7th Grade
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8/14/18All 7th Grade Standards
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7-MS-PS1-2 (Matter and Its Interactions)
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Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred.
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Clarification Statement
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Examples of reactions could include burning sugar or steel wool, fat reacting with sodium hydroxide, or mixing zinc with hydrogen chloride. Examples of chemical and physical properties to analyze include density, melting point, boiling point, solubility, flammability, or odor.
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Caddo Science Symbaloo
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Science and Engineering PracticeDisciplinary Core Idea
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Analyzing and interpreting data: Analyzing data in 6-8 builds on K-5 experiences and progresses to extending quantitative analysis to investigations, distinguishing between correlation and causation, and basic statistical techniques of data and error analysis.

• Analyze and interpret data to determine similarities and differences in findings.
STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF MATTER
Each pure substance has characteristic physical and chemical properties (for any bulk quantity under given conditions) under normal conditions that can be used to identify it. (MS.PS1A.b)

CHEMICAL REACTIONS
Substances react chemically in characteristic ways. In a chemical process, the atoms that make up the original substances are regrouped into different molecules, and these new substances have different properties from those of the reactants. (MS.PS1B.a)
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Crosscutting Concepts
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PATTERNS
Macroscopic patterns are related to the nature of microscopic and atomic-level structure.
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7-MS-PS1-4 (Matter and Its Interactions)
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Develop a model that predicts and describes changes in particle motion, temperature, and the state of a pure substance when thermal energy is added or removed.
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Clarification Statement
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Emphasis is on qualitative molecular-level models of solids, liquids, and gases to show that adding or removing thermal energy increases or decreases kinetic energy of the particles until a change of state occurs. Examples of models could include drawings or diagrams. Examples of particles could include molecules or inert atoms such as the noble gases. Examples of pure substances could include water, carbon dioxide, or helium.
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Science and Engineering PracticeDisciplinary Core Idea
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Developing and using models:
Modeling in 6–8 builds on K–5 experiences and progresses to developing, using and revising models to describe, test, and predict more abstract phenomena and design systems.

• Develop and/ or use a model to predict and/ or describe phenomena.
STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF MATTER
Gases and liquids are made of molecules or inert atoms (the noble gases) that are moving about relative to each other. (MS.PS1A.c)

In a liquid, the molecules are constantly in motion and in contact with others; in a gas, they are widely spaced except when they happen to collide. In a solid, atoms are closely spaced and may vibrate in position but do not change relative locations. (MS.PS1A.d)

The changes of state that occur with variations in temperature or pressure can be described and predicted using temperature and pressure models of matter. (MS.PS1A.f)

The temperature of a system is proportional to the average internal kinetic energy and potential energy per atom or molecule (whichever is the appropriate building block for the system’s material). The details of that relationship depend on the type of atom or molecule and the interactions among the atoms in the material. Temperature is not a direct measure of a system’s total thermal energy. The total thermal energy (sometimes called the total internal energy) of a system depends jointly on the temperature, the total number of atoms in the system, and the state of the material. (MS.PS.3A.c)

The term “heat” as used in everyday language refers both to thermal energy (the motion of atoms or molecules within a substance) and the transfer of that thermal energy from one object to another. In science, heat is used only for this second meaning; it refers to the energy transferred due to the temperature difference between two objects. (MS.PS3A.e)
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Crosscutting Concepts
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CAUSE AND EFFECT
Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems.
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7-MS-PS1-5 (Matter and Its Interactions)
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Develop and use a model to describe how the total number of atoms does not change in a chemical reaction and thus is conserved.
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Clarification Statement
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Emphasis is on the law of conservation of matter and on physical models or drawings, including digital forms, that represent atoms. The use of atomic masses, balancing symbolic equations, or intermolecular forces is not the focus of this performance expectation.
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Science and Engineering PracticeDisciplinary Core Idea
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Developing and using models:
Modeling in 6–8 builds on K–5 experiences and progresses to developing, using and revising models to describe, test, and predict more abstract phenomena and design systems.

• Develop a model to describe unobservable mechanisms.
CHEMICAL REACTIONS
Substances react chemically in characteristic ways. In a chemical process, the atoms that make up the original substances are regrouped into different molecules, and these new substances have different properties from those of the reactants. (MS.PS1B.a)

The total number of each type of atom is conserved, and thus the mass does not change. (MS.PS1B.b)
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Crosscutting Concepts
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ENERGY AND MATTER
Matter is conserved because atoms are conserved in physical and chemical processes.
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7-MS-PS3-4 (Energy)
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Plan an investigation to determine the relationships among the energy transferred, the type of matter, the mass, and the change in the average kinetic energy of the particles as measured by the temperature of the sample.
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Clarification Statement
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Emphasis is on observing change in temperature as opposed to calculating total thermal energy transferred. Examples of experiments could include comparing final water temperatures after different masses of ice melted in the same volume of water with the same initial temperature, the temperature change of samples of different materials with the same mass as they cool or heat in the environment, or the same material with different masses when a specific amount of energy is added.
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Science and Engineering PracticeDisciplinary Core Idea
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