Social mobility
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The nine charts that shame BritainHow do I download this spreadsheet?
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SOURCES: OECD, DFE, ALL PARTY PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON SOCIAL MOBILITY, HIGH INCOMES DATABASEhttp://www.appg-socialmobility.org/http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/2/7/45002641.pdf
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1. Britain has some of the lowest social mobility in the developed world
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How much do sons' earnings reflect their fathers?
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High score means closer to parental earnings, therefore less social mobility
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Denmark0.15
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Austria0.165
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Norway0.17
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Finland0.182
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Canada0.191
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Sweden0.274
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Germany0.32
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Spain0.32
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France0.41
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USA0.47
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Italy0.48
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UK0.5
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2. And it hasn't improved much. If you were born in the 1950s, you would be better placed than a child born in the 1970s
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Born% of graduates from top compared to bottom 20% of society
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Left school in 1970s, aged 54 now4X
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Left school in 1980s, 42 now5X
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3. Education is an engine of social mobility. But in the UK, achievement is not balanced fairly
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Mother has no qualifications%
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Richest 20% of pop3
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Poorest 20% of pop46
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4. Parental influence still makes a big difference to a child's education in the UK, especially compared to other countries
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Pisa science score test - difference between the highest and lowest 25%Background effect School effect
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Germany21.097877.0997106
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Netherlands15.796957276.404
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France21.014962565.5133472
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Italy12.62006955.9518138
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UK33.20376834.0799412
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USA37.25277131.0116387
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Austria28.196963229.7584
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New Zealand41.285115427.6726989
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Canada24.705765920.8095706
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IRL30.686991320.3905702
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Spain30.422996416.0183802
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Sweden33.907991414.8892784
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Norway29.52409759.6717048
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5. Higher education is not evenly balanced either in terms of aspirations
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Main parent thinks child is likely to
go to university:
%
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Richest 20% of pop81
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Poorest 20% of pop53
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6. … or achievement
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Likely to apply to university and
likely to get in
%
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Richest 20% of pop77
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Poorest 20% of pop49
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7. And those in the top jobs tend to have top educations
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24% of vice-chancellors
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32% of MPs
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51% of top Medics
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54% of FTSE-100 chief execs
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54% of top journalists
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70% of High Court judges
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…went to private school, though only 7% of the population do
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8. There is a strong link between a lack of social mobility and inequality - and the UK has both
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AustriaAUT
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Gini coefficient ineqaulity scoreWage persistence, corrected for distributional differences
(Percentage points change in wages)
BelgiumBEL
73
Austria0.2655.0DenmarkDNK
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Belgium0.27145.9FinlandFIN
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Denmark0.23214.2FranceFRA
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Finland0.26925.1GreeceGRC
77
France0.28123.0IrelandIRL
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Greece0.32112.5ItalyITA
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Ireland0.32834.6LuxembourgLUX
80
Italy0.35248.6NetherlandsNLD
81
Luxembourg0.25844.9SpainESP
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Netherlands0.27147.4SwedenSWE
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Spain0.31948.1United KingdomGBR
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Sweden0.23433.1PortugalPRT
85
United Kingdom0.33562.6
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Portugal0.38566.9
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9. If you are at the top, the rewards are high - the top 1% of the UK population has a greater share of national income than at any time since the 1930s
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Top 1% of the UK population's share of income
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191819.24
100
191919.59
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THE CHARTS DATA
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