Scraped Top 50 Snippets on Googleyness
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googleyness
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Googleyness is a trait which is defined closely by phrases such as “Not just being cool, but really-really cool”, “Being out of the norm”, “Being an out-of-the-box thinker”, “Being Phenomenal, Amazing, Innovative, and Disruptive” and, of course “Being a status quo challenger”
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Googleyness is a nebulous characteristic of what Google wants in an employee. Having interviewed and been offered a job at Google, I think it's an excuse for them to pass off biases (potentially based on race, gender, and others).
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Googleyness is a trait which is defined closely by phrases such as “Not just being cool, but really-really cool”, “Being out of the norm”, “Being an out-of-the-box thinker”, “Being Phenomenal, Amazing, Innovative, and Disruptive” and, of course “Being a status quo challenger”.
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“Googleyness” is a set of qualities like fun, intellectual humility, conscientiousness, and a track record of having done interesting things. And according to ex-Google employees that Fast Company spoke to, that's what hiring managers are looking for in applicants beyond their skills and experience.
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Googleyness: are they a culture fit? For example, ‘Googleyness’ is synonymous with strong ethical and collaborative styles.
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Everyone at Google defines cultural fit (a.k.a. "Googleyness) differently. "It isn't about whether you're a bro-grammer, or are just like us, or fit a narrow mold," Bock says. Instead, he says, Google is looking for people who are comfortable with ambiguity, have intellectual humility and can bring something new to the mix."
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Yet if this person is your equal (or more) in intellect, creativity, and these factors we call Googleyness, the two of you would still have a provocative conversation, and your company will be better off having the both of you on the same team.
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‘Googleyness’ – this intangible quality “isn’t the same as cultural fit”, said Agyei. It is best explained as a sense that the hire is ‘good for Google’ and that they have a particular tolerance for ambiguity. Engineers, for example, are hired into a general pool and won’t be told where they will work (and who they will be led by) until they have accepted an offer. The business believes Googleyness is what makes people work well together, and is investigating whether it can quantify and account for this quality among its most successful teams.
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Googleyness is another term the company coined to describe what it means to be the right cultural fit. Bock explains Googleyness as “people who are comfortable with ambiguity, have intellectual humility, and can bring something new to the mix.”
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To me, Googleyness encompasses a couple of key things:
Working well with others
Caring about a cause bigger than yourself [1]
Curiosity (and "comfort with ambiguity")
Approaching problems from different, interesting angles and thinking "outside" of the box
Having that signature, unique quirky thing that sets you apart (because everyone's different!)
Passion. Period.
Desire to improve and learn from mistakes
And, above all, don't be evil.
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Googleyness is also mentioned on the “How We Hire” page. Someone who has it is an innovator who works well with others.
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"Googleyness" is a term that job applicants at Google may be familiar with. The firm explains it, on its website, this way: "Googleyness: Share how you work individually and on a team, how you help others, how you navigate ambiguity, and how you push yourself to grow outside of your comfort zone."
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The good news is that many of the more nuanced forms of "googleyness" are hard wired into the culture, and so new hires tend to pick up on these sorts of things through osmosis and seeing how more senior engineers behave. Things like gathering data to back up theories, and not just making assertions, or writing code very defensively and with a heavy emphasis on testing, etc.
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Googleyness: A combination of fun, intellectual humility, conscientiousness, and a track record of having done interesting things, among other attributes.”
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The employees who have these creative insights are called creatives and they bring diversity, innovation, passion and intelligence that all combine to an attribute that is famously named “Googleyness.” The founders of Google have made this attribute the foundation of their organizational culture which has attracted some of the most innovative and intelligent young creatives the Tech world has to offer. What is the actual attraction to the idea of “Googleyness”? It is the leadership style of Google that allows for this collection of people to share their creative insights with the world that has ultimately brought about social change.
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Google’s take on leadership has produced amazing results in innovation and propelled the company to the forefront of technology. The concept that people are the most precious resource has developed a system where people are the crucial element to Google’s success. And an innovative leader is not afraid to make mistakes because those mistakes create experience, and experience evolves to good judgment. In turn, good judgment allows a leader to collect the right people with “Googleyness” around them.
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Google wants to make sure the candidate could thrive at Google, and looks for signs of comfort with ambiguity, bias to action, and a collaborative nature.
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What most stood out for me was the culture, the sheer “Googleyness” of it all. Everyone we met was cheery and helpful (in addition to being ludicrously good looking).
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Googleyness is the possession of qualities that Googlers strive for. It describes a collaborative, ingenious, passionate, friendly, genuine person, and I was privileged to work with so many people like this. My coworkers helped me through every problem I had and took the time to explain the answer. If I was working at my desk during lunch time, they would ask me to join them for food. They wanted to spend time with us outside of work. Googleyness is honestly the best compliment someone can receive.
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Googleyness means everyone is always willing to offer a helping hand, no matter how busy they are with their own code.
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Share how you work individually and on a team, how you help others, how you navigate ambiguity, and how you push yourself to grow outside of your comfort zone.
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A person who passes the LAX/Googleyness test has to be someone you could have an interesting conversation with and respect. However, he or she is not necessarily someone you have to like...if this person is your equal (or more) in intellect, creativity, and these factors we call Googleyness, the two of you would still have a provocative conversation, and your company will be better off having the both of you on the same team...a multiplicity of viewpoints – aka diversity – is your best defense against myopia.
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It’s the name the company gives to those characteristics that make you a cultural fit, which Bock says boil down to “intellectual humility.” You don’t have to be warm and friendly, but you need to be able to admit — and believe — when you’re wrong if you want to mesh with other Googlers.

Last on the list, they look for “expertise in the job we’re gonna hire you for.”

Surprised that one’s last? Google isn’t the only company that hires this way — it’s just the company that’s made the idea most famous in the past decade.

If you can learn and understand new information, are willing to step in where you’re needed, and can admit and adjust when you’re wrong, then picking up the skills needed for a position should be a piece of cake.
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We... want to make sure this is a place they'll thrive, so we look for signs around their comfort with ambiguity, bias to action, and collaborative nature.
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The G-word in this case means “… a culture that has combined legal and business skills, technical knowledge, and a team approach to problem-solving…”
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“Googleyness” is not a word you’d encounter during job interviews, but it is a key value if you want to work in Waze. But before you pad up your resume and send it off to Waze, you have to realise that getting into Waze is just as hard as landing a job at Google, the global tech firm which is the second most valued company, according to Fortune 500.
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It is being comfortable with ambiguity, working through an unknown territory
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In the company’s jargon, this is referred to as ‘Googleyness’, which Bock defines broadly as intellectual humility. “You don’t have to be nice, or warm, or fuzzy,” he explains (although you do have to be fun). “You just have to be somebody who, when the facts say you’re wrong, can admit that”. The company believes the capacity to admit mistakes is an essential learning tool.

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“Googleyness” is hard to define, but easy to spot. It’s a mashup of passion and drive, intellectual curiosity and a mission to change the world.
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Okay, it’s a made-up word, but it basically means that hiring managers want to make sure Google is a place where you will thrive and can still be “you.” Google is a place where people work together to solve problems—which may not always have clear-cut answers or one solution. If you have good interpersonal skills and are okay with a little ambiguity in your daily life, then Google might be a good fit for you.

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“We want to get a feel for what makes you, well, you. We also want to make sure this is a place you’ll thrive, so we’ll be looking for signs around your comfort with ambiguity, your bias to ac:on and your collabora:ve nature.”
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Given that ‘googleyness’ is a made up word we can look at it and be confused or we can try to define it by saying it probably means ‘creativity’. Either way Google are ‘allowed’ to ask you to have it and you’ll need to prove that you have a sense of Googleisation (see that, Google? I can invent words too) if you stand a chance of making their shortlist.

So:

What has this taught us? That so long as the criteria isn’t either directly or indirectly discriminatory and if there’s no clash with the Equality Act then employers can be daft as proverbial brushes.

Even if it they do come out with criteria that sound somewhat Dr Seuss-ish.
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Google liked to hire people who possess something it calls "Googleyness", a measure of how well they will fit in. It’s not easily defined, but it includes things like enjoying fun and coping well with ambiguity. This emphasis on ‘‘cultural fit’’ isn’t unique to Google; it seems to have spread across industries as work hours have lengthened and as offices have further blurred the distinction between work and leisure.
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And it should come as no surprise that hiring for cultural fit can be self-reinforcing. In 2014, Google for the first time released data on the makeup of its employees: 2% of them were black, and 3% were Latino. 70% were men. And, as at most tech companies, Asian-Americans made up a disproportionately large share of employees.
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And they have tried to build diversity into the definition of ‘‘Googleyness’’, like whether someone has taken an interesting life path or solves problems in a different way.
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Googleyness: This means the candidate is a cultural fit. Are they comfortable with ambiguity? Do they have intellectual humility? Do they bring something new to the mix?
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“It’s different for each person, there’s no strict definition. Anything cool that makes you interesting as a person.”
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The term we use is "being Googley," meaning, doing whatever it is that Google people do: thinking big, focusing on the user, not being evil, etc. On a more day-to-day basis, being Googley means turning out the lights when you leave a conference room, being friendly and helpful to new engineers, being a good citizen.
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This looks at the ability of a candidate to fit into the company’s culture, based either on team spirit or preference for self-teaching, among other qualities.
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As Google's culture page states: "We hire technical folks with a healthy disregard for the impossible." The company stresses leadership, expertise, problem-solving skills and "googleyness," or the right culture fit, in their hiring standards. There's room for visionaries with fascinating backgrounds in dozens of fields, from artificial intelligence to data compression.
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Share how you work individually and on a team, how you help others, how you navigate ambiguity, and how you push yourself to grow outside of your comfort zone.
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"Googleyness", alongside other traits like leadership and problem-solving skills. "Do you challenge the status quo? Are you willing to ask the hard questions, call out the elephant in the room?
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The guidelines for Google recruitment never change: They are not looking for “white collars” or “perfect guys.” Google’s philosophy is to challenge themselves and the world around them – they have the clear goal of changing the status quo and offering innovation. Indeed, this view on candidates even has its own internal term
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While you’ve certainly heard about “culture fit,” being a key criterion for getting a job in 2018, at Google diversity is valued over conformity. “It’s not, ‘Are you like us…’ We actually look for people who are different, because diversity gives us great ideas,” Bock explained.
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We know that culture is important. We even think we know what it is. But culture isn’t perks like dogs and snacks in the workplace — nor is it a defining personality, like, say, “googleyness”. Culture is the collective behavior of an organization… and whether or not you go about creating one, you’re going to get one anyway, argues a16z cofounder Ben Horowitz. “Unless you set it, it’ll just be what it is.”
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defines cultural fit—or what he calls “Googleyness”—as not being “just like everyone else,” but instead as sharing a common set of traits. For Google, this includes being comfortable with ambiguity and bringing new ideas to the table. As a business owner, should you strive to be like Google, or should you carve your own path?
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there’s the “Googleyness” factor. They look for ambition and drive, team orientation, willingness to take risks, listening & communication skills, bias to action, interpersonal skills, creativity, ability to go beyond design to build prototypes and integrity.
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This is particularly important for the first few people hired at growing companies, but it can never change as companies grow. Your new co-workers will dictate how well you perform in the future, and how fun it’s going to be. So take your time, make sure there is a alignment of values and fire fast if things don’t work out. Companies like Xero, Vend, Timely and Define Instruments* are incredibly selective and difficult to get recruited into (and they are hiring). That’s by design, and that’s why they can stay ahead.
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Namely, they are looking for ‘Googleyness’ or, in plain English, intellectual humility. Leadership skills are another valuable asset for selection, although the ability to step away and relinquish power is just as important. CEO Larry Page gets the final say on any individual talented (and fortunate) enough to make it through the selection process. Not often, but every now and again, he stops someone at the final hurdle. So as to prevent shortsightedness, verdicts, such as whom to hire and fire, how performance is rated and which promotions are given, are never made unilaterally. “Each of these decisions is instead made either by a group of peers, a committee, or a dedicated, independent team”, writes Bock in his book Work Rules.
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Google grew from 50,000 to 60,000 Googlers over the past year. HR faced a challenge to select the right people from those three million applicants. First of all, the 'notorious application procedure' of sometimes fifteen interviews was reduced to four, because research showed that the subsequent discussions did not add anything. HR also composed four key elements: Do you have analytical skills? How fast can you learn? What did you do with the opportunities in your life? And finally you get into the Google culture? A structured questionnaire that candidates answer in writing must show how candidates score on these four pillars. The answers are then analyzed before a selection interview takes place.
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