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TimestampWhat meeting is the session at?Session titleSession number/identifierSession organizers and contactSession keywords (enter up to 5 words or phrases)Session descriptionLink to session information / abstract submissionSubmission deadlineDirect link to this response spreadsheet is https://tinyurl.com/OCB-related-sessions (view only)
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2/9/2024 16:10:19GoldschmidtAlkalinity cycling in coastal sediments: natural processes and CO2 capture methods8aAstrid Hylén, Felipe Freitas, Thiago Monteiro, Abby Lunstrum (contact: abbylunstrum@gmail.com)Alkalinity; Sediments; Benthic; Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement; Weathering We are pleased to announce our session for the upcoming Goldschmidt 2024 conference, entitled “Alkalinity cycling in coastal sediments: natural processes and CO2 capture methods”.

We invite submissions on topics related to the production, consumption, and cycling of alkalinity in coastal sediments, including both natural processes and ocean alkalinization techniques. Our goal for this session is to promote an integrated view of coastal alkalinity cycling. Potential topics include: measurements of processes in the alkalinity cycle, how they are controlled and interact, modeling efforts, and studies of the efficiency and ecological effects of ocean alkalinization. We also encourage contributions on methodological developments that improve research on the alkalinity cycle, especially as they pertain to sediments.

Session details: https://conf.goldschmidt.info/goldschmidt/2024/meetingapp.cgi/Session/6071

The abstract submission deadline is March 29, 2024. Please feel free to reach out with questions, and share this information with colleagues who might be interested.
https://conf.goldschmidt.info/goldschmidt/2024/meetingapp.cgi/Session/60713/29/2024
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7/2/2024 8:58:02AGUBiogeochemical Processes in the Coastal OceanOS009Olivier Gourgue (ogourgue@naturalsciences.be), Jean-Philippe Belliard (jean-philippe.belliard@uantwerpen.be), Judith Rosentreter (judith.rosentreter@scu.edu.au), Raymond Najjar (rgn1@psu.edu), Dante Horemans (dmlhoremans@vims.edu)Estuarine and nearshore processes; Biogeochemical cycles, processes, and modeling; Physical and biogeochemical interactions; Sediment transportThe coastal ocean comprises diverse and dynamic shallow coastal ecosystems that are characterized by the interplay of processes driven by physical, biological and chemical oceanography, ecology and geomorphology. To gain insight from research fields related to these disciplines, and synthesize recent progress in science, we invite studies that focus on biogeochemical processes in shallow coastal ecosystems using diverse approaches. From subtidal (e.g., seagrass meadows, kelp forests, coral reefs) to intertidal ecosystems (e.g., saltmarshes, mangrove forests), we want to use this session to bring together diverse methodologies (e.g., numerical modeling, remote sensing, field observations, laboratory experiments) that advance our understanding of the complex processes occurring in shallow coastal regions. We strongly encourage studies investigating the impacts of climate change or other human-induced environmental changes and management strategies in shallow coastal ecosystems. https://agu.confex.com/agu/agu24/prelim.cgi/Session/2261447/31/2024
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7/2/2024 18:05:05AGUSediment Processes on Estuaries and Shelves & Their Impact on Morphology, Biogeochemistry, and EcologyOS035Julia Moriarty (Julia.Moriarty@colorado.edu; CU Boulder), Courtney Harris (VIMS), Dongxiao Yin (WHOI), and Cindy Palinkas (UMCES)Sediment erosion, transport and deposition in shallow marine environments shape morphology and the stratigraphic record, as well as biogeochemistry and ecology. On short timescales, sediment transport occurs via mechanisms including suspension and fluid muds, and varies with tides, storms and other drivers. On longer timescales, factors such as geologic setting and climate impact sedimentary processes. Understanding these processes is particularly important in shallow marine systems, which typically have tight benthic-pelagic coupling. On short timescales, for example, seabed fluxes and transport of particle-associated organic matter impact biogeochemistry and organisms. Over longer timescales, morphology and seabed texture impact habitats and the fate of carbon, nutrients, and pollutants.

This session encourages abstracts on sedimentary processes over a range of spatiotemporal scales, and/or their impact on morphological, geological, biogeochemical and ecological processes. Submissions may focus on estuaries, shelves, wetlands, and/or any coastal or nearshore environment, and use observational, experimental, modeling, or other approaches.
Abstract Guidelines: https://www.agu.org/annual-meeting/present#abstracts ; Session Details are here (you can also submit an abstract from here): https://agu.confex.com/agu/agu24/prelim.cgi/Session/228526 7/31/2024
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7/10/2024 21:24:52AGU The Global Carbon Cycle and Its Feedbacks with Anthropogenic ChangeB106Forrest M. Hoffman (ORNL), Galen A. McKinley (LDEO-Columbia), Renato K. Braghiere (NASA/JPL), and Bharat Sharma (ORNL)Quantification and prediction of terrestrial and oceanic carbon fluxes and storage with rising CO2 emissions and climate change are essential objectives of Earth system science. These processes are influenced by global carbon and nutrient cycles, climate interactions, and feedbacks with the Earth system. Relevant processes operate at different spatial and temporal scales and vary across terrestrial, coastal, and marine ecosystems. Biogeochemical feedbacks may be altered by anthropogenic and natural disturbances, including warming, tropospheric O3, changes in nutrient and hydrological cycles, eutrophication, acidification, land cover/land use change, prescribed and wildland fires, and potential climate intervention strategies. This session focuses on terrestrial and marine biogeochemical feedbacks and their impacts on carbon cycle and Earth System predictability. We welcome studies evaluating the effects of changing extremes, benchmarking Earth system models, constraining future climate projections (e.g., emergent constraints), and applying machine learning to improve mechanistic and predictive understanding of global biogeochemical cycles.https://agu.confex.com/agu/agu24/prelim.cgi/Session/2255327/31/2024
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7/12/2024 9:43:10AGUAquatic Aerosols: From Microscale Processes to Impacts on Clouds and ClimateA037Conveners: Hosein Foroutan (Virginia Tech), Ernie R Lewis (Brookhaven National Laboratory), Amanda A Frossard (University of Georgia), Meinrat O Andreae (Max Planck; UCSD), Raymond Leibensperger III (University of California San Diego)Aquatic environments, covering over 70% of the planet, are major sources of atmospheric aerosols. Sea spray aerosol (SSA), generated by wave breaking and bubble bursting, substantially impacts the radiative properties, chemical composition, and biodiversity of the atmosphere. Depending on their size, morphology, and physiochemical properties, SSA particles can serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nucleating particles (INPs), provide media for heterogeneous reactions of oxidants and radicals, and transfer pollutants and microorganisms to the atmosphere, thereby affecting human health. Aerosols generated from freshwater sources, including lake spray aerosol (LSA), can also affect atmospheric properties and human health. This session welcomes theoretical, experimental, observational, biogeochemical, and modeling studies that improve our understanding of aquatic aerosols from the molecular to the global scale.https://agu.confex.com/agu/agu24/prelim.cgi/Session/2300487/31/2024
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7/17/2024 18:41:33AGUQuantifying Resilience Across the Natural and Engineered SciencesGC166 Rusty Feagin, Josh Lerner, Astrid Layton, and Murat ErkocThe notion of “resilience” has been conceptualized in a variety of ways across natural and engineered systems, giving rise to numerous quantitative frameworks, methods, metrics, and statistical analyses. Resilience can be broadly defined as the ability of a system to withstand and recover from perturbation. Individual attempts to quantify resilience have led to discoveries about system dynamics, tipping points, and alternative stable states. Still, there has been little consensus on generating standardized metrics for quantifying and measuring resilience, so comparing results across systems or disciplines has been challenging. The aim of this session is to synthesize theoretical and empirical work across disciplines and explore the potential for unified resilience metrics to facilitate comparisons across a wide diversity of systems. Particular emphasis will be placed on quantifying system resilience in time series, big data, remote sensing, and long-term datasets in natural and engineered system contexts.https://agu.confex.com/agu/agu24/prelim.cgi/Session/2273917/31/2024
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7/23/2024 22:29:29AGU
Emerging Perspectives on Dissolved Organic Carbon Sources, Age, and Reactivity in the Deep Ocean
OS018
Laura Lapham, lapham@umces.edu; Andrew Wozniak, awozniak@udel.edu, Leigh McCallister, slmccalliste@vcu.edu; John Pohlman, jpohlman@usgs.gov; Ellen Lalk, elalk@usgs.gov
dissolved organic carbon, deep ocean, DOC source, DOC reactivity, DOC age
Marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is one of the largest reactive carbon reservoirs on Earth. A long-standing effort in oceanography has been to unravel the sources of marine DOC, explain its age, and define its role within the carbon cycle. While the vast majority of deep ocean DOC is derived from surface primary productivity, additional sources that include fires, rivers, and the seafloor have received less attention. Chemosynthesis, thermogenesis, and pyrolysis have the potential to create DOC with unusual forms of ancient carbon that may (or may not) persist. In this session, we will examine the potential for non-algal sources of DOC, especially expelled from methane and petroleum seeps and hydrothermal vents, to influence the age, composition and bioavailability of deep-ocean DOC. We invite contributions from field observations, laboratory experiments, novel analysis techniques and modeling projects that provide insight into processes that produce, transport, consume and transform deep-ocean DOC.
https://agu.confex.com/agu/agu24/prelim.cgi/Home/0
7/31/2024
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