Abolishing Homework Pledge
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Name Twitter HandleReason(s) for Abolishing Homeworok
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John Spencer@johntspencerkids don't need to work overtime -- let them play
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Jeff Peterson@petersonjeffreykids should have time in class to get work done. Teacher = guide and tutor > sage on stage
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Bob Lendzinski@themindofbobParents are much less involved. Less help at home = less effective learning at home.
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Scott Ziegler (administrator)@schoolSZHomework has little academic value; adds stress and pressure to families
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Tony Baldasarobaldy7All too often it is meaningless. I am not against work at home, but only when it is authentic, meaningful and is about developing competency. I am not in favor of homework counting toward a grade. When I taught, kids did work at home, but it wasn't because I assigned it, it was because they wanted to do work (regardless of time or place) to learn that which they wanted/needed to learn.
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Laurie FowlerelfphdBecause so many students don't have anyone at home to help them.
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Jaime Vandergrift@jaimevandergHomework quite simply is a practice that simply has never been reexamined for its true effectiveness.After years of giving homework, followed by a year in which I did not give homework, I am the example that shows there is absolutely no link that ties together student success with after hours practice.
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Luke Neff@lukeneffI saw Race To Nowhere, and then I did some research. If you read someone like John Hattie, you realize that there are a handful of different interventions that teachers can use before homework that are more effective. I've committed to using those interventions that have larger effect sizes than homework during the time we have in class. Here's a link to a chart: http://www.teacherstoolbox.co.uk/T_effect_sizes.html . I encourage students to pursue the projects that they are interested in during all that time they have not doing homework for my classes.
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Maggie @march4teachersI have seen it used as a punishment too often. Also, I have seen my middle school son come home with hours and hours of homework every nights. It is ridiculous. He likes to read when it is self-selected reading. Homework takes away his choice (as you stated), and I do not want to do that to my students.
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Melissa Scott@mmreesescottI am no longer a classroom teacher, but if I were I would no longer assign homework. I think students need time to be kids...they need to play, go outside, make, discover their passions, learn to be problem solvers, read and spend time with their family. Homework does not let you do any of these things. I am always challenging the teachers at my school with why they assign homework. We need to make school different for our children....
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Scott Kapla (administrator)@scott_kaplaI believe in many cases (not all) homework is used to teach character under the cloak of "learning". Students can be taught responsibility and other pillars of character without assigning homework.
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William Chamberlain@wmchamberlainI don't want to steal their time.
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Dale coleChoco_PrincipalTo create the opportunity for more quality family time. Maybe parents will respect school time if we respect family time. I also find around 95% of the homework assignments i see as mindless and repetitive.
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Matt @dropstepdunkI don't assign homework to just assign homework. If students don't get finished with the day's activity/assignment/etc then it becomes work to do at home for the next day/class. I have found that one, they don't want to do it. Two, they won't do it. Three, they are too busy with their lives outside of school for the work to be meaningful. Four, more than likely, there isn't someone at home that can answer their questions. Finally, they need to be kids.
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Alison Palkhivala@alisonpalkInterferes with family life, creates unnecessary tension between parents and children, possible contributor to childhood obesity as it teaches that learning must happen sitting down, turns kids off learning
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Alfonso GonzalezeducatoralI don't feel like it's my place to intrude into my students' family time. I strongly believe that kids need to be playing, running, building, climbing, etc after school and NOT doing school work (unless it's for fun AND their choice).
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Jeff Russell@jrussellteacherI couldn't stand it as a student, couldn't stand it as a college student, can't think of anything MEANINGFUL to send my students home with as "homework." They can work on things at home, if they think they need to or want to, but not because I made them.
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Kirsten Nelson@mommakatI taught in a Title 1 school where homework turn in rates were <17% for most grades, yet hw was often mandated at the district level. Personally, I understood that my students went home with thoughts of survival on their minds, not any motivation to complete meaningless sheets they struggled to understand. If we needed extra practice,I believed it was my job to build that into the lesson, or stay after school and volunteer my time to work along side students through authentic learning activities. At home, they had the task of hunting down food, watching siblings, and the unspoken fact that many worked, even at 10 and 11. We don't foster a sense of intrinsic motivation in our students by forcing more meaningless work that interferes with real life, but we can provide opportunities for choice and growth by helping our students find ways to apply the process of learning and problem solving to their individual lives. When we do that, it isn't work but exploring and experiencing, true learning that allows their conceptual understanding to develop naturally.
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Scott Schaeferscott_schaeferKids are busy enough. We get them for 45 minutes per day, and we need to complete our job in this time.
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Ian Coon@waukeestudentMost of the time it is busy work and unneeded worksheets that have no impact on learning. Have them enjoy the real world outside of the classroom and encourage them to authentically connect to what they've learned and/or learning.
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Steve Reiher@sreiherI have been teaching for 20 years and the main reason we make kids do it is because a small amount of parents demand it. I abolished homework in my 5/6 classroom last year, as an experiment, only asking the kids to do 20 minutes free-choice reading, 4 nights a week. I explained to parents that we spent at least two periods a week distributing, collecting and correcting homework, and the actual amount of 'learning' taking place was minimal, compared to the time spent at school, (and home) trying to complete the routine. The kids responded well. Some parents were excited about the reduced stress at home, and how there was a new interest in reading. Some kids were encouraged to work on projects at home, if they wanted, but it was not compulsory.
By the end of the year I had a reputation of be a rebel, but the kids in my class actually enjoyed school! I think homework, for the sake of doing homework is a complete waste of time, especailly in years Prep. to 9. It causes far more problems that it cures. It makes kids hate school and causes many families an incredible amount of stress.

I am all for flipping the classroom, where kids watch a video, or listen to a podcast for "homework"... or working on some project-based learning.

My goal: to abolish the phrase "Have you got any homework?" from every household in Australia. And replace it with "Are there any school projects you'd like to work on?"

For too long, opponents of homework have held their tongues. Do you have the guts to stand up for what's right?
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Justin Vail@ED_SHIFTI emancipated my students from the shackles of homework nearly two years ago. I began to realize that the burden of homework fell heavy on students and teachers. It was as painful for me to enforce as it was for students to complete. I tried more engaging home assignments and dabbled with the Flipped model. I had been reading and listening to abolitionists such as Afie Kohn, Joe Bower, and Mark Barnes for a few years. I began to realize that students had lives outside of school, they learned outside of school, and homework was alienating them from an education they already saw as obsolete and meaningless. I decided to free my students, and I haven't regretted my decision for one second. My students are learning at least as much, probably more, as they ever have. One of the best decisions I have ever made.
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Beverley Bunker@beverleybunkerThose who complete meaningless homework don't usually need "extra practice" - those who don't complete it usually need the teacher's guidance. Our job is to create a passion for learning, encourage creativity and critical thinking, not stress out families. I expect students to be engaged while they are in class and to connect learning to their life, not spend their free time completing work that has no value to them. Interest = passion = learning.
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Mark DavisgraphpapershirtWe have the students for six hours. If that's not enough hours of the day for learning then we're probably doing something wrong. Let them go home to play and be with friends and family. The kids are alright.
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Misty Higgins@mistynorman12Children don't need to work another shift of "school work" at home, they spend 6-7 hours in the classroom AND that's enough. We need to let families enjoy quality time together.
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Peggy Riso@artfulmomI stopped it several years ago because the kids that "may" have needed it didn't do it and the ones that didn't really need it did do it. Crazy. I told parents (and continue to tell them) that kids need to play outside and have fun. I work them hard all day and now their brains need to be worked differently. Enjoy and learn from nature, other kids, their parents, just not from some silly homework.
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