Falcon 9 Launches
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Flight №
Date
Rocket Type
Launch site
Mission Outcome
Landing Outcome
Landing typeNotes
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1June 4, 2010v1.0CCAFS LC-40SuccessFailureParachutesMain goal of first launch is testing the rocket. SpaceX had hoped to recover the first stage of the rocket, which fell into the Atlantic Ocean after launch and was expected to be buoyed by parachutes on its descent. But the rocket segment broke apart as it fell to Earth.
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2December 8, 2010v1.0CCAFS LC-40SuccessFailureParachutesFlight 2 is about testing the Dragon spacecraft.
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3May 22, 2012v1.0CCAFS LC-40SuccessNo attempt
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4October 8, 2012v1.0CCAFSLC-40SuccessNo attemptThe secondary payload was inserted into abnormally low orbit and lost due to Falcon 9 boost stage engine failure
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5March 1, 2013v1.0CCAFSLC-40SuccessNo attemptLast launch of the original Falcon 9 v1.0 launch vehicle.
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6September 29, 2013v1.1VAFBSLC-4ESuccessFailureOceanFollowing second-stage separation from the first stage, SpaceX attempted to perform a propulsive return and ocean touchdown of the discarded booster vehicle. The exercise provided good test data on the experiment—its primary objective—but as the booster neared the ocean, aerodynamic forces caused an uncontrollable roll. The center engine, depleted of fuel by centrifugal force, shut down resulting in the impact and destruction of the vehicle.
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7December 3, 2013v1.1CCAFSLC-40SuccessNo attempt
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8January 6, 2014v1.1CCAFSLC-40SuccessNo attempt
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9April 18, 2014v1.1CCAFSLC-40SuccessSuccessOceanFollowing second-stage separation, SpaceX conducted a second controlled-descent test of the discarded booster vehicle and achieved the first successful controlled ocean touchdown of a liquid-rocket-engine orbital booster.[61][62] Following touchdown the first stage tipped over as expected and was destroyed.This was the first Falcon 9 booster to fly with extensible landing legs and the first Dragon mission with the Falcon 9 v1.1 launch vehicle.
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10July 14, 2014v1.1CCAFSLC-40SuccessSuccessOceanSecond Falcon 9 booster with landing legs. Following second-stage separation, SpaceX conducted a controlled-descent test of the discarded booster vehicle. The first stage successfully decelerated from hypersonic velocity in the upper atmosphere, made reentry and landing burns, deployed its landing legs and touched down on the ocean surface. As with the previous mission, the first stage then tipped over as intended and was not recovered.
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11August 5, 2014v1.1CCAFSLC-40SuccessNo attempt
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12September 7, 2014v1.1CCAFSLC-40SuccessNo attempt
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13September 21, 2014v1.1CCAFSLC-40SuccessSuccessOcean
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14January 10, 2015v1.1CCAFSLC-40SuccessFailureDrone shipFollowing second stage separation, SpaceX performed a test flight which attempted to return the first stage of the Falcon 9 through the atmosphere and land it on an approximately 90-by-50-meter (300 ft × 160 ft) floating platform—called the autonomous spaceport drone ship. Many of the test objectives were achieved, including precision control of the rocket's descent to land on the platform at a specific point in the Atlantic ocean, and a large amount of test data was obtained from the first use of grid fin control surfaces used for more precise reentry positioning. The grid fin control system ran out of hydraulic fluid a minute before landing and the landing itself resulted in a crash.
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15February 11, 2015v1.1CCAFSLC-40SuccessSuccessOceanThe first stage made a test flight descent to an over-ocean landing within 10 m (33 ft) of its intended target.
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16March 2, 2015v1.1CCAFSLC-40SuccessNo attempt
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17April 14, 2015v1.1CCAFSLC-40SuccessFailureDrone shipFollowing the first-stage boost, SpaceX attempted a controlled-descent test of the first stage. The first stage contacted the ship, but soon tipped over due to excess lateral velocity caused by a stuck throttle valve resulting in a later-than-designed downthrottle.
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18April 27, 2015v1.1CCAFSLC-40SuccessNo attempt
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19June 28, 2015v1.1CCAFSLC-40FailureVehicle breakup at T+150 seconds.
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20December 22, 2015F9 FTCCAFSLC-40SuccessSuccessGround padSpaceX received a permit from the FAA to land the booster on solid ground at Cape Canaveral, and succeeded.
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21January 17, 2016v1.1VAFBSLC-4ESuccessFailureDrone shipSpaceX again attempted a recovery of the first stage booster by landing on an autonomous drone ship; this time located in the Pacific Ocean. The first stage did achieve a soft-landing on the ship, but a lockout on one of the landing legs failed to latch and it fell over and exploded.
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22March 4, 2016F9 FTCCAFSLC-40SuccessFailureDrone shipFollowing the launch, SpaceX attempted an experimental landing test to a drone ship, although a successful landing was not expected because launch mass exceeded previously indicated limit for a GTO there was little fuel left. As predicted, booster recovery failed: the spent first stage "landed hard", but the controlled-descent, atmospheric re-entry and navigation to the drone ship were successful and returned significant test data on bringing back high-energy Falcon 9s.
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23April 8, 2016F9 FTCCAFSLC-40SuccessSuccessDrone shipThe rocket's first stage landed smoothly on SpaceX's autonomous spaceport drone ship, making this the first ever successful landing of a rocket booster on a ship at sea as part of an orbital launch. The booster core used B1021, was later also the first orbital booster to be used again in launching SES-10 on March 30, 2017.
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24May 6, 2016F9 FTCCAFSLC-40SuccessSuccessDrone shipThis was the first time a booster successfully landed after a GTO mission.
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25May 27, 2016F9 FTCCAFSLC-40SuccessSuccessDrone ship
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26June 15, 2016F9 FTCCAFSLC-40SuccessFailureDrone shipFirst stage landing attempt on drone ship failed on landing due to low thrust on one of the three landing engines.
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27July 18, 2016F9 FTCCAFSLC-40SuccessSuccessGround padThis mission had a successful first-stage landing at Cape Canaveral.
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28August 14, 2016F9 FTCCAFSLC-40SuccessSuccessDrone shipFirst attempt to touch down from a ballistic trajectory using a single-engine landing burn.
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N/ASeptember 1, 2016F9 FTCCAFSLC-40FailureThe rocket and Amos-6 payload were lost in a launch pad explosion.
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29January 14, 2017F9 FTVAFBSLC-4ESuccessSuccessDrone shipReturn-to-flight mission after the accident in September 2016.
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30February 19, 2017F9 FTKSCLC-39ASuccessSuccessGround padThe first stage of Falcon 9 landed at SpaceX’s Landing Zone 1 (LZ-1) at Cape Canaveral.
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31March 16, 2017F9 FTKSCLC-39ASuccessNo attemptThere was no attempt at a first-stage recovery so this rocket did not have landing legs or grid fins.
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32March 30, 2017F9 FTKSCLC-39ASuccessSuccessDrone shipFirst payload to fly on a reused first stage, B1021, previously used for CRS-8, the stage also successfully landed.
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