E-Consultation on SDG 16: "Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels", to be reviewed at the HLPF 2019 under the auspices of ECOSOC (Responses)
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Inputs Received for E-Consultation on SDG 16: "Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels", to be reviewed at the HLPF 2019 under the auspices of ECOSOC
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This file compiles inputs from MGoS on SDG 16, which will be under in-depth review at the HLPF 2019. Outcomes may contain advice, opinions and statements of various information providers. The United Nations does not represent or endorse the accuracy or reliability of any advice, opinion, statement or other information provided through this e-consultation. Our office reserves the right to delete any content/input that is not aligned with the United Nations Charter and/or the principles and purposes of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
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2. Name of Organization5. If you represent a major group or other stakeholder constituency, please indicate which one?6. Based on the evidence, and keeping the regional/local context in mind, what are the most effective ways to accelerate progress towards SDG 16? 7. Based on the evidence, and keeping the regional/local context in mind, where are the biggest shortfalls/gaps towards making progress towards SDG 16?8. How can one best leverage the interlinkages between SDG 16 and the rest of the 2030 Agenda?9. Can you share examples of effective models of multi-stakeholder engagement for the implementation of SDG 16?10. Please, add here any additional comment related to SDG 16.
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Gatef organization
Non-Governmental Organizations, Volunteer Groups
okay
i will tell you at the meeting
i will tell you at the meeting
i have more examples not now
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Amis des Étrangers au Togo: ADET
Non-Governmental Organizations
Décentraliser l'ONG: Amis des Étrangers au Togo : ADET, Financement à l'ONG: ADET
Financement, La paix, la justice
Les modèles efficaces sont l'exemple de l'ONG: Amis des Étrangers au Togo: ADET
Fini
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Cordaid / Civil Society Platform for Peacebuilding and Statebuilding
Non-Governmental Organizations
initiate and support multi-stakeholders processes to prioritize and agree on concerted action to accelerate progress
this SDG goal is very broad, multi-faceted and multi-layered. At the same time it deals with the essence that needs to be in place to progress on the 2030 Agenda. Sometimes these are uneasy or thorny issues that underperforming member states might feel not comfortable about
These interlinkages are important, SDG 16 is an enable and accelerator for progress on the entire agenda - ensuring viable progress is made on SDG 16 is hence a pre-requisite for advancement of the entire agenda
There are a number of examples that can be mentioned here, i.e. OGP and IDPS. We as Civil Society Platform for Peacebuilding and Statebuilding are engaged in the IDPS-partnership where we bring in concerted civil society inputs after coordinating with our global membership
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Chairman of Elmoustkbal organization for Media Studies
Non-Governmental Organizations, Media
Media attention to human rights issues and professional journalistic monitoring, as well as activating the role of civil society organizations.
The gap between the reality of practices on the ground and the routine reports of justice and human rights.
The eradication of poverty, equality and the achievement of sustainable development goals lead to justice and peace in societies.
Poverty and the absence of democracy in some societies led to the spread of conflicts, the discourse of hatred and the spread of terrorism.
Link for My CV:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/cg1294bvrireph5/Amro%20Selim%20CV.doc?dl=0
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Self-employed
Women, Volunteer Groups, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
It's pretty difficult to prioritize it when all is closely intertwined. However, a participative, bottom-up initiatives that empower grassroots, vulnerable groups and other less involved in decision-making process is the most effective way, since the political pipeline is usually concentrated under the hands of powerful long-lasting representatives that do not properly represent the diversity of groups in a certain territory.
Capacity-building and citizenship empowerment initiatives that encourage vulnerable groups to have their demands taken into account in political decision-making.
SDG 10 is an excellent opportunity to make the interlinkage between inclusive societies, reduction of inequalities and put in practice some initiatives that provide empowerment to vulnerable groups.
In Brazil, there are environmental mitigation projects (Projetos de Educação Ambiental) undertaken to empower groups affected by Oil and Gas enterprises to participate in decision-making and transform the political structure into more participative and inclusive. They consist in environmental education projects that are underpinned in people empowerment and advocacy in attempt to achieve more sustainable territories, as well as negatively impactful development projects.
None.
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Psychological Responsiveness NGO
Women, Non-Governmental Organizations, Older Persons
Promote target group meaningful participation and hearing their voices
Positive discussion to turn problems to be peaceful and avoid violence
It seems NARPI - North East Asia Regional Peace building Institute has good model learning
None
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MESA COLOMBIANA DE INCIDENCIA POR LAS ENFERMEDADES CRONICAS
Women, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Workers & Trade Unions, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Education & Academic Entities, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development, CONSUMERS
ARRANGE TO AN INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENT TO STOP SELLING WEAPONS, STOP THE DEVELOPMENT OF ARMAMENT AND PROHIBIT THE MASSIVE USE OF WEAPONS
WAR IS A BUSINESS THAT ONLY FACES A FEW INTERESTS IN THE WORLD. EDUCATION FOR PEACE IS FUNDAMENTAL
ECONOMIC INTERESTS SHOULD NOT BE ABOVE HUMAN RIGHTS, BUT AT THE SERVICE OF THEM. ARE THOSE INTERESTS WHO GENERALLY PROMOTE THE WARS
LA PAZ DE MANDELA, THE PEACE PROCESS WITH THE FARC IN COLOMBIA, TODAY UNFORTUNATELY IN DANGER
PEACE IS A RIGHT COMMON GOAL; THE MULTINATIONAL CAN NOT CONTINUE TO DECIDE FOR THE REST OF HUMANITY
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Pakistan Press Foundation (PPF)
Non-Governmental Organizations
By strengthening capacities and institutions on national level and emphasizing the need for responsive and accountable institutions
Pakistan’s policy-makers are not familiar with the importance of SDG16 goal and targets.
SDG 16 goals are crucial to achieving other SDGs, without Peace, Justice and Inclusion achieving these and other goals can be difficult. It is considered as an enabling goal to achieve others.
Specifically, without a safe and secure environment envisaged in SGD 16.10.1 journalists and media institutions will be not able to hold duty bearers accountable.
In the same way in SDG 16.10.2 public access to information is absolutely necessary for governmental transparency and effective democracy that allows people to seek public documents serves as a critical tool for fighting corruption, make governments more efficient and helping persons exercise their fundamental human rights.
PPF has played a part in promoting and defending freedom of expression, access to information and media safety can be a good model in implementing the goals of SDG 16.10.1 and 16.10.2 indicators specifically.
None
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Goffe Law
The public registered in the Regional Public Mechanism for the Escazu Agreement
To encourage Latin American and Caribbean countries to sign and ratify the Escazu Agreement
The lack of standards/legislation to encourage greater public participation in decision-making processes
Ensure that accountability is promoted for all SDGs
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FIACAT
Non-Governmental Organizations
A good administration of justice is a prerequisite to any stable and peaceful society and to ensuring the Rule of Law. If the justice institutions are more trustworthy (and that also goes through the fight against corruption) then the population will not feel the need to carry just itself.
In many countries where FIACAT and its member organisations work, there is an important lack of trust in the governemental institutions due to a lack of transparency and a high rate of corruption. FIACAT has been working more specifically on the issue of abusive pre-trial detention and has noted that this issue is inherently linked to a bad administration of justice and an insufficient collaboration between stakeholders.
Through FIACAT's project to combat abusive pre-trial detention , the objective is an overall improvement in the functioning of justice and better cooperation between the judicial and prison administration. Collaboration between the judicial administration, the prison administration and civil society is at the heart of the project and is present from the first training workshop that brings together these different actors. In addition, the ACATs met with these various actors before the implementation of the project in their country and regularly throughout the duration of the project to ensure their collaboration. The objective is to make everyone understand that this project does not aim to point out dysfunctions but to jointly find solutions to remedy them in order to facilitate everyone's work. In order for this partnership to be established, the working groups during the workshops are set up in such a way that representatives of each body are represented. This has therefore created an opportunity to lay the foundations for such a partnership.

In general, through the drafting of alternative reports, FIACAT and the ACATs highlight the institutional difficulties existing within the administration of justice. Meetings between FIACAT, the ACATs and the authorities also provide an opportunity to discuss these difficulties and develop measures to remedy them.
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ONG WIÑOY LEPAY KIMÜN
Women, Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, desarrollo indígena
que los estados sean mas inclusivos para el mundo indígena o que las ong tengan mas apoyo para apoyar mejor a las personas.
en los gobiernos. no son inclusivos
el cambio de las leyes de los estados
igualdad no existe en chile, los mapuches somos matados, torturados e inculpados por hechos que jamas se han cometido.
mejorar el acceso a la educación, es la única herramienta de defensa.
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Sukaar Welfare organization
Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Education & Academic Entities, Private Philanthropic Organizations
Yes YesYesYesNo
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Regional Center for International Development Corporation
Non-Governmental Organizations
signing of arms trade treaty
sales of guns that are not accounted for has coursed alot of pain to communities
no peace no development peace and human rights are the foundation to toward attainment of agenda 2030
women involvement in peace and reconciliation process,government process in silencing the the gun and disarmament,ngos campaigns on small arms and light weapons control in eastern Africa
SDG 16 most governments are not concern about it whatever they do is for public relations.
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CIIAT - Universidad de Los Hemisferios
Education & Academic Entities
Increase democracy standars (information, participation an justice) trough the sign and ratification of Escazú Agreement.
Weak empowerment of civil society (people and organizations). Lack of political will. Ineffectiveness of institutional, policy an regulatory frameworks.
Facilitating the generation and outreach of key information and promoting public participation and corresponsability on decision making processes.
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World Federalist Movement Canada (WFMC)
Governance
Public Support and Political Will - Engagement
Lack of engagement with Elected Representatives
Support engagement with Elected Representatives (especially NLR's (National Level Representatives), Parliamentarians, Members of Congress, Etc) by recognizing their importance and creating permanent space for them to participate in the process
Create a Governance Group (Cluster or Assembly) consisting of Elected Representatives to represent citizens at the Global Level in order to advocate for the Sustainable Development Goals through improved governance - At All Levels
Endorse the call for a proposed - UN Parliamentary Assembly (UNPA) - https://en.unpacampaign.org/
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AEST
Science & Technological Community
Privatization of institutions
Strengthening of policies
Document and publish policies to neccessary institutions
NoneNone
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Global Financial Integrity
Non-Governmental Organizations
Governments can implement policies and regulations to make it more difficult to move illicit funds (16.4). Moreover, developing country customs departments should implement a trade risk-assessment database that allows them to identify in real-time (i.e. while the goods are still in the port) when goods have been misinvoiced which will enable them to collect the correct amount of duties and VAT. Global Financial Integrity (GFI) released a study on Jan. 28 that estimates trade misinvoicing among all developing countries at $940 billion in 2015. Lost revenues from this level of misinvoicing are likely to be in the tens of billions annually. GFI has developed a trade risk-assessment database - called GFTrade - and it is being used in Africa now. User- data shows the tool is fit for purpose and can be a game-changer for domestic revenue collection.
As concerns 16.4, lack of political will to focus on illicit flows issues.
The illicit flows component of 16.4 is the only target in the SDGs that will raise money for global development if it is achieved - or only partially achieved. Simply put, if 16.4 is achieved it will provide funds that can be used to achieve the other SDGs.
As concerns 16.4 and IFFs, none come to mind.
IFIs must educate developing country gov'ts of policies, regs and tech that will help reduce IFFs.
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Gamio
Persons with Disabilities
The exercise of legal capacity, and access to justice on equal terms for persons with disabilities
The resistance to the recognition of the enjoyment and exercise of the legal capacity of persons with disabilities. That they are capable of making their own decisions
If the 2030 Agenda puts the dignity of people at the center, it is necessary that the most invisible groups are the main ones in SDG 16
There are still countries that deny birth registration to children with disabilities
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Union of Education Norway
Union for Teachers
To use the position we and other unions enjoy as social partners whereby we have a defined role in negotiations, discussions and decision-making fora.
In Norway it is a big shortfall that a national plan on how to reach the SDG is not elaborated. The work done to acheive the SDGs are in many instances ʺoutsideʺ the ordinary cooperation and organized work life.
As a union for teachers we see the other goals in light of education, and how we can contribute as a union. We believe it is important for an organisation to identify or see the goal of particular interest in light of the other goals.
Cooperation through social dialogue is discussed, but not implemented.
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Make Mothers Matter
Women, Children & Youth, Mothers
Informed, respected, supported and empowered mothers will nurture healthy, educated, violence-free families and communities. Full-potential development, equal opportunities, social justice, and ultimately peace, are born of mothers' work.

Beyond acknowledging mothers' fundamental role in society, education, appropriate legislation and financial support must be provided. Locally, guaranteeing accessible, affordable and high-quality public services and infrastructures will alleviate women's unpaid care working conditions and afford them the time and energy to build and participate in more sustainable, just and peaceful societies. Furthermore, respect, support and inclusion of (often mother-centered) small, grassroots groups and initiatives by governments and NGOs will solidify mothers' contributions to justice and peace in the world.






MMM believes that mothers are the pillars of their families, the transmitters of values.
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Make Mothers Matter
Women, Children & Youth, Mothers
Informed, respected, supported and empowered mothers will nurture healthy, educated, violence-free families and communities. Full-potential development, equal opportunities, social justice, and ultimately peace, are born of mothers' work.

Beyond acknowledging mothers' fundamental role in society, education, appropriate legislation and financial support must be provided. Locally, guaranteeing accessible, affordable and high-quality public services and infrastructures will alleviate women's unpaid care working conditions and afford them the time and energy to build and participate in more sustainable, just and peaceful societies. Furthermore, respect, support and inclusion of (often mother-centered) small, grassroots groups and initiatives by governments and NGOs will solidify mothers' contributions to justice and peace in the world.






MMM believes that mothers are the pillars of their families, the transmitters of values.
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cso
Non-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological Community, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
securing food first for 3rd world countries for no food creates restlessness
none focus on the real situations
capture carbon monoxide through a dollar solution
high level & sophisticated solutions on carbon capture equals to non-implementation
refrigeration has played a vital role on securing earth's natural resources and mending itself.
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Manchester Museummuseums
By museums and others connecting with universal human values and initiatives, e.g. Universal Declaration of Human Rights, to promote global not simply national agendas
nationalistic agendas, populism
through international observance days, to draw on history and promote peaceful and just societies
Connect local and global agendas, and now and the future
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UNSAS
Workers & Trade Unions
The rule of law requires stable institutions but above all independent justice not exploited by policies but also access to justice for all. Good governance also militates in favour of a pacified and open society
The major shortcomings are the non-observance of the rules of law, the lack of democracy and good governance, the non-independence of justice the exorbitant powers of the President of the Republic in our States
Without peace or democracy, it will be difficult to achieve the other objectives. So to achieve sustainable development it is necessary to have peace in our countries and stable institution
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UNSAS
Workers & Trade Unions
The rule of law requires stable institutions but above all independent justice not exploited by policies but also access to justice for all. Good governance also militates in favour of a pacified and open society
The major shortcomings are the non-observance of the rules of law, the lack of democracy and good governance, the non-independence of justice the exorbitant powers of the President of the Republic in our States
Without peace or democracy, it will be difficult to achieve the other objectives. So to achieve sustainable development it is necessary to have peace in our countries and stable institution
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World Indigenous Teaching & Learning Centre Circle (WITLCC)
Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Persons with Disabilities, Education & Academic Entities, Families; Metis/Mestizaje; Human and Environmental Health Practitioners
Peace, justice and inclusion depend on the ethics of acknowleding others as equal persons like ourselves in PRACTICE. In actuality policy should not be required if ethical practices existed. How can Ethics fit in with the SDGs?
Peace is founded on health and well-being. Human commonalities dictate some aspects of justice and others - such as social justice - are culturally related. Thus the same form of 'justice' cannot be equal in all circumstances.
Interreligions and interfaith initiatives perhaps should be core in every aspect of action, practice and progress.
Gift Economy / Giving Principle
See answer to 9
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NGO Federation of Nepal
Non-Governmental Organizations
National multi stakeholder dialogue on SDG 16 and localizing SDG16 in local and province level
Data gap and lack of joint implementation plan
SDG16 is crosscutting goal of all rest of the 2030 agenda. It is political goal and should have interlinked between other goal.
NGO Federation of Nepal (NFN) has been successfully accomplished the very fruitful and contextual program on review of SDG 16 at Kathmandu among the multi-stakeholders. Program was remained more effective with the glorious presence Chairpersons of both house of the federal parliament of Nepal. representative from National Assembly's Hon. Taradevi Bhatta ( Chairperson, Sustainable Development and Good Governance Parliamentry Committee of National Assembly) and Hon. Niru Debi Pal ( Chairperson, Women and Social Parliamentary Committee of House of representatives of Nepal) were actively participated the program and put remarks on SDG 16 and commit for proper implementation of SDG 16 in the country. Likewise, Hon. Dr. Bimala Rai Poudel, Member of Sustainable Development and Good Governance Parliamentry Committee of National Assembly and former member National Planning Commission, Dr. Narayan Paudel, Representative from National Planning Commission SDG implementing committee, CSOs leaders as well activist along with SDGs 16 working groups take part of the today's program with their valuable views and updates.
Focus on SDG16 campaign and prepare SDG 16 indicator by consultation with multi stakeholders.
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IndustriALL Global Union
Workers & Trade Unions
• the key to achieving SDG16 is the full respect, globally, for trade union rights; notably (but not exclusively) those identified in the ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work (1998)
• there is an emerging body of internationally recognized rights, laws, and standards that stands in competition with the "free market" and "free trade" narrative
• it is generally not understood that "free trade" actually requires a global agreement on the ground rules of trade, which therefore establishes a body of international law that will continue to grow over time
• there has been some progress on indicators of poverty reduction and improved quality of health and life, globally
• the ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work (1998) commits Member States to respect and promote principles and rights in four categories, whether or not they have ratified the relevant Conventions; notwithstanding that commitment there continues to be resistance by governments to fully recognizing these fundamental rights.
• there continues to be very little attention paid to the global (especially USA) military budget and how it compares with amounts needed to mitigate and adapt to climate change
• nations that think they can have it both ways: rules-based international trade and the right to ignore rules when it is politically expedient to do so
• recent failures of democracies to produce quality leaders who are interested in the public good
• there is truth in the slogan, "no justice, no peace"
• old sins once thought nearly defeated, such as racism, intolerant religious fundamentalism, and jingoistic nationalism (accompanied by trade wars as well as old-fashioned wars of conquest) are on the rise
• a strong and healthy trade union movement helps to reduce inequality and ensure human dignity, health, wellbeing, and social standards; by so doing achievement of all SDGs is facilitated
• peace and inclusion facilitates the achievement of all of the other SDGs
• trade unions facilitate social dialogue, both within and without the formal negotiations of collective bargaining agreements
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Save Cambodia
Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Business & Industry, Education & Academic Entities
Having governmental standards and engaging with non-governmental organizations and other stakeholders to develop, monitor and implement the standard.
Decision making based how high one's economic status is versus basing on vulnerable groups and efforts opposite of the SDGs to sustain citizens, institutions, and overall region.
Accountability on all parties.
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Tebtebba (Indigenous Peoples International Centre for Policy Research and Education)
Indigenous Peoples
"Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels"
1. Lack of access to justice to address historical injustices against indigenous peoples, especially the appropriation of lands by government for state projects (public parks, forest reservations, research stations, etc.), since the American colonial government and the adoption of the same Regalian Doctrine by subsequent governments, which until now are the roots of unpeace in ancestral territories
2. Ineffective implementation of the Indigenous Peoples Rights Act, especially within the State bureaucracy, which is causing conflicts/confusion within and between indigenous peoples, and the leading to the tedious process of acquiring Certificate of Ancestral Domain Title over ancestral territories
3. Inaction of State agencies on reports of violations against indigenous peoples rights
4. Closure and harassment of indigenous peoples' community schools without due process
5. Martial law in Mindanao, home to a majority of the country's indigenous peoples, which is used to harass, intimidate and coerce indigenous peoples human rights defenders (IPHRDs) and their communities
6. Killings of IPHRDs
Legal recognition of the right of indigenous peoples to their ancestral domains, with the corollary right to manage, control and govern these, will allow indigenous peoples to address, poverty, hunger, strengthen their own institutions, develop their own resources on land and below water, education systems, mediate peace, develop traditional livelihoods and decent work opportunities, and other SDGs.
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FEDWASUN
Non-Governmental Organizations
Integrity in all key stakeholders
Rules are made to address certain situation, later situation may be difference, legal literacy and corruption controlling
Awareness of rights and duties
Water conflict solved by cooperation of the all stakeholders, pending project restarted with cooperation in Kailali
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MPIDO
Women, Indigenous Peoples
1. A favorable democratic government is key to realization of SDG 16.
2. Implementation of legal ruling and interpretation of policy provision on human rights is key to peace and inclusivity.
3. Ratification and implementation of regional / global agreements on human rights, peace and other interventions is key
Corruption in government, legal systems and daily living is hampering the efforts for peaceful coexistence and holding state parties accountable.
Peace, inclusivity and holding states accountable by the Civil societies / activists is critical to overall development and the realization of the agenda 2030.
1. Kenya's journey in REDD+ readiness is characteristically inclusive with IPs participating in the preparation of the readiness proposal.
2. Kenya has been held accountable to the respect of human rights by various regional courts. this has increased the respect of Human rights in all areas.
The recognition and respect of human rights is key to peaceful coexistence, inclusive societies.
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KABAROLE RESEARCH AND RESOURCE CENTRE (KRC)
Women, Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations
the SDG 16 needs to be tailored to the existing local protocals like Vision 2063, regional frameworks, locally contexualise the SDG in line with the local context and this will promote popularisation of the SDG 16
Locally there is general lack of knowledge on the SDG16 which requires a consolidated effort towards addressing the SDG hence calling for continuous popularsation of the SDG, the internal conflicts between the pastoral indigenous communites like the pastoralists and the famers
Identifying the key indicators that contribute to other SDGs since all the SDGs are not indipendent of the other, the success of one leads to the success of the other.
strengthening the local working groups: this can best be done thorugh formation of regional SDG 16 groups with constant follow up
Currently Uganda has initiated an SDG16+ working group that requires to be strengthened
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National Dalit Movement for Justice (NDMJ-NCDHR)
DALIT RIGHTS ORGANIZATION
In South Asia over 220 Million are affected by caste; of which 201 live in India. Caste hierarchy of the society based on ‘birth’ continues to discriminate, exclude and marginalize a large section of people–Dalits (Scheduled Caste) continue to perform ‘unclean traditional’ occupations based on caste; a majority continue to live in segregated spaces; do not own assets, or lands and are vulnerable to caste based atrocities; denied justice, equality and dignity. Thus, to make progress in SDG 16 access to justice can be possible only by "Strengthening Criminal Justice System" as Law Enforcement bodies - Police, lawyers, prosecution and Judges reflect “caste prejudice”. There is an attitudinal issue impacting fair investigation & trail process in cases of caste based and gender based atrocities. Thus its important to hold awareness camps for judges, prosecutors, lawyers on human rights, caste, gender perspectives to overcome the layered prejudices that are operational in the systems and minds. Secondly, regular capacitation of the communities on existing legal provisions of national and international mechanisms is essential for the communities to be strengthened in legal knowledge and the available safeguards. The unaware status is the most dangerous position that's plagued the human race leading to exploitation under caste system, capitalism and modern slavery.
There are several gaps, increasing violence against dalit community as they assert their rights, entitlements, or refuse to abide by caste structural code. The special legislation SCs and STs Prevention of Atrocities Act, 1989,Amended 2015 recorded high incidents over last 5 years; 2014 recorded over 50,000 cases of atrocities. Rising violence & discrimination against children with over 100,000 cases reported in 2016. Legal Impunity is very much high in India though having many progressive laws; the implementation of laws and rules are major issues. Most often law enforcement agencies reflect caste-gender based prejudice- reference is Kuruvan community in Tamil Nadu, and in many caste based massacres there have been acquittals. Judicial impunity is also in violence against dalit women and children with high acquittal and pendency in courts. Supreme Court of India in 2018 came out against the Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) Act 1989 as Amended 2015; in the ruling it diluted provisions of the act and overlooked the historical context on which the Act was formulated in the first place and completely ignoring the struggles of caste survivors and efforts of the Dalit organizations coalition. Dalit Human rights Defenders-Women HRD are falsely implicated by police-dominant community for addressing issues caste/gender based violence. Dalit community's Socio-economic inequality, justice denial are major gaps to achieve SDGs 4, 5, 10, 16 and 17.
SDG 16 access to justice is key goal of SDGs, the goal is inclusive of the rest of the goals standing for justice, equality and peace and strengthening of institutions. Without SDG 16, achieving other goals such as SDG 4, 5, 10 and even 17 is not possible. Access to justice is also linked to access to education, equality of all the groups especially, the marginalized and socially excluded groups like the SCs and STs (Dalits and Adivasi), women, children, indigenous groups and many other displaced or excluded groups in the world. Thus, focusing on Dalit Rights as Human Rights is the best to pool efforts in identifying the most marginalized in these kinds of social stratification of society and making a difference in achieving equity, freedom for these communities and the like.
We try to organize Interface meetings with the Government elected commissions for the Scheduled Castes, Tribe and Minorities as well as with the Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment the nodal ministry on issues affecting the communities for action and better enforcement of Legislation and law for the protection of people from caste based atrocities.
SDGs urgently needs to declare Dalit Rights as Human Rights
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East Africa Trade Union Confederation
Workers & Trade Unions
Through Civic Education
Political instability , nepotism, conflict among others greatly affects making progress.
When there is no peaceful coexistence, marginalization and discrimination among people in a country then implementation of the other goal will not be fully achieved.
None that I know in my region
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Article 19 Brasil
Women, Non-Governmental Organizations
To strengthen public institutions through fighting corruption and promoting transparency has been a common goal from the whole civil society in Brazil and the country’s control organs for accomplishing SDG 16. The evidences for it are: an increase in the number of disciplinary actions for undue advantage and cases of responsibilization of private entities for harmful acts towards public management between 2016 and 2017. It was made possible only after the promulgation of a decree on the regulamentation of the Sistema de Gestão de Procedimentos e Responsabilização de Entes Privados that made compulsory the register of the aforementioned offences.
Furthermore, the National Strategy for Fighting Corruption and Money Laundry (ENCCLA) was created, and was coordinated by the Ministry of Planning since 2003. With almost 70 participating organs, the initiative showed positive outcomes, such as the implementation of the National Program for Training and Capacitation for Fighting Corruption and Money Laundry (PNLD in portuguese) and the creation of a way of measuring transparency for the annual evaluation of governmental organs.
Therefore, the most efficient tool for implementing SDG16 has been investing in more transparency and enhancing social participation mechanisms. For that matter, we also highlight the existence of the Access to Information Law (LAI), the National Open-Data Policy and the Open Government Partnership, better described in the items that follow this consultation.
Domestically, the brazilian state plays a role of a major agent of violence - as the increasing police lethality and the brutality of the penitentiary system have shown. Today, this context of institutional violence and injustice is the highest obstacle for the implementation of SDG 16. The constant use of punitive and repressive measures on the strategies used by security organs led to mass incarceration, resulting that 34% of prison population are under pre-trial custody and only 24 out of 27 states have Public Defenders offices - and only 4 of them have offices in all districts, which undermines the right to access to justice.
Besides state violence, the major social inequality in Brazil and structural racism are responsible for creating obstacles for full racial equality within the country. One big evidence are he homicide indexes, for example. According to a UNICEF report “A Familiar Face: Violence in the lives of children and adolescents”, in 2014, 75% of young men who were killed were either black or multiracial.
The best way to interconnect the SDG 16 and the rest of the 2030 Agenda is to be aware that sustainable development will only be accomplished if based on good governance and transparency, in a way that all people feel empowered to take bigger control over policies that impact their lives and get to know better the government’s procedures.
However, this is only possible within an environment where information can really flow, so that access to information enables better participation in the implementation of the Agenda as a whole. We won’t be able to accomplish all SDGs if policies are built with transparency and participation.
The Open Government Partnership is one of today’s most important multi-stakeholder engagement mechanisms that fights for a transparent government and stronger public institutions in Brazil. In the national level, there’s a Multi-ministerial Committee, a Civil Society Working Group (that works alongside the Comptroller's Office) and Director Committee - although the Ministerial body has a bigger decision-making power and no civil society participation. The working group defines and monitors the action plans chosen through open consultation, and is responsible for the implementation in four branches: Transparency, Civic Participation, Accountability and Technology and Innovation. Also, there are sectoral commitments regarding environmental issues, open education, gender, etc.
Besides OGP national experience, the Internet Management Committee (CGI.br) can also be considered an important space for multi-sectoral governance in Brazil. The committee has the main task of establishing strategic guidances in the use and the development of the internet in Brazil and engages different sectors by bringing civil society and government to the conversation. The CGI.br and NIC.br actions embraces from technical aspects to safety procedures recommendations, researches and policy evaluation.
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Union to Union
Workers & Trade Unions
If we wish to promote peaceful and inclusive societies, it is highly important to remember that trade unions are actors for democratization, good governance, freedom of assembly and freedom of association. Since this SDG is also about providing access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels, one must also remember that journalists’ unions and trade unions in the public sector are important for increasing transparency, reducing corruption and upholding freedom of expression in the world. Trade unions also promote social dialogue, which is a tool that contributes to institutional stability by promoting consensus among social partners on socio-economic policies.
Failing to recognize or ignoring human and labor rights, freedom of association and collective bargaining and social dialogue are creating gaps in the progress towards peaceful, democratic and inclusive societies.
Also, democratic societies and institutions are necessary for enabling economic and social development with decent working conditions. For example, social dialogue requires an enabling environment as well as an effective institutional framework. This includes the respect for fundamental freedoms of right to association and right to collective bargaining to democratic and independent employers and workers’ organizations, and the respect for the ‘social partners’ in the dialogue.
Human and labor rights, freedom of association and collective bargaining and social dialogue are not only crucial columns of democracy-building and peaceful institutions, but are also needed in order to create decent work and fair working conditions. This SDG is obviously also linked to SDG 8. It is however also obvious that peace, access to justice and inclusive institutions are crucial for every aspect of the society, not least aspects that are important for trade unions, such as gender equality, responsible productions and effective climate actions. This SDG is therefore linked to every goal in the agenda.
The involvement, respect and active participation in democratic institutions, such as the International Labour Organization, are crucial. ILO is an institution that brings together governments, employers and workers of 187 member States, to set labor standards in the world of work, which is important for everything from freedom of press to the freedom of assembly. ILO is thus an example of a crucial cooperation and multi-stakeholder model that may promote a peaceful and sustainable development.
Another model relevant for this goals is of course social dialogue, which is a model that supports accountable and inclusive labor market institutions.

Social dialogue requires an enabling environment as well as an effective institutional framework.
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Girls Not BridesWomen
Ensuring that a multi-sectoral approach is applied to development, with approaches to ensuring peace, justice and strong institutions aligned closely with other development priorities such as health, education and gender equality.

In addition, achieving progress towards SDG 16 requires a multi-stakeholder approach, including civil society, government, UN and intergovernmental agencies, and academia.
Child marriage is a form of violence: it puts girls at particular risk of sexual, physical and psychological violence throughout their lives. Girls who marry as children are particularly at risk of violence from their partners or their partners’ families. They are consistently more likely to experience domestic violence by their partner than girls who marry later. Forced sexual initiation and early pregnancy often have long lasting effects on the physical and mental health of child brides for years after.

Ending child marriage and ending violence against children and women require addressing the root causes of violence, which include discriminatory gender norms that devalue girls and women. Investments in ending violence against children and gender-based violence can thus be leveraged to achieve goals in ending child marriage, and vice versa. Ending child marriage also requires implementation of strong legal frameworks which set the minimum age of marriage at 18 and protect girls’ rights. The continued lack of implementation of minimum age of marriage laws effectively undermines the rule of law. By supporting programmes which address child marriage, and ensuring implementation of legislation which establishes a minimum age of marriage, governments can address a widespread and systematic violation of the rule of law in their countries.
A lack of attention to child marriage undermined the achievement of six of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). We have since learned that child marriage is a core development and human rights issue, which hinders the achievement of many other development goals: half of the SDGs will not be achieved without significant progress on child marriage, including those related to poverty, health, education, nutrition, food security, economic growth and reduction of inequality, and other manifestations of gender inequality.
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Comision Huairou
Women, Non-Governmental Organizations, Farmer, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
Focus efforts to reduce violence in the private space, especially violence against girls, boys and women. In addition to giving focus to rights to justice systems.
The patriarchal structure of the family, society (which is reflected in the institutions of the State), corruption and ignorance of the rulers on human rights.
It is totally linked. A society that has no peace within their homes, in the streets and jobs, can not move forward. It is necessary to build a State of Law
xx
Justice is a snake, and only bites the barefoot" E. Galeano.
43
Unio
Workers & Trade Unions
The goals should be institutionalised nationally by way of a wide-reaching white paper as a first step towards a national plan for realising the sustainable development goals.
Further: The social partners must be involved in the planning, execution and evaluation of the government’s work on the UN’s sustainable development goals.
And: special parliamentary hearings on the realisation of the sustainable development goals should be held in connection with the presentation of the proposed annual budget
• Weakness in coordination. Need of national plan.
• The sustainable development goals still not incorporated in education at all levels – from kindergarten to higher education – and enable the institutions to exercise this mandate.
• Cooperation through social dialogue is discussed, but not implemented
Highlight and emphasis on social dialogue.
Implement knowledge about SDG s in education om all levels. Intersectionality and interdiciplin in education embedded in practice
Focus on Just changes/transition and decrease wealth gap in society in general
• Ensure that the sustainable development goals are introduced to the social partnership.
• Use joint fora that bring together labour unions, employer organisations, civil society and business to highlight and strengthen the efforts to realise the sustainable development goals.
• co-operation with key social institutions such as research/educational institutions, museums, archives and libraries to reach the sustainable development goals.

• involve the local and regional level
• Social dialogue
• extensive financing.
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Forum de la Jeunesse pour le Développement Durable (FOJEDD)
Non-Governmental Organizations
- Support and build the capacity of CSOs on citizen control of public action
- Set up a support fund for states that take initiatives to improve governance
- Create sub-regional consultation frameworks to facilitate exchanges and sharing of experience between States on the one hand and between civil society organizations on the other
- Put in place mechanisms and disciplinary measures forcing companies to fulfill their social responsibility duties
- Support electoral processes in countries to ensure free and fair elections.
- Low collaboration between the state and civil society
- Insufficient citizen initiative to compel public authorities to establish effective bases for democratic participatory governance
- States are not open to citizens.
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FEMUM ALC -Huairou Commission Member
Women
in LAC Region, the two principal challenges around the SDG16 progress are the peace process in post conflict context, and gender violence. The most effective ways are political commiment and social pact to guarantee policies, public budget and services ( linked with M&E, and set of indicators)
post conflict societies as several ALC nations, couldnt resolve the impact of war over justice system, human rights, and couldnt ending peace process yet.
Localization of global agenda, expressed in local and comunity services to guarante justice, delivery services to attend vulnerable sector of population, Subnational Government and Municipal have a vital role. Peace and justice are the bases of SDG 2030 implementation and connecting with SDG on poor, health, gender, equality, water, urban areas etc. and NUA-Hab3
we are connecting the SDG 16 with UNSC1325 to emphasized peace/justice/post conflict/disasters
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Equipo de Relaciones Internacionales de CGT RA
Workers & Trade Unions
Promover la ratificación de los convenios fundamentales de la OIT en los países, teniendo en cuenta lo expresado en la meta 16.2. Estos convenios son: Convenio núm. 182 de la OIT sobre las peores formas de trabajo infantil y Convenio núm. 138 de la OIT sobre la edad mínima de admisión al empleo.
Dos elementos resultan fundamentales para avanzar sobre el Objetivo 16 y la meta relativa a la gobernanza: la negociación colectiva y el diálogo social. En este sentido, entendemos importante institucionalizar el dialogo social con participación sindical efectiva. Asimismo, valoramos el fortalecimiento de la negociación colectiva con garantías para el ejercicio de los derechos de sindicación y de constitución de sindicatos.
Los Estados deben garantizar el derecho a la libertad sindical en tanto constituye la base de las libertades civiles y una herramienta fundamental para garantizar la justicia y la paz social.
A nivel regional se registran situaciones de presiones, persecuciones, campañas de desprestigio y distintos actos de violencia contra dirigentes sindicales que condicionan el ejercicio de la libertad sindical.
En Argentina en particular se han registrado en los últimos años conductas de injerencias indebidas en la vida sindical y acciones punitivas contra el patrimonio de las organizaciones gremiales.
Asimismo se han identificado prácticas limitativas de “baja intensidad” como la morosidad en la resolución de simples trámites administrativos.
La corrupción corroe la democracia y al acceso equitativo a los servicios del Estado, así como el crecimiento económico. Además, la corrupción en las compras por parte de instituciones del Estado fomenta la infiltración de organizaciones delictivas en los servicios públicos.
El fortalecimiento del diálogo social y su institucionalización efectiva resulta un eje transversal que debe adoptarse para la concertación de políticas públicas orientadas a lograr los objetivos de desarrollo sostenible.
La articulación de los sindicatos del Mercosur con los organismos de derechos humanos, en particular en los programas de Memoria, Verdad y Justicia constituyen un ejemplo de partes interesadas en lo referido a la defensa de la democracia, los derechos humanos y la actuación de los tribunales internacionales en materia de delitos de lesa humanidad.
Libertad sindical, derecho de negociación colectiva y diálogo social son pilares de la democracia
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Comite de Juventud de CSI - Secretaria de Relaciones Internacionales de CGT RA
Workers & Trade Unions
"Promover la ratificación de los convenios fundamentales de la OIT en los países, teniendo en cuenta lo expresado en la meta 16.2. Estos convenios son: Convenio núm. 182 de la OIT sobre las peores formas de trabajo infantil y Convenio núm. 138 de la OIT sobre la edad mínima de admisión al empleo.
Dos elementos resultan fundamentales para avanzar sobre el Objetivo 16 y la meta relativa a la gobernanza: la negociación colectiva y el diálogo social. En este sentido, entendemos importante institucionalizar el dialogo social con participación sindical efectiva. Asimismo, valoramos el fortalecimiento de la negociación colectiva con garantías para el ejercicio de los derechos de sindicación y de constitución de sindicatos.
Los Estados deben garantizar el derecho a la libertad sindical en tanto constituye la base de las libertades civiles y una herramienta fundamental para garantizar la justicia y la paz social.
A nivel regional se registran situaciones de presiones, persecuciones, campañas de desprestigio y distintos actos de violencia contra dirigentes sindicales que condicionan el ejercicio de la libertad sindical.
En Argentina en particular se han registrado en los últimos años conductas de injerencias indebidas en la vida sindical y acciones punitivas contra el patrimonio de las organizaciones gremiales.
Asimismo se han identificado prácticas limitativas de “baja intensidad” como la morosidad en la resolución de simples trámites administrativos.
La corrupción corroe la democracia y al acceso equitativo a los servicios del Estado, así como el crecimiento económico. Además, la corrupción en las compras por parte de instituciones del Estado fomenta la infiltración de organizaciones delictivas en los servicios públicos.
El fortalecimiento del diálogo social y su institucionalización efectiva resulta un eje transversal que debe adoptarse para la concertación de políticas públicas orientadas a lograr los objetivos de desarrollo sostenible.
La articulación de los sindicatos del Mercosur con los organismos de derechos humanos, en particular en los programas de Memoria, Verdad y Justicia constituyen un ejemplo de partes interesadas en lo referido a la defensa de la democracia, los derechos humanos y la actuación de los tribunales internacionales en materia de delitos de lesa humanidad.
Libertad sindical, derecho de negociación colectiva y diálogo social son pilares de la democracia
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ITUC
Workers & Trade Unions
To implement and achieve SDG 16, promoting the decent work agenda and its four pillars - employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue – is key. Human and labour rights, freedom of association and collective bargaining, hand in hand with social dialogue are not only essential ingredients for sustainable economic growth and job creation, but also the pillars of democracy-building. Building and fortifying democratic processes is in turn a cornerstone for just development.
Working for peace, democracy and rights means securing a decent standard of living for all. It means social justice, equality and equity for everybody.
Shrinking democratic space for working people and unchecked corporate greed are on the rise according to our annual ITUC Global Rights Index. The number of countries with arbitrary arrests and detention of workers increased from 44 in 2017 to 59 in 2018, and freedom of speech was constrained in 54 countries.

Further information: https://www.ituc-csi.org/IMG/pdf/ituc-global-rights-index-2018-en-final-2.pdf
There critical connections between targets in goal 16 and the achievement of goal 8 and 10, and the opposite way around.
While countries that embrace a social model recognise the benefits of social dialogue, the relevance of this form of governance has yet to be fully understood within sustainable development debates.

The following paper aims to provide an overview of the contribution of social dialogue to sustainable development and outlines the conditions required to maximise this contribution: https://www.ituc-csi.org/IMG/pdf/tudcn_issue_paper_-_social_dialogue_development_en.pdf
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The Amal Alliance
Women, Children & Youth
Addressing psychosocial challenges at the root cause helps to prevent violence from reoccurring in various communities. Specifically, promoting development of local communities while fostering inclusivity leads to more sustainable, accessible and just societies.
Currently, in displacement scenarios, there is a massive gap between the individuals of a host community and the people who have been welcomed into this new community. In order to promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, it is necessary to bridge this gap and break down barriers between community members. In this example of displacement, the displaced people must also feel represented and advocated for in the community. Therefore, the people working to promote their inclusion and access to opportunity should share their values or ideas in order to promote a safe and accepting environment.
SDG 16 relates to all of the 2030 Agenda because promoting peace and inclusivity in one aspect of an individual’s life directly ties to their wellbeing in other areas. In order to best leverage coexistence and acceptance, a person must also have access to clean water, be free from poverty, have gender equity, and other rights outlined in the 2030 agenda. If people do not have equal opportunity, it is not an equal and just society.
iACT is a refugee-led solution operating in Chad to work with local populations through the people who are affected. Furthermore, the Amal Alliance works in collaboration with Lebanese organizations and local partners in the Beqaa Valley for training, as well as to directly engage with refugee populations.
For stateless individuals, living in a peaceful environment can be difficult if they feel unwelcome.
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IMCS Pax RomanaChildren & Youth
The most effective ways is to empower youth and women on values of common good, transformational leadership and solidarity/social justice mindset. It is important that the values take the most important part in the desire of establishing institutions because these institutions are led by people. Establishing sustainable and credible institutions and creating a climate of justice and peace will start by considering the crucial role of youth and women. It is important therefore to support youth-led organisations to ensure access of knowledge, values and leadership skills for their constituencies
In West Africa context, I think more about the instrumentalisation of legal process either for political or economic processes. Authorities make all the possible to not violate the law (constitutions and other dispositions) not because they have democratic mindset, but to justify why they are doing what they are doing. This makes institutions still weak in Africa and there is no much confidence in them, especially in Francophone Africa.
Moreover, the dependance of african national institutions vis-a-vis of western multinational corporations influence deeply the credibility of institution and the establishment of climate of social justice and peace.
The autonomy of national institutions from the corporation and their less instrumentalisation for political games will be one of the important way of working towards societies of justice and peace in francophone west Africa. Indeed the conflict and situations of poverty in these countries are systemic.
If there is not credible institutions, there is no way of working efficiently becaus, most of the social issues we are confronted to are systemic. The countries that has good marks in implementing any SGD has potentially good institutions that leads social transformation
Taking the example of the resolution 2250, an example of multistakeholder engagement will involve youth led associations and youth leaders, development agencies, governements (political parties and representant of political/juridical institutions) and civil society.
Governments plays a crucial role in the advancement of the implementation of SDG 16.
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NGO Peace One Day Mali
Non-Governmental Organizations
Social cohesion peacebuilding
Violent Extremism
Peacebuilding and Conflict Management by Capacity building trainings and Mediation
Social cohesion peacebuilding education and implication of all the civile society organisation's
Supporting local communities affected by crisis and Violent Extremism
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Morya Samajik Pratishthan
Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Workers & Trade Unions, Volunteer Groups
Effective Participation to Proper Organization and shareholders
ectully Many People form the World Dont know abut SDG Program
53
Plan International
Non-Governmental Organizations
SDG 16.2:
1. Increase funding: Governments need to allocate adequate funding and ensure child-centred budgets and investments in legal and child protection systems as well as infrastructure to collect and share data on violence against children.
2. Listen to and involve children: Children are agents of change. Governments, international agencies and partners must formalize and fund processes to ensure meaningful and active inclusion of children.
3. Change harmful social norms and practices through state legislation, investing in systems, and public campaigns: States must proactively promote gender equality, positive parenting, education and life skills.
4. Report on states’ progress through Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs): Increase transparency and accountability on commitments made to end all forms of violence against children through regular reporting on processes and involving key stakeholders in monitoring states efforts.
5. Invest in what works to prevent violence: Scale up existing practices by building on longstanding and documented good practices from civil society using existing guidance materials and tools. Strengthen the capacity of local civil society organisations to hold governments accountable.
6. Leave no one behind: Place greater emphasis on meeting the needs and ensuring the rights of the most vulnerable children. This involves an approach that is age and gender-responsive, and inclusive. It also requires investment in the most fragile contexts.
1. Negative social norms that condone violence in society: across the world, it is the negative social norms that allow violence to become commonplace in society that need to be tackled. There remains too little evidence on interventions that work, and too little funding for long-term programming. Without this, we will never achieve the progress we need towards ending violence.
2. Conflict and emergencies: Too many interventions assume fully functioning governments, but we are well aware that the most vulnerable, disadvantaged individuals will be those living through emergencies - whether short-term or protracted, caused by conflict or disaster. There are too few interventions addressing violence in these contexts, and very little involving work across the humanitarian-development nexus.
3. Online threats to children: The rising threat of violence against children online must be tackled in a more systematic way. There is too little intergovernmental cooperation, a weak legal framework, and too little understanding of the space, to make much headway in tackling violence online.
1. Ending violence in schools: much work can be done to end violence in and through schools. This means dealing with violence in a gender-sensitive way through school curricula, classroom pedagogies and learning materials; as well as dealing with violence that takes place within schools, through a whole-school approach including codes of conduct, strong reporting mechanisms and support for survivors.
2. Tackling gender-based violence: Ending violence against all children (16.2) must be linked to ending violence against girls (5.2) and harmful practices (5.3). More must be done to understand the gender dynamics that drive all forms of violence, and gender-based violence against children more specifically. Harmful practices must equally be viewed as a form of violence against children.
3. Dealing with violence across borders and during emergencies: All forms of violence are significantly increased in conflict, emergencies and where there are weak prevention and response structures in place. In particular trafficking and the worst forms of child labour are an increased threat (linked to goal 8.7). Much more must be done to protect children, and girls in particular, from trafficking before, during and after emergencies, and to ensure victims are able to access support services and safe, gender- and age-sensitive reporting mechanisms.
1. The CSO Forum to End Violence Against Children is the independent voice to End Violence against Children. A coalition of 15 civil society organizations working at national, regional and global levels to end all forms of violence against children. This Forum is an advocacy body, utilising connections in over 20 countries to share information, collaborate, and share knowledge and evidence.
54
Netherland Institute for Multiparty Democracy
Political parties and local partner organizations working on democracy support
Equal participation of all groups of a society is critical for developing effective, accountable and inclusive institutions. At the same time, equal participation needs to be interpreted as both inclusion within the system - (i.e. representation and participation of women, youth and minority groups - and by the system – by allowing mechanisms of consultation and accountability. In this sense, institutions must ensure the representation and participation of women, youth and minority groups, as well as ensure institutions themselves take measures to engage people. Only then can institutions be truly effective, representative and accountable to the needs and interest of all people.

Furthermore, encouraging broader participation of all groups within institutions helps transform societies by breaking down kinships that make institutions less accountable. Doing so will help promote peaceful and inclusive societies, and ultimately achieve the overarching goal of “leaving no one behind”. This will help ensure greater sustainable development over time. The HLPF itself offers a mechanism for increasing participation within the institutions, via the Volunteer National Review process by engaging stakeholders in this process through informing, consulting, involving, collaboration and empowerment.
For institutions to be effective, accountable and inclusive, all groups need to be recognised, represented and engaged in policymaking and governance. To date, substantial investments have been made to train women, youth and minority groups, in order to increase their inclusion within institutions. Despite these efforts, politically marginalised groups continue to be under-represented and excluded from participation, meaning their rights are not respected, protected or fulfilled. Capacity strengthening alone is not sufficient to change mind-sets and barriers: we need to invest in the transformation of social norms and structures and create space and opportunities for women and excluded groups at all levels to enter leadership positions and decision-making processes. This involves tackling the barriers that prevent inclusiveness from within the system and through transformative policies across the economic, social, cultural and local context.
As noted above, normative change is needed in order for women and marginalised groups to have equal opportunities for participation. It would therefore be of interest to explore synergies with other SDGs addressing social and normative change, in order to assess how these actions foster a more enabling environment for political inclusion, participation and representation. More explicitly, the links to SDG5 and SDG10 can be leveraged to achieve SDG16: by empowering women and girls and reducing inequalities, we can create more effective, accountable and inclusive institutions, and vice versa.
Multiparty dialogue platforms can have influence in making politics more inclusive. In Kenya, Georgia and Guatemala, such multiparty dialogue platforms, led by the political parties themselves, have resulted in legislative and institutional reforms. The broad participation of both government and opposition parties, on an equal basis, led to increased opportunities for women’s political participation and inclusion in political decision-making. In Kenya, the platform lobbied for an affirmative action provision for women in the constitution, which was adopted in 2010.

In Georgia, NIMD’s efforts resulted in special legislative measures and financial incentives to political parties to promote women in politics and their greater representation in parliament. This multistakeholder approach combined not only raising awareness on an issue but also creating spaces for increased number of women in parliament.

In Guatemala, the local NIMD office supported the Women’s Committee of the national Parliament in developing a transformative policy against femicide. NIMD also helped the Committee to elaborate criteria for strengthening mechanisms for preventing violence against women and protecting victims from aggressors. This reflects how social transformation can be a step towards guaranteeing a safer environment for women to develop and ultimately become active members of their communities.
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Concern Worldwide
Non-Governmental Organizations
Evidence demonstrates that targeted investment in, and sustained political leadership on, conflict prevention is the most effective way to accelerate progress.
SDG 16 cannot be achieved simply through responding to/addressing the consequences of conflict. Concern’s research in CAR and South Sudan points to the legacy of violence in conflict-affected contexts, long after return. This legacy plus the fact that conflicts more complex, multifaceted and protracted, makes the case for upstream conflict prevention efforts.
Only a strategic investment and sustained political leadership on conflict prevention will make peaceful, inclusive and just societies a reality. Beyond the moral imperative to prevent conflict and save countless lives, evidence shows that such an investment is cost-effective and delivers major returns. Estimates indicate that for every dollar invested in peacebuilding and conflict prevention, the global community can expect to save as much as $16 in the costs incurred as the result of future conflicts. To achieve this, collectively UNMS should support SG Guterres’ agenda for a surge of diplomacy and meet his call to increase funding to $500m for a reformed UN peacebuilding architecture. Individual international actors must promote peace and prevent conflict in their international assistance: in 2016, just 2% of total gross Official Development Assistance (ODA) went to conflict prevention and only 10% to peacebuilding activities.
Beyond women’s roles as victims in violence, there is a distinct gendered gap in peacebuliding and conflict prevention efforts that is hindering progress towards SDG 16. In UN coordinated appeals, protection funding has one of the lowest percentage of requirements met, with under one-third of appeals funded, and GBV interventions in turn receive at most 30% of protection funding.

Evidence shows that targeted support for empowering women and promoting gender equality is an effective way of sustaining peace. Women must be meaningfully included in efforts to address these legacies and in post-conflict institutions and governance to ensure sustainable peace and effective, inclusive institutions. UN Women’s 2015 global consultation on women, peace and security found that conflict prevention remains ‘the poor relative of better resourced peace operations deployed during and after armed conflict.’

It is vital that any increased investment in conflict prevention is not only gender-responsive, but gender-transformative, and that sustained pressure and political leadership makes the ambition of women’s full and equal participation and leadership of peace processes a reality. Women continue to be underrepresented in peace delegations, and in recent years, their representation even declined. Binding language on the percentage of women participating in and leading peace processes is necessary to lead a step-change in inclusivity.
Conflict halts development gains and may roll back progress on these for years. A typical civil war decreases Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita by 15% and increases the level of undernourished people by 3.3%. Conflict is much more than ‘development in reverse’: it represents the unfulfilled potential of future generations.
Beyond SDG 16, therefore, targets under SDG 2 (hunger), SDG 4 (education), SDG 5 (gender equality), SDG 8 (decent work) and SDG 10 (reduced inequalities) are also critical for peaceful and inclusive societies.
Conflict and hunger are inextricably linked: in 2017, 124 million people faced crisis-level food insecurity, with conflict the key driver in 60% of cases of acute food insecurity. As the global community strives to achieve Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 2 of ending hunger, conflict is fundamentally undermining progress.
Given the particularly close linkages between conflict and hunger (SDGs 2 and 16), and building on the recent historic and unanimous passage of UN Security Council Resolution 2417 (2018) on conflict and hunger, UN member states should maintain this momentum by introducing specific monitoring, reporting and accountability mechanism for violations of Resolution 2417 (2018) on conflict and hunger. Resolution 2417 (2018) is a critical step in the global community’s recognition of the links between conflict and hunger. But it is only a first step.

International donors face mounting needs in increasingly complex contexts, which must be matched by fresh thinking and renewed commitment.
Absolute levels of Official Development Assistance (ODA) to fragile contexts have stagnated in recent years, and as a percentage share of total ODA, have fallen by nearly 7% since 2010. At the same time, humanitarian needs are becoming less predictable, with a growing divergence between anticipated and real-world needs. They are also becoming more protracted, with the average duration of a humanitarian appeal now seven years, and 90% of appeals lasting longer than three years. In spite of this, the majority of humanitarian donors continue to operate in short 12-18 month funding cycles.

This mismatch between needs and systems must be fixed: donors need to meet existing commitments to reshape the humanitarian and development architecture to make it more flexible and responsive in the early stages of crises, and close funding gaps in chronically underfunded, protracted crises. This can only be done if governments demonstrate political leadership with domestic public – through development education, public statements and clear action – that reasserts the value of humanitarian aid and our responsibility to alleviate suffering and save lives.


Conflict is the greatest driver of crisis, and the biggest threat to a sustainable future.
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International Presentation Association
Faith Based communities in Ireland and in England
We can and do lead as an example of a country where peace and strong institutions are in evidence. We have a peacekeeping force with an exemplary reputation. we live in a country with a brokered peace agreement that works and that involves cooperation, collaboration and dedication.
We do not link this power achievement in SDG 16 with the SDGs and therefore we give it no power in the achievement although we implicitly understand that in a country struggling to achieve SDG 16 there would be little chance of achieving any of the SDGs.
Improve mapping in this area to the target (and sub targets) of the SDGs
We have a reputation abroad for peace making and peace keeping. We are a proudly neutral nation in Ireland and this lends us a credibility when it comes to assuring all of our work in SDG 16
We need to believe in the power of SDG 16 to enhance the overall achievement of the SDGs.
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