Variables_table_integrated
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ABCDEFGH
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Name of variableDescription/definitionHow to measure/ detectReference/sourceRelations (statistical correlation to others, function of others, dependency of others)Source ProjectSupported/used by ProjectComment (status, cross-references and others)
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Demographic data
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AgeAge in yesrs
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SexSex
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Antropometric data
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WeightNude body weight as measured on physician's scalesBalanceAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
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StatureThe vertical distance from the standing surface to the top of the head. The subject stands erect and looks straight ahead.Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
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Acromial (shoulder) heightThe vertical distance from the standing surface to the most lateral point of the acromial process of the scapula.
The subject stands erect and looks straight ahead.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
11
Waist heightThe vertical distance from the standing surface to the waist landmark.
The subject stands erect and looks straight ahead.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
12
Crotch heightThe vertical distance from the standing surface up into the crotch until light contact is made.
The subject stands erect, heels approximately 10cm apart, and weight distributed equally on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
13
Trochanteric heightThe vertical distance from the standing surface to the most superior point of the greater trochanter of the femur.
The subject stands erect looking straight ahead, heels together and weight distributed equally on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
14
Tibiale heightThe vertical distance from the standing surface to the proximal medial margin of the tibia.
The subject stands erect, heels together and weight distributed equally on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
15
Calf heightThe vertical distance from the standing surface to the maximum posterior protrusion of the gastrocnemius.
The subject stands erect, heels together and weight distributed equally on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
16
Ankle heightThe vertical distance from the standing surface to the level of the minimum circumference of the ankle.
The subject stands with his weight equally distributed on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
17
Elbow heightThe vertical distance from the standing surface to the depression at the elbow between the humerus and the radius.
The subject stands erect with his arms hanging naturally at his sides.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
18
Wrist heightThe vertical distance from the standing surface to the most distal point of the ulna.
The subject stands erect with his arms hanging naturally at his sides.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
19
Sitting heightThe vertical distance from the sitting surface to the top of the head.
The subject sits erect, looking straight ahead.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
20
Eye height, sittingThe vertical distance from the sitting surface to the outer corner (external canthus) of the eye.
The subject sits erect and looks straight ahead.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
21
Midshoulder height, sittingThe vertical distance froxr the sitting surface to a point on the upper surface of the shoulder midway between the acromiale and the neck.
The subject sits erect with his upper arms hanging relaxed and forearms and hands extended forward horizontally.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
22
Elbow rest heightThe vertical distance from the sitting surface to the bottom of the elbow.
The subject sits erect with his upper arms hanging relaxed and forearms and hands extended forward horizontally.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
23
Knee height, sittingThe vertical distance from the floor to the uppermost point on the knee.
The subject sits erect with his knees and ankles at right angles.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
24
Popliteal heightThe vertical distance from the floor to the underside of the thigh immediately behind the knee.
The subject sits erect with his knees and ankles at right angles.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
25
Shoulder-elbow lengthThe distance from the top of the acromion process to the bottom of the elbow.
The subject sits erect with his upper arms vertical and forearms and hands extended forward horizontally.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
26
Forearm-hand lengthThe distance from the tip of the elbow to the tip of the longest finger.
The subject sits erect with his upper arms vertical and forearmsand hands extended forward horizontally.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
27
Buttock-popliteal lengthThe horizontal distance from the most posterior aspect of the right buttock to the back of the lower leg at the knee.
The subject sits erect with his knees and ankles at right angles.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
28
Buttock-knee lengthThe horizontal distance from the most posterior aspect o f the right buttock to the most anterior aspect of the right kneecap.
The subject sits erect with his knees and ankles at right angles.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
29
Thumb-tip reachThe horizontal distance from the wall to the tip of the thumb, measured with the subject’s back against the wall, his arm extended forward, and his index finger touching the tip of his thumb.Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
30
Thigh clearanceThe vertical distance from the sitting surface to the highest point on the right thigh.
The subject sits erect with his knees and ankles at right angles.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
31
Biacromial breadthThe horizontal distance across the body between the acromial landmarks.
The subject stands erect with arms hanging naturally at her sides.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
32
Bideltoid (shoulder) breadthThe horizontal distance across the body at the level of the deltoid landmarks.
The subject stands erect with his arms hanging naturally at his sides.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
33
Hip breadth, sittingThe maximum horizontal distance across the thighs.
The subject sits erect, upper arms relaxed, forearms and hands extended forward horizontally, thighs completely supported by the sitting surface, and the long axis of the thigh sparallel.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
34
Chest (bust) depthThe horizontal depth of the trunk at the level of the nipples.
The subject stands erect, looking straight ahead, heels together, and weight distributed equally on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
35
Chest breadthThe horizontal distance across the trunk at the level of the nipples.
The subject stands erect, looking straight ahead, with his arms slight ly abducted.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
36
Hip breadthThe maximum horizontal distance across the hips.
The subject stands erect, heels together and weight distributed equally on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
37
Neck circumferenceThe maximum circumference of the neck at a point just inferior to the bulge of the thyroid cartilage.
The subject sits erect, head in the Frankfort plane.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
38
Shoulder circumferenceThe horizontal circumference of the body over the deltoid muscles.
The subject stands erect, looking straight ahead, arms relaxed at the sides, heels together, and weight distributed equally on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
39
Chest circumferenceThe horizontal circumference of the chest a t the level of the nipples.
The subject stands erect, looking straight ahead, heels together, and weight distributed equally on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
40
Waist circumferenceThe horizontal circumference of the trunk at the level of the waist landmarks.
Subject stands erect, looking straight ahead, heels together and weight distributed equally on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
41
Buttock circumferenceThe circumference of the hips at the level of the maximum posterior protrusion of the buttocks.
The subject stands erect, looking straight ahead, heels together, and weight distributed equally on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
42
Thigh circumferenceThe circumference of the thigh at the level of the gluteal furrow.
The subject stands erect, heels approximately 10 cm apart, and weight distributed equally on both sides.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
43
Knee circumferenceThe circumference of the knee at the level of the midpatella landmark.
The subject stands erect, heels approximately 10 cm apart, and weight distributed equally on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
44
Calf circumferenceThe maximum horizontal circumference of the calf.
The subject stands erect, heels approximately 10 cm apart, and weight distributed equally on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
45
Scye circumferenceThe circumference of the scye, passing through the axilla over the anterior and posterior vertical scye landmarks and over the acromial landmark.
The subject stands erect, looking straight ahead, with the right arm slightly abducted.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
46
Biceps circumference, flexedThe circumference of the arm at the level of the biceps landmark.
The subject stands with his elbow bent at 90 degrees and the biceps maximally flexed.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
47
Biceps circumference, relaxedThe circumference of the arm at the level of the biceps landmark.
The subject stands with his arm slightly abducted.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
48
Forearm circumference, flexedThe circumference of the arm at the level of the forearm landmark.
The subject stands with his upper arm raised so that its long axis is horizontal, elbow flexed 90 degrees and fist tightly clenched.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
49
Wrist circumferenceThe minimum circumference of the wrist at the level of the stylion landmark.
The subject stands with the arm slightly abducted.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
50
Vertical trunk circumferenceThe circumference of the trunk measured by passing a tape between the legs, over the protrusion of the right buttock, and up the back to lie over the midshoulder landmark. The other end of the tape is brought up over the right nipple to the midshoulder landmark.
The subject stands with the legs slightly apart.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
51
Spine-to-wrist length (sleeve length)The surface distance from the spine to the wrist landmark.
The subject stands, arms horizontal, elbows flexed about 60 degrees, fists clenched and touching, and shoulders relaxed.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
52
Waist frontThe surface distance from the suprasternale landmark to the anterior waist landmark.
The subject stands erect, looking straight ahead.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
53
Waist backThe surface distance along the spine from the cervicale landmark to the posterior waist landmark.
The subject stands erect, with his head in the Frankfort plane.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
54
Shoulder lengthThe surface distance along the top of the shoulder from the right lateral neck landmark to the right acromial landmark.
The subject stands erect, looking straight ahead.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
55
InterscyeThe horizontal distance across the back between the posterior scye point landmarks.
The subject stands erect with the arms relaxed.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
56
Head lengthThe maximum length o f the head between the glabella and the occiput in the midsagittal plane.Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
57
Head breadthThe maximum horizontal breadth of the head above the level of the ears.Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
58
Head circumferenceThe maximum circumference of the head passing above the brow ridges.Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
59
Hand lengthThe distance from the wrist landmark to dactylion.
The subject sits with the hand flat on a table, palm up, with fingers together and straight.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
60
Hand breadthThe breadth of the hand between metacarpal-phalangeal joints II and V.
The subject sits with the hand flat on a table, palm down, with the fingers together and straight.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
61
Hand circumferenceThe circumference of the hand passing over the metacarpal-phalangeal joints II and V.
The subject sits with the hand flat on a table, palm down, fingers extended, and thumb abducted.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
62
Foot lengthThe distance, parallel to the long axis of the foot, from the back of the heel to the tip of the most protruding toe.
The subject stands with weight equally distributed on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
63
Foot breadthThe maximum horizontal distance across the foot, at right angles to the long axis.
The subject stands with weight equally distributed on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
64
Ball of foot circumferenceThe circumference of the foot over the distal ends of the metatarsal bones.
The subject stands with his feets lightly apart and weight distributed equally on both feet.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
65
Menton-sellion (face) lengthThe distance from the menton landmark to the deepest point of the nasal root depression.
The subject sits with mouth closed and jaw relaxed.
Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
66
Bizygomatic (face) breadthThe maximum horizontal breadth of the face between the zygomatic arches.Tape measure, anthropometerAnthropometric Source Book, Volume I: Anthropometry for Designers, NASA, 1978
67
Gait parameters
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Step lengthStep length is defined as the anterior displacement of the foot from foot strike to contralateral foot strike. In both cases the same given point on foot is measured, usually is the midpoint of the distance between the most posterior part of the calcaneus and the 1st or 5th caput metatarsal. Its unit is either (m) or (cm). People can control gait speed by changing this parameter: greater step length, faster speed. During normal walking speed (1.2 and 2.2 m/s) healthy populations have a step length of about 0.7 and 0.8m, respectively.Gate analysis system (chronophotography, cine film or video recordings using footage from single or multiple cameras, Passive marker systems, active/passive marker systems, inertial (cameraless) systems based on MEMS inertial sensors, biomechanical models and sensor fusion algorithms, etc.)[2], [3], [9], [10]
69
Step widthStep width is the mediolateral distance between the feet. It is measured as the distance, perpendicular to the direction of progression, between a point on one foot (usually at its initial contact) and the same point on the other foot at the subsequent contact. The width will therefore depend on which point is chosen. The centre of the heel is often used, although again this may not be appropriate for some pathological gait patterns. Step width has a value of a few centimetres for normal subjects, while for patients with balance problems, such as cerebellar ataxia or athetoid form of cerebral palsy, it can increase to as much as 15 or 20 cm. Step width variability may relate to fall risk. There is a high correlation between step length and height of a person. Older individuals who tend to walk more slowly and have a shorter stride/step length displayed a higher falls risk score.Gate analysis system (chronophotography, cine film or video recordings using footage from single or multiple cameras, Passive marker systems, active/passive marker systems, inertial (cameraless) systems based on MEMS inertial sensors, biomechanical models and sensor fusion algorithms, etc.)[9], [65], [66]
70
Stride lengthStride length is the distance between two successive placements of the same foot, consisting of two step lengths. In other words it is the distance travelled by one person during one cycle. With normal subjects, the two step lengths will be approximately equal, but with certain patients there will be an asymmetry between the left and right sides. Similar to step length it is measured either in (m) or (cm). Stride length is an important component of speed (speed = stride length × cadence). Stride length depends on strong leg muscles and a good range of motion in joints, especially those of the hip and knee. The natural mix of joint mobility, muscle strength, neural control and energy leads to a customary walking speed, stride length and step rate. Time and distance factors combined with swing and stance times, constitute the person’s stride characteristics. Stride length for normal persons averages 1.41 meters.Gate analysis system (chronophotography, cine film or video recordings using footage from single or multiple cameras, Passive marker systems, active/passive marker systems, inertial (cameraless) systems based on MEMS inertial sensors, biomechanical models and sensor fusion algorithms, etc.)[2], [9], [10]
71
Gait cycleThe period of time between any two identical events in the walking or running cycle. There are two main phases in gait: a. Stance phase, during which the foot is on the ground and b. swing phase where the same foot is no longer in contact with the ground and the leg and the leg is swinging theough in preparation for the next foot strike. It is measured in [Hz] – cycle per second.Gate analysis system (chronophotography, cine film or video recordings using footage from single or multiple cameras, Passive marker systems, active/passive marker systems, inertial (cameraless) systems based on MEMS inertial sensors, biomechanical models and sensor fusion algorithms, etc.)
72
CadenceIt is the total number of 'revolutions per minute' or number of steps taken within a minute, and is used as a measure of athletic performance. Step rate is commonly called cadence. Cadence is calculated in steps per minute. It is the second gait parameter after step length with which people can control gait speed: again greater cadence, increased speed. Healthy populations demonstrate during normal walking speeds (1.0-3.0 m/s) a cadence of 70 steps/min at the lowest speed and 155 steps/min at the highest speed. In speed range of running (1.5-8.0 m/s), they ran with a cadence of 33 steps/min at the lowest and 214 steps/min at the highest speed.Gate analysis system (chronophotography, cine film or video recordings using footage from single or multiple cameras, Passive marker systems, active/passive marker systems, inertial (cameraless) systems based on MEMS inertial sensors, biomechanical models and sensor fusion algorithms, etc.)[2], [3], [9], [10]
73
VelocityA physical quantity that values the rate of change in position. The scalar absolute value (magnitude) of velocity is speed. Velocity is a measure of a body’s motion in a given direction. Because velocity has both magnitude and direction, it is a vector quantity that can be positive, negative, or zero. Normal free gait velocity on a smooth level surface averages 82 meters per minute (m/min) for adults. Velocity=Stride length ×0.5 Cadence.Gate analysis system (chronophotography, cine film or video recordings using footage from single or multiple cameras, Passive marker systems, active/passive marker systems, inertial (cameraless) systems based on MEMS inertial sensors, biomechanical models and sensor fusion algorithms, etc.)[2], [3], [9], [10]
74
Walking BaseWalking base is the sum of the perpendicular distances from the points of initial contact of the right and left feet to the line of forward progression.Gate analysis system (chronophotography, cine film or video recordings using footage from single or multiple cameras, Passive marker systems, active/passive marker systems, inertial (cameraless) systems based on MEMS inertial sensors, biomechanical models and sensor fusion algorithms, etc.)[9], [10]
75
Double supportPeriod during which both feet are in contact with the floor. Both the beginning and the end of the stance phase are considered to be double-support period.[117]
76
Upper body parameters
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Shoulder - FlexionFlexion of the shoulder moves the limb forward (towards the anterior side of the body).Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
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Shoulder - ExtensionExtension of the shoulder moves the limb backward (towards the posterior side of the body).Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
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Shoulder - AbductionAbduction occurs when the arms are held at the sides, parallel to the length of the torso, and are then raised in the plane of the torso. This movement may be broken down into two parts: True abduction of the arm, which takes the humerus from parallel to the spine to perpendicular; and upward rotation of the scapular, which raises the humerus above the shoulders until it points straight upwards.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
80
Shoulder - AdductionAdduction is the opposite motion of arm abduction. It can be broken down into two parts: downward rotation of the scapula and true adduction of the arm.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
81
Shoulder - Internal RotationRotary movement around the longitudinal axis of the bone toward the center of the body; turning the upper arm inward.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
82
Shoulder - External RotationRotary movement around the longitudinal axis of the bone away from the center of the body; turning the upper arm outward.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
83
Elbow - FlexionElbow flexion is a movement that occurs when the arm is bent at the elbow and the forearm and the upper arm come together.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
84
Elbow - Hyper-extensionThe opposite of elbow flexion, during which the arm is straightened and the forearm and upper arm move away from one another.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
85
Forearm pronationPronation is the rotation of the forearm that moves the palm from an anterior-facing position to a posterior-facing position, or palm facing down. The hand is supine (facing anteriorly) in the anatomical position.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
86
Forearm supinationSupination is the opposite of pronation, the rotation of the forearm so that the palm faces anteriorly, or palm facing up.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
87
Forearm RangeofMotionSum of Pronation and SupinationGoniometer[1], [6], [8]
88
Wrist - FlexionBending the joint resulting in a decrease of angle; moving the palm of the hand toward the front of the forearm.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
89
Wrist - ExtensionStraightening the joint resulting in an increase of angle; moving the back of the hand toward the back of the forearm.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
90
Wrist - Radial DeviationLateral movement away from the midline of the body; moving the thumb side of the hand toward the lateral side of the forearm.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
91
Wrist - Ulnar DeviationMedial movement toward the midline of the body; moving the little finger side of the hand toward the medial side of the forearm.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
92
Wrist RangeofMotionSum of Radial and Ulnar DeviationGoniometer[1], [6], [8]
93
Thumb - Metacarpal FlexionFlexion of the metacarpal joint of thumb.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
94
Thumb - Metacarpal ExtensionExtension of the metacarpal joint of thumb.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
95
Thumb - Metacarpal AbductionAbduction of the metacarpal joint of thumb.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
96
Thumb - Metacarpal AdductionAdduction of the metacarpal joint of thumb.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
97
Thumb - Proximal FlexionFlexion of the proximal joint of thumb.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
98
Thumb - Proximal ExtensionExtension of the proximal joint of thumb.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
99
Thumb - Proximal AbductionAbduction of the proximal joint of thumb.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
100
Thumb - Proximal AdductionAdduction of the proximal joint of thumb.Goniometer[1], [6], [8]
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Variables
Affective - Measurement tests
References
Sheet5