Weather and Music: doi:10.1002/wea.2464
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Brown, S., Aplin, K.L., Jenkins, K., Mander, S., Walsh, C. and Williams, P. (2015) Is there a rhythm of the rain? An analysis of weather in popular music. Weather (doi:10.1002/wea.2464).
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http://www.metlink.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Brown_et_al-2015-Weather.pdf
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Is there a rhythm of the rain? An analysis of weather in popular music
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Abstract
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Weather is frequently used in music to frame events and emotions, yet quantitative analyses are rare. From a collated base set of 759 weather-related songs, 419 were analysed based on listings from a karaoke database. This article analyses the 20 weather types described, frequency of occurrence, genre, keys, mimicry, lyrics and songwriters. Vocals were the principal means of communicating weather: sunshine was the most common, followed by rain, with weather depictions linked to the emotions of the song. Bob Dylan, John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote the most weather-related songs, partly following their experiences at the time of writing.
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This file contains the list of weather songs we found and are mentioned in the paper above, where a full analysis of the songs may be found.
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Do you have ideas for weather or climate themed pop songs? If so, did we mention your song? Please check the list on the next tab to see if it is listed. If it isn't. please use this link (http://bit.ly/1J7gpsj) where you can add new songs. Please enter the song name, the singer and/or songwriter, and then the weather types mentioned in the song, by entering '1' in the appropriate box.
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We are interested to learn more about potential songs we have missed, and new songs released since originally submitting the paper. If you have any other thoughts about weather and music, please free free to email any of the author team (details below).
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Thank you, we hope you enjoy reading the paper and thinking about the songs!
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18th November 2015: Interesting climate change and music article by Alex Marshall here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-34844244
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We would like to carry on our research and are interested in any kind of music inspired by astronomy. If you have any ideas, please enter them by clicking on the weblink below:
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https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1lK69eP19SgOMp_QxGuKsry4MeNgJElkt4cECDZGvkv4/viewform
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Sally Brown, University of Southampton and Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research (sb20@soton.ac.uk)
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Karen Aplin, University of Oxford (karen.aplin@physics.ox.ac.uk)
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Katie Jenkins, University of Oxford and Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research (katie.jenkins@ouce.ox.ac.uk)
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Sarah Mander, University of Manchester and Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research (S.Mander@manchester.ac.uk)
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Claire Walsh, Newcastle University and Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research (claire.walsh@ncl.ac.uk)
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Paul Williams, University of Reading (p.d.williams@reading.ac.uk)
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Notes:
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Under code on next sheet, 'D' indicates the song was in the karaoke database we used to reference the lyrics, and was in the main dataset for analysis, 'ND' indicates it was not in the database (up until 31st December 2012), so specific details of each song were not analysed. We acknowledge the KaraFun karoake database (http://www.karafun.co.uk/) as the source of our inspiration for weather related songs, selected for its ease of use and availability of lyrics. Other music sites also provided inspiration, as noted in the paper.
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weather songs in doi:10.1002/wea.2464