6th Grade Scope and Sequence
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXY
1
8/13/18All 6th Grade Standards
2
3
4
6-MS-PS1-1(Matter and Its Interactions)
5
Develop models to describe the atomic composition of simple molecules and extended structures.
6
7
Clarification Statement
8
Emphasis is on developing models of molecules that vary in complexity. Examples of simple molecules could include carbon dioxide and water. Examples of extended structures could include sodium chloride or diamonds. Examples of molecular-level models could include drawings, 3-D models, or computer representations showing different molecules with different types of atoms.
9
10
Caddo Science Symbaloo
11
12
13
Science and Engineering PracticeDisciplinary Core Idea
14
Developing and using models: Modeling in 6–8 builds on K–5 and progresses to developing, using and revising models to describe, test, and predict more abstract phenomena and design systems.

• Develop and/or use a model to predict and/or describe phenomena.
STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF MATTER
Substances are made from different types of atoms, which combine with one another in various ways. Atoms form molecules that range in size from two to thousands of atoms. (MS.PS1.A.a)

Solids may be formed from molecules, or they may be extended structures with repeating subunits (e.g.,crystals). (MS.PS1A.e)
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
Crosscutting Concepts
24
SCALE, PROPORTION, AND QUANTITY
Time, space, and energy phenomena can be observed at various scales using models to study systems that are too large or too small.
25
26
27
28
6-MS-PS2-1 (Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions)
29
Apply Newton’s Third Law to design a solution to a problem involving the motion of two colliding objects.
30
31
Clarification Statement
32
Examples of practical problems could include reducing the effects of impact of two objects such as two cars hitting each other, an object hitting a stationary object, or a meteor hitting a spacecraft.
33
34
35
Science and Engineering PracticeDisciplinary Core Idea
36
Constructing explanations and designing solutions:
Constructing explanations (science) and designing solutions (engineering) in 6–8 builds on K–5 experiences and progresses to include designing solutions supported by multiple sources of evidence consistent with scientific ideas, principles, and theories.

• Apply scientific ideas or principles to design, construct, and/or test a design of an object, tool, process or system.
FORCES AND MOTION
For any pair of interacting objects, the force exerted by the first object on the second object is equal in strength to the force that the second object exerts on the first, but in the opposite direction (Newton’s third law). (MS.PS2A.a)

DEVELOPING POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS
A solution needs to be tested, to prove the validity of the design and then modified on the basis of the test results in order to improve it. There are systematic processes for evaluating solutions with respect to how well they meet the criteria and constraints of a problem. Sometimes parts of different solutions can be combined to create a solution that is better than any of its predecessors. Models of all kinds are important for testing solutions. (MS.ETS1B.a)
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
Crosscutting Concepts
52
SYSTEMS AND SYSTEM MODELS
Models can be used to represent systems and their interactions—such as inputs, processes and outputs—and energy, matter, and information flows within systems.
53
54
55
56
6-MS-PS2-2 (Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions)
57
Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object.
58
59
Clarification Statement
60
Emphasis is on balanced (Newton’s First Law) and unbalanced forces in a system, qualitative comparisons of forces, mass and changes in motion (Newton’s Second Law) in one dimension to a given frame of reference, or specification of units.
61
62
63
Science and Engineering PracticeDisciplinary Core Idea
64
Planning and carrying out investigations:
Planning and carrying out investigations to answer questions (science) or test solutions (engineering) to problems in 6–8 builds on K–5 experiences and progresses to include investigations that use multiple variables and provide evidence to support explanations or solutions.

• Plan an investigation individually and collaboratively, and in the design: identify independent and dependent variables and controls, what tools are needed to do the gathering, how measurements will be recorded, and how many data are needed to support a claim.
FORCES AND MOTION
The motion of an object is determined by the sum of the forces acting on it; if the total force on the object is not zero, its motion will change. The greater the mass of the object, the greater the force needed to achieve the same change in motion. For any given object, a larger force causes a larger change in motion (acceleration) (MS.PS2A.b)

All positions of objects and the directions of forces and motions must be described in an arbitrarily chosen reference frame and arbitrarily chosen units of size. In order to share information with other people, these choices must also be shared. (MS.PS2A.c)

The motion of an object is dependent upon the reference frame of the observer. The reference frame must be shared when discussing the motion of an object. (MS.PS2A.d)
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
Crosscutting Concepts
83
STABILITY AND CHANGE
Explanations of stability and change in natural or designed systems can be constructed by examining the changes over time and forces at different scales, including atomic scales.
84
85
86
87
6-MS-PS2-3 (Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions)
88
Ask questions about data to determine the factors that affect the strength of electric and magnetic forces.
89
90
Clarification Statement
91
Questions about data might require quantitative answers related to proportional reasoning and algebraic thinking. Examples of devices that use electric and magnetic forces could include electromagnets. Examples of data could include the effect of the number of turns of wire on the strength of an electromagnet, or the effect of increasing the number or strength of magnets on the speed of an electric motor.
92
93
94
95
96
Science and Engineering PracticeDisciplinary Core Idea
97
Asking questions and defining problems:
Asking questions (science) and defining problems (engineering) in grades 6–8 builds from grades K–5 experiences and progresses to specifying relationships between variables, and clarifying arguments and making models.

• Ask questions that can be investigated within the scope of the classroom, outdoor environment, and museums and other public facilities with available resources and, when appropriate, frame a hypothesis based on observations and scientific principles.
TYPES OF INTERACTIONS
Electric and magnetic (electromagnetic) forces can be attractive (opposite charges) or repulsive (like charges), have polar charges (north and south poles) and their sizes depend on the magnitudes of the charges, currents, or magnetic strengths involved and on the distances between the interacting objects. (MS.PS2B.a)
98
99
100
Loading...
Main menu