MDST Fall 2019 Schedule of Classes
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SIS is the official record for course offerings.
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CourseSchedule
InstructorCreditsElectivePractice?DiversityNonUSFilmPolicyDescription
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MDST 2000-Introduction to Media StudiesTR 11:00-12:15; WIL 402Cavalcante, Andre4NNIntroduces students to the topics, themes, and areas of study that are central to an understanding of media in contemporary society. Focuses on the forms, institutions, functions, and impact of media on local, national, and global communities.
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MDST 2200-Introduction to FilmMWF 9:00-9:50am; CAB 058Marshall, Matthew3NNYWe tend to take movies for granted. They are there for our entertainment. But movies are made by people in specific ways for specific purposes, and this course examines how films are made to elicit an emotional or intellectual response. We will investigate film structure—how meaning is created—and how this structure can be read and understood. What is the act of interpretation? How do we understand what we see on the screen? We will study film genres, the specific stories films tell us, and the ways films and their audience are part of the larger structure of the culture in which they exist.
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MDST 2508-Sports Media ProductionMW 2:00-3:15; GIB 041Clay, Anna Katherine3NYIn conjunction with UVA's Athletic Foundation and the new ESPN/ACC Production studio inside JPJ, students in this course will participate in all roles associated with sports television production. From writing scripts to working as on-air broadcasters, students will rotate through experiential positions essential to real sports TV production. The class will meet weekly; written assignments will also be required.
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MDST 2700-News WritingTR 9:30-10:45; BRY 203Kelly, Charles3NYIntroductory course in news writing, emphasizing editorials, features, and reporting.
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MDST 2700-News WritingTR 8:00-9:15; BRY 203Kelly, Charles3NYIntroductory course in news writing, emphasizing editorials, features, and reporting.
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MDST 2810-Cinema as an Art FormTR 6:00-7:15pm; CLK 108; Required screening Tu 7:30-9:30pmMarshall, Matthew3NNYWe tend to take movies for granted. They are there for our entertainment. But movies are made by people in specific ways for specific purposes, and this course examines how films are made to elicit an emotional or intellectual response. We will investigate film structure—how meaning is created—and how this structure can be read and understood. What is the act of interpretation? How do we understand what we see on the screen? We will study film genres, the specific stories films tell us, and the ways films and their audience are part of the larger structure of the culture in which they exist.
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MDST 3000-Theory and Criticism of MediaM 2:30-5:00; BRY 235Bodroghkozy, Aniko3NNThis course introduces students at the beginning of the major to theoretical and critical literature in the field. Topics range from the psychological and sociological experience of media, interpretation and analysis of media forms and aesthetics, theories of audience and reception, anthropological approaches to media as a cultural force, and contemporary theories of media from humanities and social sciences perspectives. The goal of the course is to provide a foundation for thinking critically about media and to give them a sense of media studies as a critical and theoretical field. Restricted to Media Studies majors.
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MDST 3050-History of MediaTR 11-12:15; WIL 325Driscoll, Kevin3NNThis is a survey, lecture-format, course on the history of media forms, institutions, and technology from the origins of writing, invention of print technology, through the development of digital media. Attention to the specific characteristics of individual media, the changing role of media as a force in culture, and the continually transforming institutions and business of media will all be touched on. The role of media forms in the creation of public discourse and the social controls on media through censorship, legal constraints, and economic policies will also be examined, largely from within the context of the United States. Students will create a case study of a media work or artifact from a historical perspective.
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MDST 3103-Long-form JournalismMW 3:30-4:45; GIB 141Vaidhythanathan, Siva3YYAn exploration of the art and process of narrative non-fiction. An examination of the genres and forms of distribution like magazines, Web sites, and podcasts.
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MDST 3310-Sound and CinemaM 3:30-4:45; GIB 211Hamilton, Jack3YNYThis global cinema history class will proceed chronologically from the dawn of the sound era (early 1930s) to the early 1970s, looking at ways sound shaped filmmaking throughout this period and introducing students to various theoretical and critical writings on the relationship between visual and the aural.
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MDST 3405-Media Policy and LawTR 11:00-12:15; WIL 301Ali, Christopher3YNYThis course examines the constitutional, legal and regulatory foundations common to print, broadcast media and the Internet. An overview of topics such as libel, invasion of privacy, obscenity and copyright helps students understand forces that shape news and information they receive and prepares them to use media more effectively as citizens, voters and entrepreneurs in an increasingly complex multimedia world.
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MDST 3500-Comparative Histories of the InternetTR 9:30-10:45; MIN 130Driscoll, Kevin3YNYStudents will learn how computer networks became a medium for interpersonal communication & community. We will "reverse engineer" the technologies & technical cultures that gave rise to the global information infrastructure. Students will explore unfinished systems, abandoned experiments, & other historical "dead ends." This is a hands-on approach to media history & the technical concepts that make the internet possible.
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MDST 3559-Social Media and Global South Societies 006TR 2:00-3:15; CAB 389Nemer, David3YNYThis course studies the relationship between social media and Global South societies. Students in this course will analyze the various theories related to the effects and affordances of social media on ideological polarization, social influence, social capital, and social movements. Students will be required to look beyond positive/negative effects of social media, and conduct in-depth interrogations about issues that surround them.
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MDST 3630-Screening TerrorismMW 2:00-3:15; DEL 2 101Little, William3YNYThis course examines contemporary cinematic & televisual representations of terrorism. It aims to do the following: to promote critical awareness of the ways in which terrorism is depicted on screen, particularly in the post-9/11 world; to encourage exploration of the complex ways in which real acts of terror involve performance & theatrics; to address the ethics and responsibilities of film and TV in re-creating acts of terror on screen.
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MDST 3650-Shooting the WesternMW 4:00-5:15; MRY 110Little, William3YNThis course provides an overview of the enduring genre of the American Western in its classic and revised forms. The course will address the social and historical contexts informing the films. Students will be asked to perform both cultural and formal analysis of the cinematic texts.
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MDST 3661-Media Bodies 004TR 11:00-12:15; GIB 242Ellcessor, Liz3YNYThis class will not be listed until April or May. Increasingly, we use media to better understand our bodies - MRIs, fitness trackers, bluetooth hearing aids, and other media help to construct bodily health, ability, and gender. We will study a range of tech that mediate bodies, and also consider how media representations of "normal" bodies effect social life and mental health.
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MDST 3690-Sports JournalismTR 11:00-12:15; NAU 141Clay, Anna Katherine3NYThis course will cover all manner of media as it relates to sports journalism.Students will analyze published work across various mediums, learn the tools for reporting and writing different types of coverage, including features, profiles, long-form, game stories and more. Students will write articles, interview subjects, analyze sports journalism, participate in peer reviews and hear from some of the most prominent figures in sports journalism.
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MDST 3704-Games and PlayTR 11:00-12:15; GIB 041Duncan, Sean3YNThis course is an introduction to game studies, surveying theories of play and research on contemporary videogames to “folk games” to sports/e-sports. Historic tensions and debates in game studies will form the foundation for the course, then students will engage with game studies as inherently interdisciplinary, developing novel research projects on games and play as well as interrogating their own play experiences.
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MDST 3704-Games and PlayTR 2:00-3:15; MIN 130Duncan, Sean3YNThis course is an introduction to game studies, surveying theories of play and research on contemporary videogames to “folk games” to sports/e-sports. Historic tensions and debates in game studies will form the foundation for the course, then students will engage with game studies as inherently interdisciplinary, developing novel research projects on games and play as well as interrogating their own play experiences.
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MDST 3750-Money, Media, and TechnologyTR 12:30-1:45; BRY 328Swartz, Deja3YNMoney is one of the oldest media technologies in the world, bu in recent years a variety of experiments from Venmo to Bitcoin have emerged, promising to reinvent the form of money itself. This class looks at the historical, social, and cultural dimensions of money as a media technology.
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MDST 3751-Value, Values, and ValuationTR 2:00-3:15; BRY 328Swartz, Deja3YNMeasuring "value" is an important feature of media industries and contemporary life more broadly. This class asks how value is determined, according to what value systems, through what systems of valuation. We will look at taste, metrics, reviews, awards, likes, retweets, and ratings, to try to understand how people answer the question, "What is valuable?"
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MDST 3760-#BlackTwitter and Black Digital CultureTR 2:00-3:15; PHY 218Clark, Meredith3YNYUsing a mix of scholarly and popular-press readings and an examination of digital artifacts, we will analyze the creations and contributions of Black digital culture from the mid-90s to the present. Covering topics including the early Black blogosphere; the creation of niche content sites like BlackPlanet.com; the emergence of Black Twitter; the circulation of memes, and the use second-screening.
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MDST 3800-Field Experience in Media StudiesLittle, WilliamVARNNProvides an opportunity for students to get credit for field work, in the area of media studies. Students must put a proposal together for the project with a faculty sponsor, which must be approved by the add/drop deadlines. Restricted to Media Studies Majors.
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MDST 4101-Privacy & SurveillanceMW 2:00-3:15; NAU 241Vaidhythanathan, Siva3YNYCan we preserve dignity and privacy in the age of Facebook? This seminar will consider the history and current applications of technologies & cultures of surveillance. How & why did we get to the point where almost all of our activities leave a trace? What sorts of laws and policies do we need to protect our sense of personal integrity? Students will conduct two brief oral presentations (accompanied by a video) & produce a 20-page research paper.
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MDST 4106-Media and the Kennedy EraTR 12:30-1:45; BRY 235Bodroghkozy, Aniko3YNThis course examines mass media – network television, journalism, advertising, cinema – both during the Kennedy years and after to explore the impact, ideas, ideals, and iconography of this presidency.
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MDST 4559-Memory, Media + Justice 001W 5:00-7:30; GIB 041Clark, Meredith3yNYIn this course, we draw on counter-narratives of digital divide perspectives to inform our study and creation of open, accessible, and interactive digital media projects using social media data related to social justice work. Our purpose to is to empower marginalized communities to preserve and tell their own stories through equitable digital archiving.
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MDST 4559-Media & Learning 002M 2:00-4:30; MIN 130Duncan, Sean3YNThis course covers instructional media, learning in media cultures, and media literacy. Students will engage with topics such as digital media and learning, connected learning, cultural studies and its impact on institutional education, as well as learning as embedded within fan practices, subcultural media engagement, and “everyday” media participation. Students will conduct semester-long research projects on media and learning and media literacy, with the option of designing digital media and learning interventions.
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MDST 4704-Political Economy of CommunicationTR 3:30-4:45; NCH 183Ali, Christopher3YNYThis survey course introduces students to the political economy of media. Central themes include political economy’s historical development, its usefulness to the study of media and communications, and its contemporary applications in scholarly research. Students will be introduced to the power dynamics and institutional forces that impact media institutions, industries, ownership, cultural production, consumption and distribution in the US and elsewhere.
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MDST 8000-Introduction to the Field of Media StudiesW 2:00-4:30; NCH 415Ellcessor, Liz3NNThis is a core course that surveys key texts in Media Studies. The course take a histroical approach to the development of the field, but also surveys the various developments in the social sciences, the humanities, and film studies relevant to the interdisciplinary study of media.
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