NAS Exoplanet Science Strategy White Papers
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Title or Topic (required)Lead Author (required)Lead Author email (required)CoauthorsLooking for coauthors?Looking for cosigners?AbstractKeywords
Link to white paper/draft
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Giant Planet Atmospheres with JWSTJonathan Fortneyjfortney@ucsc.ecduN. Lewis, T. Kataria, C. MorleyYesYeshttps://docs.google.com/document/d/1fYCQTj2GoOWuDzvU3-tsCfn1AFsxkW76H_3IJzqquJ4/edit
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Exoplanet Atmosphere Characterization with FINESSEJonathan Fortneyjfortney@ucsc.ecduRob Zellem, Mark SwainNot just yetProbably
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The Origins Space Telescope: A Comprehensive Understanding of Temperate Planetary AtmospheresJonathan Fortneyjfortney@ucsc.ecduTiffany Kataria, Kevin StevensonYesYeshabitable planets, transits, biosignatures
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1KkjpjVEzDkBVAQqmZY3sbBsymA-Soy0233qkPIHBkLc/edit
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A comprehensive understanding of planet formation is required for assessing planetary habitability and for the search for lifeDaniel Apaiapai@arizona.eduG. Mulders, F. Ciesla, I. Pascucci, L. Ziurys, N. Turner, et al.NoYes
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Understanding Stellar Contamination in Exoplanet Transmission Spectrum as an Essential Step in Small Planet CharacterizationDaniel Apaiapai@arizona.eduBen Rackham, Mark Giampapa, Yesyes
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Science Questions for Future Direct Imaging Missions: SAG15 SummaryDaniel Apaiapai@arizona.eduSAG15 teamNoYes
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The WFIRST Exoplanet Microlensing SurveyDavid Bennettdavid.bennett@nasa.govWFIRST MicroSITyesyes
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Preparing for the WFIRST Exoplanet Survey: SAG11 UpdateDavid Bennettdavid.bennett@nasa.govSAG 11 teamnoyes
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Characterizing Transiting Planet Atmospheres through 2025 (SAG-X Report)Nick Cowannicolas.cowan@mcgill.caSAG-X TeamLooking for lead to condense and update, otherwise will just submit the PASP paper itself: http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1086/680855/pdfyes, but let's figure out the lead firsttransits, habitable planets, hot Jupiters, sub-Neptunes
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Ground-based thermal IR imaging of exoplanets with ELTs: Complementary to reflected light studies from ground and spaceMichael R. Meyermrmeyer@umich.eduOlivier Guyon, Thayne Currie, Sascha Quanz, Christian Marois, Chris Packham, Markus Kasper, John Monnier, Yasuhiro Hasegawa, Ian Crossfieldnot yetyes
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The Potential of Exozodiacal Disks Observations with the WFIRST Coronagraph InstrumentBertrand Mennessonbertrand.mennesson@jpl.nasa.govyesyes
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WFIRST Coronagraph Instrument (CGI) technology development statusVanessa Baileyvanessa.bailey@jpl.nasa.govCGI instrument teamyesyes
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Exoplanet Characterization with the Habitable Exoplanet Mission (HabEx)Bertrand Mennessonbertrand.mennesson@jpl.nasa.govHabEx Study Team yesyes
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Characterizing Potentially Habitable Planets orbiting M-dwarfs with Thermal Phase CurvesTiffany Katariatiffany.kataria@jpl.nasa.govR. Kopparapu, S. Kane, J. Fortney, K. Stevenson, P. Cuartas-Restrepo, E. Wolf, M. Line, J. Fraine, R. ZellemyesyesEmail T. Kataria for the link!
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iSHELL PRVs for TESS Follow-upPeter Plavchanpplavcha@gmu.edu Bryson Cale
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EarthFinder PRVs in spacePeter Plavchanpplavcha@gmu.edu
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Climates of Potentially Habitable Planets and Priorities for the FutureTony DelGenioanthony.d.delgenio@nasa.govV. Airapetian, N. Kiang, K. Tsigaridis, S. Guzewich, S. Rugheimer, S. Kaneyesyeshabitable planets, climate
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Exoplanet Diversity in the era of large space telescopesRavi Kopparapuravikumar.kopparapu@nasa.govEric Hebrard, Rus Belikov, Chris Stark, Natalie Batalha, Gijs Mulders, Shawn Domagal-Goldman, Aki Roberge, Avi Mandellyes?yesFuture large space-based direct imaging missions can detect and characterize a multitude of planets, along with Earth-like worlds. While there is an intense focus on observing bio-signature features on exo-Earths and their yields, little attention was given to characterization and expected yields of other classes of planets. This whitepaper discusses a classification scheme to highlight the diversity of exoplanets that could be detected by direct imaging missions.
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Giant Planets as Pathfinders for Characterizing the Pale Blue DotMark Marleymark.s.marley@nasa.govN. Lewisnot just yetyes
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Magnetic Fields of Extrasolar Planets: Planetary Interiors and HabitabilityJoseph LazioJoseph.Lazio@jpl.nasa.govG. Hallinan, E. Shkolnik, J.-M. Griessmeier, W.M. Farrell, J. Kasper, L.A. Rogers, P. Zarkayesyes
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Distribution of Exoplanet Parameters: Counts by Period, Eccentricity Correlations on Planet and Star Mass, Number of Planets, Single vs Multiple StarsStuart F. Taylorastrostuart@gmail.comSeeking coauthors!Yes!Yes
Counts by Period, Eccentricity Correlations on Planet and Star Mass, Number of Planets, Single vs Multiple Stars. Evolution of shortest period falloff. Strength of tidal dissipation and seeking to measure period decreases
Distributions, parameters, tidal migration, tidal dissipation, period shortening
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Exoplanet Science Priorities from the Perspective of Internal and Surface Processes for Silicate and Ice Dominated WorldsWade G. Henningwade.g.henning@nasa.govJ. P. Renaud, A. Mandell, P. Saxena, L. Glaze, T. Livengood, V. Airapetian, E. Asphaug. J. Teske, W. SchwietermanYesYesEmail Wade for a link
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Highly Volcanic Exoplanets, Lava Worlds, and Magma Ocean Worlds: An Emerging Class of Dynamic Exoplanets of Significant Scientific PriorityWade G. Henningwade.g.henning@nasa.govJ. P. Renaud, P. Saxena, P. Whelley, A. Mandell, L. Glaze, T. Hurford, T. Livengood, C. Hamilton, M. Efroimsky, S. Guzewich, K. Tsigaridis, G. ArneyYesYesEmail Wade for a link
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Using Ground-Based Telescopes to Mature Key Technology and Conduct Critical Preparatory Science for Future Direct Imaging MissionsThayne Curriecurrie@naoj.orgR. Belikov, O. Guyon, C. Marois, J. Kasdin, M. Marley, K. Cahoy, M. McElwain, E. Bendek, M. Kuchner, M. Meyernoyes
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Scientific Value of Astrometry for Exoplanet ScienceEduardo Bendekeduardo.a.bendek@nasa.govM. Shao, O. GuyonYesYesWork in progressAstrometry, mass, exoplanets
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Direct Imaging of Exoplanets with OSTTiffany Meshkat and Eric Nielsenmeshkat@ipac.caltech.edu and enielsen@stanford.eduyesyesJupiter and Saturn detection, characterization, planet yields, mid-IR
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Exoplanet Science with Small SatellitesDavid Ardiladavid.r.ardila@jpl.nasa.govYesYesWhat can we do with <180 kg of stuff in space? This would be a good place to capture the SmallSat RFI exoplanet ideas
https://www.dropbox.com/s/pgi3gb1os3ousvq/SmallSats_v2.docx?dl=0
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Transit Spectroscopy of Giant Planets Beyond JWSTJonathan Frainejfraine@stsci.eduTiffany Kataria, Courtney Dressing, Kevin Stevenson, Miguel de Val-Borro, Jonathan Fortney, Mike Line, Peter Gaoyesyes-Atmospheric characterization of temperate Jupiters
-Constraining cloud species (e.g. MnS) from their resonance features in mid-IR (10-30 microns)
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Technology Needs for Detecting Life in Distant Star SystemsBrendan Crillbcrill@jpl.nasa.govSiegler, Stapelfeldt, Mamajek, Domagal-GoldmannonoOverview of space technology needs for exoplanet science in the coming decades, from the NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program office's point of view
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Polarimetry of Exoplanets Max Millar-Blanchaermax.a.millar-blanchaer@jpl.nasa.govWiktorowicz, Sanghavi, Jensen-Clemnoyes
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Life Beyond the Solar System: Remotely Detectable BiosignaturesShawn Domagal-Goldmanshawn.goldman@nasa.govShawn Domagal-Goldman, Nancy Y. Kiang, Niki Parenteau, David C. Catling, Shiladitya DasSarma, Yuka Fujii, Chester E. Harman, Adrian Lenardic, Enric Pallé, Christopher T. Reinhard, Edward W. Schwieterman, Jean Schneider, Harrison B. Smith, Motohide Tamura, Daniel Angerhausen, Giada Arney, Vladimir S. Airapetian, Natalie M. Batalha, Charles S. Cockell, Leroy Cronin, Russell Deitrick, Anthony Del Genio, Theresa Fisher, Dawn M. Gelino, J. Lee Grenfell, Hilairy E. Hartnett, Siddharth Hegde, Yasunori Hori, Betül Kaçar, Joshua Krissansen-Totten, Timothy Lyons, William B. Moore, Norio Narita, Stephanie L. Olson, Heike Rauer, Tyler D. Robinson, Sarah Rugheimer, Nick Siegler, Evgenya L. Shkolnik, Karl R. Stapelfeldt, Sara WalkerYes - to an extent. But we should not add significant text that goes well beyond (or against) the findings of the SAG16 group.YES!Review of biosignature science, following on the findings of the SAG 16/NExSS Workshop Without Walls on the remote detection of exoplanet biosignaures. We try to cover everything here - ground/space and transit/direct spectroscopy and theory/observation. So it's a tight fit into 5 pages.
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Investigating Planet Formation and Evolutionary Processes with Short-Period ExoplanetsBrian Jacksonbjackson@boisestate.eduElisabeth Adams, Michael EndlSure!Sure!
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High-Energy Photon and Particle Effects on Exoplanet Atmospheres and HabitabilityJeremy Drakejdrake@cfa.harvard.eduYesYes
https://www.overleaf.com/14247342wpcwjdbrpvzk
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The Importance of UV Capabilities for Identifying Inhabited Exoplanets with Next Generation Space TelescopesEdward Schwietermaneschwiet@ucr.eduChristopher Reinhard, Stephanie Olson, Timothy LyonsNoYes
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1pHZpzwzCC0DTawGaVgLcpk_64GUdO4JMSiCDdXIA_Hk/edit
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Observing Exoplanets with JWSTCharles Beichman
charles.a.beichman@jpl.nasa.gov
Tom Greene?YesThe James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will revolutionize our understanding of exoplanets with transit spectroscopy of a wide range of mature planets close to their host stars ($<$2 AU) and with coronagraphic imaging and spectroscopy of young planets located further out ($>$10 AU). The census of exoplanets has revealed an enormous variety of planets orbiting stars of all ages and spectral types. The TESS observatory will add to this census with an all-sky survey of the closest, brightest stars, but the challenge of the coming decade will move from demography to physical characterization. This white paper discusses the wide variety of exoplanet opportunities enabled by JWST's sensitivity and stability, its high angular resolution, and its suite of powerful instruments. JWST observations will advance our understanding of the atmospheres of young to mature planets and will provide new insights into planet formation.
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1wAk-cY94ms9hLEmBMeMPN3SCRFo5U7hY
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Venus: The Nearby Exoplanetary LaboratoryStephen Kaneskane@ucr.eduNoYes
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1taxMLM8AZG0cUCIOU10DDdjuuQ3Mc0ASBouAS9CuUqI/edit?usp=sharing
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Combining high-contrast imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy for exoplanet characterizationGarreth Ruanegruane@astro.caltech.eduNemanja Jovanovic, Ji Wang, Charles Beichman, Brendan Bowler, Michael Fitzgerald, Jonathan Fortney, Renyu Hu, Jeffery Jewell, James Lloyd, Julien Lozi, Jared Males, Ben Mazin, Bertrand Mennesson, Jorge Llop Sayson, Gautam VasishtNoYesThe development of methods to characterize terrestrial exoplanets orbiting nearby stars has progressed significantly over the past decade, especially due to the emergence of concepts that combine high-contrast imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy, also known as high-dispersion coronagraphy. High-contrast imaging uses wavefront control and coronagraphs to reduce the amount of unwanted starlight detected along with the signal from the planet. On the other hand, cross-correlating the measured high-resolution spectrum with a modelled spectrum, based on prior knowledge about molecules of interest, makes efficient use of the relatively few planet photons and the spectral information they carry. Together, these concepts offer a means to measure the relative abundance of molecular species in exoplanet atmospheres and will likely open a vast area of research in comparative exoplanetology. In this white paper, we make the case for continuing the development of HDC technologies for current ground-based instruments and supporting observational campaigns that make use of HDC instruments to characterize known exoplanets. These efforts will pave the way towards the first detection of biosignatures in the atmospheres of potentially habitable worlds with future ground- and space-based telescopes.
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