Influence of art and social movements on a Callot Soeurs evening gown (Responses)
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Which Social and Art Movements do you see represented in this dress?
Why ?Name:Comments:
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2/28/2018 10:12:36Art Nouveau, Artistic/Aesthetic Dress
the flowery motif, the use of gold, the stripes
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2/28/2018 10:41:36Art Nouveau
The s-curve silhouette is strongly related to Art Nouveau, and you see that influence in the dress motifs as well.
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2/28/2018 11:05:05Art Nouveau
The development of artistic/aesthetic dress starts with the influence of pre-raphaelite dress and can be seen between 1870s and 1890s. The term aesthetic dress is especially used during the 1880s and linked to british Aestheticism and Arts and Crafts movement. In dress history literature, the terms are mostly used interchangeably, though some scholars argue about their differences. Their influences are especially seen in the designs of Liberty. Dress reform movements peek between 1850-1914 and are linked to various currents within the society which request changes in dress and introduction of simple and rational forms liberated from heavy layers, more healthy or more adapt to everyday use. The Callot Soeurs dress is french, dating 1907/1908, and therefore late Art Nouveau/Belle Epoque combined with the elegant organic, floral motives. Very luxurious, decorative and elegant. I have written about late nineteenth-century dress reform movements and the influence of marginal clothing discourses, so the topic is very interesting to me. Best regards, Alicia Mihalic, Assistant Lecturer at Faculty of Textile Technology, University of Zagreb, Croatia.
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2/28/2018 11:16:41Art Nouveau
Motifs, colors, and draping feel art nouveau. I don't really see the other movements because of the standard silhouette
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2/28/2018 12:06:40Art Nouveau, Artistic/Aesthetic Dress
The lily-shape of the skirt and the curves of the bodice are emblematic of the "organic" shapes of Art Nouveau, and the colors and embroidery seem like classic Aesthetic dress.
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2/28/2018 12:18:00Art Nouveau
The floral detail trim that's everywhere.
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2/28/2018 13:28:13Art Nouveau, possibly arts and crafts
Some of the forms seem to reflect the curvilinear/flora forms of art nouveau. On the other hand there is a geometry to some of it that suggests the arts/crafts influence. The suggestion of hand work details around the top also seem to connect to arts/craft
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2/28/2018 13:28:32Art Nouveau, Artistic/Aesthetic Dress
Art-Nouveau for Floral motives and soft color. It definitely celebrates artistic design (over functional). I see the Aesthetic movement in that the dress is especially reminiscent of Medieval lines in the skirt, but the fit is traditional for 1907-08.
Mary Gibson
I love it !!! I have a similar (partial) bodice with that "breast-plate" design.
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2/28/2018 13:36:35Art Nouveau, Artistic/Aesthetic Dress
The embroidery, particularly on the drape panels down the skirt front read very much as Art Nouveau influenced to me. I nearly want to say that there might be some Aesthetic dress influence in the panel and shaping of the front bodice section. It looks similar to the pseudo-medieval styles seen in wrappers and gowns of the slightly earlier era that are stiffer and less delicately sheer on the bodice than I might expect from a gown like this.
Brittney Belz
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2/28/2018 13:41:28Art Nouveau, Artistic/Aesthetic Dress
The beautifully name decoration shows signs of both the Art Nouveau and the Artistic/Aesthetic Dress movements. Additionally although beautifully designed it isn't overly decorated. I don't think it shows Dress Reform because the wearer still was corseted to at least some degree.
Marian Ann Montgomery
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2/28/2018 13:50:31Art Nouveau, Artistic/Aesthetic Dress
The overall lines and silhouette of this dress, which are curvilinear, seem to be influenced by the Art Nouveau movement. The trim detail has a medieval quality to it, which would be appropriate for artistic/aesthetic dress. However, I do tend to think of aesthetic dress as an 1880s phenomenon that freed wearers from their corsets. This dress was definitely meant to be worn by a corseted figure, which is why I do not see any elements of dress reform in this garment.
Leslie BellaisBeautiful dress
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2/28/2018 13:57:31Art Nouveau, Artistic/Aesthetic Dress, Dress Reform
Dress reform and Artistic for the structure and what seems like a reasonable waist. Art Nouveau and Artistic for the color choice and the scale of the surface decoration.
Barbara Stratyner
It is a beautiful dress. Can you provide the source of the image or current location of the dress?
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2/28/2018 14:27:01Native American
The feather-image embroidery, and some of the few geometric details are reminiscent of native american inspired motifs. The panel across the breast seems vaguely suggestive of a thunder-bird image.
Brandi Shawn-Chaparro
I don't know that there is any real precedent for native american motifs in french fashion of the early 20th century, but it might be worth exploring.
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2/28/2018 15:01:58Art Nouveau, Art Deco
Art Nouveau, due to the s-curve silhouette, the soft color ,the sinuous curves and floral motifs in several borders. Art Deco, which was JUST entering into the lexicon of the day, is evident int the flat, geometric approach to the gold embroidered flowers in the blue, beaded area just over the bust line.
George Sarofeen
No aesthetic or dress reform shown, as a corset was still required and nothing harkens back to the renaissance or a previous time period, that I can see.

This was fun, Thanks!
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2/28/2018 15:02:02Art Nouveau, Artistic/Aesthetic Dress
The dress has the soft lines that I associate with what women participating in the aesthetic movement wore. There were a number of examples at the V&A when I was studying in the UK, and then I went to the de Young's exhibition on the movement multiple times a few years back, where they had several examples. Art Nouveau also seems to apply because of the organic nature of the design work, but it is far too structured to be Dress Reform in my opinion.
Brenna A. Barks
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2/28/2018 15:14:45Art Nouveau
While this does look like it is embracing the more relaxed style of artistic/aesthetic dress and the more movement-friendly designs championed by dress reformers, I wonder usually associate those both with specific ideology and something that is hard to pin down without more information (who owned it, how it is constructed). I think the surface design does reflect art nouveau aesthetics, which seems to be more of a style and easily identifiable from just looking at images.
Annette
This is such an interesting question! I look forward to hearing about the results of this survey!
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2/28/2018 15:21:47Art Nouveau, Artistic/Aesthetic Dress
Looser, more flowing lines, embroidered motifs & style reflects that style: i.e. William Morris type flowers.
Joan Fioravanti
This was fun, let’s do more!
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2/28/2018 15:25:18Art Nouveau
The embroidery reflects popular Art Nouvea motifs from architecture, fine art and decorative arts
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2/28/2018 16:34:17
Art Nouveau, Artistic/Aesthetic Dress, Orientalism? I would need to see the designs on the front panels.
Curvilinear lines to the silhouette (Art Nouveau), Embroidery (Chinese? and Arts & Crafts from Aesthetic period)
Linda Welters
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2/28/2018 17:17:56Art Nouveau, Arts & Crafts
My museum did an exhibition about Arts & Crafts movement in the Pacific Northwest with a lot of influence on home and woodwork. I feel like the decorations have the same kind of elegant heaviness-- the trim is substantial but looks well made.
Clara Berg
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2/28/2018 20:17:33
Art Nouveau, The Art Nouveau influence, while there, is not really strong. To me, most dominant trend is Historicism and it fits into a spirit of 18th century revival that was going on at that time, happening with Callot, but also Paquin, Redfern and others.
It was a very prevalent trend. Look in Les Modes and other magazines at the time and you will see portraits from the 1770s and 80s reproduced, such as Antoinette, and Georgiana Duchess of Devonshire. Also not the hair and the hat size, and compact that with the 1780s.
Daniel James Cole
interested in the results of your survey. Please contact me when you have them, danielcoledesign@cs.com.
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2/28/2018 20:40:43Artistic/Aesthetic Dress, Rococo Revival
artistic is a guess, but how else does one explain such over-the-top decoration. The light blue embroidery looks more like Rococo than Art Nouveau. URI has a collection of fabrics with some Rococo Revival designs.
M. Ordonez
Interesting dress, but it does not make me want to play dress-up.
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3/1/2018 0:13:25Mititary and political
The wheat shelves are often used in banners and flags, coats of arms, etc. The wheat sheif is often held in the talons of an eagle or held in the arms of the goddess. The wheat can also symbolize the workers. That is the political. Some of the elements make reference to military dress. The breast plate, the stripes, the two embroidered pendants at the front of the skirt. The ribbonwork on the bodice.
B Falese
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3/1/2018 0:33:39Art Nouveau
Best fit of any of the categories above. Typical Edwardian evening dress.
Lisa Rand
Of the late Art Nouveau period but not really a great example of the aesthetic. Yes, overdone. A lot of beading and embroidery but the design has an inorganic feel. I would describe it as Art Nouveau transitioning into early Art Deco.
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3/1/2018 8:27:03None of the above
The Callot sisters positioned themselves as couturiers creating late 19th century early 20th century costume. The bodice clearly speaks to this time's very fitted corseted waist, ruffled and accentuated uni-bosom, and posture jutted forward. The sisters exhibited a technical and varied proficiency in embroidery techniques that positioned them within the top creators of their time, think Worth and Doucet. Working with organza required deft skill and their neat pleating and careful embroidery on the material speak to this.

If this gown fit into dress reform, it may have had a looser waist and fit. There is a touch of art nouveau yet, the motifs may have been longer. To me, you see more of the late victorian influence then you do early 20th century influences. I always think of the Callot sisters catering to an older wealthier client. The posture was more turn of the century than early modern.
Michele L. Hopkins
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