FORGET ME NOT.xlsx
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REVIEWS
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FORGET ME NOT - THE ALZHEIMER'S WHODONNIT
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ROB GEE
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Sunday, August 6 - Rob Gee has done it again. He has given us insight into a world we may never get to experience, that of dementia patients and their families. He does it with grace, humour, believable characters and great timing. Glad you keep coming back to make us laugh and think Rob.
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Monday, August 7 - There is not a lot that needs to be said about Rob Gee. He is a Fringe pro & always puts on an entertaining & thought-provoking show. Try & get used to his accent quickly because he is an at-times frantic performer (in the best sense of the word) who uses every moment of his hour toward a purpose. You will also need to keep track of several characters. Fortunately, Gee is a master at this sort of thing which helps immensely. His story this year is a wonderful blend of sentiment, humour, & suspense. It's a real Fringe treat to let Gee take you away into another world for an hour. Enjoy. Sean
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Monday, August 7 - "Hurrah! Rob Gee is back with his tall, lanky presence, a face that reads from miles away and his big distinctive voice flexible enough to take on any character he chooses. He performs big and you hear every syllable he utters from anywhere in the house. Yet he is subtle: two paces across the stage and you realize he has taken on another character. His style is so easy and conversational that only at key moments where he adds a slight emphasis on his version of a rhyming couplet are you aware that his text is performance poetry. His words – informed by his 12 years of experience as a psych nurse – could not be more relevant to current concerns: the proper care and dignity due to Alzheimer’s and dementia patients. For the former he has a brilliant opening sequence, where the Alzheimer’s victim in the whodunit to follow metes out the realities of the situation and from her chair suggests ways of how we can keep her happy… both amusing and practical. For the latter, we get an eye-opening (and horrifyingly humorous) perspective of attitudes as a former police detective with dementia attempts to piece together the events that led to his wife’s fall and ultimate demise in a psych ward and what became of her earrings. The all-too-real reactions of a bevy of administrators and care-givers are brilliantly exposed in a series of scenettes and overheard conversations as they go through daily routines (the mimed washing of a patient elicits a quite hilarious gasp from the audience at a key point). And then there is the whodunit! The extended scenes between the supervisor and the husband and the recurring monologue of a metaphorically challenged investigating detective are each a scream: the first of incredulity at the insensitivity of the manager and the second of fall-on-the-floor laughter at the mangling of our language. This important piece of social commentary (the Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust have recruited Rob to work with healthcare staff, using Forget Me Not as a training aid in the areas of compassion and whistleblowing) is eminently Fringe-worthy and totally ENTERTAINING!
Ian C. Nelson
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