--Responses for "Funeral Blues"
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TimestampChoose your classYour HouseYour name1. What clues does the poem's title give you about the theme of the poem? 2. Who is the speaker of the poem? 3. Who is the audience for the poem? 4. Briefly, what situation is described in the poem?5. Use line numbers to indicate the poem's major thought divisions.6. "Funeral Blues" is an elegiac poem--a meditation on loss, grief, and mortality--that holds its sentiments together through a AABB rhyme scheme. Decide which lines best express the speaker's changing sentiments. ["Silence the pianos" ]6. "Funeral Blues" is an elegiac poem--a meditation on loss, grief, and mortality--that holds its sentiments together through a AABB rhyme scheme. Decide which lines best express the speaker's changing sentiments. ["He was my North, my South, my East and West"]6. "Funeral Blues" is an elegiac poem--a meditation on loss, grief, and mortality--that holds its sentiments together through a AABB rhyme scheme. Decide which lines best express the speaker's changing sentiments. ["I though love would last forever; I was wrong"]6. "Funeral Blues" is an elegiac poem--a meditation on loss, grief, and mortality--that holds its sentiments together through a AABB rhyme scheme. Decide which lines best express the speaker's changing sentiments. ["Nothing now can ever come to any good"]7. What is the effect of using capital letters for the phrase "He Is Dead"? (Tip: when referring to God, it is common to use a capital "He"). For whom could this message be if it is written on the sky?8. Figures of speech/Symbol/ Allusion: Choose the category that best fits each phrase. ["aeroplanes circle moaning overhead"]8. Figures of speech/Symbol/ Allusion: Choose the category that best fits each phrase. ["He was my North, my South, my East and West/ My working week and my Sunday rest,/ My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song"]8. Figures of speech/Symbol/ Allusion: Choose the category that best fits each phrase. ["Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun"]8. Figures of speech/Symbol/ Allusion: Choose the category that best fits each phrase. ["black cotton gloves"]8. Figures of speech/Symbol/ Allusion: Choose the category that best fits each phrase. [“pour away the ocean”]9a. What is the tone of the poem?9b. From what key words or phrases did you deduce the poem's tone?10. Of the following, which best describes the contrast between the first and last stanzas? 11. Based on all the above, what is poem's central viewpoint or insight about Love and/or Death?
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PINK= You got itBLUE= Message from Dr. XRED= Nope
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9/20/2014 17:07:285812 (5:45)Morrisonsomebody has died and it is very sadUnknownsomebody who receives ordersthe situation described in the poem is someones lover has died and its the day of the funeral. Probably a military person or an important and loved politician like a mayor of a city. The speaker is very depressed for this death. At the beginning, he/she (most probably he as it was written un 1936) is giving orders of what to do to show respect for the death of the person , how the speaker feels for the death and what the person who died was for the speaker. At the end the speaker shows he/she feels very hurt for the loss, like if nothing else, life itself does not make sense anymore.

The semicolons and periods indicate the thoughts to be
1-4
5-8
9-11
12 (broken into two thoughts)
13
14
15-16
Commands our attention to focus on the deceased Expresses griefMeditates on mortalityExpresses lossit causes an effect of comparison with God, probably for the fact that the person who died was a very loved and lovely person, a person who used to give so much love and who also received loved an respect from others. PersonificationHyperboleMetaphorSymbolMetaphorsad/mournfulSilence, stop, moaning,  activity to inertiaThe writer allowed the reader to understand the intensity of feeling experienced upon the loss of a loved one. Loving someone and losing that person is hard, and it is devastating. Death is a part of life, and losing a loved one is one of the most difficult experiences.
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3/23/2015 1:44:26(2:15)MorrisonFuneral Blues, as we know blues are basically sad songs, and funeral is about death. So the theme of the poem is about a male who passed away. UnknownThe readerAt the first two stanzas, the speaker commands everyone to stop all the noise and to participate at the funeral. Then the last two stanzas are about expressing the speaker's loss.Didn't understand the question clearly. Commands our attention to focus on the deceased Expresses lossMeditates on mortalityExpresses griefMay be the speaker referred him to an angel.MetaphorPersonificationHyperboleSymbolMetaphorworshipful/reverent/adoring, affectionate/loving/caring, sad/mournfulBring out the coffin, let the mourners come. temporal/secular to cosmic/spiritualEverything will eventually die, even love.
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3/23/2015 20:19:52(2:15)MorrisonSince the blues means sad song, the title clues that the poem is about grief of death.UnknownThe reader, mournersThe speaker is preparing the funeral and he/she is devastated.Until the line number 8, the speaker commands what to do to prepare the funeral but since line number 9, the speaker expresses his/her loss and grief.Commands our attention to focus on the deceased Expresses griefExpresses lossMeditates on mortalityPeople usually use capital "He" to refer God. I think using capital letters for the phrase "He Is Dead" effected making the dead man as God-like figure. However, the message can be for anybody who would share the grief together.PersonificationMetaphorHyperboleSymbolHyperbolesad/mournful, somber/grim/grave, angry/bitter/offendedcoffin, mourners, Dead

I thought that love would last forever; I was wrong.
For nothing now can ever come to any good.
 temporal/secular to cosmic/spiritualDeath is stronger than love.
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9/27/2017 13:04:53(2:15)MorrisonTrisha KimThe poem's title gives the theme of a sad event of a mourning. The word "blues" gives us this clue as blues represents the feeling of sadness and depression. A femaleThe reader, Guests The poem describes the mourning of the speaker's lover. The speaker is describing her sadness and loss, as you can see when she says "for nothing now can ever come to any good." She expresses the good in her life is gone. I am not sure what the question is asking.

[line 9-12 and lines 16 expresses the poem's major thought divisions]
Commands our attention to focus on the deceased Expresses griefExpresses lossMeditates on mortalityThe effect of using capital letters for the phrase "He is Dead" gives it a symbol of the person being "the Almighty". It gives it the character of a leader and someone who is placed at a high level; the father of all. This message could be written for Jesus as it was written on the sky as a direct message, considering usually the sky represents Heaven. PersonificationSymbolHyperboleMetaphorHyperbolesad/mournful, somber/grim/grave"I thought that love would last for ever; I was wrong"
"For nothing now can ever come to any good"
"Silence"
 sound to lightThe poem's central viewpoint expresses a deep mourning from the loss of a loved one. It shows how much of an important this person was to the speaker; sitting in silence and in the dark, because their whole world has ended. Love and all the good in the world is no longer there for the speaker.
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10/1/2017 11:48:18(2:15)MorrisonGeraldoThe poem's title gives the hint that it is going to be a very solemn event. A deeper level of pain is involved when dealing with the blues. One can feel the soul of the singer distraught in pain.UnknownThe reader, any one who would listen, perhaps even a passer-by The speaker of the poem wants absolute silence and complete darkness to convey the fact that her/his lover is dead. Within the silence there is no more talk and song. Within the darkness there is no north, south, east, or west. The removal of God/Love is to remove any sense of direction in life. Lines 1-4 bring earthly topics into play such as clocks and telephones, pianos, drums, and coffins. These things are tangible. Next in lines 5-8 we move to the sky with the idea of the aeroplanes and doves. Then within lines 9-12 ideas that shape this earthly realm are used such as north, south, east, and west. Finally, in lines 13-16we move to the heavens with imagery such as stars and celestial bodies.Commands our attention to focus on the deceased Expresses lossMeditates on mortalityExpresses griefI believe by using the capital letters the speaker's belief system has been ruined. By packing up the moon and dismantling the sun the speaker is removing heavenly bodies that could be associated with God from view. At this point all that should remain when anyone looks up to pray are the words " He Is Dead". PersonificationMetaphorHyperboleSymbolHyperbolesad/mournful, angry/bitter/offendedThe strongest line in my opinion comes from line 13, "The stars are not wanted now: put out every one". By putting out the stars these emotions are no longer strictly personal but involve the world. No one can have these stars because I don't want them. It comes of as an extremely bitter line reflecting the idea that the speaker wants everyone to share in his/her emotions.  temporal/secular to cosmic/spiritualThe central insight is about the incredibly distraught feeling one gets when the supreme idea of love is destroyed. Where the love was the speakers directions, the speakers week, the speakers song. This death is for everyone. The whole sky has to proclaim his death. No one is allowed to enjoy the stars, sun, and moon.
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10/2/2017 16:17:43(5:45)MorrisonShiva RampaulFrom the title, "Funeral Blues", it's immediately clear that the theme of the poem will be sullen/sad and dark. From "Funeral" we can infer two scenarios about the poem; it will either be about someone glad a person is dead or someone devastated that someone is dead. Paired with "Blues", we can conclude it's the latter one.A femaleThe readerThe situation in the poem is describing the day of a funeral. The poem starts out with the quieting of noisy things. Then it describes what I believe is a public 'marching' funeral with the "aeroplanes circle moaning overhead" and the presence of traffic policemen.Lines 1-4 describes silencing noisy things out of respect for the dead.
Lines 5-8 describes the funeral procession with planes whizzing above and white doves.
Lines 9-11 describes the love the speaker had for the deceased.
And finally lines 12-16 describes the heartache the speaker has. The speaker no longer appreciates life; for her life has just died.
Commands our attention to focus on the deceased Expresses lossMeditates on mortalityExpresses griefI think the effect of using capital letters for the phrase "He is Dead" is to show that the speaker practically worshiped the deceased. The message written in the sky is to express to everyone that her God is gone.PersonificationMetaphorHyperboleSymbolHyperboleworshipful/reverent/adoring, sad/mournful, somber/grim/graveSilence, Dead, my, love, wrong activity to inertiaI think the poem's central viewpoint about Love is that it doesn't last for ever. Love is great when it's there but once it's gone, there's only despair. The speaker describes how much the deceased meant to her in the first three lines of the third stanza but includes heartbreak, the complete opposite, in the very last line of the same stanza.
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10/2/2017 21:57:19(2:15)MorrisonConrado MedinaBy reading the title I interpret that it refers to death, sorrow, affliction, catastrophe, heart-wrenching and mourning.UnknownThe reader, A female, A maleIt illustrates the death of a loved one possibly a romantic partner. It begins with the details in preparation for a funeral and the process of during and after the funeral. Not sure Commands our attention to focus on the deceased Expresses lossMeditates on mortalityExpresses griefThe message could be a sign of grief and hopelessness. By saying "He is dead" with a capital "H" he is referring to a higher power and could therefore be expressing his anger towards God for letting his loved one die, so he expresses this by saying God is dead as well because he did nothing to stop the death of his loved one. PersonificationMetaphorPersonificationSymbolHyperbolepassionate/ardent, sad/mournful, nostalgic/regretful, somber/grim/grave, angry/bitter/offended, defiant/resistant"Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come"
"He was my North, my South, my East and and West."
"I thought that love would last forever; I was wrong"
 temporal/secular to cosmic/spiritualThe poem's central viewpoint on Love and/or Death is the grief experienced in preparation and during the funeral of a possible romantic partner and the meaning of that loss.
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10/3/2017 3:20:03(5:45)MorrisonLasha TartarashviliDeath. Loss of loved one. Devastation. pain and suffering.A femaleThe readerA woman is moaning a death of a loved person. She is devastated and sad to loose him.not sureCommands our attention to focus on the deceased Expresses griefMeditates on mortalityExpresses griefmessage is meant to disclose the grief to all mighty God and to let the whole world know about the matterHyperbolePersonificationMetaphorSymbolHyperbolesad/mournful, nostalgic/regretfulBring out the coffin, let the mourners come.
Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves
Scribbling on the sky the message He is Dead
I thought that love would last for ever; I was wrong
For nothing now can ever come to any good

 activity to inertiaWomen has been devastated by the loss of her loved one. Her entire life has been put upside down by the loss. she was regretful that she would never experience that kind of love again because he was her world. Without him world would never be as warm or as bright as before.
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10/3/2017 8:50:07(5:45)QueensAndy VegaThe theme of the poem is death, grief, and dependence. The poems deals with someone losing somebody they love, and their world has been destroyed.W.H. AudenThe readerThe situation is the described in the poem is that sense of control that was lost when their loved one died. The line numbers indicate the poem's major thought divisions is I thought that love would last for ever and I was wrong.Meditates on mortalityExpresses griefExpresses lossCommands our attention to focus on the deceased The message that if it was written on the sky is now the dead man is gone, there is no good left in the world and none at all.MetaphorHyperboleHyperboleSymbolPersonificationthoughtful/contemplative, sad/mournful, somber/grim/graveThe phrases that I deduce in the poem's tone is for nothing now can ever come to any good. sound to lightThe poem central viewpoint is death happens and people have a hard time moving on.
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