MLA Convention 2018 Digital Work Sessions
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2. Teaching Languages and Literatures Online: Key Principles for Course Design 8:30–11:30 a.m., Concourse B, Hilton A special session Speakers: Susan Ko, School of Professional Studies, City U of New York; Richard Schumaker, School of Professional Studies, City U of New York This hands-on professional development workshop provides a guided opportunity for designing fully or partially online courses, led by two individuals with extensive expertise in faculty development for online and blended teaching and experience teaching comparative literatures and cultures. Participants draft a design plan for a course or course elements that make use of online delivery and receive feedback from moderators and workshop peers. Preregistration is required. For related material, write to Susan .Ko@ cuny .edu after 4 Dec.
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16. Digital Humanities in Practice: Caribbean Models 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Nassau West, Hilton A special session 1. “Networking the Afro- Atlantic: Finding Potential in Proximity through Digital Cartography,” Kaiama L. Glover, Barnard C 2. “Apátrida Archived: A Literary and Digital Response to Statelessness in the Dominican Republic,” Megan Jeanette Myers, Iowa State U 3. “An Explosion in the Archives: Reframing French Archives through Caribbean Digital Praxis,” Nathan H. Dize, Vanderbilt U 4. “Hamilton and the Digital Archives of LatinxCaribbean Writing,” Elena Machado Saez, Bucknell U For related material, write to mjmyers@ iastate .edu after 30 Sept.
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29. Micropress Poetry and the Politics of Electronic Text 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Hudson, Hilton Program arranged by the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses 1. “The Electronic Text Made Physical: Digital Poetics and Contemporary Chinese Experimentalism,” Kate Costello, U of Oxford, St. Hugh’s C 2. “The Invisible Online Poetry Library,” Stephen Reid McLaughlin, U of Texas, Austin 3. “Small Data,” Claire Grossman, Stanford U 4. “Niche and Glitch: Poetry E-books and Their Readers,” Mel Bentley, independent scholar Respondent: Trisha Low, Small Press Distribution For related material, visit www .spdbooks .org/ Pages/ Item/59229/MLA- 2018.aspx
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49. Digital Humanities Approaches to Japanese Media 1:45–3:00 p.m., Nassau West, Hilton Program arranged by the forum LLC Japanese since 1900 1. “Virtual Reality, Mapping, and the Future of Literary History,” Charles Exley, U of Pittsburgh 2. “The Sound of Silents: Digital Humanities Project on Benshi and Silent Film,” Kyoko Omori, Hamilton C 3. “The Resonance of Digital Space: New Critical Practices in Digital Curation,” Joanne Bernardi, U of Rochester
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50. The Historical Novel after Postmodernism 1:45–3:00 p.m., Flatiron, Sheraton A special session 1. “Mapping the Historical Turn: Privileged Periods in Prize-Winning Novels,” Alexander Manshel, Stanford U 2. “‘Building New History’: Mike Meginnis’s Fat Man and Little Boy and Contemporary United States Historical Fiction,” Samuel Cohen, U of Missouri, Columbia 3. “What Is Missing: The Novel as Memorial,” Sarah Chihaya, Princeton U 4. “Don DeLillo’s Bad Art History: Aesthetics, Politics, and the Paradox of the Contemporary,” David Alworth, Harvard U For related material, write to amanshel@stanford.edu after 1 Nov.
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54. The Ethics of Progressive Shakespeare 1:45–3:00 p.m., Sutton Place, Sheraton A special session. Presiding: Alexa Alice Joubin, George Washington U 1. “The Ethics of Digital Publication and Global Shakespeare Studies,” Laura Estill, Texas A&M U, College Station 2. “Global Shakespeare, Dramatic Form, and the Ethics of ‘Progress,’” Katherine Schaap Williams, New York U, Abu Dhabi 3. “Ethics of Global Shakespeare Pedagogy,” Ema Vyroubalova, Trinity C Dublin 4. “How to Read a (Digital) Shakespeare Play,” Elizabeth Pentland, York U
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57. Activism in the Humanities: Digital Projects for Public Engagement 1:45–3:00 p.m., New York, Hilton Program arranged by the forum TC Digital Humanities. Presiding: Mark Sample, Davidson C Speakers: Jacqueline Arias, Jersey Art Exchange; Jim Casey, Prince ton U; Alexander Gil, Columbia U; Purdom Lindblad, U of Maryland, College Park; Sarah Lynn Patterson, U of Massachusetts, Amherst; Laila Sakr, U of California, Santa Barbara; Jacqueline D. Wernimont, Arizona State U West; Dennis Yi Tenen, Columbia U Panelists discuss activism through digital humanities projects. Topics include how to engage local communities through digital projects, how to shift from academic work to social and political advocacy, how to introduce issues- oriented and community- oriented projects to students, and how to bring together technology with activist work. For related material, visit lklein .com/ mla- 2018/.
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66. States of Insecurity: Digital Writing in the Post–2016 Election Era 1:45–3:00 p.m., Madison, Hilton Program arranged by the forum RCWS Writing Pedagogies. Presiding: Bonnie Lenore Kyburz, Lewis U 1. “Plagues of Misinformation,” Katherine Gaudet, U of New Hampshire, Durham 2. “Games Trolls Play: Lessons from GamerGate for the Age of Trump,” Anastasia Salter, U of Central Florida 3. “How Do Facts Matter Now? Teaching Students How to Analyze the Digital Public Sphere,” Philip Longo, U of California, Santa Cruz 4. “Public Selves and Political Commentary: Digital Danger and Identity,” Monica F. Jacobe, C of New Jersey
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79. Rethinking Paul de Man 1:45–3:00 p.m., New York Ballroom West, Sheraton Program arranged by the Society for Critical Exchange. Presiding: Jefrey R. Di Leo, U of Houston 1. “A Return to ‘The Return to Philology’; or, I Profess,” Martin McQuillan, Kingston U 2. “De Man’s Negativity,” Lee Edelman, Tuts U 3. “Paul de Man’s Romantic Materialities,” Tom Eyers, Duquesne U 4. “Unseen Crystal: De Manian Materiality and the Digital Future of ‘Inscription,’” Avery Slater, U of Toronto Respondent: Ian Balfour, York U
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97. Contemplation of Keywords: Celebrating the Rhetoric Society of America’s Fiftieth Anniversary 3:30–4:45 p.m., Flatiron, Sheraton Program arranged by the Rhetoric Society of America 1. “Contemplating and Selecting Rhetoric’s Keywords,” Michelle Ballif, U of Georgia 2. “The Digital,” James J. Brown, Jr., Rutgers U, Camden 3. “Memory,” Bradford Vivian, Penn State U, University Park
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108. The Internet of Everything: African Literature in a Digital Age 3:30–4:45 p.m., Clinton, Hilton A special session. Presiding: Olorunshola Adenekan, U of Bremen 1. “Digital Networks and Their (Dis)Contents: Articulating Instability through Online African Writing,” Olorunshola Adenekan 2. “Collaborative Social Media Networking and Satire in Ghana—My Book of #GHCoats and Flash Fiction Ghana,” Kwabena Opoku- Agyemang, West Virginia U, Morgantown 3. “Digital Providence: Serendipity and Self-Fashioning in the Work of Adaobi Nwaubani, Chimamanda Adichie, and Binyanvanga Wainaina,” Rhonda Cobham- Sander, Amherst C
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113. Implementation Stories: Successes and Struggles in Digital Programming 3:30–4:45 p.m., Concourse G, Hilton A special session Speakers: Sonia Chaidez, Whittier C; Anne CongHuyen, Whittier C; Ellen MacKay, U of Chicago; Angel David Nieves, Hamilton C; Marisa Parham, Amherst C; Jacqueline D. Wernimont, Arizona State U West The successes and hazards of noncurricular digital humanities programming are seldom publicly aired, yet staff, fellows, and directors at DH institutes face the same steep challenges. Our hope is that by laying bare the best and worst aspects of our programming’s implementation we will make our experiences portable for other DH institute members, learn from the suggestions of the audience, and enlarge the place of the human in the digital humanities.
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158. Commonsense Information Security for Academics 7:00–8:15 p.m., Central Park East, Sheraton Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology Speakers: Andrew Pilsch, Texas A&M U, College Station; Shawna Ross, Texas A&M U, College Station This informal workshop helps individuals secure their academic and personal data from malicious individuals, businesses, and governments. During the workshop, CIT members work with attendees to implement basic, legal cybersecurity. Bring any laptops, phones, tablets, or other devices whose data you want to secure. For related material, visit infotech .mla .hcommons .org/ after 30 Oct.
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169. Scientific Discourse in Italy (1600–1800s) 7:00–8:15 p.m., Concourse E, Hilton Program arranged by the forum LLC 17th-, 18th-, and 19th-Century Italian. Presiding: Sabrina Ferri, U of Notre Dame 1. “Astronomy and Early Modern Print Networks in Galileo’s Library,” Crystal J. Hall, Bowdoin C 2. “Boccaccio and the Lascivious Discourse of Generation and Procreation among Eighteenth-Century Men of Science,” Clorinda Donato, California State U, Long Beach 3. “L’igiene per tutti: Science and ‘the People’ in Nineteenth-Century Italy,” Silvia Valisa, Florida State U
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184. Publishing at the Center of the Humanities 7:00–8:15 p.m., Concourse B, Hilton Program arranged by the forums TC Digital Humanities and RCWS Literacy Studies. Presiding: Rebecca Kennison, K/N Consultants 1. “Connecting Scholarship to the Network: The Enhanced Networked Monograph Project,” Monica McCormick, New York U 2. “Enriching the Monograph: Fulcrum,” Mary Francis, U of Michigan, Ann Arbor 3. “Retooling the Monograph: he Manifold Scholarship Project,” Matthew K. Gold, Graduate Center, City U of New York 4. “The Remediation of Scholarly Multimedia Publishing,” Cheryl E. Ball, West Virginia U, Morgantown For related material, visit publishingpanel2017 .hcommons .org/ after 1 Nov.
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198. Digital Humanities as Critical University Studies 8:30–9:45 a.m., Concourse C, Hilton A special session 1. “Digital Humanities with a View: Beyond Research, Teaching, and Service,” Roopika Risam, Salem State U 2. “An Analysis of Alternative Career Skills in Academic Job Ads,” Beth Seltzer, Bryn Mawr C 3. “Digital Humanities as Critical University Studies: An Alt- Genealogy of DH Praxis,” Matt Applegate, Molloy C For related material, visit mapplega .com after 15 Sept.
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200. Writing for a Broader Audience; or, Academics Are Writers, Too 8:30–9:45 a.m., Lincoln Suite, Hilton Program arranged by the MLA Career Center Speaker: Jane Greenway Carr, CNN Digital This workshop outlines the process and pleasures of writing for general- audience publications, particularly digital news and culture outlets. It provides hands- on instruction and a forum to discuss becoming a humanities practitioner at any career stage, making connections with editors and producers, and translating academic expertise into accessible prose without sacrificing vital content and context
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212. Humor and Satire in Online Formats and on Social Media 8:30–9:45 a.m., Murray Hill, Sheraton Program arranged by the American Humor Studies Association. Presiding: Peter Kunze, U of Texas, Austin 1. “What Do Memes Want?” Randa El Khatib, U of Victoria 2. “‘Like a Realtor in Peoria’: Patton Oswalt, Twitter, and Heckling as Social Activism,” Steven Kapica, Fairleigh Dickinson U, Teaneck 3. “Comedy of Resistance by Lesbian YouTubers,” Nayra Delgado Lopez, U of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras 4. “Performing Whiteness: Brandon Miller’s Instagram Sensation ‘Joanne the Scammer,’” Mariann J. VanDevere, Vanderbilt U
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230. The Futures of Afrofuturism 8:30–9:45 a.m., Flatiron, Sheraton A special session. Presiding: Amy J. Elias, U of Tennessee, Knoxville Speakers: Tiffany Barber, U of Rochester; Michael Bennett, Arizona State U; André Carrington, Drexel U; Michelle Commander, U of Tennessee, Knoxville; Nettrice Gaskins, Boston Arts Acad.; R. Scott Heath, Georgia State U; Alessandra Raengo, Georgia State U Afrofuturism, an evolving pop genre, is a contemporary arts movement connecting the musical, literary, and visual arts and combining elements of science fiction, speculative futurism, history, and fantasy with African and African diasporic cultural history, politics, and aesthetics. Speakers focus on how the genre is changing and on the cultural import of that change in writing, music, film, digital media, and installation arts. For related material, write to aelias2@ utk .edu.
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237. The Matter of Writing 10:15 a.m.–12:00 noon, Murray Hill East, Hilton Presiding: Suzanne Blum Malley, Columbia C, IL Speakers: Jonathan Alexander, U of California, Irvine; Kristine Blair, Youngstown State U; Douglas Eyman, George Mason U; Douglas Hesse, U of Denver; Deborah H. Holdstein, Columbia C; Shir­ley Wilson Logan, U of Maryland, College Park; Andrea Abernethy Lunsford, Stanford U; John L. Schilb, Indiana U, Bloomington; Kathleen Yancey, Florida State U This plenary brings together scholars of rhetoric and composition studies, also known as writing studies, a discipline within English studies, to share key concepts, theories, movements, and agendas of the discipline, especially as it relates to common issues faced by larger ields, such as literary studies, in English departments and in universities. For related material, visit kairos.technorhetoric .net/stasis/2018 after 1 Jan.
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258. Questioning Precarity in the Global South 10:15–11:30 a.m., Columbus Circle, Sheraton Program arranged by the forum LLC African since 1990. Presiding: Moradewun Adejunmobi, U of California, Davis 1. “Who is Precarious Now?” John Macintosh, U of Maryland, College Park 2. “The Precarious Mobility of the Digital Brown Worker,” Sagnika Chanda, U of Pittsburgh 3. “City Limits: Bulawayo beyond Precarity,” Pashmina Murthy, Kenyon C 4. “Protesting Precarity in Film,” Rita Keresztesi, U of Oklahoma
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268. Teaching the Fragments: English Education, Democracy, and Digital Media 10:15–11:30 a.m., Gramercy, Sheraton Program arranged by the College English Association Speakers: Ellen Carillo, U of Connecticut, Storrs; Laura J. Davies, State U of New York, Cortland; Benjamin Keating, U of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Laura Lisabeth, St. John’s U, NY; Shane McCoy, U of Washington, Seattle; Annemarie Perez, Loyola Marymount U; Ah- Young Song, Teachers C, Columbia U Panelists explore the role of English education in an age of rising populism and rampant social fragmentation.  How can English teachers work to heal an increasingly divided nation?  How can we use the tools of our trade—close reading, the poem, the novel, the essay—to teach citizenship in a digital age?  Is this a battle even worth fighting?  Or is critical literacy, and maybe even the idea of education as a democratizing force, outdated?
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294. The Rhetoric of (New) Fascism 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Nassau West, Hilton A special session. Presiding: Nidesh Lawtoo, U of Bern 1. “Donald Trump and the New Fascism,” William Connolly, Johns Hopkins U, MD 2. “‘Besides, We Weren’t Racists or Fascists’: Sloterdijk, Houellebecq, and the Violence of Submission,” Chet Lisiecki, Colorado C 3. “‘Brexit Means Brexit’: Hypnosis, Contagion, and Strategies of the ‘New Right,’” Elisabetta Brighi, U of Westminster 4. “Digital Totalism and Writing Pedagogy,” Eric Rawson, U of Southern California
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304. Activist Infrastructures: Vulnerable Collections and Minimal Computing 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Concourse C, Hilton Program arranged by the forum TC Digital Humanities. Presiding: Élika Ortega, Northeastern U 1. “A Case Study in Using Our Power and Knowing Our Place,” Vika Zafrin, Boston U 2. “Digitizing Seasonality: he BBC’s Springwatch and the Nature’s Calendar Survey,” Sarah Dimick, U of Wisconsin, Madison 3. “Security through Transparency: Minimal Computing in the Jungle of the Real,” Andrew Pilsch, Texas A&M U, College Station 4. “Take Only Data, Leave No Footprints,” Jefrey Moro, U of Maryland, College Park Respondent: Alexander Gil, Columbia U
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314. Blended Learning: Balancing Social Media and Face-to-Face Pedagogies 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Chelsea, Sheraton Program arranged by the forum HEP Teaching as a Profession. Presiding: Olga Menagarishvili, Appalachian State U 1. “Better Learning through Hashtags: Building Community and Improving Discussion with Twitter,” Rebekah Fitzsimmons, Georgia Inst. of Tech. 2. “Technical Communication Process in a Face- to-Face and a Blended Learning Class: Managing Time, Drafting, Collaborating, and Providing Feedback,” Olga Menagarishvili For related material, visit rburnett.lmc.gatech .edu/ after 1 Dec.
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332. The Function of the Print Scholarly Edition at the Present Time 1:45–3:00 p.m., Empire Ballroom East, Sheraton Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Scholarly Editions. Presiding: Paul B. Armstrong, Brown U 1. “Failure to Launch: Some Difficulties in Coordinating Print and Digital Editions of the Complete Letters of Henry James,” Greg W. Zacharias, Creighton U 2. “Editing the Complete Works of Edith Wharton in Print and Online,” Donna M. Campbell, Washington State U, Pullman; Carol J. Singley, Rutgers U, Camden 3. “Editing the Stainforth Library Catalog: Print Pasts and Digital Futures for the Study of Women’s Writing,” Kirstyn Leuner, Santa Clara U 4. “From Linear to Open Reading: Adapting ‘Parcours numeriques’ for Scholarly Editions,” Michael Eberle- Sinatra, U of Montreal
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333. Web 2.0 Readers 1:45–3:00 p.m., Regent, Hilton Program arranged by the forum TC Popular Culture. Presiding: Gwendolyn Pough, Syracuse U 1. “Goodreads and the Black Box of Online Reading,” Allison Hegel, U of California, Los Angeles 2. “The Insecure Reading Chair,” Julia M. Walker, State U of New York, Geneseo 3. “Redrawing the Lines? Korean War Webtoons and the Politics of Disengagement,” We Jung Yi, Penn State U, University Park 4. “Microblogging Junot Díaz: Political Engagement and Web 2.0 Readers,” Ellen McCracken, U of California, Santa Barbara For related material, visit ellenmccracken .weebly.com.
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347. Varieties of Digital Humanities 1:45–3:00 p.m., Beekman, Hilton Program arranged by the PMLA Editorial Board. Presiding: Alison Booth, U of Virginia; Miriam Posner, U of California, Los Angeles Speakers: Lauren Klein, Georgia Inst. of Tech.; Alan Liu, U of California, Santa Barbara; Marisa Parham, Amherst C; Howard Rambsy, Southern Illinois U, Edwardsville; Ted Underwood, U of Illinois, Urbana Digital humanities (DH) designates a debatable array of practices and institutional structures, materials and resources, and aspirations. It is expansive, movable, but precarious, a tent still not big enough in terms of diversity and access. Anticipating an issue of PMLA devoted to the topic, we ask, What is next for DH? And what can we learn from what has come before? For related material, visit www .mla .org/ pmla_ submitting.
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352. Partnerships beyond the Stacks: Collaborations between Scholars and Librarians in Research and Teaching 1:45–3:00 p.m., Clinton, Hilton Program arranged by the forum TM Libraries and Research. Presiding: Harriett Green, U of Illinois, Urbana Speakers: Rebecca Baumann, Indiana U, Bloomington; Amy Chen, U of Iowa; Laura Clapper, Indiana U, Bloomington; Heather Cole, Brown U; Emilie Hardman, Harvard U; Adam G. Hooks, U of Iowa; Erika Jenns, Indiana U, Bloomington New types of partnerships emerging between faculty members, students, librarians, and curators offer exciting avenues for humanities scholarship. Panelists present collaborative projects between scholars and librarians on creative teaching approaches for archival research, building digital tools, and socially engaged undergraduate research. he panelists discuss strategies for fruitful collaborations and the impacts of these partnerships. For related material, visit mla .hcommons .org/ groups/ libraries- and- research/ after 4 Dec.
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355. Catfished: Lies Online 1:45–3:00 p.m., Sugar Hill, Sheraton Program arranged by the forum GS Life Writing. Presiding: Emily Hipchen, U of West Georgia 1. “A Catfish’s Motives,” Kathrin Kottemann, Adams State U 2. “Real People, Fake Narratives: Does Self- Publishing Online Promote or Obstruct Authenticity?” Anna Cairney, St. John’s U, NY 3. “Catfished: Who Am I Now?” Jillian Abbott, York C, City U of New York For related material, visit www .auto- biography .org.
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362. Making the Most of Humanities Commons 3:30–4:45 p.m., Hudson, Hilton Program arranged by the MLA Office of Scholarly Communication Speaker: Nicky Agate, MLA his workshop serves as an introduction to the nonprofit scholarly network Humanities Commons and its open- access repository, CORE. Learn how to gain more readers while increasing the impact of your work, make interdisciplinary connections, build class blogs and collaborative Web sites, find and reuse openly available research materials, and crat a professional online presence. Sign up in advance and view related material at scholcomm .mla .hcommons .org/ mla18/.
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365. Net Work: Then and Now 3:30–4:45 p.m., Riverside Ballroom, Sheraton Program arranged by the forum LLC 17th- Century English. Presiding: Christopher Warren, Carnegie Mellon U 1. “Using the Methods of Our Manuscripts: Networking and Early Modern Recipe Collaborations,” Hillary M. Nunn, U of Akron; Melissa Schultheis, Rutgers U, New Brunswick 2. “The Ifs, Ands, and Buts of Early Modern England,” Jonathan P. Lamb, U of Kansas 3. “Early Modern Echo Chambers? The Quotidian Networks of Civil War London,” Christopher D’Addario, Gettysburg C 4. “Financial and Professional Networks in the Restoration Theater,” Mattie Burkert, Utah State U For related material, write to cnwarren@cmu.edu after 1 Dec.
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393. Printable Pedagogy and 3- D Theses 3:30–4:45 p.m., Gramercy East, Hilton Program arranged by the Association for Computers and the Humanities. Presiding: Brian Croxall, Brown U Speakers: Erika Mary Boeckeler, Northeastern U; Emily Brooks, U of Florida; Jonathan Fitzgerald, Northeastern U; Mary Catherine Kinniburgh, Graduate Center, City U of New York; Aaron Santesso, Georgia Inst. of Tech.; Margaret Simon, North Carolina State U; Edward Stratford, Brigham Young U, UT Over the last decade, alongside the arrival of digital humanities methods, universities have invested in 3- D printing and maker spaces. Presenters discuss how they use fabrication tools and spaces to teach languages and literatures or to conduct linguistic or literary analysis. Brief talks address the praxis of printing and the metaphysics of physicalization for understanding languages and literatures. For related material, visit ach .org after 15 Dec.
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402. Literacies in Motion: Crossing National, Cultural, Generational, and Local Borders 5:15–6:30 p.m., Concourse D, Hilton Program arranged by the forum RCWS Literacy Studies. Presiding: Suzanne Blum Malley, Columbia C, IL 1. “Digital Stewards of Alaska Native Languages and Literacies,” Jennifer Stone, U of Alaska, Anchorage 2. “Intimate Technologies: Affects, State Authority, and Documents as a Literacy Technology,” Eileen Lagman, U of Colorado, Boulder 3. “Revising and Relocating the Good Hmong Daughter,” Kaia Simon, U of Illinois, Urbana 4. “Women Crossing Over: Vietnamese Educational Migrants Navigating Competing Contexts of Globalization,” Ilene Crawford, Southern Connecticut State U For related material, visit mla .hcommons .org/ groups/ literacy- studies/ after 15 Dec.
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407. Historical Time Machines: Time Criticalities of Nineteenth-Century Media 5:15–6:30 p.m., Sugar Hill, Sheraton A special session. Presiding: Roger Whitson, Pullman, WA 1. “Big Time: London’s Big Ben, Deep Time, and Time-Criticality Studies,” Andrew Burkett, Union C 2. “Babbage and Blake, Lovelace and Byron: The Algorithmic Condition of Nineteenth-Century Poetics,” Roger Whitson 3. “New Grub Street on Paper,” Richard Menke, U of Georgia Respondent: Crystal Lake, Wright State U For related material, visit MLA Commons after 1 Dec.
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408. The Work of the Anthology in American Literature 5:15–6:30 p.m., Flatiron, Sheraton A special session. Presiding: Nicholas Rinehart, Harvard U Speakers: Wai Chee Dimock, Yale U; Shelley Fisher Fishkin, Stanford U; Sandra M. Gustafson, U of Notre Dame; Patrick Jagoda, U of Chicago; Carla Kaplan, Northeastern U; Tavia Nyong’o, Yale U Editors from several major journals in American studies and literary and cultural studies consider the work of the anthology in American literature and culture—and its role in research, teaching, and public outreach.
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415. "Aca- Fandom" and Digital Scholarship: Rethinking Research and Fan Production 5:15–6:30 p.m., Murray Hill, Sheraton A special session. Presiding: Rachel O’Connell, U of Sussex 1. “Like Dumbledore’s Army Except Hermione Is In Charge: Podcasting, Feminist Fandom, and the Public Academic,” Marcelle Kosman, U of Alberta; Hannah McGregor, Simon Fraser U 2. “Queer Geek Methodologies: Social Justice Fandom as a Transformative Digital Humanities,” Alexis Lothian, U of Maryland, College Park 3. “‘Maybe Willam . . . ’: Writing Fandom, Intimacy, and Queer Femininities,” Rachel O’Connell
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418. The Digital Divide: South Asia in Crisis 5:15–6:30 p.m., Sutton Place, Sheraton Program arranged by the forum LLC South Asian and South Asian Diasporic. Presiding: Nira M. Gupta- Casale, Kean U 1. “DigiQueer: Archives of South Asian Sexualities,” Kanika Batra, Texas Tech U 2. “Swaach Bharat and Its Conversations with Social Media,” Amrita De, Binghamton U, State U of New York 3. “Queer Identities in Hansal Mehta’s Aligarh and Shakun Batra’s Kapoor and Sons,” Rahul Gairola, Indian Inst. of Tech. Respondent: Rajender Kaur, William Paterson U For related material, write to ncasale@ kean .edu after 20 Dec.
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440. Hacking the Scholarly Workflow 5:15–7:15 p.m., Gramercy East, Hilton Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology. Presiding: Shawna Ross, Texas A&M U, College Station; Beth Seltzer, Bryn Mawr C Speakers: Nicky Agate, MLA; Eileen Clancy, Graduate Center, City U of New York; Eric Detweiler, Middle Tennessee State U; Jonathan Goodwin, U of Louisiana, Lafayette; Jason B. Jones, Trinity C, CT; Amanda Licastro, Stevenson U; Andrew Pilsch, Texas A&M U, College Station; Zuleima Ugalde, California State U, Northridge his workshop shares eight simple, real- life, lowcost, practical hacks to help scholars organize research materials, streamline teaching, manage their calendars, promote their work, and connect with other academics. A round of descriptive lightning talks is followed by interactive breakout sessions during which speakers demonstrate their hack in- depth.
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454. Digital Humanities Tools and Technologies for Students, Emerging Scholars, Faculty Members, Librarians, and Administrators 8:30–11:30 a.m., Sutton Center, Hilton Program arranged by the MLA Office of Scholarly Communication. Presiding: Raymond G. Siemens, U of Victoria Speakers: Alyssa Arbuckle, U of Victoria; Rebecca Dowson, Simon Fraser U; Randa El Khatib, U of Victoria; Elizabeth Grumbach, Arizona State U; Diane Jakacki, Bucknell U; Aaron Mauro, Penn State U, Erie- Behrend; Raymond G. Siemens; Lee Skallerup Bessette, U of Mary Washington his workshop offers participants both theoretical and hands- on considerations of digital humanities (DH) tools, software, and methodologies; on- campus digital scholarship; DH postdoctoral fellowships; social media; DH for academic administrators; #alt- ac roles; and open social scholarship. Preregistration is required. For related material, visit dhsi .org after 15 Sept.
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455. The Digital Future of Literary Archives 8:30–9:45 a.m., Clinton, Hilton Program arranged by the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing. Presiding: Lise Jaillant, Loughborough U Speakers: Dennis Denisof, U of Tulsa; Angus Grieve- Smith, Columbia U; Trenton Judson, Jarvis Christian C; Melanie Micir, Washington U in St. Louis; Carlotta Paltrinieri, Indiana U, Bloomington; Greta Smith, Miami U, Oxford Literary archives have been transformed by the digital revolution in terms of preservation through digitization projects, discoverability and accessibility (making available materials that were previously difficult to discover and access), and scholarship (use of digital tools such as visualization to analyze archival documents). Panelists focus on the future of literary archives in a fast- changing context. For related material, visit www .sharpweb .org/ after 1 Dec.
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457. We’re All Living Dead Now 8:30–9:45 a.m., Bowery, Sheraton Program arranged by the forum MS Screen Arts and Culture. Presiding: Rebecca A. Wanzo, Washington U in St. Louis 1. “Duane Jones: Acting and the Paradox of Race,” Katherine A. Kinney, U of California, Riverside 2. “‘We Urge You to Stay Tuned to Radio and TV and to Stay Indoors at All Costs’: Zombies, Live Broadcast, and the Powers of the False in George Romero’s Night of the Living Dead,” James McFarland, Vanderbilt U 3. “Dawn of the Living Digital Horde: Zombies in the Twenty- First Century,” Zachary Price, Cornell U
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496. Interviews in the Digital Age: Making the Most of First- Round Video Interviews 8:30–9:45 a.m., Sutton North, Hilton Program arranged by the MLA Career Center. Presiding: Lisa Chinn, Duke U; Niko Tracksdorf, U of Rhode Island 1. “Understanding and Negotiating the Skype and Other Digital Technologies Interview,” AlainPhilippe Durand, U of Arizona 2. “Skype Interviews: Thoughts from Both Sides of the Screen,” Seth . Reno, Auburn U, Auburn 3. “The Different Art of the Skype Interview,” Michael Carl Schoenfeldt, U of Michigan, Ann Arbor For related material, write to niko@ tracksdorf .com after 20 Dec.
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497. Teaching Early American Literature in the Digital Age: Crèvecœur’s Letters from an American Farmer, a Digital Critical Edition 9:45–11:45 a.m., Exhibit Hall Entrance, Rhinelander Gallery, Hilton Presenters: Mary McAleer Balkun, Seton Hall U; Diana Hope Polley, Southern New Hampshire U Highlighting work with the open- source scholarly publishing platform Scalar and Crèvecœur’s Letters, this poster presentation comprises a traditional print poster outlining the context of the project and a concurrent digital projection of the online edition. Attendees can experiment with embedded links, learn about the application, and discuss the practical and pedagogical implications of the platform and the edition.
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510. Memory and the Archive 10:15–11:30 a.m., Murray Hill East, Hilton Program arranged by the MLA Publications Committee. Presiding: Jessica Berman, U of Maryland Baltimore County Speakers: Meredith Benjamin, Barnard C; Edward Chamberlain, U of Washington, Tacoma; Marthe Djilo Kamga, independent director; Frieda Ekotto, U of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Nayoung Aimee Kwon, Duke U; Nikolaus Wasmoen, U at Buffalo, State U of New York This session fosters conversation among scholars engaged in the creation, preservation, digitization, and critique of archives. Their archives are variously defined, whether as a collection of material artifacts that requires interpretation or as a body of work that might enable reflection on the relations among literature, visual media, and memory.
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514. Digital Humanities Approaches to Japanese- Language Texts 10:15–11:30 a.m., New York, Hilton Program arranged by the forums LLC Japanese since 1900 and LLC Japanese to 1900. Presiding: Michael Emmerich, U of California, Los Angeles 1. “Yashiro’s Tears: Affect and Aura in the Digital Archive,” Jonathan Zwicker, U of California, Berkeley 2. “Applying Digital Corpus Analysis to Heian Period Vernacular Literary Texts,” Naomi Fukumori, Ohio State U, Columbus 3. “Developing Interactive Visualizations for Teaching and Exploring Japanese Text Corpora,” Peter Broadwell, U of California, Los Angeles
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570. Environmental Humanities and Italy 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Nassau West, Hilton Program arranged by the forum LLC 20th- and 21st- Century Italian 1. “he Dialogues Digital Project: Landscape Ecology in Central Italy from the Sixth Century to the Present,” Damiano Benvegnu, Dartmouth C 2. “he Politics of Organic- Food Discourse in Italy: Identity, Authenticity, Sustainability,” Patrizia LaTrecchia, U of South Florida, Tampa 3. “In heir Own Voices: A ‘Kenotic’ Approach to Animal Studies and Ecotheology,” Demetrio S. Yocum, U of Notre Dame
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579. New Directions for Teaching and Researching Technical Communication 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Concourse B, Hilton Program arranged by the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing. Presiding: William Klein, U of Missouri, St. Louis 1. “he Institutional Review Board and Research in Writing Studies,” Johanna Phelps- Hillen, U of South Florida, Tampa 2. “he Rising Power of Digital Genre: he Role of WeChat QR Codes in Accommodating Healthcare Exigency in China,” Hua Wang, Michigan Technological U 3. “(Technical) Writing about (Technical) Writing: Building a Literacy for Students as Makers and Consumers of Technical Writing,” Kelly Whitney, New Mexico State U, Las Cruces Respondent: Ashley Clayson, U of West Florida For related material, write to bill_ klein@ umsl .edu.
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583. Critical Infrastructure Studies 1:45–3:00 p.m., Murray Hill East, Hilton Program arranged by the forum TC Digital Humanities. Presiding: Alan Liu, U of California, Santa Barbara 1. “On Human Infrastructure,” Tung- Hui Hu, U of Michigan, Ann Arbor 2. “Cabinet Logics: Infrastructures for Epistemological Containment,” Shannon Mattern, New School 3. “Infrastructures of Hate,” Tara McPherson, U of Southern California 4. “Interrogating Global Humanities Infrastructure,” James Smithies, King’s C London Respondent: Matthew K. Gold, Graduate Center, City U of New York For related material, visit criticalinfrastructure .hcommons .org/.
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610. Open Humanities 101 1:45–3:00 p.m., Gramercy East, Hilton Program arranged by the MLA Office of Scholarly Communication. Presiding: Nicky Agate, MLA Speakers: Cheryl E. Ball, West Virginia U, Morgantown; Christopher A. Barnes, Gettysburg C; Carl Blyth, U of Texas, Austin; Martin Paul Eve, U of London, Birkbeck C; Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Michigan State U; Rebecca Kennison, K/N Consultants; Megan Wacha, City U of New York An introduction to open-access publishing for humanities scholars, including books, journals, and repositories. Participants discuss and answer questions on the potential benefits and drawbacks of open access, negotiating open author contracts, publishing open-access monographs, Creative Commons licensing and fair use, open peer review, open educational resources, and where to upload work to have the greatest possible impact.
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617. Editing Manuscripts: Transparency and Insecurities 1:45–3:00 p.m., Riverside Ballroom, Sheraton A special session. Presiding: Cristanne Miller, U at Bufalo, State U of New York 1. “‘Relentless Accuracy’: Insecurities and Irrecoverable Problems in Editing Marianne Moore,” Cristanne Miller 2. “Conjuring a Chesnutt Edition: Manuscripts, Print, and Digital Transformations,” Stephanie Patricia Browner, New School 3. “The Borders of the Archive and the Limits of Genre: Challenges in Editing Whitman,” Kenneth M. Price, U of Nebraska, Lincoln
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619. New York as Text: Bibliographies and Geographies 1:45–3:00 p.m., Chelsea, Sheraton Program arranged by the forum TM Bibliography and Scholarly Editing. Presiding: Amanda Golden, New York Inst. of Tech. Speakers: Jonathan Goldman, New York Inst. of Tech.; Kristen Doyle Highland, American U of Sharjah; Mark J. Noonan, New York City C of Tech., City U of New York; Angel Lopez Santiago, Hunter C, City U of New York; Emily Silk, Harvard U Panelists introduce new considerations of New York literary and social history, including projects combining digital mapping and archival research, and discuss New York’s racial diversity, archives, book history, social welfare, and print culture. Addressing Manhattan from the nineteenth century to the present, the presenters shed new light on New York’s vitality in twenty- first- century bibliographic and textual scholarship. For related material, visit agoldenphd .com.
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624. Possibilities of the Public Humanities 3:30–4:45 p.m., New York Ballroom West, Sheraton Program arranged by the MLA Committee on the Status of Graduate Students in the Profession. Presiding: Meredith Farmer, Wake Forest U Speakers: Colin David Dewey, California State U, Maritime Acad.; Armanda Lewis, New York U; Jennie Lightweis- Gof, U of Mississippi; Victoria Papa, Massachusetts C of Liberal Arts; Jessica Richard, Wake Forest U; Kym Weed, U of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Christine Yao, U of British Columbia In a moment of crisis in the humanities we find one silver lining: scholars have found a multitude of ways to make a difference for broader publics. Our panelists introduce public projects (digital humanities, medical humanities, podcasting, community engagement, service learning, and teaching in prisons), then speak to how they built those projects, ultimately offering advice for getting started with new public work. For related material, visit https:// mlagrads .mla .hcommons .org/ after 20 Dec.
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630. Preserving and Circulating Women’s Texts, 1660–1740 3:30–4:45 p.m., Chelsea, Sheraton Program arranged by the forum LLC Restoration and Early- 18th- Century English. Presiding: Laura L. Runge, U of South Florida, Tampa 1. “Expanding Access: The Role of the Women in Book History Bibliography,” Kate Ozment, Texas A&M U, College Station 2. “First: A Map,” Jennifer Keith, U of North Carolina, Greensboro 3. “Eighteenth-Century Women’s Writing Now,” Catherine Elizabeth Ingrassia, Virginia Commonwealth U Respondent: Laura C. Mandell, Texas A&M U, College Station
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632. Bicentennial Bits and Bytes: The Digital Frankenstein Project  3:30–4:45 p.m., Riverside Suite, Sheraton A special session. Presiding: Rikk Mulligan, Carnegie Mellon U Speakers: Elisa Beshero- Bondar, U of Pittsburgh, Greensburg; Jon Klancher, Carnegie Mellon U; Matthew Lavin, U of Pittsburgh; Rikk Mulligan The Digital Frankenstein Project creates a scholarly edition from all three versions of the novel (1818, 1823, 1831) and includes textual analysis, data visualizations, and online annotations. This session discusses project scoping, workflows, task sharing, and coordinating the efforts of nine- month and twelve- month faculty members housed in departments and libraries across several institutions. For related material, write to rikk@ cmu .edu.
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633. Modernism and Digital Archives: Aesthetics, Curation, Reading 3:30–4:45 p.m., Columbus Circle, Sheraton Program arranged by the Modernist Studies Association. Presiding: Susan Barbara Rosenbaum, U of Georgia 1. “From Man to Woman and from Work to Tech: Queer Narratives and the Digital Archive,” Pamela L. Caughie, Loyola U, Chicago 2. “Aesthetics of the Archive: Digital (Late) Modernism,” Mark Byers, Newcastle U 3. “Out of the Darkroom: Reading in the Digital Archive,” Emily Setina, U of Nevada, Las Vegas
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644. Feminist Pedagogy in Digital Spaces 3:30–4:45 p.m., Sutton Center, Hilton Program arranged by the MLA Committee on the Status of Women in the Profession. Presiding: Eileen Cheng- Yin Chow, Duke U Speakers: Dene M. Grigar, Washington State U, Vancouver; Laura Hartmann- Villalta, Georgetown U; Andie Silva, York C, City U of New York; Lee Skallerup Bessette, U of Mary Washington; Elizabeth Skwiot, Ashford U; Jennifer Travis, St. John’s U, NY; Dhipinder Walia, Lehman C, City U of New York; Melinda White, U of New Hampshire, Durham Digital spaces are a challenge for feminist discourse: platforms like Twitter amplify trolling and harassment, unmoderated online forums can become havens for misogyny, and being visible as a woman online is associated with sexual harassment and microaggressions. However, digital spaces are also sites of learning. This interactive roundtable examines ways to integrate feminist discourse into digital pedagogy while considering accessibility and inclusion.
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681. Managing the Online Classroom: Challenges and Strategies 5:15–6:30 p.m., Concourse C, Hilton Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Contingent Labor in the Profession. Presiding: William Christopher Brown, Midland C 1. “Depth versus Breadth: Coverage in the Online Classroom,” Carrie Sickmann Han, Indiana U– Purdue U, Indianapolis 2. “More Than Just Convenience: Harnessing the Learning Opportunities of the Online Classroom,” Melissa Dennihy, Queensborough Community C, City U of New York 3. “Reinventing the Online Course: Social Media Approaches to Learning,” Lisa Longo Johnston, Centenary U 4. “Teaching World Literature Online: Helping Students Engage with Multicultural Literature,” Pamela Kirkpatrick, U of Arkansas, Fayetteville
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691. Transnational and Transmodal Retelling of Young People’s Literacy Narratives 5:15–6:30 p.m., Midtown, Hilton Program arranged by the forum RCWS Literacy Studies. Presiding: Alanna Frost, U of Alabama, Huntsville 1. “Transcending Commodification and Disrupting the Literacy Myth: Reading I Am Malala as a Literacy Narrative,” Kara Poe Alexander, Baylor U 2. “Digital Dispositions: Leveraging Youth Literacy Practices in Academic Contexts,” Merideth Garcia, U of Michigan, Ann Arbor 3. “Moving Bodies, Moving Borders: Mobility and Containment in School and Society,” Brice Nordquist, Syracuse U For related material, visit mla .hcommons .org/ groups/ literacy- studies/ after 2 Jan.
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694. Open Pedagogy: Practices in Digital Citizenship and the Ethics of Care 5:15–6:30 p.m., Columbus Circle, Sheraton Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Information Technology. Presiding: Angel David Nieves, Hamilton C Speakers: Brian Croxall, Brown U; Geoffrey Gimse, U of Wisconsin, Madison; Viola Lasmana, U of Southern California; Zach Whalen, U of Mary Washington Open pedagogy can be extremely valuable but can also be risky, especially when student work may critique dominant cultures of access, privilege, ableism, or oppression. How do we balance the benefits and the risks of public engagement? What are our ethical obligations to our students?  his session generates practical advice and examples for best practices, beyond the option of pseudonymity, for connecting students to authentic, public audiences. For related material, visit infotech .mla .hcommons .org/ after 1 Dec.
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723. Collaborative Authorship at Large Scale 8:30–9:45 a.m., Lincoln Suite, Hilton A special session. Presiding: Andrew Piper, Mc- Gill U Speakers: Mark Algee- Hewitt, Stanford U; Michelle Nancy Levy, Simon Fraser U; Laura B. McGrath, Michigan State U; Tom Mole, U of Edinburgh; Dahlia J. Porter, U of Glasgow; Jonathan Sachs, Concordia U his session explores the practical, intellectual, and technological implications of large- scale collaborative authorship in literary studies.
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739. Going Public: How and Why to Develop a Digital Scholarly Identity 8:30–9:45 a.m., Gramercy East, Hilton Program arranged by the MLA Career Center. Presiding: Katina Rogers, Graduate Center, City U of New York Speakers: Lisa Marie Rhody, Graduate Center, City U of New York; Danica Savonick, Graduate Center, City U of New York; Lisa Tagliaferri, Fordham U Establishing a meaningful digital identity is essential to managing one’s scholarly and professional reputation. This workshop addresses ways to cultivate an online identity and offers guidance on “going public” using tools and strategies for building a community around your work. Topics include social media, writing for different audiences, personal Web sites, digital dissertations, and more.
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777. Method and Critique in the Age of Metrics 10:15–11:30 a.m., Madison, Hilton A special session. Presiding: David Theo Goldberg, U of California, Irvine 1. “How Can Literary and Cultural Study Respond to Faculty Performance Management?” Christopher John Newfield, U of California, Santa Barbara 2. “Data Mining versus the Case History,” Laura C. Mandell, Texas A&M U, College Station 3. “Quantification from Above and Below in United States Academic Labor Criticism,” Heather Stefen, U of California, Santa Barbara For related material, write to heather.stefen@ gmail.com after 1 Nov.
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791. Digital Histories of the Book in America 10:15–11:30 a.m., Gramercy, Sheraton A special session. Presiding: Thomas Augst, New York U 1. “The Anglophone Early Modern Printing Trade,” Molly O’Hagan Hardy, American Antiquarian Soc. 2. “Mapping the Native American Book,” Mike Kelly, Amherst C 3. “The (Printer’s) Devil Is in the Details; or, the Case for Digitizing Black Bibliographic Data,” Jacqueline D. Goldsby, Yale U; Meredith L. McGill, Rutgers U, New Brunswick
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808. Critical Algorithm Studies 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., New York, Hilton Program arranged by the forum TC Digital Humanities. Presiding: Lawrence Evalyn, U of Toronto 1. “Trees, Daylight, and Dirt,” Ingrid Burrington, Data and Society Research Inst. 2. “Algorithmic Insecurity,” Rita Raley, U of California, Santa Barbara 3. “Speculative Algorithms,” Allison Burtsch, UNICEF Innovation in Speculative Hardware Respondent: Wendy Chun, Brown U For related material, visit mla .hcommons .org/ groups/ digital- humanities- 2014/ after 30 Nov.
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822. Exploring Literary and Nonliterary Texts 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Midtown, Hilton Program arranged by the forum LSL Linguistics and Literature 1. “Carceral Metaphors in Literature and Nonfiction: A Corpus-Based Analysis,” Monika Fludernik, U of Freiburg 2. “Second-Order Foregrounding in Nonstandard Closed Similes,” Roi Tartakovsky, Tel Aviv U 3. “he Rhetorical Construction of a Nineteenth- Century Novena Reader: A Sociolinguistic Inventory,” Cyril Belvis, De La Salle Araneta U For related material, write to troyerr@wou.edu.
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760. Resurrecting Dead Worlds: Video Game Aesthetics and Posthuman Narratives 10:15–11:30 a.m., Columbus Circle, Sheraton A special session. Presiding: Patrick Jagoda, U of Chicago 1. “Romantic Deep Time and Dejobaan Games’s Elegy for a Dead World (2014),” Andrew Burkett, Union C 2. “Darwin, Dickens, and Drowned London: The Industrial Revolution as Event in Assassin’s Creed: Syndicate (2015) and Sunless Sea (2015),” Allison Dushane, Angelo State U 3. “Sea Slugs and Atom Bombs: Genetic and Ideological Manipulation in BioShock (2007),” Kathleen McClancy, Texas State U
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782. Insecure Imaginations: Poetry in Invented Languages 10:15–11:30 a.m., Concourse G, Hilton A special session. Presiding: Susan Jennifer Vanderborg, U of South Carolina, Columbia 1. “Invented Language, Created Life: From Insecurity to a Poetics of Variation,” Ming-Qian Ma, U at Bufalo, State U of New York 2. “Inventing a Women’s Language: The Poetic Crises of Láadan,” Susan Jennifer Vanderborg 3. “Visualizing a Cyborg Poetics: Crises and Code Poetry,” Margaret Rhee, U of Oregon
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247. Medieval Futures
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