EFCL City Council Candidates Survey 2017
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST
1
Candidate NameWhich ward are you running in?The existing Municipal Development Plan envisions a compact, transit-oriented city. Soon the City of Edmonton will be re-writing this Plan. What is your vision for the future of Edmonton?What do you see as the role of community leagues in the City?How do you plan to support leagues?How will you ensure the community has adequate input, the input is of equal value to that of experts and other stakeholders, and the community has some control over decisions directly impacting them?What strategy will you support to protect the livability of mature neighbourhoods while preventing sprawl?Do you support the creation of Community Redevelopment Plans? Why or why not?When deciding on amendments to the Zoning Bylaw and land rezoning, how will you balance the concerns of community residents with the concerns of developers?How would you ensure that redevelopments would not excessively negatively impact existing residents?What factors would you consider when deciding whether to support an infill proposal?Would you vote in favor of a multi-tower infill housing project in a residential neighbourhood such as Holyrood?  Why or why not?Would you agree that changing public open space to any other land use should require a community needs assessment and should be supported by City policy? Why or why not?Nearly every year school boards have been declaring some school sites surplus to their needs. The City then has an option of acquiring these sites. Cities such as Calgary have had a policy stating that surplus school sites shall remain public lands.    As a City Council member, will you support a policy to keep surplus school sites as public lands for public purposes?  Why or why not?Are you committed to preserving green space and sports fields? Why or why not?What projects would you support to improve transportation by private auto?What projects would you support to improve transportation by transit?What projects would you support to improve transportation by active transportation (cycling & walking)?What will you do to ensure taxpayers are getting value for their tax dollars?Do you believe that housing & supports for low income people and physically or mentally challenged people should be finely distributed throughout Edmonton, OR concentrated in a few communities in central Edmonton where most of the services now exist?
2
Don IvesonMayoral candidateIn order to retain the top talent who will drive our city’s growth, and to keep our city moving, we must commit to a series of critical decisions that will help us meet our big city challenges head-on. These include: Building more affordable infill – I will push for more affordable infill housing for young families and seniors in communities where it makes the most sense, including along major transit routes in mature neighbourhoods and near significant employment centres. This is the so-called ‘missing middle’, and it includes townhomes and apartments that are close to amenities like schools, neighbourhood stores and transit. I am committed to addressing the zoning and pricing challenges that come with building this kind of critical housing. Aggressively build our LRT with the long-term funding I secured from Ottawa and with provincial funds that will match what Calgary recently received. Building the West Line is Council’s next priority, which I fully support, and I will push for moving the LRT above or below traffic at key intersections to keep Edmontonians moving. We also need to plan and build mass transit in the northwest and further south, perhaps with rail, perhaps with bus rapid transit – depending on funding.. Delivering a big-city public transit system that serves people more efficiently – This means changes to today’s bus routes for a more efficient transit system that supports the busiest routes and connects to the LRT as its backbone. This will mean increased productivity, reducing traffic congestion, stimulating our economy and achieving our ambitious environmental goals. Putting people first in urban design – I will push to widen sidewalks, narrow traffic lanes in key pedestrian areas and improve intersection design for people, not just cars. I’ll also continue advocating for expanding our bike lane network to give more people the safety and the confidence to choose cycling, lower speed limits in more areas where we know pedestrians will be clustered, and increasing signal timing so seniors and those with mobility challenges can cross safely. Develop a new approach to prioritizing and building interchanges and on-ramps in new communities to ensure suburban residents have greater certainty over when new links will be built and that we have a plan to cover the huge costs of these roadways.Community leagues are an integral part of our city. Edmontonians have a long history of being active in their communities: the first community league in North America was founded right here in Edmonton, a centennial we proudly celebrated with Crestwood and EFCL this year. I also proudly served on a Community League board before my time on Council, Sarah and I made a substantial donation to our hall renovation, and my kids play community league soccer. I see the role of community leagues serving an evolving mandate that is still consistent with their original purpose, namely, bodies that: provide civic advocacy on behalf of community members and offer social and recreational programs and infrastructure. Community leagues have also come up with new and innovative ideas, support residents to feel connected to the place they call home, and provide valuable input into the City’s policy making process.During my time on Council I have had the pleasure of visiting many of the leagues in the City, whether to meet on a specific issues or to enjoy their hospitality on community league day. I will continue to support community leagues by involving and seeking their perspective on relevant issues, and including EFCL and member leagues as key stakeholders for public engagement. I also see continued support for The Community League Operating Grant, which provides funding assistance.During the last election, all of Council heard loud and clear that residents and communities wanted to be a part of the decisions that affect them. This is why we launched the Council Initiative on Public Engagement to formalize how Edmontonians can share their voice and shape their city. As part of my commitment to an open and transparent Government, I will ensure full and thorough implementation of the new framework to ensure Council has the best advice from our public on difficult decisions.Density is the only answer to slowing the overall consumption of agricultural land — higher density for both new growth and for the redevelopment of the existing footprint of the city over time. High level strategy and policy consistent with this can be found in the new Regional Growth Plan, which I helped to create (see: http://capitalregionboard.ab.ca/growth-plan/). In my opinion, density supports livability in several direct ways: to support school populations in mature areas; to sustain mom’n’pop local businesses that add vibrancy to neighbourhoods; to ensure housing choice that supports expanded diversity of income and age in neighbourhoods; land and construction efficiency to support home affordability. In addition to those outcomes, density also makes the city more fiscally efficient when it comes to infrastructure costs and service delivery. These are all desirable outcomes. However, the next push for density should be focused on delivering the ‘missing middle’ in key nodes and along key corridors.Under certain circumstances, yes - I think the 109 Ave Corridor Plan was a good exercise. I think the Strathcona ARP is a key planning document too. The recent Downtown Plan has been largely positive. That said, I think it will be practically difficult to do Community Redevelopment Plans for all neighbourhoods currently experiencing redevelopment pressure, so we will have to prioritize carefully.The concerns of impacted nearby property owners are of key relevance to Council, as are questions of feasibility and economic viability. Both are valid land use planning considerations. I do support getting stronger support for council to model and understand the pro-formas developers are working with to test their claims.The policy tests are around development impacts that would place undue interference with the amenities in a neighbourhood or significantly impact the use, enjoyment or value of neighbouring properties. Understanding impacted landowner perspectives on these decisions is why the notification and hearing processes are critical.I would consider all the relevant factors as required by the Municipal Government Act, its regulations and any relevant legal precedents as advised by the City Solicitor.As this matter is currently before council it’s important to reserve judgement until elected officials have heard from community, planners and the proponent. In general it makes sense to have significant density on this site.sense to have locate significant density on this site.Yes, in accordance with existing City policy, except in the case of surplus school sites which are considered development sites in waiting.Surplus school sites allow unique opportunities for the City to work with communities and advance the goals of the neighbourhood and the City as a whole. When a school site – with or without an existing school building – is declared surplus and no other school board desires it, the City considers acquiring the site in the context of both community needs and corporate priority needs (such as parkland deficiencies, requirements for drainage, etc.). Where sites are situated on reserve land, the City almost always acquires it, because the cost of acquiring the site is $1. Where sites are situated on non-reserve land, a primary factor is the cost, which is evaluated against available City funds. When the City acquires an undeveloped surplus school site, we evaluate whether the land can be used in a way that helps fulfil City Council’s strategic goals city-wide as well as specific community needs. This allows us to be flexible and build things like libraries, seniors housing or first place homes. I am committed to continuing this vision for public use of surplus school sites.Edmonton has the highest per capita area of parkland of any Canadian city. Our residents value this interconnected network of open spaces, which is why the City of Edmonton created the Breathe green network strategy. This integrated network approach to planning and supporting green space are framed through three overarching themes: Ecology: Open space protects the environment. By working with our ecosystems, we support natural ecological processes, save our riverbank from erosion and build habitat for animals such as birds, fish and moose, as well as plants and trees. Wellness: Open space supports health and well-being, and offers places for people to be physically active and recharge mentally. Celebration: Open space connects people to each other and builds a sense of place. These are key places for communities to thrive, gather and celebrate. I support the goals and strategic direction of the Breathe strategy and will continue to support the project through to implementation.I believe it is important to develop a new approach to prioritizing and building interchanges and on-ramps in new communities to ensure suburban residents have greater certainty over when new links will be built and that we have a plan to cover the huge costs of these roadways. The discussions with the province regarding City Charters are advancing and will inform this plan. The Southwest is an area of particular concern and I have supported development of a 10-year plan for this area, with a first move to upgrade the 40 Avenue/Terwillegar Drive intersection. This past term we were also able to secure long term funding for a $1 Billion to transform a 25-kilometre section of the Yellowhead into a freeway. All this combined with our ongoing commitment to repair and revitalize our networks and continuing our neighbourhood renewal efforts form the basis of our private auto transportation improvements.I am committed to aggressively building our LRT with the long-term funding I secured from Ottawa and with provincial funds that will match what Calgary recently received. Building the West Line is Council’s next priority, which I fully support, and I will push for moving the LRT above or below traffic at key intersections to keep Edmontonians moving. We also need to plan and build mass transit in the northwest and further south, perhaps with rail, perhaps with bus rapid transit – depending on funding. I am also committed to delivering a big-city public transit system that serves people more efficiently – This means changes to today’s bus routes for a more efficient transit system that supports the busiest routes and connects to the LRT as its backbone. This will mean increased productivity, reducing traffic congestion, stimulating our economy and achieving our ambitious environmental goals.I am firmly committed to Putting people first in urban design. I will push to widen sidewalks, narrow traffic lanes in key pedestrian areas and improve intersection design for people, not just cars. I’ll also continue advocating for expanding our bike lane network to give more people the safety and the confidence to choose cycling, lower speed limits in more areas where we know pedestrians will be clustered, and increasing signal timing so seniors and those with mobility challenges can cross safely.As an organization, the City of Edmonton is a responsible steward of tax dollars; our financials are transparent and posted yearly in the form of our annual report. One specific example I would point to is that City Council directed administration to begin undertaking a comprehensive program and service level review in the final quarter of 2015. To date, administration has completed three pilot reviews that will inform the process going forward. This review has already improved efficiencies and reduced costs for the City and I anticipate this will continue as more programs and services are scrutinized and improved. Alternate delivery methods are always an option, but the first questions under review are relevance and effectiveness of the program or service itself. I also anticipate that a more stable cost environment with lower labour cost pressure, and with large tax-supported programs like Neighbourhood Renewal reaching full levels of investment in 2018, I do predict tax increases much lower than we have seen over the last decade.I have been very transparent about supporting a distributed approach. The purpose of supportive housing is to ensure that residents with complex needs are having the majority of them met within the housing facility.
3
Fahad MughalMayoral CandidateMy vision is to consult the communities before any important decision will be made in council chambersAs someone who has been on a community league board for a year. I believe that community leagues a mode to connect citizens with the community.I plan to empower community leagues as a key stake holder for consultation prior to any development permit has been issued in the area.I have provided the response in previous question, community leagues are going to be key stake holders and will be consulted prior to any development has been approved in Edmonton.I think we should start the conversation with the leagues and citizens of what their priority is. Do they prefer to pay for urban sprawl or infill? And what changes would they like to see in infill?I think that Area Redevelopment Plan (ARP) are sufficient and could be amended if there is a need but community league involvement is a key.We need to start with pro's an con's of any project or proposal which is under consideration. The developers should also present their ideas to communities prior to an application of development permit.Redevelopment has to be responsible. Traffic study and green space reduction should be considered first.Traffic Study, Green space & community inputNever. Today at the 1st Mayoral forum I echoed my voice for Holyrood and Bonnie Doon Communities.Based on my prior experience with Land Development and Construction. This is simple Math. If 50 acre of open space is serving 5000 people and then you develop half of that space to increase the population by 5500. How will 25 acres of open space will now serve 5500 people? Yes, I believe the land their could be utilized to help non profits who are serving different communities and reducing tax burden.Green space and sports field serve our communities and children which is one of the major reason why people choose to live in those communities. I will commit to preserve green space and sports field and to maintain them properly.unfortunately private auto will not serve our seniors or people who are vulnerable, I see no value in private auto transportation.I would consider Rapid Transit System to LRT station and developing multi level parkades on LRT station with a minimum cost to ensure accessibility to public transit.In a designated winter city where we have snow on the ground for around 6 months. Building bike paths comes with maintenance cost every year. I would consider adding concrete bike paths adjacent to side walk if the budget allows and we can ensure lower cost of maintenance.I have proposed official opposition in City Government. The role of opposition will be to check and balance the business of City Council, and to ensure that we don't have to wait for a City Employee to blow the whistle or City Auditor to conduct investigation after a lot of time and resources have been wasted on failed project. For instance: Nait LRT Sand Recycling Program Walter Dale BridgeI think ideal scenario would be central location, but we do have space constraints in central core. I would look at the successful practice of other cities in Canada and Europe so we can benefit from it and void any pitfall of experimentation,
4
Neil StephensMayoral CandidateGreater densification but utilizing caution so as not to create future slums. Segregated BRT routes used in a secondary role for emergency vehicle expressways. ATS = Automated Transit Services such as driverless trains, again, utilizing segregated lanes. More green space that can be used for recreation rather than just green strips that are not wide enough to be used beyond running, walking and cycling.A place for families and community members to gather and grow through organized community gatherings where community members can meet their neighbours and create lasting bonds of friendship.I will work with leagues to help coordinate and support opportunities to foster growth and sustainability as well as good family values to help younger members to find acceptance in their own part of Edmonton and encourage them to stay as they themselves become adults and start new families.I will seek to create a pattern of on-going consultation with community groups and seek the guidance of long-term residents on issues BEFORE decisions are made.I prefer smaller scale densification so as not to disrupt and destroy communities but to enhance the look and entice new residents to help keep the community healthy and vibrant.Yes. And why is obvious. A stagnant community is one that is less inviting to younger families and single residents and that influx of youth always helps to keep communities active and attractive to others seeking a welcoming place to start and raise their families.That may be an issue that can only be determined by the state of the community in question, but, I believe that the answer to question 7 suffices as a valid response for this question. Unfortunately, sometimes due to the age of the community and the state of infrastructure (roads, sewers, sidewalks, schools, etc.) redevelopment needs to take on a large role and that will sometimes mean massive changes for that particular community so the idea is to integrate new infrastructure (apartments, condos, sewers, schools, etc) in a well developed on-going long term plan.That would be entirely dependant on where the infill is proposed and the state of the surrounding housing, I really don't like "skinny" homes so the entire infill program as it sits at present needs to be revisited. I was at the meeting at the school in Holyrood involving the HOLYROOD GARDENS condo tower project and made it very clear that huge projects such as that one are overwhelming additions to any community and that the project needed to be scaled back somewhat to address community concerns. While other communities have high towers and large scale projects I feel each project warrants comprehensive scrutiny and the input of community members to make a valuable decision.
5
Steven Shewchuk
Mayoral Candidate
6
Carla FrostMayoral CandidateSafety and maintenance next four years.Absolutely need to be involve and part of all aspects of Edmonton. Being a visual Mayor. A part of the community family. Let's keep each other informed by hearing and seeing each other so we all feel together and not alone.Protection of over development is my platform as we have so much development and we need to preserve and fill what is in.place first .Not if we are going to go further in debt.Community comes first.Not supporting more problems only solutions. Community FirstDoes it create a real quality of life improvement and jobs.Absolutely not.If the land space supports quality of life and sensitive to nature only. And if not l will not support any policy outside of the above platform mentioned. Community has a voice and if there voice agrees then we work together for solution. I will not support land site problems or policies that go against the community.Yes l do for preserve these areas for our future generations. Restrictions on dangerous bike lanes. Safety assessments need to be done. Or we would have to remove bike lanes that maybe high safety risks.I will only support safety and train maintenance for the next four years.Designated bike trails, and safe bike lanes such as bike paths and community slow zone bike lanes.We would recommend a Frost freeze tax for the next four years and look at alternative ways to generate paying down the debt. Looking for solutions is not easy as this problem was created from pass city elected officials. Edmonton is Edmonton we do not support one area more than the next. Even balance is possible but requires work and proper solutions.
7
Andrew KnackWard 1My vision is to have complete communities where people have housing choice so they can live in a community their entire lives. This involves focusing higher density along corridors and close to major amenities (ex: school and park sites, transit centres, etc.). This is already the case in many of our newer communities and it is something we should strive for in our mature communities. Complete communities also include having a healthy school population and vibrant local businesses within walking distance of where people live. Many mature communities used to have that and struggle to achieve that now due to declining populations. That shift significantly changes the character of the community and a new Municipal Development plan that focuses on complete communities will be the most important decision made by the next City Council.Community leagues bring everyone in the neighbourhood together. This is done to either celebrate specific events or inform residents about important information that impact their community. Community leagues should also empower their members to take leadership roles in the community and city. In the end, it's up to each community to decide what to focus on.I will continue to support leagues by attending meetings and events, regularly connecting with the board to talk about important issues, making myself available for community town halls, and any other way they would like to be supported.I believe the new Public Engagement Policy will ensure the community has significant input into the decisions that directly impact them. With that said, I continue to door-knocking once or twice a month across the ward to engage residents as well as hosting quarterly Community Conversations to discuss previous and upcoming topics.As mentioned in the question about the Municipal Development Plan, I believe there is a lot of work to do to address the vibrancy of our mature neighbourhoods. The strategy is outlined in my platform (http://www.andrewknack.com/2017platform/).I happily supported the Jasper Place ARP and that process gave me confidence that there are times where certain communities may need a specific plan beyond what it set out in the Residential Infill Guidelines. Not every community needs one but we shouldn't rule them out.As with every rezoning decision, I will make the decision that I believe benefits all of Edmonton. This shouldn't be looked at as community residents versus developers as often times, they share similar goals of vibrant communities.I believe the substantial amount of changes made to infill construction practices over the last three years has gone a long way in making redevelopment a more positive experience. I'm certain there will still be more work to do and am interested in additional suggestions.There are many different factors to consider in a rezoning proposal and each application is different. It would depend on the plans currently in place, when they were developed, the current feedback from residents, the health of the community, the variety of housing choices, and many other factors. Each application is looked at independently and should be thoroughly reviewed before making a decision.I have supported some multi-tower proposals and have voted against some. As mentioned in question 11, there are many factored that need to be considered before making a final decision.I believe Breathe provides that necessary direction around how to best deal with public open space in the city. I'd like to see that plan put into action.As with the previous questions, every site needs to be considered on an individual basis.Yes. I supported Breathe and look forward to it being put into action.This Council supported the Yellowhead Trail upgrades which will make a significant improvement. Also, the investment in LRT will help improve transportation by car because those that can make the choice to switch, will mean less cars on the road for those that need to drive. Additional road widening in newer communities will also be critical to helping the movement of people and goods.The West LRT and the implementation of the recently approved Transit Strategy. Also the investment into BRT into areas that need better transit service.I supported the downtown grid but would also like the city to invest more in sidewalk and trail repairs to make it safer for those who need to walk, in particular our seniors.The continued growth in our city and lack of investment in our mature communities several years ago have created financial pressures as we must fund the construction and operations of new facilities (ex: fire halls, rec centres, etc.) along with the ongoing maintenance of our mature communities. 2018 is expected to be the last year for the dedicated increase to our Neighbourhood Renewal Program. At the same time, the full program and service level review will be completed in 2018. Therefore, when the next Council begins their 2019-2022 operating budget deliberations, City Council should be in a great position to minimize the budget required to provide the necessary services and amenities. During the 2017 budget discussions I put forward a motion to remove some positions that had gone unfilled for over 6 months which resulted in $5.2 million in savings and helped us achieve the lowest approved tax increase in a decade. If re-elected, I will take a similar approach to our most recent budget discussions to balance our needs and wants. I would like to strive for an increase no higher than inflation in 2019.I believe it should be distributed throughout Edmonton.
8
Randy AllenWard 1A dynamic city with viable and accessible neighbourhoods for all. One that acknowledges its past and prepares for its future. Somewhere that is not overly congested but continues to have large open expanses for all the citizens to enjoy. Reestablish ourselves as the true gateway to the north.Community leagues used to be a common link for everyone in an area to come together, get acquainted and have an organized element to recreation. Our community league used to be what made our neighbourhood home.I will try my best to reinvigorate the need for community leagues throughout Edmonton. They are essential for establishing a common ground for neighbourhoods to come together, work together and support each other in times of need.My thoughts would be to have a committee comprised of EFCL members, city council and possibly city administration to meet on a regular basis to bring forth recommendations, concerns or ideas for consideration. The EFCL would select 3-4 people from their members to sit on the committee and be responsible for bringing forth the concerns of the federation.We have to be cautious in regards to this. My personal opinion is the houses should be no more than a duplex, be visibly attractive in relation to the rest of the neighbourhood and must not overtly impact the available parking.Yes. Some communities have been neglected so badly over the years the will require a viable, sensible and minimal intrusion plan for redevelopment. Each case would have to weighed on its own merits. Is the potential rezoning going to negatively impact the area? Is it going to affect safety to the residents of the area? Is it going to benefit the local residents? Employment? Accessibility?Redevelopments need to be carefully scrutinized for the benefits of all parties concerned. Excessive traffic load, parking issues, emergency services access, snow removal, obstruction of views and loss of open space. These all should be considered.the property being replaced is in severe disrepair and is degrading to the rest of the neighbourhood. the architectural element of the infill has to fit in with the area.No. Although the apparent desire is to be like every other city and build up and not out. I am not a fan of this. We are still a young city and have room to grow out without building for human congestion. My belief is these types of developments are unhealthy for the overall area. Yes. The issue with repurposing open spaces is we are basically eliminating open spaces. This is what once made Edmonton a desirable city for many as it wasn't overly congested. Yes with the caveat whereby if it can be proven a developer or private group can obtain the land and maintain the existing sites open space. This would force a developer potentially to only build to the same square footage the existing school and support buildings currently occupy.Yes. I feel sports fields and green spaces are essential to the growth and development of the citizens in the area. In today's society if there are less opportunities to enjoy the outdoors in your neighbourhood you will not make the effort to do so elsewhere. Edmonton's green spaces are what makes this city so beautiful. Yes it may come at a minor cost to maintain but what price do you put on the health of your community?Expansion of Anthony Henday to properly accommodate the amount of vehicle traffic we have. Reassess and redesign the locations where there are dangerous volume delays. A minimum of three continuous lanes plus merging lanes would be more effective than the current system. 215 street needs a major upgrade to accommodate the new neighbourhoods being built in the west. 184 street needs upgraded as well to ease congestion and improve viability of businesses along that route.LRT expansion to west Edmonton is crucial. The most viable and least expensive route, to my knowledge, has never been presented. That is follow 111 Avenue all away around to West Edmonton Mall. This would go near two major post secondary institutions, two hospitals, three malls, Telus World of Science and countless schools. It would not require any land appropriation and would not disrupt or disturb any existing residential areas. However, it would be extremely accessible to an incredibly large population base and workforce.I would support a return to educating potential cyclists to the correct and safe manner to operate a bicycle first and foremost. A majority of sidewalks can easily be converted into multi use pathways. The only area I am concerned with is Winterburn road from Hawks Ridge to Secord absolutely requires a multi use pathway for the residents of Westview Village and the aforementioned for safe access to schools, shops and services. We need to stop spending money on "want" projects and romantic notions of being some other city which we are not and focus on what is actually needed and required to continue to make our city viable and sustainable. I will do my best to ensure money is not wasted as in the past four years of unnecessary actions and projects like bike lanes in ridiculous areas, removal of slogans, rebranding to name a few.The problem with "concentrating" a group of perceived people who are less fortunate than others creates stigmas, biases and the potential for profiling. I prefer they live, work, play and exist wherever the facilities are available throughout the city. Transportation to services should not be a concern as we have a respectable transportation network available currently.
9
Reuben AvellanaWard 1I believe in the vision of a compact, transit - oriented city, however we should not lose our souls and wallets in the process. Infills should be done with real community consultation, and costs of new projects should be kept reasonable.Continuing to bring communities together and bring issues that affect them to the attention of council.Help form new community leagues in the new residential areas of Ward 1, and promote awareness of existing community leagues in my Ward and what they do for their communities.I will keep the lines of communication open and will try to inform them of any city project that may affect their community. I will also work to attend and organize meetings for important decisions that would affect those communities, well in advance of those decisions being made.Infills should be done with community consultation. Otherwise, I feel a number of regulations and bureaucracy needs to be streamlined. For example, getting a permit for a skinny house takes over 10 months. If the regulations are made more sensible, it will be easier for people to take the initiative to improve their communities and densify the area the way they want it.Yes, but we need to have more consultation with the community and commit a realistic amount of money to the plan. If we are going to do it, it should work well the first time and not act as a band aid.We need to reduce the amount of bureaucracy and red tape for developers, however they still need to do consultation for projects that will affect the community.Consultation and I will also solicit opinion and advice online, to ensure we get as many ideas and thoughts related to the project as possible.Will this be a positive impact on the community? Does the community want it? Is this an effective use of the land?If community consultation shows the community wants it, it is an effective use of land, then yes. Otherwise no.Depending on the size of the land, yes. If it is a small plot of green space that isn't already designated a park, then I don't feel a community assessment is warranted. However a large area of green space should require a community needs assessment and consultation.The city should acquire the land, however it should under go a community needs assessment and consultation as to what the land should be used for.It depends on what the community needs are. If the community has enough sport fields and need a new community center or library, I do not see a problem with re purposing the land for that. Revisit the speed limit restrictions of 30km/hr on Junior and High Schools, as well as the idea of 30k/hr restrictions in residential areas.West LRT Line and ensuring that the line will not disrupt roadways and repeat the mistakes of the intersections around Southgate and Kingsway.Look at having another crossing point around stony plain road that make life easier for pedestrians and cyclists.End wasteful spending and ridiculous regulations. Regulations such as the city requiring bike racks to be made from material that doesn't come from the earth's crust is an outrageous requirement that only serves to drive up our costs. Requirements like this should come to an end.It depends on their needs. People that cannot survive in society without aid should be concentrated in communities where services exist. However people who are simply hard on their luck or have disabilities that do not prevent them from living in society should be free to live wherever they want.
10
Dave OlivierWard 1
11
Bev EsslingerWard 2I envision a vibrant city that includes a great people of all backgrounds, cultures and ages. Together we will build a city that embraces one another. It is a city that has used our land well, building public facilities together rather than individual buildings that utilizes green building principles. It is a city that has a range of transportation choices for people and has built increased density along our transit corridors. It will be a city that provides open green spaces for people and embraces community gardens, child friendly housing and is built with winter in mind. Our city will be a safe place for all.As a former Community League President I understand the value of community leagues as a connector of people, providing social and recreational opportunities for the community.I would support leagues by interacting with individual leagues listening to their concerns, working with their on projects and supporting their events.Public engagement is important to the city and our new public engagement policy looks at a variety of ways to reach out and gather this vital input from our communities.One of the biggest challenges facing mature neighbourhoods is how to maintain the character of the community when replacement or or additional housing is being built. I propose a Neighbourhood Design Committee that is comprised of community members from across the city who will review infill projects and provide feedback on how to adapt design to fit into the neighbourhood. I think we need to revisit the best way to gather input from the community on their community redevelopment. There is so many communities that do not have plans and it takes so long to create so we need to find a way to do this differently.It is important to hear from both the community and the applicant on each issue. No two rezoning are exactly the same so it is important to be open minded, understand the concerns of the community and consider each rezoning that is before us. Council has made a great many changes to ensure that redevelopments do not excessively impact residents from improved communication, addressing draining, height, set backs, etc.Again, every rezoning is distinct and all the information must be heard at that time. I've addressed earlier how I would address the concern of infill fitting into the neighbourhood through a Neighbourhood Design Committee.Every rezoning must be considered individually and you must look at all the facts and impacts. I cannot say until I hear all the information.I am not sure it needs a community needs assessment but it does need public engagement.I would consider such a policy but need to consider possible impacts thoroughly.Yes as it is important for every community to have green space. I support the Open Spaces Master Plans.I supported the Yellowhead Upgrades to improve travel, goods and services movement and flow throughout city. I support a transit strategy that addresses improved access and frequency to all quadrants of the city as not areas are served well by transit. I think we need more shared use trails and we need to connect them throughout the city so people can use them for leisure, access to schools, shopping and work.I think we need to balance our needs and services with our limited financial resources. We also need to ensure that projects use best procurement, design and project management possible.They should be distributed throughout the city.
12
John OplanichWard 3This MDP was approved in 2010. It was a 10 year plan that envisioned Edmonton as a transit-oriented city. I agree 100%. LRT is key for the future of Edmonton. Unfortunately, North Edmonton has been forgotten. In 1976 during the Commonwealth Games the LRT was built North towards Clareview. It has been more than 40 years since 1 foot of rail has been added. North Edmonton was driving the train in 1976 but has been sitting in the caboose unhitched driving everyone else's agenda south of the river. Why? North Edmonton can't wait until 2030. We are starting to feel treated like a ghetto. Re-writing of this plan needs to happen ASAP and North Edm needs to be driving this train into CastleDowns within 4 years. Community Leagues know best what they need. We need to LISTEN. I want to give them powers similar to Home Owner Associations(HOA's) that exist around Canada. Go to www.ElectOplanich.com Community Leagues are correct. City doesn't treat us as a stakeholder. I have proposed a number of ideas: #1. Each ward needs to be issued 1 photo radar unit. All funds generated MUST go to the community leagues in that Ward. #2. $2/household/month from our property taxes need to be paid to the Community Leagues in Ward 3. These monies are to be used for beautification, water parks, playgrounds, sports equip for disadvantaged etc. We need to empower our Community Leagues not treat them like an unnecessary apendage.Go to www.ElectOplanich.com Community Leagues are correct. City doesn't treat us as a stakeholder. I have proposed a number of ideas: #1. Each ward needs to be issued 1 photo radar unit. All funds generated MUST go to the community leagues in that Ward. #2. $2/household/month from our property taxes need to be paid to the Community Leagues in Ward 3. These monies are to be used for beautification, water parks, playgrounds, sports equip for disadvantaged etc. We need to empower our Community Leagues not treat them like an unnecessary apendage. Homeowner Associations (HOA's) - is an organization in a subdivision, planned community or condominium that makes and enforces rules for the properties within its jurisdiction. The purchase of the property automatically makes the homeowner a member of the HOA. Some associations can be very restrictive about what members can do with their properties. We have to empower Community Leagues. They know what is best for there communities. Empower Community Leagues to make those choices. You slow down sprawl by redevelopment of mature neighbourhoods - LRT access attracts young people back into these neighbourhoodsYes but needs to be done as partnership with Community Leagues.There has to be balance. Redevelopment encourages residents to upgrade their properties. Increases values in older neighbourhoods.You need restrictive covenants as part of there proposals.Does it fit the current neighbourhood as it exists.They have already approved some projects. Remember this is an area with single homes. If you want to build multi-tower infill than it has to be on large parcels of land not in the middle of a neighbourhood with single family homes.Yes - if it is land that has been sitting there for many years empty then why not develop. 127 ave & 113 A st has about 50 acres that has been sitting there since 1920. It`s not doing anyone any favours.It depends where it is located. In some cases it may make sense to keep them public lands.Absolutely. We are in short supply of sports & green space. I don`t know what you meanLRT to Castledowns. I also think we need to extend LRT from Clareview to 167 ave and then west down 167 ave to Castledowns YMCA.I think we have more than enough. Let`s spend our money on more pressing matters like access out of our neighbourhoodsguaranteed portion of tax dollars must be reinvested back into our communities - our roadways, sidewalks, & alleys are crumbling but they want more room for bikes - let`s get our priorities in orderThey should be concentrated in areas where most of the services exist.
13
Martin NarsingWard 4
14
Hassan HaymourWard 4My vision is to collaborate with the residents and businesses of our city to help create a flourishing Edmonton. I will focus on creating jobs by developing our Edmonton Energy and Technology Park to become North America’s premier eco-industrial hubs. I will work with our law enforcement to keep our neighbourhoods safe and ensure our residents have easy access to all essential services and infrastructure, such as police, fire, hospitals, schools, parks and community leagues, providing opportunities for youth involvement. I will also work to ensure that City Council is open and accountable, reducing any wasteful spending and ensuring there is transparent oversight on major public projects. I am confident that with the help of our residents and businesses, we will co-create a safe, and flourishing Edmonton!Community leagues help create a sense of community in our city. They provide opportunities for youth involvement, keeping our children safe. They foster building relationships among neighbours, creating friendships that transcend ethnic or political boundaries. They provide venues for social gatherings to literally bring people together. They are a vital part of our city and important stakeholders in the development of our communities.First, by expressing my gratitude for the great work done by all employees and volunteers of community leagues. Then by engaging with the community leagues in Ward 4, but also throughout the city, to get a good understanding of the needs of our communitities. I will then take the needs of these community leagues to City Council to ensure those voices are fairly heard and represented. I plan on supporting community leagues by ensuring our budgetary spending prioritizes them equally and fairly.I will work to ensure the voice of every resident and business in Ward 4 is equally heard and fairly represented. I will engage with members of our communities through traditional platforms, such as public forums, but also modern tools, such as social media and other online tools. I will work to ensure that our decision making process is clear, open and transparent, so our constituents can keep their government accountable to the needs of our city.I will work with city planners and developers to ensure that we develop housing that takes into consideration the capacity of our current infrastructure. I will also work to ensure that all projects are of great quality, compliant to permits and considers the design characteristics of existing neighbourhoods.Yes, if the plan makes sense. Every Community Redevelopment Plan is unique, because the needs of every community is unique. If the residents and businesses of Ward 4 provide feedback or concerns about a need they have, I will work with them to create a solution. I will work with our community residents to hear their thoughts and opinions on certain topics, before moving forward on any major decisions. I will ensure that all stakeholders, both residents and businesses, have their voice equally heard and fairly represented.By ensuring that the needs of existing residents are always carefully considered. I will work to ensure that any new redevelopments takes into consideration the capacity of our existing infrastructure so that existing residents are not negatively impacted. I will consider the impact that this infill would have on the existing community, the residents and businesses of the area, as well as the demands placed on our current infrastructure.I’m not sure if this question is an error, as I am running for Ward 4, not Ward 8. Any new project proposed in any neighbourhood needs to be carefully considered and all stakeholders consulted before making decisions. The needs of our communities need to be considered in every decision we make. Changing a public open space to any other land use should be carefully considered, taking into account the needs of our constituents. If it is necessary to our decision making process, we will conduct a community needs assessment supported by City policy. That depends on the specific school site and the needs of our constituents at that time. If the constituents feel that the site is needed for public purposes, such as a school, park or community league, then we will keep it as such. Green spaces, parks and sports fields provides opportunities for our children and youth to play and learn valuable life skills. They are an integral part of our communities and should be protected as such.I will work towards reducing our greenhouse gas emissions by providing incentives for alternative energy vehicles.I will work towards reducing our greenhouse gas emissions by investing in improving our public transportation networks of Bus Rapit Transit and Light Rail Transit, revisiting the closed bus routes in Northeast Edmonton.I will work to ensure that any developments of new bicycle lanes are effective and minimize disruption to existing vehicles.I will work to ensure that all decision making in City Council is open and transparent, especially as it pertains to budgetary spending. I will work with the residents and businesses of Ward 4 to ensure that their voice is equally heard and fairly represented. I will consult with all stakeholders to ensure their needs are carefully considered and addressed.I believe that social support and housing for low income people, and physically or mentally challenged people should be distributed throughout the City to ensure all communities contribute an equal share in supporting those in need.
15
Sam HachemWard 4I would love to see expanded LRT service into all areas of the city. But above ground or below, otherwise our traffic issues will get problematic.Community leagues are important because they engage young families to be more involved thus creating safer communities for all. These leagues are essential.I will continue to be a supporter throughout my time in office. Its about sitting down with all of the leaders in each community and learn from them as to what they need in order to best serve. Town Hall meetings are key. Allowing people to come out and voice their opinions is important. SUPPORT proper infill development. I am 100% for this to be done properly and we need to support those who are willing to build infill properties. I would not want to see the older neighborhoods deteriorate. Yes. We can't let things go. We must be proactive to preserve these communities.Well we need to look at the long term effect of each project. Well we need to build the right way. Consulting the residents is important. But also redevelopment revitalizes areas in a way that cannot be done otherwise.Long term effect, that's it.If the project makes sense, and there is enough land, then yes.... but.... those type of projects would make more sense in the inner city close to Kingsway or downtown.Like I said, it should be assessed on a case by case basis.Yes. There are many other areas that can be open for redevelopment. Yes of course. Those make up part of the communities we live in.
16
Alison PosteWard 4
17
Felix Amenaghawon
Ward 4My vision is to see Edmonton as an attractive place to live, raise a family, do business and invest in our Capital City'Front line' liaison hub in community development I plan to facilitate collaboration between the community leagues and other tiers of government to ensure we have the growth and development in our communities.I plan to have community leagues more involvement in the initiation, planning and implementation stages of projects that will implemented in their communities.
18
Aaron PaquetteWard 4Northeast Edmonton hasn't been well served or listened to by the city in recent years. We need better public services in our area. And the city needs to listen to our concerns. After telling the city we needed better transit in the northeast, the City cut six bus routes and took cars off the Capital LRT line to put on the Metro run. If elected, I will make sure the residents views are heard and respected. The area needs more local businesses, more seniors' facilities, and better family programming at our recreation centres. But the first step is that we need to be heard.Community leagues are the eyes and ears, protectors, and activity planners of their community. If elected, I intend to keep in close contact with the leagues in Ward 4 to hear their concerns and raise them at City Hall.Northeast leagues need a voice at city hall that is a loud and proud advocate for the north east. I intend to keep in close contact with community leagues, work on their issues, and fight their battles at city hall.Experts play an important role, but not the only role. If experts and voters don't see things the same way, there is a problem. That's where leadership from the city needs to come in. As councillor, I will work hard to find solutions voters can live with, that are best practices in government, planning and engineering.The northeast is already one of the denser areas of the city (excepting downtown). We have numerous condo complexes, town homes and apartments. But to prevent sprawl and roads, we need better services closer to home. We need more businesses in the northeast so we don't have to travel to Sherwood Park or downtown to shop or play. This is a planning issue that needs to be addressed.The critical issue is the fact northeast residents have not been listened to in recent years. I will not support any plan that doesn't have the full input of Ward 4 residents.Edmonton is made up of people. People come first. There is a role for developers, but residents have to live in their community after development goes in. A good Councillor will find solutions that both sides can live with.Again, it goes back to listening to residents - something that hasn't been happening in the northeast.Does it make good use of the land, does it fit the character of the area, and how do local residents feel about it.That proposal is far from Ward 4, but I believe that while density is a good thing, it has to develop over time. Going from low density to high rises overnight is a recipe for upset residents. People live in the northeast, and people need to be listened to and respected.Yes.I cannot make a blanket declaration. It seems reasonable to assume we would want more park and public space, but individual projects need to be assessed on their merits.Yes.Our roads are a mess. We need a greater investment in maintaining them. We need more parking at northeast LRT stations.Start by reversing the cuts to six bus routes in the northeast, and the Capital line. Northeast residents were recently surveyed about the changes they need. I would dust off that report and start working on it.Northeast residents pay the same level of taxes as every other part of the city, yet we are always last in line for services. I will be a loud and proud advocate to build better services for our area.It should be evenly distributed.
19
Dawn NewtonWard 5Edmonton is a great community with exciting opportunities, but more can be done to realize this city’s potential. As one of the fastest growing cities in Canada, City Council needs to take a forward looking view to plan for future growth. We need better coordination to build an integrated transportation network to help Edmontonians move throughout our city.Community leagues play a vital role in bringing people together, creating neighbourhood connectivity, and combating social isolation.As City Councillor for Ward 5, I will attend community league meetings and events to better understand local issues, as well as champion local projects at City Hall.
20
Tish ProuseWard 6
21
Scott McKeenWard 6The City's Municipal Development Plan envisioned 25 percent of growth to go into mature neighbourhoods. Edmonton hasn't reached the fairly conservative goal, though basement suite development bumped the number up in recent reviews. I can't see abandoning the goal. Should Edmonton be even more ambitious. Seemingly, we have to focus on winnable wins. In Ward 6, that means areas like The Quarters, Rossdale and the Muttart lands. While we can focus more on arterial roads and transit corridors development for medium and high rise development, council must look at creative ways to encourage development in neighbourhoods more open to infill. In Ward 6, my focus will be on finding incentives for infill in communities like McCauley, Boyle Street and Central McDougall. I've also committed to looking for ways to better protect heritage homes. Glenora and Westmount have seen far more than their share of infill. I realize these desirable neighbourhoods present less risk to infill builders, who I sympathize with, so far as the challenges of infill versus greenfield home building. But the question then is: How does City Hall reduce the risk for builders so we can get infill housing in communities that would dearly love it. That, to me, is the challenge facing council next term. We also need to find ways to encourage more creative housing types better design and design that better fits in the context of the neighbourhood. Council made strides this term, so far as improving infill compliance and reviewing the Mature Neighbourhood Overlay. But we still have much, much more work to do.First, I think some of the most important community values in Edmonton, of collaboration and volunteerism, comes from the fact the EFCL has been around since 1921. It binds neighbours together into collective effort, whether it is to run minor sports, to organize block parties or to advocate for or against development. There will always be some tension between individual community leagues and city council. But I have no issue, so long as the community league executive is open minded and fair to, for example, infill developers. EFCL central office and its civics committee members have been a tremendous benefit in regards to their input on various civic policy discussions. Stay in regular contact. Attend meetings when possible or when invited. Meet with the executive when they ask. Support EFCL city-wide initiatives. Remind council colleagues of the history and importance of EFCL contributions to quality of life and community connection. On occasion, there is real tension between a community league's executive and the local councillor. We all need to remember that everyone is trying to do their best for the community. Diverse opinions must be heard in order for council to make the most informed decisions.Any councillor who doesn't listen to community concerns -- often brought by community league executives -- should not be on council. Period. Local knowledge is critical to informed decision making. However, I think it's also incumbent on communities, through their leagues, to reflect broad community concerns. When I'm sitting in a public hearing on a rezoning, and a handful of people from a community are in attendance to oppose a development, I often wonder what the other 90-plus percent of the neighbourhood believes. The City is responsible for public engagement, but EFCL are critical partners in this. We must walk the talk of representing all voices in the City and in impacted neighbourhoods.Infill has been an unfolding process. Allowing subdivision of 50-foot lots did not allow the majority of neighbourhoods to participate. The next step, I believe, is in finding ways to encourage infill in neighbourhoods that truly require revitalization. How do we do that? Financial incentives? I'd need to see evidence that they wouldn't merely drive up land costs in the targeted neighbourhood. But I think we can speed up the permit process for specific neighbourhoods. We also need to focus on transit corridors, obviously, with medium density. As well, we have several development areas -- The Quarters, West Rossdale and the Muttart Lands -- that require special city council attention this next term. Quite properly, citizens in neighbourhoods seeing infill question why Blatchford, etc., are taking so long to develop.Community Redevelopment Plans, or Area Redevelopment Plans, can be helpful. But only if developers are involved in the process. Too often I've seen communities put in hundreds of hours of work into an ARP and then be faced with a development proposal that doesn't "fit" because a developer was able to assemble land, say, for a higher density development outside the area designated for such things in the plan. What I think we must do is gather communities to discuss their aspirations demographically and socially before we talk built form. Does the community want to attract young families? Is the community lacking in green space, relative to other neighbourhoods. If the goals are to increase green space and attract families, then it can begin to look at built form. What kind of housing could be developed that would be affordable for young families. What kind of density is required so that some space in the neighbourhood could be freed up for pocket parks, for example. How many families are required to keep the local school open. I think we often get into pitched battles around built form and forget about the human beings we want to move into our neighbourhoods.I've always done this. My voting record includes nay votes against infill, as well as yay votes. The community carries more weight when it comes with specific local knowledge and facts to the debate. Central McDougall, for example, has used census data to clearly show that it needs support in uplifting the neighbourhood out of poverty. Council is swayed more by facts, data and evidence. I'm open to the idea of the City hosting seminars for community leagues on how best to gather information that will have impact.Interesting question. I've worked with communities to ensure they are informed on what council needs to see or hear at a public hearing. See above. So a petition of 20 names will carry far less weight, than facts and data. I realize this puts pressure on the neighbourhoods. But even if someone presents to council with questions around specific impacts -- and if city administration has not answered those concerns -- then it raises doubts in the mind of a voting councillor. The issue for individual community leagues is getting the attention of councillors outside their ward. I can't speak for other councillors, so far as the due diligence they do in reviewing redevelopment. It is up to community leagues to perhaps review their city councillors voting record to see if they ever vote against redevelopment in other wards. Might be a sign.I always look at the impacts. I always review whether the infill makes sense, so far as on-site parking, lot coverage, etc. Again, I've voted against several smaller infill developments this term -- as well as three tower projects -- because they either didn't fit the context or because the City did not do enough analysis or public engagment.I would vote for it, sure ... if the major community concerns are addressed. In Holyrood, it seems to me, the community is deeply concerned about traffic being driven back through the neighbourhood and past schools. This is a legitimate issue and must be addressed by the developer or the City with a proper transportation plan. But the development site is a high value target for infill, given that it is adjacent to an LRT stop. We can and must find a way to make this project work for existing and future residents.I represent downtown and Oliver, which is green-space-deprived on a per capita basis. No, the river valley does not count. Parents with stollers and people with mobility issues, including seniors, can't easily access river valley trails. Young parents, especially, need green space nearby. So yes, needs assessments are required, just as quality infill is required, as affordable housing is required in ALL neighbourhoods in Edmonton.We have to be a bit more nuanced on these issues, I think. Your previous question mentioned a needs assessment. What if the neighbourhood in question has above-average amounts of public green space? I'm sorry, but I will make decisions based on such information. And I'm sorry, but Ward 6 and a few of its communities have been asked to accept the majority of non-market housing for the entire city. Other neighbourhoods must step up. Again, can we use real evidence, information and comparisons across the City to reach conclusions that are fair and equitable to each neighbourhood. Of course I support preserving green space. The fact is, in high-population-density neighbourhoods like downtown and Oliver, there isn't enough green space. So the City, over time, will have to look for opportunities to purchase even small parcels for pocket parks. Green space and sports fields contribute to community connection -- minor sports introduces parents to each other -- and to mental health, as myriad studies show. I brought the Mental Health and Urban Isolation initiative to city council, so creating places to rejuvenate people in urban settings is something I'll always support. That is my default position. But again, evidence and information on individual cases must be weighed to make good decisions.I think the City's transportation operations can be challenged to find improved ways to move automobile traffic, through light timings, prohibited right turns and even centre lanes that reverse traffic flow during morning and evening rush hours. Bikeways should be placed on sidewalks as shared-use paths whenever possible, so as to not remove traffic lanes. Bikeways, meanwhile, must be proven out in the downtown and Old Strathcona area before the City extends them out. I think they will, by the way. And I think more and more people commuting by bike will help reduce congestion over time. The same is of course true of LRT. Unfortunately, LRT is seen as a problem because it takes up lanes of traffic. But because it promises to remove hundreds if not thousands of cars off the road during rush hour, LRT is clearly a solution, so far as improving transportation by private auto. Cars are still the most important way for most of us to get around in this spread out city. I use my car almost exclusively and lament the divisiveness of some of the discourse. Promoting active forms of transportation — promoting transit — will reduce traffic on the roads for people who remain dependent on their cars. We can't widen roads all over the City. So getting more and more people to use bikes, buses, LRT or shoe leather is the best way, over time, to make Edmonton more auto friendly.I support the transit review. I support the notion of frequency along major routes. For more than a decade I depended on bus and LRT to get to and from work downtown at The Edmonton Journal. It was so frustrating to just miss a bus and realize it was a 30-minute wait for the next one. More than once, I thought about buying a second car for my family to overcome that frustration. Frequency is critical. But so is ensuring we can equitably reach people with mobility issues who live too far from a frequent bus route. I am confident we can do this and create a transit system that attracts more riders and still works for everyone.Again, I think the downtown and Old Strathcona bikeways will prove themselves. I think it's then a matter of building a grid out from the core, of segregated bike lanes. The previous strategy of putting in bike lanes when the City was doing major roadway renewal created a disjointed plan of painted bike lanes that worked for no one.This past council term approved tax increases that, on average, were lower than the last two city council terms. The service review underway in administration will, I believe, help council find ways to reduce costs, or even eliminate lines of business. City government is becoming more and more important to the lives of citizens and to the economy. But we also have to push back on the provincial government in regards to funding policing and permanent supportive housing for the homeless, to reduce costs borne by the central city in the region. Dispersing solutions to homelessness and poverty around Edmonton is my highest priority for my second term. Permanent supportive housing is akin to extended care facilities. They create no more issues for the community than seniors facilities. So we need to get ALL councillors involved in finding appropriate sites around the City. Credit to Michael Walters and for already having those conversations with groups in his ward.
22
Adil pirbhaiWard 6Iam supportive of mass L.R.T. lines we should look to other cities who have in vested on metro lines that allows residents &those business who plan on re locating. it true we will never get rid of cars it is their right to drive a car we how ever should give citizens benefits of using Metro.The community leagues have a role to play in the community however the attendance is going down and the people feel that the league is becoming too involved special interest groups.I support the funding from the city but the city can only do so much and I would like to see a fund drive in the community and province should also give grants to the community league through lottieries.Holding town hall meetings, actually consulting with organizations like yours including other experts.I have been door knocking in ward 6 and people have been saying that they are very concerned about urban sprawl and infill constructions. The city has not been listening to their concerns. Developers have been getting a free ride from the council a it has to stop.Plans that benefit the community I support. Some are good and some are not the good. As I said the city needs consult the citizens. For example, downtown Jasper Avenue needs a major redevelopment. Hockey arena has not done what it is suppose to.Community Residents come first. Developers come second.By consulting the residents before doing anything. That is what democracy is about. Most residents are getting frustrated . Nothing will change if the cast their ballots due to the council does not listen to them. Plan has to be very clear. Does not effect the residents in that area.No I would not.It should be supported by city policy andcommuninty assessment. i support paks &green spaces.We should stop doing what Calgary does. I would do what is best for my city with the in put by the citizensIam supporter of green space &spots field Climate change is real.None through private auto Public. LRt to west &across the-all city.Cycling , taking a bus,&walking During cold Winter Months People drive &it is hard on our senior citizens.I would like to see nothing again happens like 102ave bridge,Water dale &who can for get Nait LRT, cost over runs I would like to see an independent Auditor . I believe it should be evenly distributed how ever not the worst criminals.
23
Matthew Kleywegt
Ward 7I envision a walkable city where the streets are alive with people. A city of neighbourhoods where all of your day to day needs can be met from small businesses within walking distance of your home. I envision a city where people know their neighbours, their elected officials and their community resource officers. I see community leagues as a place for people to meet their neighbours and build connections. They are vital in making an area a place instead of just an address. They co-ordinate events, they bring people out of their homes and they increase the sense of ownership for the area around someone's home. They are also a great venue for encouraging engagement in local civic issues.I would provide much reduced or no fees for the use of city resources. I would introduce a simplified preferential process for leagues to obtain permits. I would also like to hold "Town Hall" style meetings at least quarterly at Community Leagues to get peoples input and increase community engagement.Quarterly Town Hall meetings at community leagues and special sessions to discuss specific issues directly effecting the community. We have plenty of vacant space in the mature city. I would support a better permit process and upgraded infrastructure to encourage the development of vacant lots. I would also include neighbourhood design guidelines into the zoning of specific neighbourhoods so new buildings fit the aesthetics of the existing area.Yes I do. The city is going to grow and change and we need a coherent and agreed way that that is going to happen.New Buildings need to be of a similar aesthetic and of a similar scale. I will not impose any drastic changes to the look of a neighbourhood. By keeping them similar in appearance and only moderately larger than the surrounding buildings. Does it fit with the neighbourhood and with the scale of the community.No. Multi-tower infill belongs in the city core. Holyrood could support some low-rise projects but nothing over 5 stories.Yes, public open space or green space should only be developed with community input.No. I would not make a blanket policy like this. In some cases some of that land could be used for housing.Yes, green space is an important public resource.Many of our side streets and Alley ways are a mess of patches. We need to increase our efforts to repave these.I would like to see more express buses and better and larger bus transit hubs. I would like the see the LRT Bike path extending north to Clareview and south across 97th st to Rogers place. I would also like to see more cross-walks with overhead lights.Ensure that we do a better job vetting our contractors. The lowest bidder is not always the best value. I think these should be distributed according to need. These should be spread throughout the city but there will be more in denser neighbourhoods and closer to the centre.
24
Liz John-WestWard 7Changing the way we move around the city impacts everyone's live from the senior to the young from the wealthy to not so wealthy. Its important that we continue to look beyond using our cars for transportation but as we do this lets continue to be mindful of the impact of these decisions on the vulnerable and ensure that their voice is heard and responded to.I think community leagues are an asset to the community and its important that we continue to support them. Community leagues can be a place of bringing the whole neighbourhood together and possibly be the voice of the neighbourhood. My hope is to attend the community league meetings on a regular bases so that I am aware of the issues and strengths of the neighbourhoods.My background is community development and community engagement. Its important that the voice of the community is fully involved in all decisions which impacts them.Infill housing has brought in revitalization to mature neighbourhoods in the core of the city. This is good. But, what I would like to see is a more thought out response to infill housing where these houses change the character of a neighbourhood. Yes, I would support it as long as the community is a full participant in the plan.We need to figure out how to stop the tension between community residents and developers and one of the ways is to have open and transparent conversations with one another. Developers need to understand that once they do their work they are gone and its the community members who are living with the impact of their development on their daily life. Community members need to create space for development to occur so that our neighbourhoods grow and continue to be a vibrant place to live.Communicate, communicate, communicate.impact on the neighbourhood I am not the one to make this decision. Its the neighbourhood which surrounds this project who needs to make this decision. I would encourage both the developers and the neighbourhoods to continue to talk and come to a common ground. This is a healthy process.Yes, because it impacts the neighbourhood. Sure, why not keep it public land. I would need to hear a strong argument against this in order for me to change my mind. Yes because its important to our health Having different modes of transportation which is accessible to all segments of our society is important. Having good transit for the senior or for the student as well as great roads for the parents taking their kids to hockey games early in the morning. Riding a bike in our mainly winter city may be a challenge but I know many are up to this challenge. This is a good thing.Having different modes of transportation which is accessible to all segments of our society is important. Having good transit for the senior or for the student as well as great roads for the parents taking their kids to hockey games early in the morning. Riding a bike in our mainly winter city may be a challenge but I know many are up to this challenge. This is a good thing.Having different modes of transportation which is accessible to all segments of our society is important. Having good transit for the senior or for the student as well as great roads for the parents taking their kids to hockey games early in the morning. Riding a bike in our mainly winter city may be a challenge but I know many are up to this challenge. This is a good thing.Continue to be more accountable and transparent with tax dollars.Housing and supports for low income people need to be distributed throughout Edmonton. This is critical to developing a healthy and vibrant neighbourhood where people from all backgrounds live in community together.
25
Andrzej Gudanowski
Ward 7A city that will compete with other big cities on the globe. Modern city at a time, university city, the place of development of science, technology and wisdom of human thought.Every wise and developed society must be united. Every well organized society is part of the common good, the security and the development of the moral and economic life of the community.Become a moral and spiritual leader of the all my community. Be at every important meeting of my community. Incubate the community with ideas, initiatives and important meetings.As a representative of my community, I will pass and share with my community some of my power and duties.
26
Kirsten GoaWard 8In order for our City to be economically, socially and environmentally sustainable we do need to change our growth pattern. However, I think we can do this in a way that engages communities and diverse stakeholders in the conversations and decisions about how their neighbourhoods are going to grow and change. Density alone does not address the economic and social challenges caused by the lack of it. We will only be successful in bringing people into core and mature neighbourhoods if we do it in ways that increase social cohesion, connects people, supports diversity and supports the amenities our neighbourhoods need to thrive. Our most creative solutions are rooted in our communities. "People support what they create" Margaret Wheatley -- I envision an Edmonton where the changes we need to be sustainable are created in our communities. I envision an Edmonton where we foster that creativity and bring people together to make things happen.Community leagues can be the neural network of our City. They have the potential to connect the diverse members of a neighbourhood, to support their capacity, build community and shape our future. I think community leagues, because they are involved in public life, are inherently political and it's important that we support the capacity of our community leaders in navigating these waters as well as mentoring new leaders. I want to see community leagues become true hubs of the community that bring the full diversity of our neighbourhoods together to build our communities together.Leagues can be challenged by a lack of diversity and limitations in their capacity. We need to do more to support the opportunity Leagues have to do outreach, meet people where they are at and build that capacity. We need to support the development of more diverse leadership in Community Leagues, provide support for a wide range of outreach opportunities and also support the capacity that is already there. I think it's also essential that we support leagues in reaching out to other networks and groups in order to find ways to collaborate and build capacity. I'm excited about the opportunities for community leadership development and support that are embedded in the new Public Engagement policy and as a City Councillor I will work with Leagues and Administration to make sure those pieces are implemented in a comprehensive way.I was the community co-chair for the Council Initiative on Public Engagement for the last two years. I also worked on the Community Leadership working group. There are exciting opportunities for supporting the capacity of communities to engage effectively. As well as, more robust recommendations for bringing diverse people to the table, having deeper conversations about how our neighbourhoods are growing and changing and doing so well before decision making, instead of at the last minute. The best decisions are rooted in our communities and supported by a wide range of perspectives, experience and expertise. I will work to make sure that these opportunities actually happen, but I also believe that we need a Councillor who leads by example. There are so many opportunities to connect different groups of people and different expertise and perspectives and I think a Councillor can be a part of this. I already spend a fair bit of time, connecting different people and community groups to resources, other people, networks etc. that will help them achieve a goal. As a Councillor, I will doorknock between elections, go to stakeholder and public meetings, but also bring people together for these conversations well ahead of decision making and support them in developing plans and implementing them. There is so much important local knowledge and expertise in our communities, we will make better decisions if we can bring that to the table early on. I will also support these ideas as community navigates administration and the rest of Council and close the loop on the other end. Community often needs to be encouraged to meet with Council, but every vote counts and they need to be able to share their perspective and expertise before we are at a public hearing.There seems to be a fundamental issue with our zoning bylaw when we have around 1000 DC zones. It's not a good use of resources when community and administration spend so much time and energy on making plans for areas and neighbourhoods and corridors and then proposals come in that leapfrog them. We need to get a handle on the economic/market implications of our plans as a part of the process in order to negotiate more effectively with developers. Currently we have little capacity to assess the proformas of proposed developments. I'm also concerned that developers are often using "pre-sales" as their market analysis, because this skews the picture of the actual market and leaves families with children and modest income households out of the equation in many cases. Doing market analysis will also provide more predictability for all parties. If community, administration and developers are looking at the same numbers we can have a better conversation about what is possible. We need to support community in creating the vision for how they will grow and change and we need to do it in a way that looks at the demographic shifts and plans for resilience. This means bringing diverse interests and perspectives to the table. It means wrestling with what we mean when we talk about character. And it means making sure that whatever we imagine is designed to foster community connection and build social cohesion and resilience. We need to raise the bar on design so that when upzoning occurs, these new builds are designed to minimize impact on the surrounding community, will activate the street and increase community connection. Design can drive demographics so we need to build in a way that will attract diverse residents who add to the vibrancy and sustainability of the neighbourhood (income, family type etc.) and enhance the amenities that the neighbourhood depends on. This means a combination of rental and condo, this means looking at diverse affordable housing options and it means making sure we have good unit mix. We also need to tell a new story about our existing housing stock. The marketing of greenfield developers, the practices of many real estate agents and (even in my own case our lawyer) all push families towards suburban communities. We need to shift that narrative. There is a wide range of existing housing stock that is appropriate for a family, a multigenerational household, or co-ops etc. that are close to amenities and in good shape. Bringing people back into our existing housing stock and encouraging the maintenance and upgrading of this housing stock needs to be a part of the conversation. We also have a lot more empty and derelict housing than people often realize. I see it doorknocking and it’s concerning that some areas are really emptying out. We need to be on the ground in these communities to start understanding the complex factors that are contributing to this so we can reverse the trend. With all new builds and construction we need to do earlier engagement, we need to have all parties at the table in a more meaningful way. Once something is being built we need more monitoring and enforcement in order to make sure we get what we agreed to.I think these can be a really positive visioning process for a community if they engage a wide range of perspectives and can take into account demographic, social and economic factors. Unfortunately too often community engages deeply in these processes but the plans aren't adhered too. This has led to deep distrust. We need to make plans that actually work for those who will build. That doesn't mean capitulating to whims, but it does mean having our own capacity to analyze what is viable and create plans that work for communities that can actually be built.The community needs to be engaged early in the process of creating any type of plan or rezoning. The benefits and risks need to be looked at in a way that takes into consideration the local knowledge and expertise that exists in a neighbourhood. We also really need to actually be able to assess the market that the developer is functioning in, so that we can be more concrete about what is possible and where the trade offs are. This means accessing proformas or being able to build our own. It also means supporting the community in beginning to assess this information. If we had market information at the disposal of community and administration as a part of the planning process we could do a better job of negotiating effectively with the development community and understanding the trade offs. We would likely come up with more creative ideas on both the community and development side of the equation too. Having this information would also provide more stability to developers and mean that we could speak more of the same language. Fundamentally, we could collaborate on building plans that were actually viable to build. Instead of spending a lot of resources and then having them leapfrogged because of "the numbers" that we don't have.The first thing we need to do is to bring diverse perspectives and stakeholder groups in the community together to imagine what is possible and how a redevelopment could work in their neighbourhood. Knowing what would work, and how to ask for it is an important first step. We need to look at impacts through a number of lenses. The built form has an impact in terms of potential shadow or wind but it also has an impact on social cohesion and community. We need to do a better job of talking about shadow. It's too often the first thing that is brought up, but what the actual experience is hard to model. The sunshadow studies don't give a complete picture and on occasion make it seem worse than it is, and at other times gloss over real impacts. We also currently don't have metrics for wind. We need them. Living in the shadow of a 22 story tower, I can say from experience that the wind is worse than the shadow. We can design to mitigate for this. We also need to look at a redevelopment in terms of social mix. We can design for demographics. Who is likely to move into the neighbourhood and who is being displaced? We have to design for the social mix that will keep a neighbourhood vibrant. This means insisting on family oriented housing (including above grade which means we need to change our definitions). It also means insisting on a mix of rental/condo and accessible units for those with limited mobility. Finally it means integrating the full range of affordable housing across the City, so that natural supports can be developed for those on a limited income, kids can attend neighbourhood schools and our communities are more sustainable because they have a good mix. Traffic patterns and parking need to be considered along with impacts on all modes of travel. How does a development impact an 8 year old or an 80 year old as they walk through their neighbourhoods? A more robust community benefits program is also important. We need to have flexibility in terms of options, but there needs to be criteria around this.1. Good process -- I want to make sure that we actually follow the policy, principles and spirit of the new public engagement policy and that community can shape the vision for how their neighbourhoods grow and change. 2. Is it designed to attract the needed demographic mix for the neighbourhood? 3. Does it meet our needs for affordable housing? 4. Does the design support the connectivity of the community both in terms of mobility but more importantly in terms of social connections? 5. Accountability processes in place so we can address any shortcomings during contracting, permitting and construction. Where can community go to get their questions answered and raise concerns? Are they building what they said they would?Towers aren't an automatic yes or no for me. Design is much more than height and we need to look at these developments in multifaceted ways. We can do high quality high density development that fits into the context of the neighbourhood and that enhances the neighbourhood or we can do high density development that creates a lot of things people fear in terms of social disorder, isolation, shadow and traffic. We need to insist that large scale development is done right. We need to make sure design mitigates shadow and wind. We need to do good traffic studies, and we need to design for neighbourliness and a good social mix that will add vibrancy and make a community more sustainable. My issues with the current proposal for Holyrood Gardens are many. 1. Site plan creates a wall that hives off the community. It doesn't connect or integrate well. 2. The focus on 2bdrm 2 bath condos is highly problematic when it's replacing affordable market family oriented rental. At this scale there needs to be a conscious effort to include housing mix that can bring in families with children, seniors who want to age in their community, rental and owners. That is absent from this plan. 3. The public engagement process around this development has been woefully inadequate. We have a community group ready to engage and negotiate, who understand many of the trade-offs and opportunities and they've been treated poorly and their input hasn't been considered in a meaningful way. 4. Anything of this scale should be reviewed by the Edmonton Design Committee. We need to expand their mandate so that large scale development in Ward 8 was a part of it automatically. 5. We can design for connectivity, social interaction and demographic mix and we need to. This proposal does not do that.Open spaces need to be planned well. Like many other things, how they are designed makes a big difference to their functionality, safety and attraction. It definitely makes sense when planning for open spaces or making changes to land use, that we look at the community as a whole. We can't underestimate the ripple effects of our decisions on how a neighbourhood functions and the social and economic impacts our decisions have down the road. A community needs assessment would be a good way of evaluating some of this, there may be other tools that we should also be looking at.I do support school sites as public lands. We need to make sure that every community has public spaces for amenities and green space. I think if we aren't building schools we need to make sure to be creating other kinds of community hubs in neighbourhoods. We need spaces that bring people together. This could still include housing, but it needs to do so with other community building amenities integrated as a part of any development. We need to work closely with the school boards and the province as we navigate how to use these spaces.Yes -- we need park spaces for everyone. However, how we design these spaces matters, for safety and for fostering community. As we increase density, access to green space is a key driver for willingness to live in a larger scale development. If we are bringing in more people, we need to have the amenities to support a vibrant community and green space is an important part of that. Especially in mature and core neighbourhoods, we need to be looking at our parks and open spaces planning and make sure that we are creating spaces that enhance the community. As a soccer parent, player and coach, I get very frustrated with the condition of sports fields in our mature neighbourhoods and with the fact that we end up driving to the edges of the city in order to play. At least to a point, we should have these recreational amenities in our own neighbourhoods. Many of us live centrally in order to be close to most of the places we want to go. We should be able to upgrade sports fields so that the conditions are better and we have regulation sizes so that more people can use them in our own backyards.I saw a great project for a car park recently that included wrap around amenities around a large parkade in a central area. This was in a city in the US. The flexibility of the building, allowed for many cars to be parked in a smaller footprint, while also adding to the walkability and attractiveness of the neighbourhood. It also used the space efficiently. This would allow development in areas where we have surface parking lots, while still accomodating drivers. As we shift mode of transportation (and plan for driverless cars etc), the flexibility of this build could accommodate slowly decreasing the parking component. Anything that makes it really convenient to not drive, improves driving for those who still need or want to. The fewer cars we have on the road, the easier it is to drive. This means we need a really high quality, easy to use transit system and streets that are safe for everyone 8-80 who are walking or biking. Safer streets mean people are more likely to walk to the grocery store. More people walking means that when we are driving we can move through traffic more efficiently. Making sure that every neighbourhood can sustain a grocery store and coffee shop within walking distance of many people will also help shift the mode of transportation for some, making driving easier for others. We probably need to shift to more residential parking requirements for areas in mature neighbourhoods. The informal "park and ride" is putting a lot of pressure on some communities. I would like us to use design principles to encourage speed reductions in areas like school zones. This would decrease the sense of "surprise" that people sometimes have around photo radar. Using design to set the speed of roads/streets will help decrease speeding, making the streets safer for all users.We lost a generation waiting to build LRT and it is overdue. However, we need to work better with communities as we plan and build it out. I would like to see the planned LRT lines built out as efficiently as possible. Making sure that there is visibility into operations as this happens is essential. We need to ask questions early and often in order to avoid the debacle of the Metro line. I see many discussing BRT, but this also requires substantial infrastructure investment, separated lanes and signalling as well. It also doesn't carry nearly as many people. I do think we could use BRT to start the LRT process in areas that are planned for further down the road. I want us to think seriously about how to resolve the first mile/last mile problem as we move to nodes and corridors. I don't think we should be looking at outsourcing to private for hire companies, but I do think we need to get creative about how to solve these problems. I'd want to talk to a lot of transit users about what they envision working. Some sort of dial-a-bus that is more flexible in terms of user over DATS is the thought I have had, but I expect our community has more diverse and creative solutions to this need. I'm pleased that we are finally working on a transit strategy after almost 40 years without one, but we need to make sure the users most effected are at the table early to help with assessing impact of decisions we might be considering.In principle, I think we should be designing our streets and sidewalks using "complete streets" guidelines. Approximately 60% of our public land is for roads and parking, so it makes sense to carve a small amount out for bike lanes and walking infrastructure. A complete streets model keeps modes of travel separate and works hard to address mobility and accessibility issues as well as traffic and noise. This would lead to slower speeds (addressing the photo radar question), more community connections, and lower health costs due to fewer collisions and increased activity levels. Where these models have been introduced, they lead to a significant reduction not only in pedestrian and cyclist injury and death but also reductions in motorist injury and death. Safer streets work better for everyone.We need to make plans that take into consideration a wider variety of metrics in the first place. I would really like us to include real estate market data in any type of planning process. Once we've passed bylaws or plans for a project, program or service we need to make sure that we have a culture in the organization that encourages transparency and the opportunity to flag inefficiencies or problems with process early on. We also need to be looking at a full cost accounting model. Right now we often externalize the costs in order to appear like we are "saving money" but sometimes the less expensive solution in the short term costs a lot more in the long term. We need to look at the spin off impacts of decisions including whether or not they are likely to impact our local economy in positive or negative ways. Sometimes what seems like a frivolous expense makes sense when the spin-off benefits are factored in. I'd also like to make sure that social/community/health impacts are considered as a part of how we value our investments.People who are struggling, whether it's poverty, addictions, homelessness, and/or generational trauma, need both professional supports and community. They often become surrounded by service providers, but in order to really thrive, they also need relationships with people in their neighbourhoods. We need to make sure the resources stay where they are needed but also expand to include other areas of the city. In order to more effectively address these issues in the long term, they need to be more finely distributed throughout the city. We also need to bring these populations into conversation with other communities so that we can build relationships and foster better understanding. We will need to expand services to any area where we add permanent supportive housing or shelters or safe injection sites. However, all of these are harm reduction strategies that make life more stable for the individual and safer for our communities. We need to do a better job of getting to know our neighbours. We can have more robust conversations in our communities about how to meet these needs and address these pressures and find ways of welcoming people and supporting them in ways that also enhance the community.
27
Ben HendersonWard 8I believe we need to continue our commitment to building the next version of our city. Our reliance on farm land to continue to accommodate the growth of our city is not sustainable ecologically nor financially. Nevertheless as we find ways for more of that growth to be taken up by the existing city we must be careful that the planning choices to accommodate that growth protect the essence of what makes our communities work. There are built forms that are much friendlier than others to building strong and vibrant communities and I feel the tools need to be put into the new plan to make sure that we are much more vigilant in making sure those are the planning choices we make.Community leagues can serve a number of purposes. At the beginning they were voices for the community but as they developed over time they also became vital social and recreational hubs for the community. Some continue to do both of these things, some choose one or the other. That should be their choice. There is a huge advantage to the City in having leagues. If they were not there then many of the services provided by leagues and their volunteers would have to be provided by the City. They are unique to Edmonton and a key part of what allows us to provide the high quality of life that we do.I have always been supportive of the City's support of leagues. In my time we have increased the base funding for leagues and equally importantly created funding to help leagues with their capital needs both with their buildings and the parks, spray parks, and playgrounds often connected to leagues. We should always been looking for ways that we can continue to improve our support of leagues. As I mentioned above not having leagues would place a much larger load on the City than the support we currently provide. It is also important, that if we are going to continue to rely on leagues to be the voices of their communities that we must give them the resources to make sure they are connected properly back to the communities they are being asked to represent.Over the past four years I pushed for and achieved the creation of our City's new public engagement strategy. Now the challenge is to ensure the implementation of that strategy. Moving it into the culture of the City administration is the vital next step to make sure all the work done to date is not lost. Central to that is my believe that communities have knowledge of themselves that the technical experts do not have. Good community input, if properly listened to and used, will only make projects better. Some of our departments are beginning to understand that, we need to make sure that ethic is carried through the entire City administration. When public engagement is done well then Council will have the full tools and best information to make a decision. Done poorly and there will be vital information missing and a feeling of disenfranchisement left in the community.We do need to encourage new development in our existing city. The best opportunities are on our transportation corridors where more medium density development ideally mixed with retail will help create more of a main street opportunity in the city. Within communities the challenge is to increase the number of units without undermining what makes the neighbourhood work. Garage and garden suites, higher quality semi detached that are in architectural keeping with the neighbourhood and townhouses that also match the architecture of a neighbourhood I feel are the best way to increase density in neighbourhoods without undermining their human scaled characteristics.Yes, but not in the way we have done them in the past. In previous plans the work has been done separately with the community and the building community. The result is the two groups never really get to understand the constraints and interests of the other. We thus end up with plans that may not be financially feasible to build. One of two things then happen, either nothing gets developed and the community gets frustrated that the plans they worked so hard on lie fallow, or the building community starts to ask for ad hoc changes in the plans and the entire plan gets undermined. I believe if we can develop plans based on a full understanding of what is desirable and possible, that they have a much greater chance of long term success.Zoning bylaw decisions should be based on good planning. It is the only way that the interests of all parties come together. It is not about pleasing one or the other, it is about understanding how to build strong communities. The community input is critical because they understand their communities in ways that outsiders will not. But even within communities there are differences of opinions. The concerns of the immediate neighbours for instance may be different from those of community members further away. The job in approving planning is to try to protect against any negative effect on neighbours while still allowing for communities to change slowly over time. If they do not change they can stagnate and begin to get run down which is also in no-ones interest. Ultimately the choice must be in ensuring the long term future of healthy communities. And decisions on rezoning must be based in that.There are many things currently in our zoning bylaw that are designed to protect against negative impacts. They can always be further improved and refined and we have been working recently on strengthening them, but most critically we must stick by them and make sure they are not compromised.Does it enhance the community. Are the negative effects mitigated. Hoe does it transition to the neighbours. What are the traffic impacts. Is its location conducive to the proposed change. I am very concerned about the height of the proposed buildings in Holyrood. If the traffic concerns can be worked out then I think the community is on board for the density but would much prefer to see that density done in a medium height built form. Holyrood is a neighbourhood stop and as such is supposed to be medium height and medium density. I am very concerned with the height of the three tall towers next to single family homes. That is not an acceptable transition.Yes, We should not be removing green space without understanding what the demands are for green space in an area. Our new park master plan, Breathe, should give us a much better policy template for how to answer these questions.I absolutely believe that we should be holding on to the open land as it comes available. (i.e. the playing fields etc.) I am not aware on any situation in recent memory where the city has not puchased the open land if available. The building and building envelope are a different question. Depending on the existing building there may be other uses that are more appropriate than being a city owned building. Each situation must be looked at individually.Yes, green space is important in neighbourhoods as our recreational spaces. There are many neighbourhoods, particularly in the core where we are actually deficient in park and recreational space. As mentioned above, the new parks strategy , Breathe, will give us a much better policy template for how to address these deficiencies. The main thrust of our roadway policies is around improving roads for the movement of goods and services. Private autos will also benefit from this. In particular I have been pushing for grade separation from the rail lines on both 50st and 75st on the south side. These have been huge problem pinch points and I am happy to say we now have approval to fix them. The other large project is turning the Yellowhead into a full flo freeway. Ultimately our only real way to deal with congestion however is to create other convenient options for those who have that choice. That is what is critical about LRT expansion. If we can use our right of way to move more people by LRT then it should create more room on the roads for those who cannot make that choice. Continue focus on LRT expansion. Ultimately that is the highest quality service that we can provide in transit to offer people a convenient, affordable and efficient choice. We must also follow through on our new transit plan that will substantially improve frequency and speed of service in the parts of the city that have the greatest potential for high use. At the same time however I believe that we must maintain our parallel community bus service that serves seniors and others who may have mobility challenges. For that service we cannot provide high frequency and direct routes but in exchange we can provide what is more important for those users, getting the bus as close as possible to where they can catch it and as close as possible to their destinations.For walking we must make our streets safer for pedestrians. Streets must serve all users and in the past the pedestrians have not been well served by roadway design. We must also consider lowering speed limits on local residential roads where children and other citizens are most at risk. We have also made significant progress in upping our standards for pedestrian crossings and this work must continue. Our focus for bikes must be creating good safe separated infrastructure in the areas where there is high use. Painted lines have not given us enough advantage for the tradeoffs. Our focus must be on higher quality infrastructure to be useful. Creating a safe and clear space for bikes also makes it easier for drivers to know where the bike will be and in particular it takes away the temptation for bikes to make the dangerous choice of riding on the sidewalks. And finally the focus should be on areas where there is need. The past practise of adding disconnected lanes opportunistically when we were doing other work has not been very helpful. Our focus needs to be on quality not necessarily quantity.We have worked hard to minimize the cost of operating the city. Over my time on Council millions of dollars have been found through increases in efficiency. But the focus in looking for cuts has not been on cutting services. Holding on to the quality of service in this city is vital to supporting the high quality of life Edmontonians expect. Over the past few years we have managed to keep the rate of growth in operational cost below the level of inflation in the areas the city must operate in. But I am not prepared to cut if it jeopardizes service in the City. On the Capital side there was a need to reinvest in infrastructure. Much of the infrastructure in the city had been allowed to deteriorate as a way of keeping taxes down. This was not sustainable. This has meant increases over the past few years to build up a fund to deal, in particular, with neighbourhood renewal. I am happy to say that we are very close to having that program fully funded and the need to further increase taxes to pay for this infrastructure should now be behind us.It must be distributed throughout the whole city. There is significant evidence to show that the healthiest communities are ones with a good mix of demographics. Communities that are over represented by either the very poor or conversely the very wealthy both have problems that are not shared by communities that have a full mix of the diversity of our city. We must find ways to distribute our affordable housing and our supported housing throughout all the communities of our City.
28
James KosowanWard 8I also envision a compact, transit-oriented city, but one with affordable housing and a healthy diversity of age groups and income levels in all our mature neighbourhoods. I want to see more pedestrian-friendly streets, teeming with life because of smart urban design. I want to see more garage suites, garden suites, and secondary suites, which will increase density in mature neighbourhoods and enhance affordability while maintaining the character of these vibrant communities. I also want to see true community engagement in the development of major housing and infrastructure projects in order for residents to have meaningful input in how their neighbourhoods develop.First and foremost, community leagues provide a vital function in ensuring recreational and social activities take place in their community. They also provide an invaluable service in keeping residents abreast of emerging issues through various forms of communication. I do worry, however, when community leagues are faced with contentious political issues, such as a large-scale development, that might cause a rift in the community and impact the viability of the leagues to carry out their primary goals. This is not to say that community leagues are powerless, but I see them as facilitators and information gatherers which could then be a vehicle for an ad hoc group in the community to take a political stance on a certain issue.Having been involved in two community leagues in Ward 8 over the past 20 years, I see the amazing benefits of this volunteer-driven entity in the various neighbourhoods across the city, however, I think its reliance on that volunteer base leads to great inequity. Communities with a healthy group of volunteers and strong leadership produce some absolutely phenomenal community events and programs. But those lacking in that volunteer strength are much less capable in providing some essential services in communities most in need of it. I would like to see Edmonton have a community league conference in which the community league model is explored and evaluated, opening the door for the City to address these inequities and ensure support to all leagues across the city.Essentially, I believe that rezoning applications need to be re-written to ensure that the process in open, transparent and equitable. As it now stands, community leagues are entirely volunteer based and often lack the resources to influence the process, which puts them at a huge disadvantage. I would level the playing field and ensure the application process involved community consultation AT THE BEGINNING so residents don't feel so shut out of the process and then become adversarial to the development because of that disconnect with the goals and aspirations of the community.I would suspend lot splitting and work towards encouraging affordability in mature neighbourhoods. This can be achieved by actively encouraging garage suites, garden suites, and secondary suites. The City could even provide a tax-free status on new garage suites, for example, for the first 5 years of its existence, thus providing an incentive to develop more affordable living space in mature neighbourhoods while creating lots of construction jobs as residents embrace this opportunity to increase the value of their property and enhance the livability of the neighbourhood.Yes. These are great community building exercises and they provide a framework for redevelopment in mature neighbourhoods. My criticism is that Council often ignores their own Area Redevelopment Plans, which I feel is disrespectful of the community consultation process and engenders resentment by residents.Developers need to work with communities and not expect to ignore the various city guidelines established through extensive community consultation. Communities collectively create the value that makes their neighbourhoods desirable. Developers need to respect the goals and aspirations of the communities they want to develop in if they expect my support on rezoning applications.If developers have done their work to meaningfully consult with communities, these redevelopments will organically enhance the neighbourhoods.I will support those projects that follow community ARP guidelines and where meaningful community consultation is in evidence.It would depend on which site and how much community consultation has taken place. In the case of the Holyrood Gardens development, I would not support that rezoning application. The parcel is too narrow, the heights are beyond TOD guidelines, and the magnitude of the increase in density on the site will have a number of negative impacts on the community and surrounding area. On the other hand, if a large scale development were to be proposed on the nearby Bonnie Doon mall site, providing there was community consultation and extensive opportunity for meaningful input, I would support it. Projects have to make sense and they have to be supported by the communities in which they plan to develop.Yes. This is an absolute. Our green space is a community resource and any change would have to have buy-in from those affected by it.Yes. These spaces are part of the urban landscape and people make important decisions, such as where to live, based on these amenities in the community. Public lands are just that--public. They should remain as such.Yes. For the same reasons stated above, I am committed to preserving green space and sports fields.It would depend on a case by case basis, but I would support lessening the instances of at-grade crossings with LRT major intersections (such as Whyte Avenue and 83 Street) and train crossings (50 Street).I am a strong advocate for improving the convenience of transit. I would like to see the adoption of a Smart Card system, which would allow for greater collection of data by Edmonton Transit for route planning and frequency, but also facilitate ease of use for riders of the service. I would also like to see the introduction of Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) lines, which I believe are more cost effective and afford excellent service delivery, while being more flexible for transit planning purposes.Lots! We need to embrace smart urban design and improve the walkability and cyclability of our city. This is relatively inexpensive infrastructure and it breathes life into our streets and helps residents be more active, while also improving safety and security in our neighbourhoods.There is not an endless pool of money for Council to draw on. I will be diligent in scrutinizing projects and asking a myriad of questions to ensure taxpayers' interests are protected. And, when I feel that the city administration does not possess the expertise to properly advise Council on a major expenditure, I will seek outside consultation in order to ensure fiscal responsibility.As I stated in a previous question on infill, neighbourhoods are enriched when they have a diversity of ages and income levels. Council needs to ensure that there is not a concentration of low-income housing in just a few select neighbourhoods.
29
Rob BernshawWard 8Community Leagues should be the main contact point between the city and the neighborhoods.I would help develop a better plan for funding projects. The city has helped finance develops $10 for every $1 invested (the Arena), while Community Leagues are on a matching grant system $1 for $1. I would like to see the Community Leagues get the same preferential treatment that some preferred developers get.The Community Leagues need to do a better job of signing up more members. At present some leagues only represent 10% of the neighborhood. If they want to have a greater voice with more impact they need to represent a greater percentage of the neighborhood.
30
Kirsten GoaWard 8In order for our City to be economically, socially and environmentally sustainable we do need to change our growth pattern. However, I think we can do this in a way that engages communities and diverse stakeholders in the conversations and decisions about how their neighbourhoods are going to grow and change. Density alone does not address the economic and social challenges caused by the lack of it. We will only be successful in bringing people into core and mature neighbourhoods if we do it in ways that increase social cohesion, connects people, supports diversity and supports the amenities our neighbourhoods need to thrive. Our most creative solutions are rooted in our communities. "People support what they create" Margaret Wheatley -- I envision an Edmonton where the changes we need to be sustainable are created in our communities. I envision an Edmonton where we foster that creativity and bring people together to make things happen. Community leagues can be the neural network of our City. They have the potential to connect the diverse members of a neighbourhood, to support their capacity, build community and shape our future. Leagues can be challenged by a lack of diversity and limitations in their capacity. We need to do more to support the opportunity Leagues have to do outreach, meet people where they are at and build that capacity. We need to support the development of more diverse leadership in Community Leagues, provide support for a wide range of outreach opportunities and also support the capacity that is already there. I think it's also essential that we support leagues in reaching out to other networks and groups in order to find ways to collaborate and build capacity. I'm excited about the opportunities for community leadership development and support that are embedded in the new Public Engagement policy and as a City Councillor I will work with Leagues and Administration to make sure those pieces are implemented in a comprehensive way. I was the community co-chair for the Council Initiative on Public Engagement for the last two years. I also worked on the Community Leadership working group. There are exciting opportunities for supporting the capacity of communities to engage effectively. As well as, more robust recommendations for bringing diverse people to the table, having deeper conversations about how our neighbourhoods are growing and changing and doing so well before decision making, instead of at the last minute. The best decisions are rooted in our communities and supported by a wide range of perspectives, experience and expertise. I will work to make sure that these opportunities actually happen, but I also believe that we need a Councillor who leads by example. There are so many opportunities to connect different groups of people and different expertise and perspectives and I think a Councillor can be a part of this. I already spend a fair bit of time, connecting different people and community groups to resources, other people, networks etc. that will help them achieve a goal. As a Councillor, I will doorknock between elections, go to stakeholder and public meetings, but also bring people together for these conversations well ahead of decision making and support them in developing plans and implementing them. There is so much important local knowledge and expertise in our communities, we will make better decisions if we can bring that to the table early on. There seems to be a fundamental issue with our zoning bylaw when we have around 1000 DC zones. It's not a good use of resources when community and administration spend so much time and energy on making plans for areas and neighbourhoods and corridors and then proposals come in that leapfrog them. We need to get a handle on the economic/market implications of our plans as a part of the process in order to negotiate more effectively with developers. Currently we have little capacity to assess the proformas of proposed developments. I'm also concerned that developers are often using "pre-sales" as their market analysis, because this skews the picture of the actual market and leaves families with children and modest income households out of the equation in many cases. Doing market analysis will also provide more predictability for all parties. If community, administration and developers are looking at the same numbers we can have a better conversation about what is possible. We need to support community in creating the vision for how they will grow and change and we need to do it in a way that looks at the demographic shifts and plans for resilience. This means bringing diverse interests and perspectives to the table. It means wrestling with what we mean when we talk about character. And it means making sure that whatever we imagine is designed to foster community connection and build social cohesion and resilience. We need to raise the bar on design so that when upzoning occurs, these new builds are designed to minimize impact on the surrounding community, will activate the street and increase community connection. Design can drive demographics so we need to build in a way that will attract diverse residents who add to the vibrancy and sustainability of the neighbourhood (income, family type etc.) and enhance the amenities that the neighbourhood depends on. This means a combination of rental and condo, this means looking at diverse affordable housing options and it means making sure we have good unit mix. We also need to tell a new story about our existing housing stock. The marketing of greenfield developers, the practices of many real estate agents and (even in my own case our lawyer) all push families towards suburban communities. We need to shift that narrative. There is a wide range of existing housing stock that is appropriate for a family, a multigenerational household, or co-ops etc. that are close to amenities and in good shape. Bringing people back into our existing housing stock and encouraging the maintenance and upgrading of this housing stock needs to be a part of the conversation. With all new builds and construction we need to do earlier engagement, we need to have all parties at the table in a more meaningful way. Once something is being built we need more monitoring and enforcement in order to make sure we get what we agreed to. I think these can be a really positive visioning process for a community if they engage a wide range of perspectives and can take into account demographic, social and economic factors. Unfortunately too often community engages deeply in these processes but the plans aren't adhered too. This has led to deep distrust. We need to make plans that actually work for those who will build. That doesn't mean capitulating to whims, but it does mean having our own capacity to analyze what is viable and create plans that work for communities that can actually be built. The community needs to be engaged early in the process of creating any type of plan or rezoning. The benefits and risks need to be looked at in a way that takes into consideration the local knowledge and expertise that exists in a neighbourhood. We also really need to actually be able to assess the market that the developer is functioning in, so that we can be more concrete about what is possible and where the trade offs are. This means accessing proformas or being able to build our own. It also means supporting the community in beginning to assess this information. If we had market information at the disposal of community and administration as a part of the planning process we could do a better job of negotiating effectively with the development community and understanding the trade offs. We would likely come up with more creative ideas on both the community and development side of the equation too. Having this information would also provide more stability to developers and mean that we could speak more of the same language. Fundamentally, we could collaborate on building plans that were actually viable to build. Instead of spending a lot of resources and then having them leapfrogged because of "the numbers" that we don't have. The first thing we need to do is to bring diverse perspectives and stakeholder groups in the community together to imagine what is possible and how a redevelopment could work in their neighbourhood. Knowing what would work, and how to ask for it is an important first step. We need to look at impacts through a number of lenses. The built form has an impact in terms of potential shadow or wind but it also has an impact on social cohesion and community. We need to do a better job of talking about shadow. It's too often the first thing that is brought up, but what the actual experience is hard to model. The sunshadow studies don't give a complete picture and on occasion make it seem worse than it is, and at other times gloss over real impacts. We also currently don't have metrics for wind. We need them. Living in the shadow of a 22 story tower, I can say from experience that the wind is worse than the shadow. We can design to mitigate for this. We also need to look at a redevelopment in terms of social mix. We can design for demographics, so who is likely to move into the neighbourhood and who is being displaced? We have to design for the social mix that will keep a neighbourhood vibrant. This means insisting on family oriented housing (including above grade which means we need to change our definitions). It also means insisting on a mix of rental/condo and accessible units for those with limited mobility. Finally it means integrating the full range of affordable housing across the City, so that natural supports can be developed for those on a limited income, kids can attend neighbourhood schools and our communities are more sustainable because they have a good mix. Traffic patterns and parking need to be considered along with impacts on all modes of travel. How does a development impact an 8 year old or an 80 year old as they walk through their neighbourhoods? A more robust community benefits program is also important. We need to have flexibility in terms of options, but there needs to be criteria around this. 1. Good process -- I want to make sure that we actually follow the policy, principles and spirit of the new public engagement policy and that community can shape the vision for how their neighbourhoods grow and change. 2. Is it designed to attract the needed demographic mix for the neighbourhood? 3. Does meet our needs for affordable housing? 4. Does the design support the connectivity of the community both in terms of mobility but more importantly in terms of social connections? 5. Accountability processes in place so we can address any shortcomings during contracting, permitting and construction. Where can community go to get their questions answered and raise concerns? Are they building what they said they would? Towers aren't an automatic yes or no for me. Design is much more than height and we need to look at these developments in multifaceted ways. We can do high quality high density development that fits into the context of the neighbourhood and that enhances the neighbourhood or we can do high density development that creates a lot of things people fear in terms of social disorder, isolation, shadow and traffic. We need to insist that large scale development is done right. We need to make sure design mitigates shadow and wind. We need to do good traffic studies, and we need to design for neighbourliness and a good social mix that will add vibrancy and make a community more sustainable. My issues with the current proposal for Holyrood Gardens are many. 1. Site plan creates a wall that hives off the community. It doesn't connect or integrate well. 2. The focus on 2bdrm 2 bath condos is highly problematic when it's replacing affordable market family oriented rental. At this scale there needs to be a conscious effort to include housing mix that can bring in families with children, seniors who want to age in their community, rental and owners. That is absent from this plan. 3. The public engagement process around this development has been woefully inadequate. We have a community group ready to engage and negotiate, who understand many of the trade-offs and opportunities and they've been treated poorly and their input hasn't been considered in a meaningful way. 4. Anything of this scale should be reviewed by the Edmonton Design Committee. We need to expand their mandate so that large scale development in Ward 8 was a part of it automatically. 5. We can design for connectivity, social interaction and demographic mix and we need to. This proposal does not do that. Open spaces need to be planned well. Like many other things, how they are designed makes a big difference to their functionality, safety and attraction. It definitely makes sense when planning for open spaces or making changes to land use, that we look at the community as a whole. We can't underestimate the ripple effects of our decisions on how a neighbourhood functions and the social and economic impacts our decisions have down the road. A community needs assessment would be a good way of evaluating some of this, there may be other tools that we should also be looking at.I do support school sites as public lands. We need to make sure that every community has public spaces for amenities and green space. I think if we aren't building schools we need to make sure to be creating other kinds of community hubs in neighbourhoods. We need spaces that bring people together. This could still include housing, but it needs to do so with other community building amenities integrated as a part of any development. We need to work closely with the school boards and the province as we navigate how to use these spaces.Yes -- we need park spaces for everyone. However, how we design these spaces matters, for safety and for fostering community. As we increase density, access to green space is a key driver for willingness to live in a larger scale development. If we are bringing in more people, we need to have the amenities to support a vibrant community and green space is an important part of that. Especially in mature and core neighbourhoods, we need to be looking at our parks and open spaces planning and make sure that we are creating spaces that enhance the community. As a soccer parent, player and coach, I get very frustrated with the condition of sports fields in our mature neighbourhoods and with the fact that we end up driving to the edges of the city in order to play. At least to a point, we should have these recreational amenities in our own neighbourhoods. Many of us live centrally in order to be close to most of the places we want to go. We should be able to upgrade sports fields so that the conditions are better and we have regulation sizes so that more people can use them in our own backyards.I saw a great project for a car park recently that included wrap around amenities around a large parkade in a central area. This was in a city in the US. The flexibility of the building, allowed for many cars to be parked in a smaller footprint, while also adding to the walkability and attractiveness of the neighbourhood. It also used the space efficiently. This would allow development in areas where we have surface parking lots, while still accomodating drivers. As we shift mode of transportation (and plan for driverless cars etc), the flexibility of this build could accommodate slowly decreasing the parking component. Anything that makes it really convenient to not drive, improves driving for those who still need or want to. The fewer cars we have on the road, the easier it is to drive. This means we need a really high quality, easy to use transit system and streets that are safe for everyone 8-80 who are walking or biking. Safer streets mean people are more likely to walk to the grocery store. More people walking means that when we are driving we can move through traffic more efficiently. Making sure that every neighbourhood can sustain a grocery store and coffee shop within walking distance of many people will also help shift the mode of transportation for some, making driving easier for others. We probably need to shift to more residential parking requirements for areas in mature neighbourhoods. The informal "park and ride" is putting a lot of pressure on some communities. I would like us to use design principles to encourage speed reductions in areas like school zones. This would decrease the sense of "surprise" that people sometimes have around photo radar. Using design to set the speed of roads/streets will help decrease speeding, making the streets safer for all users.We lost a generation waiting to build LRT and it is overdue. However, we need to work better with communities as we plan and build it out. I would like to see the planned LRT lines built out as efficiently as possible. Making sure that there is visibility into operations as this happens is essential. We need to ask questions early and often in order to avoid the debacle of the Metro line. I see many discussing BRT, but this also requires substantial infrastructure investment, separated lanes and signalling as well. It also doesn't carry nearly as many people. I do think we could use BRT to start the LRT process in areas that are planned for further down the road. I want us to think seriously about how to resolve the first mile/last mile problem as we move to nodes and corridors. I don't think we should be looking at outsourcing to private for hire companies, but I do think we need to get creative about how to solve these problems. I'd want to talk to a lot of transit users about what they envision working. Some sort of dial-a-bus that is more flexible in terms of user over DATS is the thought I have had, but I expect our community has more diverse and creative solutions to this need. I'm pleased that we are finally working on a transit strategy after almost 40 years without one, but we need to make sure the users most effected are at the table early to help with assessing impact of decisions we might be considering.In principle, I think we should be designing our streets and sidewalks using "complete streets" guidelines. Approximately 60% of our public land is for roads and parking, so it makes sense to carve a small amount out for bike lanes and walking infrastructure. A complete streets model keeps modes of travel separate and works hard to address mobility and accessibility issues as well as traffic and noise. This would lead to slower speeds (addressing the photo radar question), more community connections, and lower health costs due to fewer collisions and increased activity levels. Where these models have been introduced, they lead to a significant reduction not only in pedestrian and cyclist injury and death but also reductions in motorist injury and death. Safer streets work better for everyone.We need to make plans that take into consideration a wider variety of metrics in the first place. I would really like us to include real estate market data in any type of planning process. Once we've passed bylaws or plans for a project, program or service we need to make sure that we have a culture in the organization that encourages transparency and the opportunity to flag inefficiencies or problems with process early on. We also need to be looking at a full cost accounting model. Right now we often externalize the costs in order to appear like we are "saving money" but sometimes the less expensive solution in the short term costs a lot more in the long term. We need to look at the spin off impacts of decisions including whether or not they are likely to impact our local economy in positive or negative ways. Sometimes what seems like a frivolous expense makes sense when the spin-off benefits are factored in. I'd also like to make sure that social/community/health impacts are considered as a part of how we value our investments.People who are struggling, whether it's poverty, addictions, homelessness, and/or generational trauma, need both professional supports and community. They often become surrounded by service providers, but in order to really thrive, they also need relationships with people in their neighbourhoods. We need to make sure the resources stay where they are needed but also expand to include other areas of the city. In order to more effectively address these issues in the long term, they need to be more finely distributed throughout the city. We also need to bring these populations into conversation with other communities so that we can build relationships and foster better understanding. We will need to expand services to any area where we add permanent supportive housing or shelters or safe injection sites. However, all of these are harm reduction strategies that make life more stable for the individual and safer for our communities. We need to do a better job of getting to know our neighbours. We can have more robust conversations in our communities about how to meet these needs and address these pressures and find ways of welcoming people and supporting them in ways that also enhance the community.
31
Mark HopeWard 9I would have a similar vision, with forethought for new neighbourhoods with nearby services to reduce the need for heavy traffic. These neighbourhoods would also be more sustainable, and jobs will be less Labour based as more and more automation is used.I believe in better representation, which means these leagues will be a good source for sharing and receiving information, along with a number of methods to reach people individually. They are leaders in a community.I would like to see increased support.Community input is extremely important to me. What this question suggests, is a move towards a more open source style of governing, which I support. Experts, and evidence based decision making is important, as is the opinion of Edmontonians, since this is their City and their tax dollars being spent. I believe we first need better transparency, so the public has a better understanding, and ability to add useful input. I believe we need to reach people where they already are. For the most part, this can be accomplished with social media, mailing lists, and online surveys, which I plan to be active with. I will also return email and phone calls within 48 hours, and gold community meetings, and video conferencing. This is something I would also like to make use of in City Hall, to make it more accessible for people to participate. Door to door interaction can also be used, since technology can't be the only way.to reach people. We will need to make sure we are reaching a proper cross section of demographics so everyone is included.I believe infill is a good idea for revival, and environmental factors. We just need to be aware of what the community wants, and reach a common ground that works for everyone. I also don't believe every neighbourhood should be treated the same with a blanket rule, because every neighbourhood is unique.Again, I believe in treating communities individually and seeking input from residents on what they want to see. I will represent what Edmontonians are telling me, and be their voice on City Council.We want a thriving economy, and we want developers to make money. That said, we also want developments made with people in mind, and do what is right for Edmonton currently, and with the long-term in mind. I am one of only a few candidates in the municipal election that is running while refusing Developer campaign donations. This is very important to me, as it avoids even the possibility of a conflict of interest. We have recently seen Councillors making decisions on controversial developments, who received donations from the developer in the last election. This should not be allowed. I strongly suggest anyone who is voting to find out which candidates aren't taking that money. Too often a candidate can look strong simply by having a lot of signs, which are paid for by these devedevelopers. If elected I plan to make this practice illegal.Through communication. People need to be realistic and accept change, but we also need to consider the residents and what they would like to see happen. There may be a balance in consideration of redevelopment.Community input and whatnot important in that unique situation. Something could be very important in one location that isn't in another, so I don't think I can state at the outset which factors would be important to consider, other than to avoid excessive negative impacts.I would need to be knowledgeable about every detail of the plans, and concerns or ideas from the community before saying I would support something or not. I do not think I would support the Holyrood development as it is planned now.Yes, absolutely. This is only logical. We need to hear from the community, and there isn't reason to do something that doesn't fit with the City's vision as outlined in policy.No. That is a fine use of the land, but there are many purposes it could be used for, and it would need to fit the City's plans, and the needs of the area. I can't make any guarantee, without details of an individual case.Yes. This is part of encouraging a healthy community with increased levels of 'livability' to fit many lifestyles, as well as bring communities together. Ward 9 is an area that especially has a need for fields and sports facilities.I support better flowing traffic, with smarter designs, and building with the future in mind so we are proactive, rather than reactive when we have a major problem. I support the further development of the Yellowhead, creating a terwillegar freeway out of terwillegar drive, starting with the worst pinch points first, such as 40th Ave. I also believe city council need a to work hard to get the province to support us by adding lanes to the Anthony Henday in the South West, and adding a second overpass for terwillegar drive over the Henday. I believe the white mud can be improved and see an increased speed limit as well. Speed limits need to be assessed so they are save and effective, whether that is higher or lower than it is now. Alternative means of travel, such as an LRT line to the South West, will also have an impact on private vehicles, as it will take some of those vehicles off the road and ease congestion that way. Finally, I believe we need to see a change in photo radar. I would reduce the amount of usage, and shift the focus toward school and construction zones and proven high accident areas. Beyond that, we could reallocate resources toward the education and enforcement of OTHER driving infractions that are causing accidents.I believe we need a gradual improvement to public transit, which will raise usage and efficiency. I would like to see the South West LRT built as soon as possible, and expanded bus services as it is required, including late nights on weekends to stop drunk driving. I would also support exploring the viability of Bus Rapid Transit until the LRT is completed.I believe in evidence based decision making, so this will need to be based on data for its usage. It will need to be something that represents everyone. I believe cyclists and motorists alike, want a solution that is safe and effective, and alternatives should be looked at to find the best fit. Wider divided sidewalks are one example that is possible. New communities are also easier to include this sort of infrastructure from the planning stage, with local services close by to make a more walkable neighbourhood. These services could also be included on the ground floor of condo buildings, to keep with the plan of avoiding urban sprawl.I will stand up against waste. Eleven Million was spent on ineffective bike lanes, millions more on developing a "wordmark" over the course of years by the Edmonton Economic Development Corp. These are only a couple examples of wasted spending. In everything we do, we should be looking at what is cheapest in the long-term. We need to pay attention to value, not just upfront cost. Now is also a good time to spend money on infrastructure since costs and interest are low, and it can stimulate a relatively weak economy compared to what we are used. On top of that, depending the the marginal propensity to consume in Edmonton, we will see a larger effect in the economy than just the amount spent.I believe affordable housing options should be seen throughout the city, but concentration also makes sense for issues that require specific services.
32
Rob AgostinisWard 9Communities are made up of four basic elements: Home, School, Recreation and Assembly, Essentially, every community is a ‘towne within the City’. I see a City with a downtown metropolis (distinctive skyline) with pocket parks, retail space, many restaurants, recreational spaces and places of assembly. I see the rest of the City with distinctive communities (having their own character and types and sizes of homes), recreational hubs with satellite recreational nodes, places for seniors (with great access and transit), places for assembly, theatres and parks (green space). Of course, the higher density homes and retail complexes, would be near transit. (TOD). I see a mixture of roads, various forms of transit (Busses, BRT, LRT). Eventually autonomous vehicles will be part of our future. I see a recreational bike path system with bike lanes for transit, and many paths for walkability. I envision businesses on the ground level and living quarters on the top; all connected to transit. I envision Edmonton as a healthy City, with manufacturing, fashion, startups, digital technologies. I envision Edmonton, with many parks and water features. I envision Edmonton with an amazing winter strategy (rinks, winter recreation programming), paths for cross country skiing with warming huts along the way. Finally, I envision Edmonton with an amazing federation of community leagues.I see community leagues as vital partners in collaboration with other groups as decision makers in the City, with respect to planning, recreation and programming. When I am on City Council, I would like to be the liaison from the City to the EFCL and community leagues. The Community League movement carries a lot of engaged volunteers and I want to make sure EFCL is at the same table as many others. Together we can make great things happen.First of all, any recommendations to issues or concerns, should be discussed and made at the ground roots level from community groups. There is more of a buy in, if those recommendations come from the people and not the administration. Of course, we would have other stakeholders and experts to give advice to the community group. Together we would work on that recommendation. This stage of public engagement is very important. Then we present it back to the greater community and have a larger public consultation. Currently, the infill strategy that is currently proposed is creating havoc in communities; changing beautiful communities into a mish mash of houses with lack of architectural guidelines. Some neighbours are having arguments. Therefore, we need social sustainability. We also have to prevent the environmental damage, such as loss of soil, trees and other vegetation. This can cause a strain on storm water systems. Lastly, rapid development and gentrification of an area can displace long time residents and tear a cohesive community apart. I am not opposed to infill, but I think we need to rethink the infill policy and come up with criteria that is more responsible and can be different for every community. I would like to put a hold on the strategy until we can have a balance between responsible home development, public spaces and other green spaces. Some sprawl will always continue.I do support Community Redevelopment Plans, because there comes a time in the life of a community where there needs to be revitalization. New concepts in home construction, The addition of transit or walkability. The addition of home based businesses, recreation components and places of assembly. This should be a plan where everyday citizens have input on this plan. The first aspect of any changes is public consultation and community engagement. The conversation will happen with both parties and they will have to understand what type of community they want. There may be changes to transportation modalities and routes and safety is always a priority. Again, it comes down to proper community engagement, an overall plan that is presented in a clear fashion to the community. 1. Attend to the concerns of communities and in so doing create better results with infill. • Take the concerns of community people seriously. • Stop the constant changing of the Zoning Bylaw, and spot rezoning which increases negative impacts on the neighbours. • Instead, create Area Redevelopment Plans with community people. This will get their buy-in. • Establish a means for the City and the Province to prevent construction damages. Spend more city dollars on prevention of damages and less on marketing infill housing. 2. Support Low Impact Development practices. Require more soil and vegetation on all infill sites, provide incentives and education. 3. Social Sustainability: - Help prevent infill construction damages by increasing the size of side yards and requiring excavations to meet safety standards. This would help build positive new neighbour relations. - Aim for slow redevelopments to allow new people to be absorbed and become part of the local social fabric Favour the creation of higher density housing which can accommodate households in all stages of their life, and all ages, from childhood to seniors. It depends on that initial consultation with community and the developers, understanding all the implications. I do. Citizens need to have input on their own community, not bureaucrats at City Hall. Absolutely! Surplus school lands should remain public lands used for public purposes, rather than private residences.  When neighbourhoods were planned, schools were placed in natural community hub areas. These natural community hubs should be retained for the community.  Surely the City can find other land or established housing which could be used for subsidized housing.  Green spaces are part of the overall plan of building better and healthy communities. As a board member of TRSA (Terwillegar Riverbend Soccer Association), our program is expanding and we need more soccer pitches. We need green spaces to recreate and have assembly. Well, in our area it is Terwillegar Drive with its overpasses, the widening of Anthony Henday (provincial jurisdiction), widening of Ellerslie Trail, completion of other major roads. Completion of the Capital City Line, but in the interim, I would institute BRT (Bus Rapid Transit). The building of the Park and Ride near 127th and Ellerslie. On Terwillegar and Ellerslie Road, I would construct dedicated bus lanes for BRT. Foot bridges over major roads, the river valley trail system, bike lanes alongside LRT or newly constructed roadways that don’t impede traffic. Pathways throughout communities to accommodate walkers and recreational biking. I am very concerned about how we spend our tax dollars. We are in so much debt as a City and paying a lot of money to service that debt. The next City Council have to be prudent and evaluate all the asks coming into the planning of the budget. I want to make sure that priority items (infrastructure) are dealt with first. There has to be accountability and transparency of financial issues. There is an opportunity here to engage with the community on some of these money items. The City of Edmonton has an “Affordable Housing Strategy:2016-2015” which defines Affordable Housing as “subsidized housing”.  This Strategy positions Edmonton as a major player in the provision of subsidized housing.  That is fine, but the City should continue to put pressure on the other orders of government to do their part. I support the four general goals of the Strategy, including the goal to increase the supply of affordable housing in all areas of the city.   However, the housing should never be large projects which ghettoize people with financial or other challenges, such as the project which was proposed in Terwilligar a few years ago.   Instead, the housing should be finely distributed throughout all neighbourhoods. Ideally, large housing projects would be a mix of market and non-market housing, such as the project planned by Capital Region Housing in Londonderry and in Lendrum. In terms of those with physical or mental challenges, certain areas of the City should have local resources or services to help in those aspects.
33
Payman Parseyan
Ward 9It is easy, especially in the mundane world of governance, to be complacent - watch paint dry if you will. I plan to take the energy and hustle I have shown throughout my campaign into city council and push to get things done. I have managed my own campaign and am a Project Manager, I will use my experience to ensure we have accountability in how we are spending on projects and ensuring they are completed correctly, on time and on budget.I believe that we all have a responsibility to have mixed socio economic housing throughout our wards. That being said, the proper supports, amentities and services need to be in place first - I prefer to do things correctly the first time.
34
Samantha HeesWard 10I think that the City has a long way to go to become a "transit-oriented city" I would be very excited to be a part of writing this integral plan to make Edmonton more accessible for all vehicles.I think that community leagues can play a huge roll in getting the community that they serve involved in the public consultation that the city has promised. CL's allow council to get right into the heart of the community and can provide a unique voice for all our unique communities.I think that integrating community leagues into city planning will change the way they are viewed by community members. By increasing the importance and sway of the leagues we can help create meaningful dialogue.
35
Glenda K. Williams
Ward 10My vison is for a vibrant walkable, bikable city with LRT going to the westend, Mill Woods, & the International Airport. Citzens have their choice of housing from the desparately needed Low Income and Truly Affordable Housing to the Infill revitalizing neighbourhoods with their stunning design which fits the areas they are built in. Seniors can live on their property for ss long as they like not far from their watchful families because of Garden Suites and Laneway Housing. It isn't a matter of how many skinny houses can be sandwiched into the least amount of land but of a traditional/cosmopolitan plan to add richness to mature neighbourhoods where the community picnics, BBQ's and green space is enjoyed by all neighbours.Community Leagues are the lifeblood if our city and need to be well funded to give all in the community the chance to make friends and learn something new. We are all in this world together. Community Leagues build community and are fortresses against isolation. I would meet with each league to see what do they need? Can they share resources & perhaps work together when needed on larger projects. Community Leagues are vital and need support. Public engagement I believe in open government and would ecourage community consultation through my office, website, walk the neighbourhoods to meet and engage with citizens. I would also hold monthly functions to keep in contact. All residents will know what is going on in their communities and have respected input. I will put in place the format for consultation and cooperation. When we wirk together we can accomplish everything.
36
Mike NickelWard 11As a present sitting councilor I support the continuation of many of our existing plan objectives. Yet our city has had problems in achieving those objectives due to a lack of focus on proper public consultation and monitoring the administrations progress using appropriate metrics targets and outcomes. As a council if we truly support the MDP and any changes that are to emerge through a new plan re-write, a greater emphasis on transparency, accountability and value for our taxes has to be at the fore front of everything we do. Otherwise how will we know we are achieving the plan if we publicly refuse to measure our progress? In the end what gets measured gets fixed.Our community league system is unique through out North America. They are more than just organizers for local community sports programs and fundraisers for their neighborhood playgrounds. They are an important link in the public feed back loop not just for council but for the administration and other external organizations. In short they are critical element in not just what the community wants but how that community is going to fit into the city as a whole. Community Leagues are a much needed participant in any policy forum and is often the most often appropriate aggregation of the community voice. My desire is to see these roles not just supported but advanced. As a sitting councilor I have relied heavily on my community leagues and their input in shaping how I do my job as a city councilor. I have supported community leagues through out my ward by supporting their requests to council, to helping them fund-raise for their local causes, to actively supporting membership drives. I also have supported them financially personally. If requested to do more would do soAs mentioned before if city council and the administration would appropriately track what they are doing and tracking our outcomes when it comes to public engagement the question would be clear as what to do next. In my candid opinion this last council and administration has failed to do so. It is clear news rules for public engagement have to be written. As a special council initiative has been established in regards to a "New Approach" to public engagement I await to see the outcome of this initiative. Through this process I hope we can establish some clear lines of accountability not just for communities but more importantly for our administration. My principles have always been push power and authority down to the people closest to the problem and track their results. This is always where the best solutions lie.1) Stop Lot Splitting 2) Provide more aggressive incentives for downtown development 3) Support and develop architectural controls for mature neighborhoodsTo a degree, the lack of clear metric target and outcomes in relationship to these plans need to be codified. This question is location dependent. For mature neighborhoods see answers 7 and 8. As for greenfield our standards rules are applying wellPlease see answers 7 and 8.1) Must fit the context of the neighbors 2)Must fix the context of the neighborhood 3) Must fit by in large the neighborhood structure plans in placeThis is an inappropriate question. As a sitting councilor I am not allowed to provide any predetermined judgments to a particular application before council under the MGA guidelines.YES! Doing otherwise undermines other civic objectives that deal with everything to greater recreational opportunities to communities to basic health needs. Green space in Edmonton must be protected.YES! I have always opposed the use of surplus school sites for anything other than public open green space for sports and recreational usesYES! See answer 13.Several arterials need to be widen in wards 11 and 12 to ensure that the Valley Line LRT can reach its full potential. For example, park and ride at the end of the Valley Line to the twinning of the 66 st. bridge to allow better flow through on 66 st.Using Dial a bus to help complete the last mile problem caused by the transit bus route allocation.Establishing clear metrics, targets and outcomes for all civic policies, programs and projects. If we do not track what we are doing we have no assurance that we are actually getting value for our expenditures.The problems you mentioned are not contained within one part of the city so why would we try and centralize the remedies geographically? These problems are across the city therefor so should their solutions.
37
Svitlana Pavlenko
Ward 11To have more ease and flow of all traffic-be it automobiles,LRT, and bicycles.To keep the city council in touch with the people who voted for them and to make sure the council is aware of their needs.By keeping a open door policy and making sure that the community leagues get heard and get fairness at all times.Again, I repeat, by keeping an open door policy so that there is fair representation. By holding consultations with all present so that needs and concerns are heard and dealt with.To be keenly aware of everything from traffic concerns to parking concerns and concerns re: over-subscribing schools and the destroying of old boulevard trees. This is done by meeting with the leagues and listening to their thoughts.We need community redevelopment so obviously we must plan. We need to do due diligence before we proceed on "patient zero."By going out and observing and walking the areas of question myself. Again, due diligence.By making sure that I have researched my community and that all the planners and developers are aware of the possible concerns and problems before proceeding.Schools, parking, traffic patterns, emergency access, infrastructure and making sure that the original plan can be added onto carefully and intelligently. It depends on where in the neighborhood the tower would be located. For example, so called corners on more fully used streets opposed to in the more central part of the neighbourhood.Yes I agree. Public open space helps determine how the neighbourhood flows around it and how it is used.Yes so that future needs of the public can be determined and fulfilled. These needs change constantly and a city needs to look ahead down the road to possible playgrounds and community league buildings, etc.Absolutely. I feel strongly that our communities require these spaces for preserving the integrity of the communities and their physical health.Maintaining our infrastructures and planning ahead. Doing studies of other cities in the world and how they have dealt with similar issues.We need both more LRT lines and simultaneously better bus routes so that people can more easily get from point A to D to H and back to A.Bicycle lanes that do not punish cars, and better bus and LRT routes will also encourage walking.Make sure that the bidding process is more transparent and that all builds and improvements have safeguards, penalties and again, transparency.Concentrating them along with the support facilities makes the most sense to me.
38
Keren TangWard 11Several years ago when my husband and I moved here for me to study public health, we saw the great opportunity Edmonton had to offer: a growing city where everyday people can have an impact in decision making. I’ve certainly felt that way when I spoke at city hall on several issues. I’m running because I want to build a city that we as Edmontonians are proud of, one that attracts and retains people, who can see the potential and opportunities that I saw when I came here. My vision for Edmonton is based on 5 pillars: vibrant communities, healthy environment, strong local economy, engagement and transparency, and diversity and inclusion. After months of door knocking and talking to thousands of Ward 11 residents about issues like back alleys, LRT, transit, infill, and taxation, there is one common theme emerging: there are a lot of changes happening in our communities, whether we like it or not. I think the biggest challenge facing our city is managing this growth and reconciling competing interests. As Edmontonians, we should be a part of this change and make sure our voices are heard in the process. By working together, we can ensure that our neighbourhoods remain vibrant, our infrastructure is well-maintained, and all members of our community have opportunities to live, work, and play close to home, and city-wide.I see community leagues as a vital part of building inclusive, safe, active, and informed communities across Edmonton. Community leagues play a key role in creating stronger communities and more effective local leaders. While community leagues are important for advocating on behalf of their members and providing services and programs, I also believe that they have a critical “Abundant Community” role in connecting neighbours and creating networks within neighbourhoods. I will collaborate with community leagues on an ongoing basis to develop local solutions to meet local needs. I am committed to meaningful engagement and to making decisions together. Strengthening neighbourhood networks, such as community leagues, will allow us to respond to safety concerns and engage residents on important issues such as infill, transit infrastructure, and derelict housing in evolving neighbourhoods. Community-building and city-building should be citizen-driven. But right now, it feels like the most important goals and priorities for our communities are dictated to us from above. The City follows a very limited definition of public engagement and does not effectively include the voices of marginalized Edmontonians in the conversation. I’ve seen first-hand the frustration that comes from the City’s existing engagement strategies. But it doesn’t have to be this way. I believe the City needs to improve how it approaches public engagement to empower ordinary citizens. The City must prioritize engaging with citizens, experts, businesses, and community organizations. I want to see greater collaboration, beyond mere consultation, with communities in decisions such as planning and development. I want to see the City treat communities more as a partner than simply an audience, providing support to navigate complicated systems of planning. The City needs to increase diversity of representation in civic committees, and take intentional effort to reach out to those who have barriers to participation, to ensure that everyone’s voice is heard. I believe the true value of public engagement lies in the empowerment of people and communities to advocate and speak for themselves on what they think is important. Two-way communication, and more importantly negotiation, can have a long-term return on investment because of the community buy-in that they help to build. This will be my priority as your Ward 11 Councillor. If elected, I will make sure that development and redevelopment in central neighbourhoods are done responsibly, and in collaboration with residents, businesses, and different levels of government. When done right, increasing diverse housing options and densifying our communities can: bring new amenities for neighbourhoods; increase neighbourhood-oriented commercial development; broaden our tax base; attract people at all stages of life to older neighbourhoods; curb sprawl; and ensure schools are well attended centre of community life. I believe in creating local solutions to meet local needs, and that the evolution of a community should be shaped by people who live there. If created with these things in mind, Community Redevelopment Plans can be a tool. The evolution of a community should be shaped by people who live there. With infill, for example, Edmonton needs a set of community-driven infill standards that include location-appropriate building guidelines, and a commitment from the City to enforce those standards. Already, we are making some progress. Residents in Westmount have come up with development guidelines specific to their heritage neighbourhood in a collaborative process. This is a great example for other neighbourhoods to reflect and retain elements unique to the area, while incorporating new housing types and additional density.See answer to Question #9. See answer to Question #9.I support having diverse housing options in the neighbourhood that meet the needs of every family. A transit-oriented infill development proposal such as the one in Holyrood can fulfill some of these options. However, such projects need to be done thoughtfully, and with sensitivity to neighbourhood context. Moreover, based on conversations with local residents and organizations, I learned that many in the community are eager to see redevelopment in the Holyrood area, but are feeling that it is difficult to come to the table with the developer and have a reasonable conversation about the project. There are many great examples of healthy developer-community partnerships that we can draw upon to create dialogue and open up communication so that the outcome has strong community buy-in. If elected, I will make land use decisions on public open spaces that take into consideration community needs, input from community members, sustainability, and efficiency.If elected, I will ensure that the use of surplus school sites reflect the needs and desires of the residents of Ward 11 and that all new and/or repurposed public spaces are designed to meet the diverse needs of our communities.I am committed to ensuring that Ward 11 residents have adequate green spaces and recreation sites. Green spaces and sports fields are important gathering spaces and contribute to vibrant and healthy communities. My commitment to a healthy environment is shown through my tenure as a board member of the North Saskatchewan River Valley Conservation Society. After months of listening to Ward 11 residents voice their thoughts about our city, the River Valley has been mentioned over and over again as one Edmonton’s best features. Fresh air and ample green space are also some of the things that people most appreciate about living here (Ward 11 residents have a special fondness for Mill Creek ravine, of course).I support: - Improved public transit system including the Valley Line LRT to take cars off the road and reduce congestion. - Robust options for people to use a variety of transportation modes to alleviate the impact of cars on the road and the environment. - Sustained roadway renewal, particularly in many parts of Mill Woods where streets are riddled with potholes. Like many of Edmontonians, I use the bus to get to work. My biggest concerns are accessibility and affordability. More affordable fares will make taking the bus or the train a more appealing option, and make sure that those who need it most can get where they need to go. The current transit strategy review will change bus routes and frequency in an effort to improve service and encourage greater transit use. If these changes are successful in increasing ridership and improving service efficiency, they may allow us to lower transit fares without the City having to incur additional expenses. In the long term, we need to commit to transit-oriented development to increase density near transit hubs, which will increase ridership. We need to take an inclusive approach to the ways people travel around our city. In order to make taking transit more appealing to Edmontonians from all walks of life, we need to invest in reliable and efficient service, clean and inviting buses and trains, and affordable fare options.I would like to explore options for allowing bikes on the LRT at all times, including during peak times, which could ease the burden on limited park-and-ride spaces. I would support projects to create safer streets. Streets that are safe for kids are streets that are safe for all ages and abilities. Valley Line LRT construction is changing traffic flow on neighbourhood streets, creating concerns of short-cutting and speeding. Traffic-calming measures can improve pedestrian safety, which contributes to healthy communities. Neighbourhood infrastructure maintenance projects—from sidewalk repair, snow-clearing, and alleyway beautification—can promote walking and cycling around neighbourhoods. Well-maintained streets and beautiful back alleys also contribute to neighbourhood pride, safety, and a sense of belonging. If elected, I will work with City Council and City Administration to: - Ensure that the City’s budget reflects the different lives and experiences of Edmontonians and that any cuts, expenditure, and revenues are responsive to the diverse needs of all residents. - Ensure major projects have sought out meaningful engagement early on to counter overspending due to backtracking on decisions. - Continuously seek out cost savings through streamlined administrative processes, technology, and regional collaboration. - Ensure that everyday people have an impact on decision-making, by not taking corporate or union campaign donations. My campaign is entirely funded by individuals, and powered by volunteers. I have already published a financial disclosure, and will update it before election day. I have challenged all candidates in this election to follow suit for transparency. I am running a lean campaign that follows a strict budget to spend the fund only on what we need. This would be my approach to looking at spending on Council.I support the shift to a more even distribution of services and affordable housing across the city. Issues of housing and homelessness are city-wide, including the Mill Creek and Mill Woods neighbourhoods of Ward 11. Affordable housing would greatly benefit low-income families, particularly single mothers. However, for those with complex needs (e.g., homelessness, addiction, mental and physical health concerns), we need not only subsidized housing, but also wrap-around services to address mental health and addiction issues that often contribute to homelessness. Existing permanent supportive housing programs, such as Ambrose Place, are great examples for where we could start. The City of Edmonton must plan more broadly for the future. The Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness and the Affordable Housing Strategy offer a good starting point for strategic planning. Land is limited and we must do more with what we have. Ultimately, we need to create more socioeconomically diverse communities with well-designed, well-maintained social housing in the city. With thoughtful planning, strong engagement, and good design, we can ensure that regardless of where a person lives, they have access to the services and supports they need.
39
Moe BangaWard 12Edmonton needs to be a hub for innovation and growth. For many years we’ve relied on singular industries to guide our growth and development and it’s time we move toward a more diversified economy. I plan on fighting for a ward that is inclusive, has reliable, accessible public transport, and where families can live, work and play.One of the defining aspects of this City is the inclusion of Community Leagues. Having traveled across all of Canada, I have not seen anything similar. This is reflective of a strongly organized, and passionate community that wants to see itself as a bridge between communities and the city. I see Community Leagues as a vital heartbeat of this city. They help guide and inform us at City Hall.Community Leagues need to know that the City see's them as partners in our growth. I plan on providing the necessary tools for community leagues to function and grow.If there is any reason that community leagues have believed that their input is not seen equitably, then this must change. Without the recognition that Community Leagues are equal partners, decision making at a City level can become more difficult.
40
Walter YoubWard 12I believe that the priority right now should be to put a freeze on all new capital projects and focus on the correcting the issues related to the projects already underway. One we have the situation under control we can formulate a plan on how we will move forward. Growth and development are important to a vibrant city but it needs to be handled properly. As for having a more compact city, there are areas of the city where this makes sense but I feel that people living in outlying areas such as ward 12 decide to live in these areas in order to have more space. Under my plan to improve public safety community leagues will be vital. Education is key to preventing everything from petty crimes to kidnapping. I want to bring back programs like neighbourhood watch and block parent. I see organizations like community leagues as a central point for people to meet and discuss the issues as well as join these new programs. This will allow the people to take ownership in their community.I believe that city council has a responsibility to help fund these leagues but also to take the initiative to pair the leagues with sponsors in the not-for-profit and commercial sector.Transparency and accountability are the key fundimentals of my campaign. I have committed to be a voice and advocate for the people. I will personally address all concerns raised. I have also committed to publishing a weekly post that will let the people know what I did for the week and publish all of my expenses. This way the people can follow up on the progress of the issues that concern them and ask questions based on what I am working on.I feel that neighbourhoods that have single family homes should be able to keep it the way it is. I do not feel that lot splitting is a viable solution to urban sprawl. I do support the building of medium and high density residential in appropriate areas such as downtown and in new neighbourhoods where appropriate. The only reason to redevelop an established area is if all or at least a strong majority of residents have asked for it. When someone has invested in home it is not the governments place to come in and tell them it needs to change. Government is in place to serve the people not the other way around.Developers will always be able to find different opportunities to make a profit. The government does not need to create new bylaws to manufacture opportunities. As stated previously the only way I would support redevelopment is if the home owner supported it. If developers want to redesign an area then they would have to work with the residents to get their approval or maybe consider purchasing the homes to get a majority. The only factor that matters is the support of the people in the neighbourhood.I would here from the residents and side with the majority. Council's role is to support the people not the developers. I support free market business but that cuts both ways. If the developer does not have the support of the neighbourhood then is the project really worthwhile.Yes I agree that land set aside as a park space should remain as such. The only reason it should be changed is if a compelling need for the land can be produced such as a school or hospital. This would be a situation where each case should be evaluated on a case by case basis. In a case where the land is not needed now but would be in the foreseeable future for a school facility then it would be prudent to keep the land under city control. If the land is extraneous as a school was already built but the parcel was larger than required then I would be willing to consider selling it to a developer.Parks and sports fields are important to a community and family values. There is no need in a province like Alberta to be stacking people on top of each other. These green spaces are needed and with proper urban planning there is no need to develop on these areas.I believe that there are many areas in which improvements can be made. Twinning of roads such as 17 Street, upgrading Yellowhead, and so many others. These would be part of my urban planning plan.Under my urban planning proposal I would look at ways to improve the design of new neighbourhoods to make transit more assessable. I would reevaluate the current LRT expansions to see if options such as underground systems might be better. I would also look at other options such as BRT.A proper study of the uses and most efficient system for bike and walking trails is needed. I see the need and benefit of these systems but they need to be done properly so that they are actually utilized.As stated previously I will release weekly updates on my expenses and activities so they know where there money is going. I will also work on having this policy implemented across the council. I will also be looking to restructure the way we handle urban planning including procurement procedures and project approvals.I believe that they should go where they make the most sense but spread out to give the people the chance to be near family, friends, and employment opportunities. That being said if access to certain facilities such as a hospital is a major need of the residents then it would not make sense to build any great distance from them.
41
Jo-Anne WrightWard 12
42
Mike RussnakWard 12We need to stay relevant to the needs of Edmontonians. I envision our city continuing to grow in population and area. Strides must be made in making transit more convenient for Edmontonians. Future customers will only view Transit as a viable mode of transport if it is fast, efficient and close to their destinations. This means more regular buses in off-peak times and Park-And-Ride facilities at more Transit Centres and LRT stations. To prompt sports, recreation and social activates in the community and to bring common issues to the attention of those who can help fix them. Transportation and transit are two of those common issues that everyone is concerned about, Edmonton can do better.We have a shortage of community facilities in Ward 12 and that needs to be addressed. The closer the halls are to a persons residence the more support the community league gets. We need to look at moving participation beyond sports and focus on the social side and community interaction at an adult and senior level.The early sharing of information regarding common areas of concern is critical to allowing the community to gather input, develop and present a meaningful response. The biggest areas of concern are Capital projects related to infrastructure which impact peoples daily lives. It's too late to ask for input in a sanitized environment where you have a $100K table top model showing the South leg of the LRT. What you are looking at is the finished and approved project. Input should be gathered in working groups in which the greater community is engaged. The planners need to meet face to face with stakeholders. Facilitation of the meeting should be a shared responsibility carried out jointly with the planners and community representatives. Neighbourhoods go through a lifecycle and transition over time. The hard part is getting through the transition years. Yes if we can take advantage of the existing transportation, transit and city infrastructure. The communities must have input into the process and help to decide what they are prepared to accept.With the second lowest density of Non-Market Affordable Housing in the City at 0.6%, Ward 12 is likely to see many proposals for affordable housing from Council. As a Ward we need to consider what we would accept and what do the developers need to be successful, this is a fine balance.We must ensure locations selected have well-supported transit routes and convenient access to medical and support services. I would like to assist in identifying and evaluating these potential sites with the assistance of City Council and other groups. I would also focus on gathering information from community groups and stakeholders who will be affected by these changes and integrating their input into action plans.Where, why and how will the community benefit from the change. Will the infill project strain our resources and will the social-economic impact be on the community.In a neighborhood like Holyrood, twenty two storey's for one of the seven proposed towers is insane. The other 6 structures will be "medium" density, it's just too much for one community.Yes I would. Residents of a community chose to live in an area because of the parks and green spaces offered by the neighbourhood. Changing the features of their community can affect the enjoyment of the are for residents.Yes I would. These sites should be enjoyed as green spaces. Hopefully a school will be built on the land in the future. Selling these properties to developers takes away from residents' enjoyment of their neighbourhoods.Yes I am. Green space and sports fields are vital to the happiness and physical fitness of the neighbourhood.I would vote no lowering residential speed to 30Km/hr.. Moving cyclists of the street and onto the sidewalks eliminates the need for costly and underutilized bike lanes. There is an opportunity on some roads to easily add a 3 or 4th. lane. I see no reason that a motorcycle should have to take up a space that a car could be in and I would allow them to lane split and move to the front of the line like they do in the USA and Europe. Ward 12 needs more park and ride facilities for the LRT and transitWe must find more cost-effective strategies to solve the needs of Edmontonians. While a new LRT system looks impressive on paper, according to my calculations, we could have served the same need using buses for 3.3% of the cost. I would advocate use of common sense strategies to solve our needs, vote against such costly motions and rally support of Council to resist this type of imprudent spending.We need a European model which allows both bikes and pedestrians to share the same sidewalk.Getting bikes off the streets is a safer way to go. I love the river valley shared trails and I would like to see more similar trails added wherever there is an opportunity to do so.We must find more cost-effective strategies to solve the needs of Edmontonians. While a new LRT system looks impressive on paper, according to my calculations, we could have served the same need using buses for 3.3% of the cost. I would advocate use of common sense strategies to solve our needs, and vote against such costly motions and rally support of Council to resist this type of imprudent spending.Access to medical and social services is vital for the success of the physically and mentally challenged. Additionally, housing for low income must also be located near reliable and high frequency transit routes. We can distribute this housing throughout Edmonton, but it must be carefully decided where the best sites are to serve these citizens.
Loading...
 
 
 
Sheet