Relative Advantage Chart for Integrating Specific Technologies
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This chart is going to cover general issues that occur in classrooms that may not be fully using technology opportunities. Specific examples for the high school science classroom may also be involved.
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Learning ProblemTechnologiesTechnologiesExpected Outcomeslink 1link 2link 3link 4
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Students are not actively engaged with learning once class endsAsynchronous discussions
Voicethread
Learning Management Systems such as Moodle
The class period should not determine when learning starts and stops. By having asynchronous discussions, discussions that were held during class time face to face can continue. Asynchronous discussions also allow students to have more time to think before having to share ideas.Students will be more engaged with the topics covered in class. http://voicethread.com/http://kidblog.org/home/https://www.edmodo.com/
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Students need to express their analysis of modern issuesThere are websites that provide issues for students to consider. Likewise, the teacher can find issues and have students analyze them in discussion forums, or go to the issue website before class to research their position.
Making websites or portfolios to show multiple points of view on a topic.
Problem solving is a necessary skill and it involves figuring out how to be prepared to discuss and analyze issues. Students can also use online technologies to create a space where they express their perspectives. Students can make websites to provide more than one point of view on a topic. Students can analyze case studies using VoiceThread because the text of the issue can be presented and students can take turns responding to the ethical issues. http://voicethread.com/http://kidblog.org/home/https://www.edmodo.com/
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Inquiry based learning is not utilized as much as it could be.Inquiry on a small scale means that students choose a direction for the learning. They can make decisions about what topic is to be learned, how the analysis should be done, or what next steps would be. For biotechnology classes, there are a few organizations that have written curriculum that can stand on its own, but with a little bit of tweaking, it can serve as a foundation for inquiry labs. An advantage to using curriculum that has been created outside of your classroom is that it has been trial tested and many complications have been worked out. For example, both BABEC and BioRad have GMO PCR labs that work just fine if you follow them as they are written. They involve equipment and computer analysis so technology is automatically built into the labs. As the teacher gets to know the curriculum better, she can use it more liberally to allow students the freedom to do some inquiry based learning. The expectation is that students will be more comfortable with current laboratory techniques and how to analyze data they create in labs. http://www.babec.org/?q=node/6http://www.dnalc.org/resources/
http://www.bio-rad.com/en-us/category/pcr-amplification-kits
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Student work is not celebrated as much as it could be.Online forums such as KidBlog or other places students can make a showcase of their work.
Prezi can provide spreadsheet like presentations, as can Google docs presentations.
Pinterest allows students to curate images that focus on a topic.
Free technology, relatively intuitive to figure out, easy to access.Students can take pride in their digital accomplishments. Parents can see the connections students are making with the content. I set up a section in KidBlog for the 542 Project Based Learning class. Hopefully that link will be present, even if it is not active. I also created a KidBlog space when I worked for a virtual company so that student work could be displayed. Unfortunately I am having difficulty accessing that class so I can't make it available at the moment.http://kidblog.org/ProjectBL/
http://prezi.com/prezi-for-education/https://www.pinterest.com/http://kidblog.org/MsGetzsClasses/
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Annual tests still guide instruction. In addition, there are college entrance exams that many students choose to take.Rote tutorials such as Aleks or other companies that focus on credit recovery, high school exit exams, or SAT prep.Tutorials that explain how to do the problems in pieces and can break down concepts into little parts help some students to eventually see the big picture.Students will pass high school exit exams, earn credits in their classes, and perhaps help the school's AYP by scoring better on the state-mandated tests.http://www.testprepreview.com/cahsee_practice.htmhttp://sat.collegeboard.org/practice/sat-practice-questionshttp://www.aleks.com/
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Collaborative projects need to extend beyond the classroom walls.Using a Learning Management System such as Moodle or KidBlog to provide a space where students can collaborate and share ideas.When the teacher has control over the technology environment, students can safely examine ideas. The two examples here, Moodle and KidBlog are closed. Edmoto is also a closed environment. Student identities are protected from being seen by everybody. They are only subjected to ideas and opinions that extend the range the teacher chooses to use. For example, students can be put into small groups where they are unaware of what other groups are doing. Likewise, there can be a showcase of presentations that are only accessible to classmembers and their parents so that student identity can be protected. Students will learn how to collaborate openly and share ideas. Collaboration and mingling ideas is necessary for problem solving. While there are still some careers (like teaching) where the adult can isolate him/herself and do everything on his/her own, most career paths are now requiring multiple brains to be involved. The sooner people can learn how to give and take in a collaborative environment, the better the outcomes of projects will be. Part of what students have to learn is how to balance the ego that wants recognition for having THE brilliant idea with having enough security to allow others to play with their ideas and improve upon them.An example of a Moodle course I created that has at least one lesson requiring collaboration: http://edtechdev.mrooms2.net/course/view.php?id=215http://kidblog.org/home/https://www.edmodo.com/
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The online presence needs to be carefully constructed.These technologies involve use of social media. One's digital identity does not expire. Kids are really good at being careless when they share their thoughts and ideas. Heck, as an adult I will often say things I wish I could erase. We need to introduce students to technologies that are often easily reviewed by potential employers so that the persona their future employers will see is not one that will embarrass the company. If students can set a foundation where "Googling" them brings up positive referenes, then later transgressions may be able to be overlooked. Students will establish a professional presence online. Ideally they will learn how to limit their social presence so it does not overshadow anything they want future employers to see. It is also very important to make sure images and videos they make do not show them doing anything illegal.https://twitter.com/https://www.youtube.com/www.facebook.com
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Prerequisite learning can support classroom activities.Flipping the lesson by using pre-made lessons at places like Khan Academy, or creating own lessons to introduce concepts before kids show up to class.There is never enough class time to cover everything that needs to be completed. If you have students come to class already prepared by knowing the main ideas that are going to be covered that day, it can help make class time more efficient. It is analogous to having students read the chapter before class except that since tech can be involved, they can watch videos instead.Class time can be spent discussing topics, debating ideas, or doing labs instead of it merely being a content-based lecturehttps://www.khanacademy.org/various videos at YouTubehttp://www.dnalc.org/resources/3d/
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Analyzing data acquired during lab activities.The DNA Learning Center posts students mitochondrial sequences for registered classes, has a world map of Alu allele frequencies, and several databases that have organized DNA sequences. Likewise, students can do searches in the NCBI database to analyze any information they may acquire during their research. Excel can also be used to graph the migration of DNA bands after doing PCR reactions.
By using the labs created by BABEC and the DNA Learning Center, students are using current technology and techniques to study realistic situations. There are even US-wide projects where students collect insect DNA to analyze the Wolbachia population in the insects' guts. Students are prepared for college level labs that use DNA technologies. Students understand what a printout of a DNA sequence is or how it can be used. Students can explain why forensic analysis can identify a person as being one person (unless they have an identical twin). The DNA Learning Center has several activities designed to assist students with analyzing lab data. Students can utilize the resources at the site to figure out aspects of their genome if the corresponding lab is done in class. http://www.dnalc.org/resources/http://www.babec.org/?q=node/6http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/guide/all/
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Reinforcing mundane, repetitive concepts.Tutorials written by textbook companies or the teacher.
Some tutorials I've written:
www.getzguides.com
http://edtech2.boisestate.edu/melissagetz/506/molecules/
Let's face it, even though we would love chemistry classes to be inquiry based, students still need to learn how to balance equations and do mathematical calculations involving moles and mass. Many students will stumble on the concepts of significant figures, or how to solve chemistry-centric problems. Providing what can be considered repetive drills actually solidifies the concepts, problem solving techniques, and approaches for students. These can be optional resources, but they are important ones for students who want more practice. Students still need to know the basics of algebra and other factoid, process based subjects. If students know how to do many of the processes they should learn in college before they get to college, they will be at a greater advantage in college. The students sitting next to them did the extra work when they were in high school, so merely showing up with a high school level of education does not make students competitive in college.Getz Guideshttp://edtech2.boisestate.edu/melissagetz/506/molecules/index.html
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