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StudyLinkSourceResearchersTargetResults / ConclusionsNotes
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Are Lifestyle Measures Effective in Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease?https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/410292Arch Intern Med. 2006;166(9):965-971Tonya Kaltenbach, MD; Seth Crockett, MD; Lauren B. Gerson, MD, MScAcid RefluxElevations in the HOB, left lateral decubitus positioning, and weight loss have been associated with improvement in GERD variables in case-control studiesSleep on left side
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Influence of spontaneous sleep positions on nighttime recumbent reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10445529?dopt=AbstractAm J Gastroenterol. 1999 Aug;94(8):2069-73Khoury RM, Camacho-Lobato L, Katz PO, Mohiuddin MA, Castell DOAcid RefluxThe left lateral decubitus position is preferred in patients with nocturnal GERDSleep on left side
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Body position affects recumbent postprandial refluxhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8071510J Clin Gastroenterol. 1994 Jun;18(4):280-3Katz LC, Just R, Castell DO.Acid RefluxThe direct comparison of the two positions demonstrated that the total amount of reflux time was significantly (p < 0.05) greater with subjects in the right decubitus position (231 min) than in the left (117 min)Sleep on left side
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Positional therapy for obstructive sleep apneahttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31041813Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2019 May 1;5:CD010990Srijithesh PR, Aghoram R, Goel A, Dhanya J.Sleep Apneapositional therapy was better than inactive control for improving ESS and AHI. Positional therapy may have better adherence than CPAP
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Association of body position with severity of apneic events in patients with severe nonpositional obstructive sleep apneahttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11035672Chest. 2000 Oct;118(4):1018-24Oksenberg A, Khamaysi I, Silverberg DS, Tarasiuk A.Sleep Apneaeven in patients with severe OSA who have a high number of apneic events in the supine and lateral posture, the apneic events occurring in the supine position are more severe than those occurring while sleeping in the lateral position. Thus, it is not only the number of apneic events that worsen in the supine sleep position but, probably no less important, the nature of the apneic events themselves.
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Effect of sleep position on sleep apnea severityhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6740055Sleep. 1984;7(2):110-4Cartwright RD.Sleep ApneaFor 24 subjects of this sample, who occupied both major body positions during the evaluation night, the apnea index was found to be twice as high during the time spent sleeping on their backs as it was when they slept in the side position
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Effects of sleep posture on upper airway stability in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/ajrccm.155.1.9001312American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine Vol. 155, No. 1, Jan 01, 1997
https://www.webmd.com/heartburn-gerd/features/nighttime-heartburn-sleep-tips#1
Sleep ApneaIn severely affected OSA patients, upper body elevation, and to a lesser extent lateral positioning, significantly improve upper airway stability during sleep, and may allow therapeutic levels of nCPAP to be substantially reduced
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Positional therapy in sleep apnoea - one fits all? What determines success in positional therapy in sleep apnoea syndromehttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5390972/PLoS One. 2017; 12(4)Natascha Troester, Michael Palfner, Markus Dominco, Christoph Wohlkoenig, Erich Schmidberger, Martin Trinker, and Alexander AvianSleep ApneaPositional therapy may be a promising therapy option for patients with positional sleep apnoea
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Usage of Positional Therapy in Adults with Obstructive Sleep Apneahttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4298770/J Clin Sleep Med. 2015 Feb 15; 11(2): 131–137Grietje E. de Vries, MSc, Aarnoud Hoekema, MD, PhD, Michiel H.J. Doff, DMD, PhD, Huib A.M. Kerstjens, MD, PhD, Petra M. Meijer, NP, Johannes H. van der Hoeven, MD, PhD, and Peter J. Wijkstra, MD, PhDSleep ApneaOn the short-term, PT using the tennis ball technique, is an easy method to treat most patients with positional OSA, showing significant reductions in AHI
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The Effect of Body Posture on Brain Glymphatic Transporthttps://www.jneurosci.org/content/35/31/11034Journal of Neuroscience 5 August 2015, 35 (31) 11034-11044Hedok Lee, Lulu Xie, Mei Yu, Hongyi Kang, Tian Feng, Rashid Deane, Jean Logan, Maiken Nedergaard and Helene BenvenisteBrain HealthWaste, including Aβ, removal was most efficient in the lateral position (compared with the prone position), which mimics the natural resting/sleeping position of rodents. Although our finding awaits testing in humans, we speculate that the lateral position during sleep has advantage with regard to the removal of waste products including Aβ, because clinical studies have shown that sleep drives Aβ clearance from the brain.
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Could body posture during sleep affect how your brain clears waste?https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/08/150804203440.htmStony Brook UniversityHedok Lee, Lulu Xie, Mei Yu, Hongyi Kang, Tian Feng, Rashid Deane, Jean Logan, Maiken Nedergaard, and Helene BenvenisteAlzheimer's
Parkinson's
Neuro
Sleeping in the lateral, or side position, as compared to sleeping on one's back or stomach, may more effectively remove brain waste and prove to be an important practice to help reduce the chances of developing Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurological diseasesthe same as "The Effect of Body Posture on Brain Glymphatic Transport" but summary is more on Alzheimers or neuro diseases
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Effects of posture on sympathetic nervous modulation in patients with chronic heart failurehttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11117920?dopt=AbstractLancet. 2000 Nov 25;356(9244):1822-3Fujita M, Miyamoto S, Sekiguchi H, Eiho S, Sasayama SCHF
SNS stimulation
Sympathetic nervous modulation was most attenuated in the right lateral decubitus position. The right lateral decubitus position preferred by patients with CHF may be a self-protective mechanism to control increased sympathetic nervous modulation.Sleep on right side
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Effects of posture on cardiac autonomic nervous activity in patients with congestive heart failurehttp://www.onlinejacc.org/content/37/7/1788?ijkey=ef227899ce43ab7acadd4bd0099cf34ad3660972&keytype2=tf_ipsecshaJournal of the American College of Cardiology Volume 37, Issue 7, June 2001 Shoichi Miyamoto, Masatoshi Fujita, Hiroyuki Sekiguchi, Yoshiaki Okano, Noritoshi Nagaya, Kinzo Ueda, Shun-ichi Tamaki, Ryuji Nohara, Shigeru Eiho and Shigetake SasayamaCHF
Palpitations
The right lateral decubitus position in patients with CHF may be a self-protecting mechanism of attenuating the imbalance of cardiac autonomic nervous activitySleep on right side
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The effect of the lateral decubitus position on vagal tonehttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9244024Anaesthesia. 1997 Jul;52(7):653-7Chen GY, Kuo CD.SNS stimulationThe normalised high-frequency power is highest in the right lateral decubitus position, followed in decreasing order by left lateral decubitus and supine positions. Sleep on right side
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Trepopnea as an etiological factor in paroxysmal nocturnal dyspneahttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0002870337905635American Heart Journal Volume 14, Issue 3, September 1937, Pages 255-267Francis Clark Wood M.D., Charles C.Wolferth M.D, Alexander W.Terrell M.D.DyspneaSleep on right side
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Association between maternal sleep practices and risk of late stillbirth: a case-control studyhttps://www.bmj.com/content/342/bmj.d3403BMJ 2011;342:d3403 Tomasina Stacey, John M D Thompson, Ed A Mitchell, Alec J Ekeroma, Jane M Zuccollo, Lesley M E McCowanPregnancy/ Stillbirthwomen who slept on their back or on their right side on the previous night (before stillbirth or interview) were more likely to experience a late stillbirth compared with women who slept on their left sideSleep on left side
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Sleep position, fetal growth restriction, and late-pregnancy stillbirth: the Sydney stillbirth studyhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25568999Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Feb;125(2):347-55Gordon A, Raynes-Greenow C, Bond D, Morris J, Rawlinson W, Jeffery H.Pregnancy/ Stillbirthsupine sleep position may be an additional risk for late-pregnancy stillbirth in an already compromised fetus
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Going to sleep in the supine position is a modifiable risk factor for late pregnancy stillbirth; Findings from the New Zealand multicentre stillbirth case-control studyhttps://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0179396PLOSLesley M. E. McCowan, John M. D. Thompson, Robin S. Cronin, Minglan Li, Tomasina Stacey, Peter R. Stone, Beverley A. Lawton, Alec J. Ekeroma, Edwin A. MitchellPregnancy/ StillbirthSupine going-to-sleep position is associated with a 3.7 fold increase in overall late stillbirth risk, independent of other common risk factors.
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Stillbirth threefold increase when sleeping on back in pregnancyhttps://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/04/190408114025.htmUniversity of HuddersfieldDr Tomasina StaceyPregnancy/ Stillbirthpregnant women can lower the risk of stillbirth by sleeping on their side and NOT on their back
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An Individual Participant Data Meta-analysis of Maternal Going-to-Sleep Position, Interactions with Fetal Vulnerability, and the Risk of Late Stillbirthhttps://www.thelancet.com/journals/eclinm/article/PIIS2589-5370(19)30054-9/fulltext#secst0005The Lancet Volume 10, P49-57, April 01, 2019Robin S. Cronin, Minglan Li, John M.D. Thompson, Adrienne Gordon, Camille H. Raynes-Greenow, Alexander E.P. Heazell, et al.Pregnancy/ StillbirthThis IPD meta-analysis confirms that supine going-to-sleep position is independently associated with late stillbirth. Going-to-sleep on left or right side appears equally safe.
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Association between maternal sleep practices and late stillbirth – findings from a stillbirth case‐control studyhttps://obgyn.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1471-0528.14967BJOG: International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Volume125, Issue2, January 2018, Pages 254-262AEP Heazell, M Li, J Budd, JMD Thompson, T Stacey, RS Cronin, B Martin, D Roberts, EA Mitchell, LME McCowanPregnancy/ StillbirthSupine going‐to‐sleep position is associated with 2.3× increased risk of stillbirth after 28 weeks’ gestation.seems like a duplicate of study with almost the same title
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