School Seminar 2013 Second Semester
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DatePresenterTitleShort BioAbstractsPositionStatusChairEmail Address
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Wednesday
13th August 2014
4-5pm
Dr Amir Gat, Technion – Israel Institute of TechnologyOn the interaction between creeping flows and elastic structuresAmir Gat did his B.Sc. and Ph.D. in the Faculty of Aerospace engineering, Technion – Israel institute of Technology, where his studies focused on Stokes flows in shallow configurations. In 2010 he did a postdoc at Caltech and became more interested in the interaction between creeping flows and the dynamics of solid structures. From 2012 he is an assistant prof. in the Technion’s faculty of mechanical engineering and his research is focused on analytic studies of interaction of elastic solids with creeping flows. Viscous flows in contact with elastic structures apply both pressure and shear stress at the solid-liquid interface and thus create internal stress- and deformation-fields within the solid structure. The goal of our research is to model such viscous-elastic interactions in order to understand problems such as biological adhesion mechanisms, to design soft-robots and soft-actuators with complex time-varying dynamics, and to change the mechanical properties of solids by interaction with a viscous liquid. In this presentation we will present analysis of the following cases of viscous-elastic interaction: I. Dynamics of time-varying creeping flow in a closed elastic shell. II. Viscous Poroelastic interaction as a mechanism to enhance adhesion to rough surfaces in frogs' toe pads, and III. Reducing deformation and delaying the onset of buckling of elastic structures by interaction with an embedded viscous liquid.VISIFernando Alonso-Marroquinamirgat@tx.technion.ac.il
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Wednesday
20th August 2014
1-2pm
Dr Jean-Michel Pereira, Ecole des Ponts ParisTechFrom sandcastles to CO2 geological storage: some applications of poromechanicsJean-Michel Pereira graduated from ENTPE -École Nationale des Travaux Publics de l’État, Lyon, France-, where he completed his PhD in 2005 on theoretical and numerical modeling of partially saturated soils. He did a one-year post-doc at the Technical University of Catalonia (Barcelona, Spain) on soil-atmosphere interaction. From 2006, he is appointed as a permanent researcher at École des Ponts ParisTech, where his research covers various applications of poromechanics in fields like geotechnics, oil and gas recovery or geological storage of carbon dioxide.In this talk, a few applications of poromechanics -mechanics of porous media- will be presented. The first part, dedicated to partially saturated soils, will focus on the behavior of soils and more specifically sands when subjected to wetting/drying cycles. The interplay between humidity changes and materials’s deformation will be discussed, based on both thermodynamics and experimental points of view. In the second part, some issues related to the loss of injectivity during CO2 injection in geological reservoirs will be presented, one of them being induced by adsorption-induced swelling of coal. Recent experiments and a modeling framework will be discussed.VISIFernando Alonso-Marroquinjeanmichel.pereira@enpc.fr
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Friday
22th August 2014
1-2pm
Prof. Guido Gottardi, University of BolognaRehabilitation and monitoring of an ancient bell tower in VeniceGuido Gottardi (PhD in Geotechnical Engineering at the Technical University of Torino, Marie Curie Research Fellow at the British Universities of Oxford and Southampton) is currently full Professor of Geotechnical Engineering at the Department of Civil, Chemical, Environmental and Materials Engineering (DICAM) of the University of Bologna (Italy). Coordinator of the local degree course in Building Engineering, located in Ravenna, he has been lecturer of Soil Mechanics, Geotechnical Engineering and Ground Improvement. His main research interests have concerned the landslide risk assessment and the modelling of shallow foundation behaviour, more recently also with reference to the stability of towers resting on deformable soil.The Frari bell tower, the second tallest in Venice after San Marco, has always been affected by structural problems since its construction in XIV century, mainly because of the slow but continuous differential settlement between the tower itself and the adjacent masonry structures of the basilica. In the last decade, a rather innovative intervention of soil fracturing was carried out in order to improve the mechanical characteristics of the silty clay layer underlying the tower. Once the aim of improving the stability of the soil-foundation system had been achieved, a structural joint between the bell tower and the basilica was eventually carried out to reduce the damaging structural interaction induced by the foundation movements. Such a well-documented case of rehabilitation of historic structures is presented, highlighting not only the approach aimed at improving the overall safety without altering the original structure and modifying the current stress distribution but also the fundamental methodology, adopted throughout, of a flexible and modular design, constantly driven by the outcome of an extensive real-time monitoring system of the soil-structure interaction.VISYFernando Alonso-Marroquinguido.gottardi2@unibo.it
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Wednesday
27th August 2014
1-2pm
David TollProfessor David Toll is Professor of Engineering at Durham University, UK. He is currently visiting University of Sydney as an International Research Collaboration Fellow. He has been carrying out research into the engineering behaviour of unsaturated soils for over 30 years and is Chair of Technical Committee 106 on Unsaturated Soils of the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering. He uses laboratory and field testing and numerical modelling to study rainfall-induced landslides and to investigate climate impacts on slopes and foundations. He has held visiting positions at Nanyang Technological University, National University of Singapore, University of Western Australia, University of Newcastle and is Kwang-Hua Chair Professor at Tongji University, China.The talk will discuss climate impacts on slope stability, drawing on experience from the UK and Singapore. It will discuss the likely impacts of future climate change and the implications for embankments constructed for rail and road infrastructure. Results from field measurements will be presented to help understand the response of soil pore-water pressures to rainfall and evapo-transpiration. It will highlight some of the on-going research in a national project in the UK, the iSmart project (Infrastructure slopes: Sustainable Management And Resilience Assessment).d.g.toll@durham.ac.uk
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Wednesday
3rd September 2014
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Wednesday
10th September 2014
1-2pm
Fernando Alonso-MarroquinSimultation of pedestrian dynamics using spheropolygonsI enjoy working in numerical simulations, but try not to let my mind replaced by the CPU/GPU of the computer. This is why I prefer analytical calculations. Throughout my years of research I have worked on analytical model for the electronic structure of the fullerenes molecules (1998-1999) a discrete element model for soil deformation (PhD thesis, 2001-2004), numerical simulations of earthquakes (2005-2007), Minkowiski cows (2007-08) pedestrian dynamics (2007-2013) and study of geomaterials using mathematical morphology (2008-2014). Currently I am a Senior Lecturer at the School of Civil Engineering in the University of Sydney.Several computer models have been presented to evaluate flow rates in pedestrian dynamics, yet very few focus on the calculation of the stress experienced by pedestrians under high density. With this aim, a pedestrian dynamics model is implemented to calculate the stress developed under crowd conditions. The model is based on an extension of a granular dynamics model to account contact forces, ground reaction forces and torques in the pedestrians. Contact stiffness is obtained from biomedical journal articles, and coefficient of restitution is obtained by direct observations of energy loss in collisions. Existing rotational equations of motion are modified to incorporate a rotational viscous component, which allows pedestrians to come to a comfortable stop after a collision rather than rotating indefinitely. The shape of the pedestrian is obtained from a bird's eye, cross sectional view of the human chest cavity and arms, which was edited to produce an enclosed shape. This shape is them approximated by a {\it spheropolygon}, which is a mathematical object that allow real-time simulation of complex-shape particles. The proposed method provides real benefits to the accuracy on particle shape representation, and rotational dynamics of pedestrians at micro-simulation level, and it provides a new tool to calculate the risk of injuries and asphyxiation when people are trapped in dense crowds that lead to development of high pressure.StaffYfernando.alonso@sydney.edu.au
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Wednesday
17th September 2014
No seminar
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Wednesday
24th September 2014
1-5 PM
Summer Scholarship DayItai Einav
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Wednesday
1st October 2014
1PM
Samiul Hasan Modeling Urban Mobility Dynamics: Opportunities from Geo-location DataSamiul Hasan is a postdoctoral fellow in Liveable, Sustainable, and Resilient Cities program of CSIRO’s Land and Water Flagship. He earned his master’s and bachelor’s degrees in Civil Engineering from Bangladesh Uni¬versity of Engineering and Technology. In 2007, he received the Fulbright Science and Technology Scholarship to pursue a doctoral degree in the US. In August 2013, he received a Ph.D. in Transportation Engineering from Purdue University where he also received the College of Engineering outstanding graduate student research award. His research interests include human mobility, climate adaptation engineering, transportation systems modeling, and disaster management.The widespread use of social media provides extraordinary amount of user-generated data every day. The recent introduction of the location-based services in smartphone-based social media applications allows people to share their activity related choices at the level of specific geo-referenced location and time. The overarching goal of this work is to develop data analytics to understand urban dynamics and user behavior using geo-located social media data. Novel statistical estimation techniques are developed to understand the spatiotemporal patterns of urban activities based on more than half a million Foursquare check-ins of over 20,000 users from New York City. Data-driven techniques to model user activity patterns and life-style choices are developed. A novel method is developed to infer individual activity type, its duration and location, and the sequence of the activities from incomplete trajectory data. When aggregated these activity-location sequences are indicators of travel demand within a region. The potential of geo-location data to derive dynamic traffic patterns is demonstrated by building an agent-based simulation model. Other potential applications of these techniques to a number of urban systems science challenges are also outlined.VISYFernando Alonso-MarroquinSamiul.Hasan@csiro.au
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Wednesday
8th October 2014
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Wednesday
15th October 2014
1-2pm
Wen Hao, KanCharacterizing the Effects of Niobium Additions on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of High Chromium White Cast Iron and Stainless Steels

Wen Hao, Kan is a Ph.D. candidate in the Faculty of Civil Engineering with a specialization in iron composite research at The University of Sydney. He previously completed an honors degree in civil engineering as well as a bachelor degree in economics here in The University of Sydney. His current research primarily focuses on developing iron alloys that are wear, impact and corrosion resistance for the use in harsh environments. More specifically, these alloys are to be designed for the purposes of large castings. High chromium white cast iron has long been used in environments of highly abrasive conditions due to its superior wear resistance and corrosion resistance. This study aims to design iron-based alloys that have superior wear properties without compromising corrosion resistance. Thus this study will explore the effects of niobium carbide additions to stainless steels and high chrome white irons. The resulting alloys will then be tested for changes in hardness, toughness, wear and corrosion resistance.PhD StudentYFernando Alonso-Marroquinwkan6795@uni.sydney.edu.au
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Wednesday
22nd October 2014
1pm
Ruoyu, Wang Modelling the deformation of bio-inspired multilayered functionally graded plates subjected to projectile impactRuoyu, Wang is a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Civil Engineering at the University of Sydney. She obtained her bachelor degrees in Engineering Mechanics as well as in Business Administration and her master degree in Solid Mechanics at Xi’an Jiaotong University in China. Her research interest is mainly on the dynamic response of multilayered functionally graded plates designed to provide protection for policemen etc.


This research aims to build a bio-inspired multilayered plate which can provide high ballistic resistant performance for a minimum weight. The dynamic properties of multilayered plates subjected to high velocity projectile impact are investigated using finite element method. The optimal plate is designed by the application of bio-inspired functionally graded metallic material and optimization of several structural parameters
PhD StudentYFernando Alonso-Marroquinrwan3034@uni.sydney.edu.a
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Wednesday
29th October 2014
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5th November 2014
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Wednesday
12th November 2014
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Wednesday
19 Novermber 2014
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Wednesday
26th November 2014
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Staff = Member of StaffY= confirmed
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*4:15-7:00 PMVIS = VisitorN=not confirmed
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G = PhD GeotechI= invited
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S = PhD Struct
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PM = PhD PM
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F = PhD Fluids
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