Media Studies Fall 2018
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CourseScheduleInstructorCreditsElectivePracticeDiversityNonUSFilmPolicyNonWesternDescription
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MDST 2000-Introduction to Media StudiesTR 11:00-12:15; WIL 402Williams, Bruce4NNIntroduces students to the topics, themes, and areas of study that are central to an understanding of media in contemporary society. Focuses on the forms, institutions, functions, and impact of media on local, national, and global communities.
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MDST 2508-Sports Media ProductionM 2:00-3:15; GIL 155Clay, Anna Katherine3NYIn conjunction with UVA's Athletic Foundation and the new ESPN/ACC Production studio inside JPJ, students in this course will participate in all roles associated with sports television production. From writing scripts to working as on-air broadcasters, students will rotate through experiential positions essential to real sports TV production. The class will meet weekly; written assignments will also be required.
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MDST 2700-News WritingTR 9:30-10:45; BRN 203Kelly, Charles3NYIntroductory course in news writing, emphasizing editorials, features, and reporting.
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MDST 2700-News WritingTR 8:00-9:15; BRN 203Kelly, Charles3NYIntroductory course in news writing, emphasizing editorials, features, and reporting.
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MDST 3000-Theory and Criticism of MediaMW 2:00-3:15; Nau 241Press, Andrea3NNThis course introduces students at the beginning of the major to theoretical and critical literature in the field. Topics range from the psychological and sociological experience of media, interpretation and analysis of media forms and aesthetics, theories of audience and reception, anthropological approaches to media as a cultural force, and contemporary theories of media from humanities and social sciences perspectives. The goal of the course is to provide a foundation for thinking critically about media and to give them a sense of media studies as a critical and theoretical field. Restricted to Media Studies majors.
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MDST 3050-History of MediaTR 11:00-12:15; WIL 325Driscoll, Kevin3YNThis is a survey, lecture-format, course on the history of media forms, institutions, and technology from the origins of writing, invention of print technology, through the development of digital media. Attention to the specific characteristics of individual media, the changing role of media as a force in culture, and the continually transforming institutions and business of media will all be touched on. The role of media forms in the creation of public discourse and the social controls on media through censorship, legal constraints, and economic policies will also be examined, largely from within the context of the United States. Students will create a case study of a media work or artifact from a historical perspective.
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MDST 3050-History of MediaTR 2:00-3:15; WIL 325Goin, Keara3YNThis is a survey, lecture-format, course on the history of media forms, institutions, and technology from the origins of writing, invention of print technology, through the development of digital media. Attention to the specific characteristics of individual media, the changing role of media as a force in culture, and the continually transforming institutions and business of media will all be touched on. The role of media forms in the creation of public discourse and the social controls on media through censorship, legal constraints, and economic policies will also be examined, largely from within the context of the United States. Students will create a case study of a media work or artifact from a historical perspective.
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MDST 3105-Latina/o Media StudiesMW 5:15-6:30; CAB 364Goin, Keara3YNYThis course is designed to introduce students to critical analyses of media texts, media industries, and media audiences that help explain the social, political, economic, and cultural locations of Latinas/os in America.
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MDST 3110-Hollywood Goes to AsiaM 3:00-5:30; GIB 141Kokas, Aynne3YNYYFilm production between Asian and Euro-American companies is rapidly on the rise. The fundamental objective of the course is to cultivate a rigorous theoretical understanding of the media industries within a global Asian network. We will ask: What are the cultural, political and economic implications of transnational co-productions both for global and domestic film markets?
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MDST 3140-Mass Media and American PoliticsMW 9:00-9:50; WIL 402Freedman, Paul3YNYExamines the role of mass media in the political process including such topics as print and broadcast news, media and election campaigns, political advertising, and media effects on public opinion and political participation.
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MDST 3230-Basic Multimedia ReportingMWF 12:00-12:50; WIL 214Andrews, Wyatt3NYBasic Multimedia Reporting teaches the hands on skills required for professional level news reporting, news production and short documentaries. Students may choose to specialize in Written Journalism, TV Journalism or Production. However, all students learn proficiency in research, news writing, ethics, camera use, video editing, and where requested, broadcast presentation skills.
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MDST 3310-Sound and CinemaMW 3:30-4:45; GIB 211Hamilton, Jack3YNYThis global cinema history class will proceed chronologically from the dawn of the sound era (early 1930s) to the early 1970s, looking at ways sound shaped filmmaking throughout this period and introducing students to various theoretical and critical writings on the relationship between visual and the aural.
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MDST 3402-War and the MediaTR 2:00-3:15; CAB 323Williams, Bruce3YNYThis course examines media coverage of American wars from World War I to the present. Study of the evolution in media coverage of war provides an ideal vantage point for understanding the changing nature of warfare in the 20th and 21st centuries, war's impact on American society, and the ways in which political elites have attempted to mobilize public support for foreign conflicts. Prerequisite: MDST 2000 or instructor permission.
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MDST 3405-Media Policy and LawTR 11:00-12:15; WIL 301Ali, Christopher3YNYThis course examines the constitutional, legal and regulatory foundations common to print, broadcast media and the Internet. An overview of topics such as libel, invasion of privacy, obscenity and copyright helps students understand forces that shape news and information they receive and prepares them to use media more effectively as citizens, voters and entrepreneurs in an increasingly complex multimedia world.
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MDST 3420-Media and Power in IranTR 9:30-10:45am; BRN 328Blout, Emily3YNYSuccessive Iranian leaders have struggled to navigate the fraught political-cultural space of media in the Islamic Republic, skirting the line between embracing Western communications technologies & rejecting them, between condemning social networking sites & promoting themselves on Facebook. What is the role of media in political power construction in Iran? This class will consider this question through a number of inflection points in history.
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MDST 3500-Comparative Histories of the InternetTR 9:30-10:45; BRN 235Driscoll, Kevin3YNYStudents will learn how computer networks became a medium for interpersonal communication & community. We will "reverse engineer" the technologies & technical cultures that gave rise to the global information infrastructure. Students will explore unfinished systems, abandoned experiments, & other historical "dead ends." This is a hands-on approach to media history & the technical concepts that make the internet possible.
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MDST 3559-@War: Internet and Global PoliticsTR 5:00-6:15pm; BRN 328Blout, Emily3YNYYThis course is will explore the role of the internet and world wide web in national security and international relations. How have networked communication platforms challenged traditional notions of security, conflict, and war? Students will investigate this and other questions related to the security, sovereignty, and stability of democratic states and the Westphalian system in the internet age.
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MDST 3584-Weimer CinemaMW 3:30-4:45; CAB 338Dobryden, Paul3YNYYThis course will familiarize students with the formally adventurous and globally influential cinema of the Weimar Republic. We will examine key films from a range of genres (including horror, comedy, science fiction, crime, and melodrama) by directors such as Fritz Lang, F. W. Murnau, Ernst Lubitsch, and G. W. Pabst. Topics include WWI, class and gender, nature and technology, and relationships between aesthetics, spectatorship, and politics.
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MDST 3640-American Gangster FilmMW 2:00-3:15pm; Dell2 101Little, William3YYThis course offers in-depth examination of American gangster films, tracing the genre's development from early silent film to the present. It investigates the extensive influence the genre has had on the nature of the American film industry and explores how the representation of gangster life on screen articulates crucial anxieties, frustrations, and desires circulating in American society at the time of the film's creation.
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MDST 3650-Shooting the WesternMW 5:00-6:15; WIL 214Little, William3YNThis course provides an overview of the enduring genre of the American Western in its classic and revised forms. The course will address the social and historical contexts informing the films. Students will be asked to perform both cultural and formal analysis of the cinematic texts.
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MDST 3680-The News MediaMWF 11:00-11:50; RFN G004Andrews, Wyatt3YNThis course will examine how the US new media is organized, what gets news coverage and why, and the role the news media plays in our democracy. Issues will include the impact of the digital news revolution, the importance of who owns the media, the differences between the many types of TV news and why the students' personal consumption of news matters. Students will gain an ability to analyze the news, and whether it helps them as citizen.
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MDST 3701-New Media CultureTR 12:30-1:45; GIB 141Ellcessor, Liz3YNA survey of issues in the study of new media and of new media artifacts. Objects studied may include films with digital special effects, digital animation, digital video, video games, digital art, internet art, and others. Theories of new media, media art, media change. Taught primarily via discussion with some lectures. Short papers, class participation, final project. Prerequisite: one course in Media Studies, English, Art History, or a related discipline.
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MDST 3704-Games and PlayTR 11-12:15; BRN 328Duncan, Sean3YNThis course is an introduction to game studies, surveying theories of play and research on contemporary videogames to “folk games” to sports/e-sports. Historic tensions and debates in game studies will form the foundation for the course, then students will engage with game studies as inherently interdisciplinary, developing novel research projects on games and play as well as interrogating their own play experiences.
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MDST 3704-Games and PlayMWF 1:00-1:50; BRN 235Duncan, Sean3YNThis course is an introduction to game studies, surveying theories of play and research on contemporary videogames to “folk games” to sports/e-sports. Historic tensions and debates in game studies will form the foundation for the course, then students will engage with game studies as inherently interdisciplinary, developing novel research projects on games and play as well as interrogating their own play experiences.
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MDST 3760-#BlackTwitter and Black Digital CultureTR 2:00-3:15; WIL 238Clark, Meredith3YNYUsing a mix of scholarly and popular-press readings and an examination of digital artifacts, we will analyze the creations and contributions of Black digital culture from the mid-90s to the present. Covering topics including the early Black blogosphere; the creation of niche content sites like BlackPlanet.com; the emergence of Black Twitter; the circulation of memes, and the use second-screening.
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MDST 4106-Media and the Kennedy EraTR 12:30-1:45; BRN 235Bodroghkozy, Aniko3YNThis course examines mass media – network television, journalism, advertising, cinema – both during the Kennedy years and after to explore the impact, ideas, ideals, and iconography of this presidency.
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MDST 4200-Sex and Gender Go to the MoviesMW 3:30-4:45; CAB 283Press, Andrea3YNYYThis course will examine the ways in which different mass media help to define our cultural ideas about gender differences and the ways in which feminist scholars have responded to these definitions by criticizing existing media images and by creating some alternatives of their own. The course will examine the notion that the mass media might influence our development as gendered individuals and consider different forms of feminist theory.
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MDST 4210-Global Environmental MediaW 3:00-5:30; WIL 244Kokas, Aynne3YNYFrom analysis of documentary, narrative film, animation, gaming, experimental video, and social media, the class will provide students with the tools to bridge the gap between media and scientific messages about environmental issues. Students will develop critical tools to understand the aesthetic, environmental and industrial characteristics of different media practices related to some of the most significant issues facing our world.
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MDST 4559-006-Brazilian MediaM 5:00-7:30; CAB 183Carter, Eli3YNYYNThe objective of this course is to examine the development of Brazilian television from its origins in 1950 to modern-day broadcast television, Pay TV, and Internet programming. It will focus on key policies and players—networks, screenwriters, directors, and independent production companies—formats, different modes of production, and financing mechanisms.
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MDST 4559-004-Game CultureMWF 1:00-1:50; BRN 328Duncan, Sean3YNYNIn this course, students will encounter research on games and cultures of play, with a focus on digital games (video games, mobile games, e-sports) and online discourses around games (forums, Reddit, YouTube, Twitch). Students will develop focused research papers on relevant topics, including “metagaming,” “theorycrafting,” gaming literacy, spectatorship, modding, harassment, representation, diversity, and identity in game cultures.
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MDST 4559-003-Game CultureMWF 11:00-11:50; GIB 241Duncan, Sean3YNYNIn this course, students will encounter research on games and cultures of play, with a focus on digital games (video games, mobile games, e-sports) and online discourses around games (forums, Reddit, YouTube, Twitch). Students will develop focused research papers on relevant topics, including “metagaming,” “theorycrafting,” gaming literacy, spectatorship, modding, harassment, representation, diversity, and identity in game cultures.
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MDST 4701-Media and Everyday LifeTR 12:30-1:45; NAU 141Cavalcante, Andre3YNThis course turns a critical eye towards media’s relationship to everyday life. It conceptualize media, such as cell phones, television, and YouTube for example, as central forces in representing, demarcating and franchising the ordinary. We will explore the construction of ordinariness in media as well as the ways in which audiences engage with media in daily life to achieve `taken for grantedness’. Prerequisite: MDST 2000
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MDST 4704-Political Economy of CommunicationTR 3:30-4:45; NAU 211Ali, Christopher3YNYThis survey course introduces students to the political economy of media. Central themes include political economy’s historical development, its usefulness to the study of media and communications, and its contemporary applications in scholarly research. Students will be introduced to the power dynamics and institutional forces that impact media institutions, industries, ownership, cultural production, consumption and distribution in the US and elsewhere.
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