Spring 2014 Graduate English Courses (ALWAYS CHECK BANNER FOR UP-TO-DATE SCHEDULE)
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Course
SecInstructorTitleDaysTimeDescriptionSelected Texts
2
34814ENGL51501Thomas E Douglass Topics in the NovelTR03:30 pm-04:45 pmTheme: The Outcast in the American Novel and the Search for Home
The course considers works by 7 contemporary American novelists, and their view of what it means to be an outcast and the path one takes to find a home.
Seminar class, no exam, 5 short essays, and one long semester-end composition.
Sherman Alexie Flight (2007)

Kent Haruf Plainsong (1999)

Silas House The Coal Tattoo (2004)

Cormac McCarthy Suttree (1979)

Toni Morrison Home (2012)

Julie Otsuka The Buddha in the Attic (2011)

Marilynne Robinson Housekeeping (1980)
3
34816ENGL51701Robert J Siegel Modern DramaTR02:00 pm-03:15 pmThe course will focus on characters rebelling against their communities, rebelling against the prevailing ideas of their eras, rebelling against authority, rebelling against their own sense of right and wrong. The focus will be on the individual, the effects of their rebellion and also the ideas that resonate for the audience (reader) as a result of their rebellion. We will be reading historical drama, epic drama, tragedy, absurdist theater and farce.

Hedda Gabler--Ibsen
Galileo—Brecht
Rhinoceros—Ionesco
How I Learned to Drive—Vogel
After the Revolution--Herzog
Intimate Apparel--Nottage
4
35769ENGL5170601Robert J Siegel Modern Drama (DE)onlineThe course will focus on characters rebelling against their communities, rebelling against the prevailing ideas of their eras, rebelling against authority, rebelling against their own sense of right and wrong. The focus will be on the individual, the effects of their rebellion and also the ideas that resonate for the audience (reader) as a result of their rebellion. We will be reading historical drama, epic drama, tragedy, absurdist theater and farce.

Hedda Gabler--Ibsen
Galileo—Brecht
Rhinoceros—Ionesco
How I Learned to Drive—Vogel
After the Revolution--Herzog
Intimate Apparel--Nottage
5
34819ENGL5840601John Hoppenthaler Advanced Poetry Writing (DE)onlineThis online workshop provides advanced instruction in the writing of poetry and poetic practice and is intended as the second course in ECU’s poetry writing sequence. Each student will submit one poem a week. The course will be taught via Blackboard, so fluency in use of Blackboard is expected.The Book of Goodbyes, Jillian Weise
Vulgar Remedies, Anna Journey
online materials
6
34821ENGL58501J Luke Whisnant Advanced Fiction WritingW06:30 pm-09:30 pm
7
34824ENGL58901Robert J Siegel Advanced Script WritingT06:30 pm-09:30 pmEnglish 5890 Advanced Scriptwriting

Prerequisite: ENG 3830 or consent of the Instructor (students who have been writing in the dramatic form on their own should contact me)

The course will concentrate on developing a story line for film or theater through character development and scene construction. Students will be required to complete a major portion of a full-length screenplay or stage play, and they will be expected to refine drafts through rewriting. Students will also prepare critiques for each others work.

A screenplay and a play to be determined. Also very short fiction pieces which we will adapt into dramatic scenes.
8
35770ENGL5890601Robert J Siegel Advanced Script Writing (DE)onlineEnglish 5890 Advanced Scriptwriting

Prerequisite: ENG 3830 or consent of the Instructor (students who have been writing in the dramatic form on their own should contact me)

The course will concentrate on developing a story line for film or theater through character development and scene construction. Students will be required to complete a major portion of a full-length screenplay or stage play, and they will be expected to refine drafts through rewriting. Students will also prepare critiques for each others work.

A screenplay and a play to be determined. Also very short fiction pieces which we will adapt into dramatic scenes.
9
34825ENGL60091Mark David Johnson Research Mtds in LinguisticsW06:30 pm-09:30 pmThis course will examine in detail one essential question: How do language researchers arrive at conclusions about language learning and language acquisition? In order to better understand language research and the kinds of claims that researchers make, we will analyze the design and methodology of studies on second language learning. Participants in the course will also plan and conduct a study on some aspect of language and/or language learning.Mackey, A., & Gass, S. (2005). Second language research: Methodology and design. New York: Routledge.

Selected articles
10
35260ENGL60651John Steen Tpcs Lit Theory & Crit (w/4000TR11:00 am-12:15 pmWhat does it really mean to read a novel, a poem, or a play? Literary theory takes this question seriously, and proposes to critique the assumptions that underlie our understanding of language and interpretation. Our course will examine 20th-century theoretical “schools” in order to grasp how literary theory shapes the study of literature today. We will pay particular attention to ways that archival materials inform these ongoing debates, and conduct original research on materials held in the Joyner Library’s Stuart Wright Collection. Terry Eagleton, Literary Theory
Roland Barthes, Mythologies
Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams
Jacques Derrida, Archive Fever
Edouard Glissant, The Poetics of Relation
Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Epistemology of the Closet
11
35267ENGL61211Thomas L Herron Shakespeare & Renaissance LitR06:30 pm-09:30 pm
12
35270ENGL61751Elizabeth Hoiem Victorian Literature (w/4170)MW03:30 pm-04:45 pmTheme: Work and beauty. Victorians debated the role of literature and art in an age of ugly industrial landscapes, sordid trade, and imperial conquest. When life is often cruel, should we read about the everyday experiences of common people? Or should we represent only what is most beautiful and ideal? We’ll explore these questions through industrial fiction, Victorian art and illustrated books, poetry, medievalism and fantasy, and science and travel writing.Elizabeth Gaskell (North and South), H. G. Wells (The Island of Doctor Moreau), Mary Elizabeth Braddon (Lady Audley's Secret), Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, Oscar Wilde.
13
34829ENGL6360601Seodial Deena World Lit Written in EnglonlineENGL 6360 provides the unique experience of a postcolonial, transnational, and multicultural perspective of the world through literary exploration of fiction and theory from British, Russian, African, Indian, South African, Latin American, Middle Eastern, and Caribbean works. We will examine diverse perspectives and portrayals of world issues and cultures; characters in a variety of social and economic situations; landscapes and environments; themes relevant to the past, present, and future; and styles ranging from traditional to modern to postmodern. Through cross-sectional references, the course intends to produce a rich and universal experience of intertextuality, interdisciplinarity, and multiculturalism. Our focus, though, will be a comparative study of the politics and perspectives of relationship as portrayed in world literatures—with special emphasis on works from Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. Dangarembga, Tsitsi. Nervous Conditions. Los Angeles: Seal Press, 1996.
Danticat, Edwidge. Claire of the Sea Light. New York: Knopf, 2013
Desai, Anita. Fasting, Feasting. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1999.
Ghosh, Amitav. The Shadow Lines. 1988. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company,
2005.
Gordimer, Nadine. The Pickup. New York: Penguin Books, 2002.
La Guma, Alex. A Walk in the Night. Evanston, IL: Northwestern UP, 1967.
Mernissi, Fatima. Dreams of Trespass: Tales of A Harem Girlhood. New York: Basic Books,
1995.
Morrison, Toni. Home. New York: Vintage, 2013.
Phillips, Caryl. A Distant Shore. New York: Knopf, 2003.
Roy, Arundhati. The God of Small Things. New York: Harper, 1998.
14
34830ENGL6420601Su-Ching Huang Studies in Asian American LiteratureonlineThis course explores how Asian American history and social experience register in literature and films. We start the semester with a historical overview of Asian American immigration. Then we discuss issues surrounding Asian American identity from the angles of labor and immigration, Japanese American internment, sexuality, gender conflict, language, cultural negotiation and assimilation, and so on.Hwang, David Henry. Yellow Face. New York: Theatre Communications Group, 2009.
Jen, Gish. The Love Wife. New York: Vintage, 2005.
Kadohata, Cynthia. The Floating World. New York: Ballantine, 1993.
Kim, Suki. The Interpreter. New York: Farrar, 2003.
Ozeki, Ruth. My Year of Meats. New York: Penguin, 1999.
Yang, Gene Luen, and Pham, Thien. Level Up. New York: First Second, 2011.
15
34831ENGL6460601Reginald Wade Watson Studies in African American LiteratureonlineCourse Objective:

The Black American Literature tradition has, in the past, been largely overlooked on all levels of education. It has only been recently that efforts have been made to increase public and educational awareness of the African-American’s contributions to literature. This course is designed to present a few of the many black-authored works so that a thorough and critical analysis can be made. In this course, you will learn how to read, write, and think critically so that you can respond competently through either written or verbal expression. The goal of this course is to help you gain a full appreciation and understanding of the African-American tradition.
Required Texts:
The Norton Anthology of African American Literature Eds.
Henry Louis Gates and Nellie McKay

The Color of Water by James McBride
Race Matters by Cornel West
Uncle Tom’s Children by Richard Wright
The Third Life of Grange Copeland by Alice Walker
Church Folk by Michele Andrea Bowen

Highly Suggested Text:

Gilbaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers.7th edition New York: The Modern Language Association of America. March 2009.


16
35751ENGL65271Solveig Jana Bosse Struct Eng: Syntax&Sem (w/3740TR02:00 pm-03:15 pm
17
35277ENGL6528601Mark David Johnson TESOL Theories&Prin (w/4710)DEonlineUsing an examination of our own views on language learning as a springboard for further inquiry, participants in this course will look critically at theories informing past and present practice in the teaching of English as a second and/or foreign language. To further investigate theories of second language learning/acquisition, participants in the course will also examine key research in the area.Lightbown, P. M., & Spada, N. (2013).How languages are learned (4th ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Selected articles
18
35280ENGL65311Lida Cope TESOL Methods & Pract (w/4740)onlineThis course links the theory and practice of teaching English to speakers of other languages. You will learn about approaches, methods, techniques and strategies for teaching ESL at various educational levels, develop teaching materials, observe ESL teachers’ instruction, and practice /continue ESL teaching yourself. The course is designed in Blackboard. We'll use SabaMeeting and Skype for one-on-one and group communication. (The course is taught together with ENGL4740.) Required Texts:
Brown, H. D. (2007). Teaching by principles. An interactive approach to language pedagogy. 3rd edition.Pearson Education.
Herrell, A. L., & Jordan, M. (2012). 50 strategies for teaching English language learners. 4th edition.Pearson Education.(includes a DVD)
Peregoy, S., & Boyle, O. (2013). Reading, writing, and learning in ESL. A Resource book for teaching K-12 English learners. 6th ed. Pearson Education.
19
35800ENGL6531601Lida Cope TESL: Methods and Pract (DE)online
20
34833ENGL66251Wendy Sharer Teach Comp: Theory & PracticeTR02:00 pm-03:15 pm
21
34838ENGL6700601Matthew Byron Cox Technical Editing and ProductionlineThis course moves past techniques of writing and considers how to properly layout out the information to maximize the communication. This course focuses on the current research and theory for the design and testing of documents. You will gain an understanding of how verbal and visual elements work together for the effective communication of information. Also, we will look at defining audiences, planning information requirements, analyzing levels of detail and defining expected benefits.
22
34843ENGL67401Brent R Henze Internship in Technical and Professional CommunicationsTBA
23
34845ENGL67411Brent R Henze Internship in Technical and Professional CommunicationsTBA
24
34848ENGL68051Donald Alexander Albright Research: The Writer's PerspectiveM06:30 pm-09:30 pmDesigned to fulfill research skills component of M.A. with concentration in creative writing. Intro to MLA documenting & use of writers archives. Emphasis is primarily on using research to improve individual creative writing skills: how to employ research in the writing of fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and plays. Much of the course work will be in individual student's genre of interest.Class will read one text that employs significant levels of research for each genre.
Novel: Billy Lynn's Long Half-time Walk, by Ben Fountain
Creative nonfiction: Searching for Virginia Dare, by Marjorie Hudson
Play: Seven Guitars, by August Wilson
Poetry: TBA
also, MLA Style Manual & Guide to Scholarly Publishing (3rd ed.)
Guide to Research for Creative Writers, by Philip Gerard (online)
25
34851ENGL68651Amber F Thomas Creative WritingTR03:30 pm-04:45 pmTopic: Publishing and the Creative Writer. This course invites graduate-level participants in prose, poetry, and playwriting. The course emphasizes an evaluation of venues for publication of individual works and monographic works, with a particular focus on journal, magazine, and online publication, as well as the broadside and chapbook. The course will introduce students to the best approaches for getting work published and require students to submit writing to select journals for consideration for publication. Students will have the opportunity to produce a broadside and chapbook as an example of self-publication.This course will primarily use online sources; however, the production of chapbooks and broadsides will carry a fee of $75 per student.
26
34858ENGL7070601Kristy Lynn Ulibarri Literary Theory (DE)onlineThis course will introduce students to literary theory by looking at the main theoretical boxes. Our studies will include, then, introductions to Structuralism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism, Deconstruction, Postmodernism, Feminism, Postcolonialism, Critical Race Studies, and Queer Studies. At the end of the course, students will be expected to write a seminar paper where they apply a theoretical approach to a piece of literature. Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism
Michel Foucault's History of Sexuality (v.1)
Lee Edleman's No Future
27
30876ENGL73501Seodial Deena Seminar in MTL (w/INTL 6510)T06:30 pm-09:30 pmThis course is designed to engage students in an international and intercultural discourse towards the enhancement of global and multicultural understanding, especially in a postcolonial and postmodern context. The focus will be on humanity’s cross cultural and transnational interdependence—negotiating the complications of race, class, gender, environment, religion, and sexuality in selected works. Through cross-cultural teaching, learning, and references, the course intends to produce a rich and universal experience of intertextuality, interdisciplinarity, and multiculturalism. Texts, films, documentaries, lectures, discussions, and Nobel Speeches will be used to enhance the learning experience, especially in the areas of global cultures and worldviews.
Key Words: Global, International, Intercultural, Multicultural, Transnational, Transcultural
Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. 1959. New York: Anchor Books, 1994.
Ghassan, Kanafani (Author), Hilary Kilpatrick (Translator). Men in the Sun and Other
Palestinian Stories (Paperback), New York: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1998.
Hosseini, Khaled. The Kite Runner. New York: Riverhead Books, 2003.
Phillips, Caryl. Foreigners. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2007.
Roy, Arundhati. The God of Small Things. New York: Harper, 1998.
Rushdie, Salman. The Satanic Verses. New York: Random House, 1988.
Rhys, Jean. Wide Sargasso Sea. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1992.
Walcott, Derek. The Prodigal. New York: Farrar, 2004.
28
34860ENGL7365601Julie Fay ST in MTL: Poetry (DE)onlineWe will explore and examine poets’ themes, techniques, and voices, in relation to the heritage represented by their ethnicity. Questions we’ll ask and try to answer include: What role does the poet’s ethnicity play in his/her poetry? Are there common themes among these poets’ works? In what way has their “subculture” informed their writing and influenced their technique? If the poet is bilingual, what role does the bilingualism play in the poet’s voice and style? Does the rhythm of the poet’s words rely on his/her mother tongue? What tools have been carried over from their mother language and/or culture
Meyer, Michael, Poetry: An Introduction, 7th edition ISBN: 978-1-4576-2965.

Julia Alvarez, Homecoming: New and Collected Poems and casebook in textbook above

Reetika Vazarani, World Hotel

Derek Walcott, Selected Poems

Cyrus Cassells, The Crossed-Out Swastika

Marilyn Nelson, Fields of Praise or other collection
29
35252ENGL75301Michael J Aceto Descriptive Ling (w/3750)TR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
30
34863ENGL76201Dana K Harrington History and Theory of Rhetoric IITR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
31
35248ENGL76801Michael J Aceto Writ Sys of the World (w/3720)TR12:30 pm-01:45 pm
32
34867ENGL7701601Michael J Albers Research Mtds Tech & Prof (DE)online
33
30875ENGL77101Kirk St Amant Prof Comm (w/INTL 6500)R02:00 pm-05:00 pmThis course introduces some of the basic principles of decision making, negotiation, and conflict resolution in different cross-cultural and international contexts. In so doing, the course also covers research and communication practices related to these processes. Through focusing on issues of culture, decision making, and communication, the class will examine approaches to coping with international conflicts, making critical decisions in
international situations, and engaging in negotiation practices in international contexts.
Smart Choices: A Practical Guide to Making Better Life Decisions by John S. Hammond, Ralph L. Keeney, and Howard Raiffa: New York, Broadway Books, 1999. (ISBN 978-0-7679-0886-3)

Negotiating Across Cultures: International Communication in an Interdependent World (Revised Edition) by Raymond Cohen: Washington D.C., United States Institute of Peace Press, 2007. (ISBN 1-878379-72-0)
34
34877ENGL7712601Brent R Henze Grant and Proposal Writingonline
35
34878ENGL7746601Kirk St Amant Training in TPConlineThis course provides you with an introduction to the theoretical concepts and various practices related to creating training materials for adult learners. In so doing, the course will examine different approaches to delivering communication-based training in a range of professional settings. The course will also provide an overview of pedagogical approaches and instructional technologies individuals can use in developing or conducting training sessions for adult learners.All course texts will be provided in the form of free-access online readings.
36
34880ENGL7765601Erin Anne Frost ST in TPC: Risk Communications (DE)onlineThis course brings together current understandings of risk communication—its theories, methodologies, and ideologies—with historiographically and culturally situated realities that both support and contradict popular understandings of risk. Participants in this course will work to understand how constructions of risk that hegemonic forces frame as neutral are anything but for marginalized populations. Participants will theorize ways to intervene in constructions of risk that ignore effects on those who speak from the margins. Glickman, T. S., & Gough, M. (1990). Readings in Risk. Washington, D.C.: Resources for the Future.

LaDuke, W. (1999). All Our Relations: Native Struggles for Land and Life. Cambridge, MA: South End.

Sauer, B. A. (2003). The Rhetoric of Risk: Technical Documentation in Hazardous Environments. Mahwah, NJ: L. Erlbaum Associates.

Scott, J. B. (2003). Risky Rhetoric: AIDS and the Cultural Practices of HIV Testing. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP.

Smith, A. (2005). Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide. Cambridge, MA: South End.

Woods, C. A. (2010). In the Wake of Hurricane Katrina: New Paradigms and Social Visions. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP.
37
34883ENGL7766601Guiseppe Andrew Michael Getto Sts in Comm & Emerg Tech (DE)onlineTopic: User Experience Design. Overview and practice with current research and design methods for user experience design (UX), an area of professional practice dedicated to building and improving websites, online applications, and mobile applications. No previous design experience necessary.Buley, Leah. The User Experience Team of One, 2013 - ISBN: 1933820187.

Courage, Catherine and Baxter, Kathy. Understanding Your Users: A Practical Guide to User Requirements Methods, Tools, and Techniques, 2005 – ISBN: 1558609350.

Sharon, Tomer. It’s Our Research: Getting Stakeholder Buy-in for User Experience Research Projects, 2012 - ISBN: 0123851300
38
34887ENGL79751Tracy Ann Morse Dev Engl in Two-year CollegeW06:30 pm-09:30 pm
39
34889ENGL86151William P Banks Rhetorical Theory: Queer RhetoricsT06:30 pm-09:30 pm
40
34893ENGL87801Donna Jean Kain SPC: Theories in Visual RepresM06:30 pm-09:30 pmSociety is becoming increasingly “visual.” We will focus on representations of ideas, information, arguments, and identities that challenge the primacy of words and require a broad understanding of literacy. We will engage with theories and principles of visual discourse with the overarching objectives of understanding visual thinking and communication and to applying various methods for researching, analyzing, and creating visual and visual/verbal artifacts including still and moving images, information displays in print and electronic media. Reading Images: The Grammar of Visual Design by Gunther Kress and Theo van Leeuwen (Routledge; 2 edition, 2006) 978-0415319157

Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture. Marita Sturken and Lisa Cartwright. Oxford University Press, USA; 2 edition (2009) ISBN-13: 978-0195314403

Defining Visual Rhetorics. Charles A. Hill (Editor), Marguerite Helmers (Editor) Publisher: Routledge (2004). ISBN-13: 978-0805844030

Designing Visual Language: Strategies for Professional Communicators (2nd Edition). David D. Roberts and Charles Kostelnick. Longman (2010) ISBN-13: 978-0205616404
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