statutory expression to the moral and economic rights of creators in their creations and the rights of the public in access to those creations; and to promote, as a deliberate act of government policy, creativity and the dissemination and application of its results, and encourage the fair trading that contributes to economic and social development. Intellectual property is traditionally divided into two branches: industrial property and copyright. Industrial property includes inventions (patents), trademarks, industrial designs and geographic indications of source and copyright includes literary and artistic works. WIPO Intellectual Property Handbook: Policy, Law and Use.World Intellectual Property Organization.
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Inter-modal competition
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IPThe Internet Protocol is a network-layer protocol that contains addressing information and some control information that enables packets of data to be routed between hosts on the Internet.Source: Cisco Systems Inc., Internet Protocols (IP).
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KnowledgeIs built up from interaction with the world, and is organised and stored in each individual's mind. It is also stored on an organisational level within the minds of employees and in paper and electronic records. Two forms of knowledge can be distinguished: tacit, or implicit knowledge, which is held in a person's mind and is instinctively known without being formulated into words; and explicit knowledge, which has been communicated to others and is held in written documents and procedures. Organisations are increasingly recognising the value of knowledge, and many employees are now recognised as knowledge workers.MED, (2006) , Appendix 2: Glossary, Digital Strategy: A Draft New Zealand Digital Strategy for Consultationhttp://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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Knowledge societyA society that creates, shares and uses knowledge for the prosperity and well-being of its people.MED, (2006) , Appendix 2: Glossary, Digital Strategy: A Draft New Zealand Digital Strategy for Consultationhttp://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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Last End Adopters
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learned helplessnessThe processes of 'learning to become helpless'. Caused by being repeatedly exposed to an uncontrollable event, after many repeated and failed attempts, your brain “learns” that success is beyond your control; that you cannot affect the outcome. Have developed the belief that no matter how hard they work and how much education they get they will never get out of the financial and personal straight-jacket they are in.Jess Maher
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Lost GenerationVideo produced for Argentinian political advertisement, won second place in AARP U@50 video contestYouTube, RECREAR
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42E2fAWM6rA
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LudditeLuddites were a group originally derived from unemployed factory workers who had been made redundant during the Industrial Revolution due to the introduction of machines that could do their jobs instead. They organised violent protests against the introduction of the new technological developments, and have become the classic example of people who are frightened of, or resistant to technological change in society.Wikipediahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luddite
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maintained social capitala dimension of social capital that assesses one's ability to stay connected with members of a previously inhabited communityEllison, N. B., Steinfield, C., & Lampe, C. (2007). The benefits of Facebook "friends:" Social capital and college students' use of online social network sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12(4), article 1. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol12/issue4/ellison.html http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol12/issue4/ellison.htmlJess Maher
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Metcalf's LawPrinciple that as a network grows, the value of being connected to it grows exponentially, while the cost per user stays the same or decreases(MED, 2000)J Williamson
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MicroprocessorA complex microcircuit (integrated circuit) or set of such chips that carries out the functions of the processor of an information technology system; that is, it contains a control unit (and clock), an arithmetic and logic unit, and the necessary registers and links to main store and to peripherals.
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Millenialslabel refers those born after 1980 –the first generation to come of age in the new millenniumPew Research Center. (2010). Millenials: a portrait of generation next.http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdfJess Maher
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Millennial generationlabel refers those born after 1980 –the first generation to come of age in the new millenniumPew Research Center. (2010). Millenials: a portrait of generation next.http://pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdfJess Maher
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Network Research
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Next Generation InternetNext Generation Internet is a term used by governments, corporations and educators to describe the future network and the work underway to develop it. The future Internet will be so pervasive, reliable and transparent that it will be taken for granted. It will be a seamless part of life much like electricity or plumbing. However, getting to this will involve exploring technologies and network capacities that are in advance of offerings from commercial providers in terms of bandwidths, communications protocols and services.
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OECDThe Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development comprises 30 member countries sharing a commitment to democratic government and the market economy. Its work covers economic and social issues, from macroeconomics to trade, education, development and science and innovation. Source: OECD, About OECD.
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OECDThe Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development comprises 30 member countries sharing a commitment to democratic government and the market economy. Its work covers economic and social issues, from macroeconomics to trade, education, development and science and innovation. Source: OECD, About OECD.
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Ooooby
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Phishing“Phishing” is a form of Internet fraud that aims to steal valuable information such as credit cards, social security numbers, user IDs and passwords. A fake website is created that is similar to that of a legitimate organisation, typically a financial institution such as a bank or insurance company. An email is sent requesting that the recipient access the fake website (which will usually be a replica of a trusted site) and enter their personal details, including security access codes. The page looks genuine, because it is easy to fake a valid web site. Any HTML page on the web can be modified to suit a phishing scheme.
Phishing e-mails are often sent to large lists of people, expecting that some percentage of the recipients will actually have an account with the real organisation. The term comes from "fishing," where bait is used to catch a fish. In phishing, e-mail is the bait.
MED, (2006) , Appendix 2: Glossary, Digital Strategy: A Draft New Zealand Digital Strategy for Consultationhttp://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentPage____16298.aspxJess Maher
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Phishing“Phishing” is a form of Internet fraud that aims to steal valuable information such as credit cards, social security numbers, user IDs and passwords. A fake website is created that is similar to that of a legitimate organisation, typically a financial institution such as a bank or insurance company. An email is sent requesting that the recipient access the fake website (which will usually be a replica of a trusted site) and enter their personal details, including security access codes. The page looks genuine, because it is easy to fake a valid web site. Any HTML page on the web can be modified to suit a phishing scheme.
Phishing e-mails are often sent to large lists of people, expecting that some percentage of the recipients will actually have an account with the real organisation. The term comes from "fishing," where bait is used to catch a fish. In phishing, e-mail is the bait.
MED, (2006) , Appendix 2: Glossary, Digital Strategy: A Draft New Zealand Digital Strategy for ConsultationJess Maher
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Requisite ConnectivityThe state of having robust and reliable communication media of several different types and/or transportation modes, with alternative work-around options, so that contacts can be initiated and maintained at a desired level for a given task or social outcome.Kolb, Collins & Lind (2008) Requisite Connectivity: Finding Flow in a Not-So-Flat World.
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RFIDRadio frequency identification first appeared in tracking and access applications during the 1980s. These wireless systems allow for non-contact reading and are effective in manufacturing and other hostile environments where barcode labels may not survive. RFID has established itself in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and automated vehicle identification systems because of its ability to track moving objects.Source: AIM - The Global Trade Association for Automatic Identification: Technologies: RFID.
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RFIDRadio frequency identification first appeared in tracking and access applications during the 1980s. These wireless systems allow for non-contact reading and are effective in manufacturing and other hostile environments where barcode labels may not survive. RFID has established itself in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and automated vehicle identification systems because of its ability to track moving objects.Source: AIM - The Global Trade Association for Automatic Identification: Technologies: RFID.
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Shared servicesWhere several different businesses consolidate administrative functions into a single shared service entity. Functions shared may include payroll, human resources, legal, IT, public relations, purchasing etc.J Williamson
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SMEsSmall and medium-sized enterprises. There is no official definition of an SME in New Zealand but it is usually taken to be a firm of up to 50 full-time equivalent employees (FTEs). SMEs in other countries tend to be much larger than those found in New Zealand (up to several hundred FTEs). New Zealand SMEs are typically individually owned and managed, with few if any specialist managerial staff, and are not part of a larger business enterprise. Firms with fewer than 50 employees constitute 99% of New Zealand enterprises, and account for approximately 49% of total output.Additional Page for SMEs in Wiki
Research Homepage - Can be found under theme of 3
http://sites.google.com/a/assistnz.com/sme-sns-nz/homepage/theme-of-3/smes J Williamson
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Social animals
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Social entrepreneurship
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Social Network Site
(SNSs)
see Social Networking Sites
Interchangably used with "Social Networking Site". A list of current SNSs can be found here collected from Wikipedia
Jess Maher
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Social Networking Site
(SNS)
web-based services that allow individuals to (1) construct a public or semi-public profile within a bounded system, (2) articulate a list of other users with whom they share a connection, and (3) view and traverse their list of connections and those made by others within the system. Uniquely enable users to articulate and make visible thier social networks. Boyd & Ellison (2007), Social network sites: Definition, history, and scholarshiphttp://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol13/issue1/boyd.ellison.htmlJess Maher
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Societal change
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State Owned Enterprises
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Transformational general purpose technology
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