Gr4.Math.StandardsBreakdown.Louisiana_LEAP 2025 (2018-2019)
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Assessment Resourceshttps://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1-LXHSkhxRSuGg_NNWHQiQXfnV2g7QslX?usp=sharing
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Standard ModuleLanguage of the StandardStudents need to KNOWStudents need to be able to DOOther
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4.G.A.1Module 4, Lesson 1
Module 4, Lesson 2
Module 4, Lesson 3
Module 4, Lesson 4
Module 4, Lesson 14
Module 4, Lesson 16

Module 7, Lesson 18
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4.G.A.2Module 4, Lesson 12
Module 4, Lesson 13
Module 4, Lesson 15

Module 7, Lesson 18
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4.G.A.3
Module 4, Lesson 12
Module 4, Lesson 14
Module 4, Lesson 16
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4.MD.A.1Module 2, Lesson 1
Module 2, Lesson 2
Module 2, Lesson 3
Module 2, Lesson 4
Module 2, Lesson 5

Module 7, Lesson 1
Module 7, Lesson 2
Module 7, Lesson 3
Module 7, Lesson 5
Module 7, Lesson 7
Module 7, Lesson 9
Module 7, Lesson 12
Module 7, Lesson 13
Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz.; l, ml; hr, min, sec. Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two-column table. For example, know that 1 ft is 12 times as long as 1 in. Express the length of a 4 ft snake as 48 in. Generate a conversion table for feet and inches listing the number pairs (1, 12), (2, 24), (3, 36), …Items/Time/Distance can be measured in multiple ways, but retain the same actual value. For example: 1 km = 1,000 m = 100,000 cm (all same length).

conversion - change in the units or form of a measurement, different units, without a change in the size or amount

customary (also called standard) - U.S. measurement system for length in inches, feet, yards,
and miles; capacity in cups, pints, quarts

diagram - a drawing used to describe

gram - a metric unit of mass

inches, foot, centimeter, meter, yards - units used to measure length in the customary or measurement system. There are 12 inches in a foot, and 36 inches in a yard. Centimeters and meters are units used to measure length in the metric measurement system. There are 100 centimeters in a meter.

kilogram - a metric measure of mass

liter - a metric unit of volume, usually to measure liquid

mass/weight - a measure of how much matter is in an object

metric system - measurement system that measures length in millimeters, centimeters, meters, and kilometers; capacity in liters and milliliters; mass in grams and kilograms; and temperature in degrees Celsius

standard (also called customary measurement) - U.S. measurement system of length in inches, feet, yards, and miles; capacity in cups, pints, quarts

weight - the total number of substance present in an object. Customary and metric units can be used to calculate the mass (weight).
Make measurement equivalent statements such as “If one foot is 12 inches, then 3 feet has to be 36 inches because there are 3 groups of 12.”

Create tables to show measurements equivalents with larger units expressed as smaller units within the metric system.

Make tables or charts to show equivalent measurements for pounds and ounces and for hours/minutes/seconds.

Express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit by recording measurement equivalents in a two column table.

Use both metric and standard measurement vocabulary.
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4.MD.A.2Module 2, Lesson 1
Module 2, Lesson 2
Module 2, Lesson 3
Module 2, Lesson 4
Module 2, Lesson 5

Module 6, Lesson 15
Module 6, Lesson 16

Module 7, Lesson 5
Module 7, Lesson 6
Module 7, Lesson 8
Module 7, Lesson 9
Module 7, Lesson 14
Use the four operations to solve word problems involving distances, intervals of time, liquid volumes, masses of objects, and money, including problems involving simple fractions or decimals, and problems that require expressing measurements given in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Represent measurement quantities using diagrams such as number line diagrams that feature a measurement scale.elapsed time - the amount of time passed since an event started

intervals - distance between one number and the next on the scale of a graph

length - the distance from end to end

number line - a model or representation with whole counting numbers or fractions, used to show the position of a number in relation to zero and other numbers
Solve measurement word problems including the operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.

Represent measurement quantities using diagrams such as number line diagrams that feature a measurement scale.

Explain their thinking and demonstrate how they solved the problems
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4.MD.A.3Module 3, Lesson 1
Module 3, Lesson 2
Module 3, Lesson 3

Module 7, Lesson 15
Module 7, Lesson 16
Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems.

For example, find the width of a rectangular room given the area of the flooring and the length, by viewing the area formula as a multiplication equation with an unknown factor.
area - the size of a surface

perimeter - distance around a figure or object

area of a rectangle - area = length x width

perimeter of a rectangle - perimeter = length + length + width + width
Solve area & perimeter word problems where both length and width are given.

Solve area and perimeter word problems where only one side is given and the total (area or perimeter). Scholars then find the missing side using the total and one side.
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4.MD.B.4Module 5, Lesson 28
Module 5, Lesson 40
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4.MD.C.5aModule 4, Lesson 5

Module 7, Lesson 18
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4.MD.C.5b
Module 4, Lesson 5

Module 7, Lesson 18
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4.MD.C.6
Module 4, Lesson 6
Module 4, Lesson 7
Module 4, Lesson 8
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4.MD.C.7
Module 4, Lesson 9
Module 4, Lesson 10
Module 4, Lesson 11
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4.NBT.A.1Module 1, Lesson 2
Module 1, Lesson 17
Module 1, Lesson 18
Module 1, Lesson 19

Module 3, Lesson 29
Module 3, Lesson 30
Recognize that in a multi-digit whole number, a digit in one place represents ten times what it represents in the place to its right. For example, recognize that 700 ÷ 70 = 10 by applying concepts of place value and division.

Note: Grade 4 expectations in this domain are limited to whole numbers less than or equal to 1,000,000.
Multi-Digit Whole Number -- any set of positive or non-negative integers (0, 1, 2, 3...); numbers that do not contain a fraction or decimal part. A MULTI-DIGIT whole number is a whole number greater than 9.

Digit -- any of the numerals from 0 to 9, especially when forming part of a number.

Place/Place Value -- the value of a digit depending on its place in a number

Division -- the act of splitting or separating something into equal parts or groups
Use models and the place value chart to make connections to multiplication and division by multiples of ten.

Extend and explore patterns that involve moving digits to different places in a given numeral.

Explain what is happening to the value of a digit as it appears within various places in a numeral. (ex: How does the value of the 7 in 275 compare with the value of the 7 in 725?)

Identify the relationship among places by multiplying by 10 (moving one place to the left) and dividing by 10 (moving one place to the right).
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4.NBT.A.2Module 1, Lesson 3
Module 1, Lesson 4
Module 1, Lesson 5
Module 1, Lesson 6
Module 1, Lesson 13
Module 1, Lesson 14
Module 1, Lesson 15
Module 1, Lesson 16
Module 1, Lesson 17
Module 1, Lesson 18
Module 1, Lesson 19

Module 7, Lesson 17
Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. Compare two multi-digit numbers based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.

Note: Grade 4 expectations in this domain are limited to whole numbers less than or equal to 1,000,000.
Multi-Digit Whole Number -- any set of positive or non-negative integers (0, 1, 2, 3...); numbers that do not contain a fraction or decimal part. A MULTI-DIGIT whole number is a whole number greater than 9.

Base-Ten Numerals -- 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 are the base ten numerals. All based ten numbers are made combining these numerals.

Number Names -- Names representing the numbers. Number names in English- Zero, One, Two, Three, etc.

Expanded Form -- a way of writing numbers that shows place value, expanded notation 300 + 20 + 7 + 0.8 = 327.8
(3 × 100) + (2 × 10) + (7 × 1) + (8 × 0.1) = 327.8

>, =, and < Symbols -- Greater than, equal to, and less than
Accurately read and write numbers from 1 to 1,000,000 based on place value understanding and the use of commas.

Write numbers using various forms of expanded notation. (376 = 3 hundreds + 7 tens + 6 ones or variations such as 37 tens + 6 ones OR 300 + 70 + 6)

Compare numbers using place value and use <, >, = symbols to show the comparison.
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4.NBT.A.3Module 1, Lesson 7
Module 1, Lesson 8
Module 1, Lesson 9
Module 1, Lesson 10
Use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place.Place/Place Value -- the value of a digit depending on its place in a number

Multi-Digit Whole Number -- any set of positive or non-negative integers (0, 1, 2, 3...); numbers that do not contain a fraction or decimal part. A MULTI-DIGIT whole number is a whole number greater than 9.
Identify and explain situations that call for rounding numbers.

Place the number on a number line.

Depending on the place to be rounded, identify the two numbers between which the given number falls. (Ex: to round 382 to the nearest ten, identify that it falls between 380 and 390. Plot those two numbers on the number line. Determine which rounded number is closer to the original number. 382 is 2 away from 380 and 8 away from 390. Therefore 382 rounded to the nearest ten is 380.)

Use other models that make sense for rounding strategies. Explain their reasoning.

Make generalizations that will help them to round without using models.

Use rounding in a variety of situations, including estimation, solving problems, and determining if their answers make sense.
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4.NBT.B.4Module 1, Lesson 11
Module 1, Lesson 13
Module 1, Lesson 14
Module 1, Lesson 15
Module 1, Lesson 16

Module 3, Lesson 28

Module 7, Lesson 17
Fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.Multi-Digit Whole Number -- any set of positive or non-negative integers (0, 1, 2, 3...); numbers that do not contain a fraction or decimal part. A MULTI-DIGIT whole number is a whole number greater than 9.

Standard Algorithm -- a step-by-step procedure used to calculate an answer
Make connections between previous work with
addition and subtraction from using models and other representations to developing an efficient algorithm to add and subtract multi-digit numbers.

Explain their thinking as they employ procedural steps to add or subtract, including composing and decomposing place values (regrouping) to demonstrate understanding of the procedural steps.

Use efficient mental strategies to compute when appropriate.
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4.NBT.B.5Module 3, Lesson 3
Module 3, Lesson 4
Module 3, Lesson 5
Module 3, Lesson 6
Module 3, Lesson 7
Module 3, Lesson 8
Module 3, Lesson 9
Module 3, Lesson 10
Module 3, Lesson 11
Module 3, Lesson 12
Module 3, Lesson 34
Module 3, Lesson 35
Module 3, Lesson 36
Module 3, Lesson 37
Module 3, Lesson 38

Module 7, Lesson 10
Module 7, Lesson 11
Module 7, Lesson 17
Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number, and multiply two two-digit numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.Students should understand arrays and area models as well as the properties of multiplication in order to use models and mental strategies to multiply a single-digit factor by a multi-digit factor.

It is NOT necessary for students to use or write a standard algorithm at this time. Rather, they should be developing and explaining efficient strategies that make sense to them. Problem situations should be used whenever possible as a context for multiplication work.

area model - a concrete model for multiplication or division made up of a rectangle. The length and width represent the factors, and the area represents the product.

array model - a concrete model for multiplication in which items are arranged in rows and columns. Each row (or column) represents the number of groups and each column (or row) represents the number of items in a group.

product - the result when two numbers are multiplied
Use a variety of models (arrays and area models) and strategies to represent multi-digit factors times a one-digit factor.

Explain their reasoning using pictures, numbers, and words.

Make connections to written equations.

Extend this work to multiplication of 2 two-digit factors using pictures, words, and numbers.
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4.NBT.B.6Module 3, Lesson 14
Module 3, Lesson 15
Module 3, Lesson 16
Module 3, Lesson 17
Module 3, Lesson 18
Module 3, Lesson 19
Module 3, Lesson 20
Module 3, Lesson 21
Module 3, Lesson 26
Module 3, Lesson 27
Module 3, Lesson 28
Module 3, Lesson 29
Module 3, Lesson 30
Module 3, Lesson 31
Module 3, Lesson 32
Module 3, Lesson 33

Module 7, Lesson 10
Module 7, Lesson 11
Find whole-number quotients and remainders with up to four-digit dividends and one-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.dividend - in division, the number being divided, product

divisor - in division, the number that divides another number, factor

quotient - the result when two numbers are divided; the missing factor

remainder - the amount left over after dividing a number
Students should continue to become fluent with extending basic facts to efficient recall of situations with remainders.

By the end of Grade 4 students should be able to model, write, and explain division by a one-digit divisor.

Use models that make sense to represent division situations.

Connect previous work with division facts to finding compatible numbers.

Explain their reasoning in small groups and with the whole class as they solve division problems.
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4.NF.A.1Module 5, Lesson 7
Module 5, Lesson 8
Module 5, Lesson 9
Module 5, Lesson 10
Module 5, Lesson 11
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4.NF.A.2
Module 5, Lesson 12
Module 5, Lesson 13
Module 5, Lesson 14
Module 5, Lesson 15
Module 5, Lesson 26
Module 5, Lesson 27
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4.NF.B.3a
Module 5, Lesson 16
Module 5, Lesson 17
Module 5, Lesson 18
Module 5, Lesson 20
Module 5, Lesson 21
Module 5, Lesson 22
Module 5, Lesson 29
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4.NF.B.3b
Module 5, Lesson 1
Module 5, Lesson 2
Module 5, Lesson 3
Module 5, Lesson 4
Module 5, Lesson 5
Module 5, Lesson 6
Module 5, Lesson 22
Module 5, Lesson 23
Module 5, Lesson 24
Module 5, Lesson 25
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4.NF.B.3c
Module 5, Lesson 24
Module 5, Lesson 25
Module 5, Lesson 30
Module 5, Lesson 31
Module 5, Lesson 32
Module 5, Lesson 33
Module 5, Lesson 34
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4.NF.B.3d
Module 5, Lesson 17
Module 5, Lesson 19
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4.NF.B.4a
Module 5, Lesson 1
Module 5, Lesson 2
Module 5, Lesson 3
Module 5, Lesson 4
Module 5, Lesson 5
Module 5, Lesson 6
Module 5, Lesson 24
Module 5, Lesson 37
Module 5, Lesson 38
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4.NF.B.4bModule 5, Lesson 35
Module 5, Lesson 36
Module 5, Lesson 37
Module 5, Lesson 38
Module 5, Lesson 40
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4.NF.B.4c
30
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4.NF.C.5Module 6, Lesson 5
Module 6, Lesson 6
Module 6, Lesson 7
Module 6, Lesson 8
Module 6, Lesson 12
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4.NF.C.6Module 6, Lesson 1
Module 6, Lesson 2
Module 6, Lesson 3
Module 6, Lesson 4
Module 6, Lesson 5
Module 6, Lesson 7
Module 6, Lesson 8
Module 6, Lesson 12
Module 6, Lesson 13
Module 6, Lesson 14
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4.NF.C.7Module 6, Lesson 9
Module 6, Lesson 10
Module 6, Lesson 11
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4.OA.A.1Module 1, Lesson 1

Module 3, Lesson 2
Module 3, Lesson 12

Module 7, Lesson 4
Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret 35 = 5 × 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations.Multiplication -- a mathematical operation in which a number is added to itself a specific number of times; one factor tells the number of groups or sets, the other factor tells the number of items in a group or set and the result, or product, tells the total number of items (ex: 5 × 3 = 15 5 groups with 3 in each group would give a total of 15)

Multiplication Equation -- a mathematical sentence in which one part is the same or equal to the other part. In this case, it is specific to multiplication. (ex: 5 x 3 = 15)

Comparison -- a multiplication or division situation in which one number is a multiple of the other (ex: Maya has 5 marbles. Alexa has 3 times as many. How many marbles does Alexa have?)

Verbal Statement -- using written words to represent mathematical operations

Multiplicative Comparison
-- see definition for comparison above. In this case, it is specific to multiplication.
Read and interpret multiplicative comparison situations identifying which quantity is being multiplied and which factor is telling how many times.

Write and identify equations and statements for multiplicative comparisons:
* Darlene has seven marbles. Danny has 3 times as many. How many marbles does Danny have? (7 x 3 = 21)
* Danny has 3 times as many marbles as Darlene. (3 x 7 = 21)
* The number of marbles Danny has divided by 3 is the number of marbles Darlene has. (21 / 3 = 7)
* Darlene has 3 times fewer marbles than Danny. (21 / 3 = 7)

Represent multiplicative comparisons in different ways - verbally, visually, and with equations.
Table 2 - Multiplication & Division Situations
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4.OA.A.2Module 3, Lesson 2
Module 3, Lesson 12

Module 5, Lesson 39

Module 7, Lesson 4
Module 7, Lesson 6
Module 7, Lesson 7
Module 7, Lesson 8
Module 7, Lesson 9
Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g., by using drawings and/or equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem, distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison (Example: 6 times as many vs. 6 more than). comparison model - a multiplication or division situation in which one number is a multiple of the other (example: Maya has 5 marbles. Alexa has 3 times as many. How many marbles does Alexa have?)

multiplicative comparison
Product Unknown (3 x 5 = t)
Factor Unknown - Size of each group unknown (3 x m = 15)
Factor Unknown - number of groups unknown (g x 5 = 15)

additive comparison (5 + m = 15)
Solve word problems involving multiplicative comparisons using concrete materials, pictures, words, and numbers.

Identify the information in the problem and how it relates to models. Make explicit connections between models (such as bar models) and written equations using both multiplication and division.

Write equations to represent the mathematics of the situation.

Distinguish between additive and multiplicative comparisons (additive comparison focus on the difference between two quantities and multiplicative comparisons focus on comparing two quantities when one is a specified number of times greater or less than the given quantity).
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4.OA.A.3Module 1, Lesson 11
Module 1, Lesson 12
Module 1, Lesson 15
Module 1, Lesson 17
Module 1, Lesson 18
Module 1, Lesson 19

Module 3, Lesson 13
Module 3, Lesson 17
Module 3, Lesson 19
Module 3, Lesson 26
Module 3, Lesson 31
Module 3, Lesson 32

Module 7, Lesson 10
Module 7, Lesson 11
Module 7, Lesson 14
Solve multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and having whole-number answers using the four operations, including problems in which remainders must be interpreted. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.Multistep Word Problems -- Word problems (or real-world context problems) in which scholars must apply their knowledge and answer from one part of the problem to the next part of the word problem. The information carries over.

Whole Numbers
- any set of positive or non-negative integers (0, 1, 2, 3...); numbers that do not contain a fraction or decimal part

Remainder -- Amount left when two numbers are divided

Equation - a statement that two expressions are equal (e.g., 2,389 + 80,601 = _____)

Letter for Unknown Quantity -- A symbol for a number we don't know yet. It is usually a letter like x or y.
Solve multi-step problems with all four operations using models or pictures and numbers.

Interpret remainders in division situations by focusing on the question asked in order to determine what to do with the remainder

Represent unknown quantities with a variable.

Assess reasonableness of an answer by asking themselves if their solution makes sense, solving a math problem in one's head (mental computation), making an approximation or calculation using closer or easier numbers (estimation), or changing a number to a less exact number that is more convenient for computation (rounding).

Explain their problem solving processes and compare various ways of solving problems.
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4.OA.B.4Module 3, Lesson 22
Module 3, Lesson 23
Module 3, Lesson 24
Module 3, Lesson 25
Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1−100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1−100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1−100 is prime or composite.Students think about multiplication and division in terms of composing and decomposing numbers into factors.

factor - one of the numbers multiplied to find a product

multiple - the result of multiplying a whole number by other whole numbers (multiples of 5 are 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30)

composite number - a number that has more than two factors

prime number - a number that has exactly two factors

distributive property - multiplying a sum by a given number is the same as multiplying each addend by the number and then adding the products.

array model - a concrete model for multiplication in which items are arranged in rows and columns. Each row (or column) represents the number of groups and each column (or row) represents the number of items in a group.
Students draw upon and extend their work with multiplication and division facts to determine the factors of a given number through a variety of activities.

Discuss patterns they discover as they factor a number. (For example, all even numbers have 2 as a factor. Numbers that end in 0 or 5 have 5 as a factor.)

List multiples of a given number using skip counting and other strategies.

Identify and describe prime numbers as numbers that have exactly two factors.

Identify and describe composite numbers as numbers that have more than two factors.
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4.OA.C.5Module 5, Lesson 41
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