E-Consultation on SDG 8: "Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all", to be reviewed at the HLPF 2019 under the auspices of ECOSOC (Responses)
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Inputs Received for E-Consultation on SDG 8: "Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all", to be reviewed at the HLPF 2019 under the auspices of ECOSOC
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This file compiles inputs from MGoS on SDG 8, which will be under in-depth review at the HLPF 2019. Outcomes may contain advice, opinions and statements of various information providers. The United Nations does not represent or endorse the accuracy or reliability of any advice, opinion, statement or other information provided through this e-consultation. Our office reserves the right to delete any content/input that is not aligned with the United Nations Charter and/or the principles and purposes of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
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2. Name of Organization5. If you represent a major group or other stakeholder constituency, please indicate which one?6. Based on the evidence, and keeping the regional/local context in mind, what are the most effective ways to accelerate progress towards SDG 8? 7. Based on the evidence, and keeping the regional/local context in mind, where are the biggest shortfalls/gaps towards making progress towards SDG 8?8. How can one best leverage the interlinkages between SDG 8 and the rest of the 2030 Agenda?9. Can you share examples of effective models of multi-stakeholder engagement for the implementation of SDG 8?10. Please, add here any additional comment related to SDG 8.
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Gatef organization
Non-Governmental Organizations
EgyptEgyptI will be tell you later
I have a good experience and knowledge
Not now
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HDS natural systems design science
Science & Technological Community, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
Progress toward SDG 8 would need to change direction to fulfill the intent. The deep problem is that "growth" is now defined as if "economic decoupling" was being achieved, when in fact NO DECOUPLING HAS OCCURRED except in micro-economic ways. The recent historical world data now seems conclusive, and for basic scientific reasons, makes it very unlikely that general decoupling will ever occur.

The key evidence is the 1971-2016 constant growth rates of 1) World GDP (PPP), 2) Economic Energy use, and 3) CO2 emissions. It clearly shows a) there has been no displacement of fossil fuels by renewable energy, nor b) reduction in the growth rate of the economies main parts due to efficiency and sustainability. Graphic: https://bit.ly/2RDF6KQ & Short Article: https://bit.ly/2HkRSZW

To respond, new models and indicators are needed, to accurately reflect and respond to the increasingly disruptive whole-system cultural and environmental effects of growth. The new models would be for thriving "finite development", like nature makes, as opposed to the dangerous "infinite development" models we've made. The fundamental difference is that thriving finite growth relies on "niche-making" and while boundless models rely "invasion to failure" to define their limits. Niche-making, of course, still begins with its own period of invasive growth, only then seeks to perfect rather than forever multiplying its designs.
Part of the problem is SDG 8 now assumes "economic decoupling" and as that is not happening, mounting natural conflicts with growth are creating added resistance. One of the more severe of those effects on the SDGs is that the advanced economies are affected differently, using high tech to sweep up all the development space on earth, and effectively shutting out the slow, hesitant, and somewhat clumsy efforts of the target development communities.

A related problem is the expectation that growth should start on command, when real economic growth is an *organic process* having a *considerable gestation period* of usually disorganized struggle before it takes off. "Healthy growth" tends to occur naturally in "healthy cultures," and the LDCs lack that. The intended beneficiaries don't share a common culture with the developers. So cultural bridge-making is where to start.

The first need is for promoters to learn the culture they are working with *well enough* for those subject cultures to give their *informed consent* and drawn to learn from the developments to follow.

Why this was omitted from the SDGs is that it involves *systems thinking*, in particular *natural systems thinking*. What needs to happen is to bring anthropological sciences into consulting on the design of PPPs. Some further ideas of where to start are in :
1) Systems thinking for Systems making - https://rdcu.be/LdlR
2) Culture, FfD, tPPPs
How SDG 8 efforts can foster “the Nexus of the 17” is to find inspiration from fostering healthy cultural growth, spreading that pathway to healthy economic growth. That would help the nexus of the whole become the healthy global cultural development process originally envisioned in the spirit of Rio and in drafting the SDGs

The likely struggle will first be for people in a hurry, having to include a new kind of outreach and pathfinding, while also facing resistance to it. Cultures can be slow to open up and slow to learn, and have good reasons to be resistant to change, and good reasons to react with fierce opposition to being pushed in the wrong way. Still, the hard work and challenges of finding how to give people in need of help a voice, and allowed to help in steering development, will also come with great satisfactions, buy-in, and other rewards.

Strategies for "culture growth" really should have been included in the SDGs from the start, of course. The best one I've heard of is to establish "extension services" to support the work of "sustainability librarians," drawing on the communities of "boundary crossing individuals" that the global transformation movement has produced. They would be organized to help circulate the most useful information, visiting community and business meetings to share it, facilitating a culture of learning and exchanging successful “culture-fit” development stories.
No, I don't have examples to list, mostly because I'm a scientist I think. I do come across examples but don't get to follow their histories or learn their stories. It's important to look for the patterns and learn from them. Start-ups will mostly seem to flourish at first but then find it hard to take hold, for example, often failing. That's true for business startups of all sorts even in cultures very familiar with and eager to support them. Educating less developed communities on those organic features of natural economic growth, the effort it takes, the support needed, and the wonderful satisfaction of making and being a part of things that work, would help foster the inspired culture needed and reduce the frequency of startups that waste their seed.
Shifting tracks is a growth process too, inspiration at first and persistence till it catches on.
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OSIENALA (Friends of Lake Victoria)
Non-Governmental Organizations
Education should focus on trade rather than pure academics. Most of our youths complete education or drop-out and find nothing to do. Even those who are educated to degree level, do not get jobs. So Youths should be trained properly to enable them to form business after school. The few who are gifted intellectually can pursue high academic qualification for jobs.
Focus should be at the "bottom of the pyramid" the poor community the school drop-outs to be assisted to help in production. There should be a convenient structure where the carder of community, who are of-course high percentage of the population, should fit economically.
Proper training and financial facilitation.
Women groups provided solar water pumps for their farming activities near the lake. The production was so high that they opened a bank account. You boys that were sponsored to technical school came back and were facilitated to commence their our businesses.
Women groups donated fishing gears and after five years they had constructed a rental house.
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Amis des Étrangers au Togo: ADET
Non-Governmental Organizations
Le travail éloigne de nous 3 grands mots: l'ennui, le vice et le besoin. Mais des salaires médiocres et discriminatoires aux travailleurs dans les pays du monde font que des grèves se multiplient de jour au jour: cas récent de la France. Le travail n'éloigne plus l'ennui, le vice et le besoin. L'ODD8 demande de rendre le travail décent pour tous veut dire de bien d'énumérer les travailleurs en réduisant les inégalités salariales, réduire la pauvreté et ne laisser personne de côté. Écouter les revendications sociales des syndicats. Le travail décent est une motivation pour l'accroissement économique.
Les lacunes de l'ODD8 sont:
La dictature
La corruption
L'ignorance
L'exploitation de l'homme par l'homme
Le racisme, la xénophobie, l'exclusion et les discriminations
ODD 8 favorise l,accroissement économique et sa redistribution réduit la pauvreté, la faim, améliore la santé pour tous, l'énergie pour tous. Accès à l'eau potable, améliore la paix, la justice, réduit les inégalités.
Si on parle de travail décent c'est relatif aux salaires, aux assurances, aux conditions de travail, au niveau de vie des populations. Améliorer les conditions de travail, prendre des mesures incitatives dans les institutions publiques et privées. Collaboration État, Syndicats et organisations de la société civile pour l'amélioration de conditions de travail des populations.
Le bien- être et la prospérité de tous est la clé de la paix et du développement durable
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HERMONWELL COMPANY LTD.
Women, Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Local Authorities, Workers & Trade Unions, Business & Industry, Science & Technological Community, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Older Persons, Persons with Disabilities, Education & Academic Entities, Private Philanthropic Organizations, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
one on one campaign directly move towards the non inclusive way,take the information beyond the elite,sdg is still going on within the government staff,people in power,the grants and donations are not reaching the right places,the UN employment is not reaching the local best hands..sdg 8 requires communication at an integrated method
lack of inclusion,the sdg 8 in africal is still not well spoken mostly in Nigeria,Let the campaign be Above the line and below the line targeted directly, towards the unpopular citizen of the world in the local economics growth.
GOOD LIVE' as i can summarize the whole meaning of SDG 8 leverages on 2030 agenda as a framework to be used in measuring standard operating procedure SOP at any point of Auditing the outcome or feedback in concluding any works on the forecast and backcast in the 2030 agenda. The goal 8 as a quality assurance for the rest is what we all look at as vitality meaning when we have good economy and good works we are healthy ,technology is good ,health is good etc.
1.conceptual models which can showcase how the main driver of the goals work ,represented by pictures as full system model, 2.Toy model can be used to show component of the goal this can be used to discuss inclusion strategy where ,who and how to direct the resources as stakeholders concerns.3.Single system model can be used to handle goal 8 of sdg by dealing with situation where there is need to discuss a single branch of the issues e.g minimum wages of the nations in single component to discuss good works condition this can be used for sectoral specific issues in addressing. 4.shuttle model comes out to be used as example from complex issues which has minimum occurrence that can represent properly ..this will later determ more complex solution in the processing.5.full system model covers the total information collected from the models in the concerns. this models are used in the projects like sdg goal as management strategy to take decisions
Nigeria goverment hides the information on SDG 8 from the public and poor working condition
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HERMONWELL COMPANY LTD.
Women, Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Local Authorities, Workers & Trade Unions, Business & Industry, Science & Technological Community, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Older Persons, Persons with Disabilities, Education & Academic Entities, Private Philanthropic Organizations, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
one on one campaign directly move towards the non inclusive way,take the information beyond the elite,sdg is still going on within the government staff,people in power,the grants and donations are not reaching the right places,the UN employment is not reaching the local best hands..sdg 8 requires communication at an integrated method
lack of inclusion,the sdg 8 in africal is still not well spoken mostly in Nigeria,Let the campaign be Above the line and below the line targeted directly, towards the unpopular citizen of the world in the local economics growth.
GOOD LIVE' as i can summarize the whole meaning of SDG 8 leverages on 2030 agenda as a framework to be used in measuring standard operating procedure SOP at any point of Auditing the outcome or feedback in concluding any works on the forecast and backcast in the 2030 agenda. The goal 8 as a quality assurance for the rest is what we all look at as vitality meaning when we have good economy and good works we are healthy ,technology is good ,health is good etc.
1.conceptual models which can showcase how the main driver of the goals work ,represented by pictures as full system model, 2.Toy model can be used to show component of the goal this can be used to discuss inclusion strategy where ,who and how to direct the resources as stakeholders concerns.3.Single system model can be used to handle goal 8 of sdg by dealing with situation where there is need to discuss a single branch of the issues e.g minimum wages of the nations in single component to discuss good works condition this can be used for sectoral specific issues in addressing. 4.shuttle model comes out to be used as example from complex issues which has minimum occurrence that can represent properly ..this will later determ more complex solution in the processing.5.full system model covers the total information collected from the models in the concerns. this models are used in the projects like sdg goal as management strategy to take decisions
Nigeria goverment hides the information on SDG 8 from the public and poor working condition
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Camer Translators
Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
Create more enterprise to promote decent work in various domains
Infrastructural development and high rate of unemplyment
Encourage individuals to create and encourage others to think of innovating to accelerate economic growth in the nation
Creation of enterprises or companies that will provide decent jobs
Innovation
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Caritas Ghana
Faith Based Organizations
1. Increase Technical and Vocational skills training; including using Apprenticeship models.
2. Promoting rural enterprises and industrialization.
3. Support for Agriculture
1. Employment opportunities for Young people; especially graduates
2. Lack of start-up capital for young entrepreneurs
1. Ensuring inter-sectoral coordination.
2. Using inclusive approaches for the follow-up and reviews at all levels
Caritas Ghana has assessed Government's flagship Planting for Food and Jobs on the criteria of how it fulfils the "SDG Principle of Ensure No One is Left Behind". In doing this, we looked beyond the implementation Ministry to include other Ministries. Results of study was used for a multi-stakeholders' dialogue meeting. It was obvious to stakeholders that the realization of SDG 8 cannot be left to only the Ministry of Food and Agriculture.
There is serious concern about those employed in the informal sector doing menial jobs.
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Chairman of Elmoustkbal organization for Media Studies
Non-Governmental Organizations, Media
Organizing effective media campaigns and educating citizens about the importance of investment and its role in the development of society, in addition to using the media media to better present employment and investment opportunities and encourage young initiatives.
The digital Gap between Africa and Europe is among the lowest and most expensive countries.
To provide and achieve human rights and water conservation and conservation of energy and thus will increase stability in countries and improve investment opportunities and be more popular capital from all over the world.
United Nations efforts for economic development in the least developed countries.
Link for My CV:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/cg1294bvrireph5/Amro%20Selim%20CV.doc?dl=0
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FH - Danish Trade Union Confederation
Workers & Trade Unions
Promotion of social dialogue and collective bargaining is essential to achieve decent working conditions.
Lack of structures for social dialogue and collective bargaining and week organisation density both amongst workers and employers.
A stronger attention towards the promotion of social dialogue and collective bargaining will have a strong impact on goal no. 10 reduce inequality
In Denmark we have a strong tradition for high trade union density as well as high density of organized employers. A great part of the regulation of the labour market happens trough collective agreements.
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HETAVED SKILLS ACADEMY AND NETWORKS
Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Business & Industry, Science & Technological Community, Volunteer Groups, Education & Academic Entities
To accelerate progress and achieve SDG 8, the world need to take another look at Gender friendly innovations in sustainable green economic projects in such critical areas as Agro-biz schemes, Social and Digital Entrepreneurship skills training and implementation. Please, see some of our best practices at https://www.amazon.com/author/amosobi or https://www.youtube.com/c/AMOSOBI
The lack of infrastructure and enabling environment couple with corruption represent the biggest shortfalls and gaps towards achieving the expected results in achieving SDG 8.
Economic development and growth represent a key area in eradicating poverty, hunger, injustices and social challenges. Thus, fixing economic problems represent a task to actualizing the 2030 Agenda.
Some good examples of effective multi-stakeholders engagement for the implementation of SDG 8 could be seen in the Public -Private partnership between HETAVED SKILLS NETWORKS with some Universities, local government and public agencies in executing such projects as: THE HETAVED ORGANIC GARDENS, HETAVED SDGs Campaigns; and HETAVED E-SKILLS FOR DIGITAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP training and development at Ozoro, Isoko North Local Government area, Delta state. Also, the HETAVED SKILLS NETWORKS in public -private partnership with the National Open University of Nigeria in training, mentoring and empowering young entrepreneurship in Nigeria and Afica are some good examples of multi-stakeholders engagements for the SDG and SDG 8. Again refer to: https://youtube.com/c/AMOSAOBI
To achieving SDG 8, we have initiated project available at https://www.youtube.com/c/AMOSAOBI
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MESA COLOMBIANA DE INCIDENCIA POR LAS ENFERMEDADES CRONICAS
Women, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Workers & Trade Unions, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Education & Academic Entities, CONSUMERS, PATIENTS OF NCD´S
PROMOTE LOCAL DEVELOPMENT AND INTERNAL MARKETS
IN A DEVELOPMENT MODEL WHERE ECONOMIC RIGHTS FAVOR ONLY THE MOST POWERFUL AND ARE PUT ABOVE THE COLLECTIVE RIGHT TO SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
Starting from understanding and putting into practice that all human rights are interrelated and interdependent. If one of them is not met, the other SDGs can not be reached
MANY INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES AND PEASANTS ARE TESTING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STYLES, WHICH FAVOR EMPLOYMENT / EMPLOYMENT OF THEIR COMMUNITIES FOR COLLECTIVE BENEFIT
NO COMMETS
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Nepal Development Initiative (NEDI)
Non-Governmental Organizations
Local level involve to youth on technical and vocational education, make compulsion to rich people to use money in their land, improve governance and tax system, improve social security
The traditional way of economic practices and theory using labor market, need to understand and apply the current globalize IT based economy even under development country like Nepal
The poverty is major challenges for 2030 agenda therefore with out addressing to goal 8 there is not possible to fulfill 2030 agenda
Private sector involvement and PPP policy need implement in real scene
No possible to achieve in Nepal until and unless massive changes in traditional education system
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UNSAS
Workers & Trade Unions
establish economic policies adapted to the national context, promote the development of private entrepreneurship and support small and medium-sized enterprises through incentives such as: reducing taxation, creating a favorable business environment for the local private sector and promoting creation decent jobs; fight against corruption and tax evasion
the main gaps are the non-adaptation of the public policies most often imposed by international donors, the weakness of the local private sector and the informal sector vis-à-vis the multinationals, the high unemployment rate which favors immigration, a primary sector especially the agriculture not enough developed or supported and that does not create many decent jobs, the delay in the use of digital
sustained economic growth and full and productive employment is an essential lever for achieving development, and this growth can not be achieved without appropriate economic policies that take into account other objectives such as sustainable industrialization, infrastructure development, education, management and development of cities among others
no sustainable growth without creating decent jobs to achieve this requires social dialogue
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UNSAS
Workers & Trade Unions
establish economic policies adapted to the national context, promote the development of private entrepreneurship and support small and medium-sized enterprises through incentives such as: reducing taxation, creating a favorable business environment for the local private sector and promoting creation decent jobs; fight against corruption and tax evasion
the main gaps are the non-adaptation of the public policies most often imposed by international donors, the weakness of the local private sector and the informal sector vis-à-vis the multinationals, the high unemployment rate which favors immigration, a primary sector especially the agriculture not enough developed or supported and that does not create many decent jobs, the delay in the use of digital
sustained economic growth and full and productive employment is an essential lever for achieving development, and this growth can not be achieved without appropriate economic policies that take into account other objectives such as sustainable industrialization, infrastructure development, education, management and development of cities among others
no sustainable growth without creating decent jobs to achieve this requires social dialogue
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ONG WIÑOY LEPAY KIMÜN
Women, Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Older Persons, desarrollo indígena; educacional, económico, cultural, otros.
promoviendo la creación de emprendedores pero formales con documentación legal
falta de oportunidades para la creación de nuevas pequeñas empresas. falta apoyo en lo legal.
al crear pequeñas empresas se crearían puestos de trabajo, con la legalidad de las PIME se podrían generar mas y mejores empleos.
Tenemos la convicción que para desarrollar los pueblos debemos partir por la educación.
mas capacitación.
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Member of the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
Persons with Disabilities
Governments must be fully aware of their obligation to train people with disabilities for work. In the countries of my region it is thought that it is a voluntary action, of altruism and not of human rights
The welfare approach and not of human rights that is given to people with disabilities
Focus international cooperation towards training in the subject of social management to the most affected groups such as women, people with disabilities, older adults
"Building Bridges" Program capys@prodigy.net.mx
Focus efforts on training the most vulnerable groups for work
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Sukaar Welfare Organization
Women, Children & Youth, Farmer, Education & Academic Entities, Private Philanthropic Organizations
YesYesYesYesNo
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International Presentation Association
Women, Non-Governmental Organizations
Promote qualitiatve,equitable compulosry education for all with opportunities for job orinented skill training and entreprenureship at the high school level.
Promote community colleges that provide life skills and matches job training with community needs.
Local governments work with community based and Faith based organisations to provide skill training in communites through self help groups ectc.
Make credit and bank loans avaialble to community based enterprises.
Facilate micro finnacing and micro enterprises within local communities.
Ensure land rights of women, indigenous and other marginalsied communities and promote people's cooperatives.Provide agricultural subsidies to small and marginalsied farmers and encourgage community farming.
Ensure minimum wages and social protection for all.
Land grabbs of indigenous and tribal communites by mining companies and mega dam projects.
Increasing job redundency due to advanced technology.
Unemployment,under employment and over employment.
Forced migration from displacement due to climate change,land grabbs,conflict etc
Government policies that favour the rich and powerful.
Lack of and insufficent policies that protect unorganised sector of labour
Life long education and skill training can provide job opportunities and help reduce inequalities.Effective policies and monitoring of effective implementation
Presentation sisters in India through a number of community based projects collaborate with local governments,Local communities,education Institutions,Parent Teacher Associaitons to identify and provide life skills and job training to local youth and women .Some of the activites include formation of self help groups,training in micro finnace management,notebook prinitng, training in mechanics,computer literacy, tailoring,beauty parlours etc and hundreds of women and youth are helped to find self employment or jobs.Institutions support community based enterprises by giving orders for school note books,school uniforms as well as help sell the goods produced by the women's groups through the suppport of PTA.Local governments suppport certain number of skill training programs by providing grants.
Effective implementation of Universal Social protection and other people friendly labour policies.
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Union of Education Norway
Tachers Union
To use the position we and other unions enjoy as social partners whereby we have a defined role in negotiations, discussions and decision-making fora. (We also believe that it is essential to involve and consult organisations representing the differente professiones in public sector)
In Norway it is a big shortfall that a national plan on how to reach the SDG is not elaborated. The work done to acheive the SDGs are in many instances ʺoutsideʺ the ordinary cooperation and organized work life.
As a union for teachers we see the other goals in light of education, and how we can contribute as a union. We believe it is important for an organisation to identify or see the goal of particular interest in light of the other goals
Cooperation through social dialogue is discussed, but not implemented
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Make Mothers Matter
Women, Children & Youth, Mothers
Unpaid care work is vital but invisible and underrecognized.
We need to give unpaid carers status and rights , including social protection. We must also take into account the time spent delivering unpaid care, such as maternity leave, in the calculation of pensions.
Women in many countries, because of the unpaid care work they provide to their families ( caring for children, for the elderly, for family members with needs), cannot access full employment.



We need to recognize care as an essential basis for human développement and human dignity.
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cso
Non-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological Community, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
acceptance of raw and obsolete technologies from participating countries
countries pretending to be poor and poor countries pretending to be rich
just do itnot yet for now
the pen is mightier than the sword
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World Indigenous Teaching and Learning Centre Circle (WITLCC)
Women, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Persons with Disabilities, Education & Academic Entities, Metis, Mestizaje; Environmental and Human Health
* Giving Principle/Gift Economy
* Acknowledge official qualitative and socioeconomic value and validity for the key role of the unpaid work of mothers, wives, homemakers, grandmothers as equal` "sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work" and equally of fathers, husbands, and grandparents of the diverse types required to achieve family health and well-being, and other alternative forms of "work" which are essential to our society whether or not a dollar value is assigned.
*Mandate standard exceptions to policy and reasonable accommodations to create timely accessible for persons with different functional abilities to apply and receive a fair interview; acknowledge that the notion of Industry standard "one-size-fits-all" solutions is infeasible and a falsehood that "makes work" for those who ostensibly pass as advocates without actually offering or achieving fairness.
*Ensure that the cost of employment accommodations receives a significant tax write off and that industry aims for adaptive uses to create a more equal footing.
The assumption that standardization is feasible.

Acknowledge and include Giving Principle and Gift Economy practices, policies and processes.
Giving Principle and Gift Economy

Design, implement ways to overcome stigma, stereotype, exclusion.
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International Dalit Solidarity Network (IDSN)
Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Workers & Trade Unions, Business & Industry, Dalit communities
States must draw on the skills of Dalit civil society to raise awareness of the SDGs and set local indicators with civil society using accurate and disaggregated data. Monitoring and evaluation of these indicators should include participation of the Dalit community to ensure accurate results. States must disaggregate data by age, sex, disability, race caste, ethnicity, origin, occupation, religion or other economic status.

More specifically, set aside a portion of the budget for job creation; institute affirmative action and ensure these roles are filled; regulate the informal sector to prevent exploitation and violence of Dalit workers; investigate the Dalit children engaged in child labour; and ensure legal contracts for Dalits working in municipalities. States should also institute a comprehensive policy on ensuring equal pay for equal work at a living wage and mechanisms to ensure effective implementation of the policy; institute policies to eliminate indecent jobs like manual scavenging and bonded labour and set up mechanisms to ensure effective implementation; ensure policies towards rehabilitation and compensation of those forced into the aforementioned roles; and ensure free and secure grazing for Dalit farmers and fishing rights for common water bodies. IDSN is calling for the continued protection of employment opportunities of Dalits in the all sectors, including the private sector, through affirmative action (reservation) for social justice and equal opportunity.
Despite legislation to protect Dalit populations they are often subject to systematic discrimination both in the public and private sector. The unemployment rate for Dalits is consistently higher than that of the upper castes and it is continuing to rise. This is in addition to the loss of opportunities in the various state government areas. Although there is a quota system in many caste affected countries in the public, government and educational institutions, the positions are kept vacant. National development programmes have failed to reach the most vulnerable populations. A small fraction of Dalits have been able to escape from their ‘traditional role’ of manual scavenging, but often those with Dalit-sounding names are not even called for interviews.

With an agenda of ‘Leave No-one Behind’, the exclusion of Dalits and caste discrimination as a key factor of decent work means that this goal will never be achieved. Dalits are at the bottom of most supply chains in caste-affected countries and are forced to do the most menial, dirty and hazardous work. Addressing their labour rights in a business and human rights agenda is paramount. Furthermore, Dalits make up the majority of forced and bonded labourers in South Asia and still undertake the heinous task of collecting and removing human faeces from dry latrines, which still exist throughout India. This must end.
A state nexus with civil society, business, academia and citizens is paramount for any successful implementation of these goals. Therefore, civil society and government agencies should review domestic policy frameworks and processes to identify how they can facilitate effective implementation with the SDG.
Disaggregated data is crucial for each of the SDGs - data must be reflective of all major stakeholders within the State and collected at regular intervals. Monitoring of the implementation of the SDGs should be done by expert government officials with Dalit representation.

It is crucial that caste-based indicators are developed for each SDG as Dalits are affected by their caste in every aspect of their lives. The planning and implementation of the SDGs should focus on the intersectionalities of communities who face multiple discriminatory practices in order to reach those furthest behind. It is vital to address the importance of the intersectionalitites within the SDG model.
IDSN raises awareness of the SDGs and how they can be used to push for the improvement of Dalit’s situation throughout South Asia. IDSN helps local, grassroots members to engage with the SDGs by facilitating training on the SDGs, travel, joint submissions to the HLPF and joint sub-meetings in New York.
Excluding Dalits and caste discrimination from the SDGs means that these goals cannot be achieved.
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IndustriALL Global Union
Workers & Trade Unions
• trade union rights; particularly the freedom of association and the right to collective bargaining: SDG8 will not be achieved without full recognition of trade unions’ right to bargain collectively
• sustainable industrial policies: policies for the development of productive industries that fully take on board the social and environmental effects of their policies
• expectations of infinite growth on a finite planet are destroying the environment and will eventually destroy us unless growth can be de-coupled from resource depletion and pollution (including GHGs).
• social dialogue, particularly collective bargaining
• local, regional, national and global social dialogue
• the failure of governments to fully recognize trade union rights
• the generation and accumulation of wealth by the few no longer guarantees a reasonable rate of creation of decent work
• lack of full integration of social, economic, and environmental dimensions of sustainability
• corruption - not just financial but also intellectual
• lack of a compelling global socioeconomic narrative or alternative to consider, other than "casino capitalism"
• business schools must teach that trade union rights are human rights; and promote sustainable industrial policy and not financialization, as a growth strategy
• growth for growth's sake is not sustainable; economic growth must also improve the lives of all and reduce inequality - primarily by providing decent work
• sustainable industrial policy must be developed and implemented in an inclusive, multistakeholder fashion
• implementation of trade union rights, of necessity, results in better social dialogue
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Tebtebba (Indigenous Peoples' International Centre for Policy Research and Education
Indigenous Peoples
1. Legislate recognition of the rights of indigenous peoples in domestic law, with measures to grant legal documents to ancestral domains
2. Recognise, promote, mainstream and resource traditional livelihoods and the indigenous political structures (IPS) that regulate these
3. For States, in consultation with indigenous communities, craft policies and programs, with accompanying budget support, for the development of indigenous individuals as managers of their own economic resources to promote productive employment and decent work within the ancestral domains.
1. Non-recognition of the rights of indigenous peoples to their lands, territories and resources
2. Criminalisation of traditional livelihoods, like rotational agriculture, resource extraction, etc.
3. Lack of educational programs sensitive to indigenous peoples culture, aspirations and worldviews
4. Discrimination against indigenous peoples as peoples
IP-sensitive education programs geared towards the development of lifeskills of indigenous children and youth to meet the challenges of current development paradigms at the same time entrenching their indigenous knowledge systems and practices and identity, crafted by indigenous peoples with meaningful support from States, can lead to acquisition of knowledge and skills that will allow them to have productive employment and decent work, thus address their poverty and hunger situation, at the same time build strong indigenous peoples institutions, and protect life on land and under water.
The public-private partnership with effective and meaningful participation of indigenous peoples in the development of their ancestral domains
Recognition of IPS as State administrative institutions in ancestral domains
34
MPIDO
Women, Indigenous Peoples
1. Devolution of county government in Kenya has improved the rate of economic growth in most areas
2. Increase national budget allocation to the devolved ( County) government has increased the number of persons and quality of employment to locals.
3. Public private partnerships ( PPPs) have introduced modern working conditions as well as new sources of employment and work to the localities.
1. Inconsistent work remuneration and grading creates a way of discrimination to the locals in formal employment
2. employment categorization and promotion is purely based on formal education that then discriminates most indigenous people in employment.
3. Lack of and low access to financial services and investment capital is unfavorable to Indigenous Peoples to initiate economic activities.
1. Economic empowerment is key to sustainable livelihoods.
2. Access to employment and quality work complements access to Capital as a driver of innovation.
1. Private Public Partnerships in energy, infrastructure and health services have increased economic growth and created quality employment opportunities.
There is unfavorable economic growth and conditions in ASAL areas.
35
FEDWASUN
Non-Governmental Organizations
Transportation and Quality Education are most essential for local development
Good governance and integrity is gap
Community development affects all development indicators
36
Lawyers' Association for human Rights of Nepalese Indigenous Peoples (LAHURNIP)
Women, Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Local Authorities, Workers & Trade Unions, Business & Industry, Volunteer Groups, Older Persons, Persons with Disabilities, Education & Academic Entities, Private Philanthropic Organizations
To promote entrepreneurship indigenous knowledge and practice, that helps to increase income status of indigenous peoples. In addition, it creates employment environment for indigenous peoples and stops migrant for work.
In the name of development there are massive development project developed in indigenous territory such as hydro power project, transmission line, cement factory, road expansion etc., which directly affect indigenous peoples. Yes, Nepal rectified ILO convention 169 and party to the UNDRIP but there is not any policies and law related to FPIC. The development projects rare consults with Indigenous peoples and less number of project distributes remedial.
In Nepal some Indigenous peoples are running their cottage industry such as hand made cotton cloths, handicrafts, wines, animal husbandry etc., which helps revive indigenous knowledge, create employment opportunity and helps sustainable entrepreneurship. In addition, indigenous women are running cooperatives, which helps to empower women.
Also, Upper Trishuli Hydro power project applies FPIC process
37
East Africa Trade Union Confederation
Workers & Trade Unions
Having policies that would drive labour intensive development, most of the East African countries have been experiencing impressive economic growth but this growth has been accompanied by joblessness growth.
Having investment, agricultural and trade policies speak to each other in ensuring creation of not just any jobs but decent jobs.
creation of decent job. The narrative that any job is a good job in africa should stop if we have to make any meaningful progress
Personally I think in Africa you can not talk about the other SDGs if you have not fully achieved SDG8. How do i provide for quality education when i can not afford because I am a working poor or unemployed, how do you talk about health when i can not even afford to give my family a decent meal, definitely climate change will not be on my mind if year in and year out i have to rely on my peasant farming harvest, I will still sink into poverty as the cost of living sky rockets and I can not afford basic needs.
The tripartite model of engaging, Employers, Trade Unions and government has work in ensuring workers right to decent employment
38
Union to Union
Workers & Trade Unions
In order to make progress towards SDG 8, it is crucial that international labor standards, including freedom of association, access to collective bargaining and social dialogue, are respected. They lay the foundations for decent working conditions, employment creation and a fair and inclusive growth, and are driving forces for a sustainable development and social progress, thus making them the most effective tools for progress towards SDG 8.
The failure to recognize and implement international labor standards, such as freedom of association and access to social dialogue will make it impossible to progress towards SDG 8. Humans and labor rights are foundations for decent work and preconditions for a sustainable economic growth. Regarding decent work, one must also acknowledge the vast gender inequalities at the labor market, and that specific actions are needed to fight discrimination, harassment’s and gender based violence.
The fulfilment of this goal is a precondition for achieving several other SDGs, especially SDG 1 to end poverty, and SDG 10 to end inequality. This since decent work and decent wages are crucial in order to lift people out of precarious conditions and poverty. There are also evidence which shows that the respect for, and use, of social dialogue can raise socio-economic progress and be an instrument for sustainable development in several areas, for example within actions towards climate changes and gender based violence, which make the fulfillment of SDG 8 crucial for the implementation of all the SDGs.
The most effective model of multi-stakeholder engagement when it comes to progress towards sustainable economic growth and decent work is collective bargaining. This since collective bargaining bring employers and their organizations and trade unions into an inclusive dialogue on sound labor relations, wages and working conditions, which is a necessity in order to obtain SDG 8. In, for example, the sector of building and woodworkers, have collective bargaining and collective agreements contributed enormously to the improvement of working conditions and wages for workers all over the globe.
Another important model well worth mentioning is international development cooperation between trade unions. This models brings together several stakeholders from different countries, and together are these actors working for decent work through the everyday work of unions in low- and middle income countries.
The collaboration between trade unions in the ‘north’ and ‘south’ that connect to Agenda 2030 goal number 17 is also crucial in order to strengthen unions and to enable them to participate in complex dialogue questions with the more powerful actors from both governments and multinationals and other companies.
Tools for social dialogue, such as the Global Deal initiative, would be effective for this SDG.
39
Comision Huairou
Women, Non-Governmental Organizations, Farmer, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
Ant work, microcredits in the hands of women
Neoliberal economic model, inequality in the distribution of wealth and lack of education, exploitation and debit of employee protection systems
Promoting quality education, education focused on technology (microenterprises, small industries) and commercialization of proudcts.
The results of the Community Resilience Fund of the Huairou Commission in Honduras and Guatemala.
Organized women and local governments jointly promoting the local economy
40
Girls Not BridesWomen
Ensuring that a multi-sectoral approach is applied to development, with approaches to economic growth aligned closely with other development priorities such as health, social protection and gender equality.

In addition, achieving progress towards SDG 8 requires a multi-stakeholder approach, including civil society, government, UN and intergovernmental agencies, and academia.
When women are educated and healthy, they are more productive, thereby contributing to greater national productivity and higher Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Delaying marriage, keeping girls in school, and involving women in the formal labour market not only increases their individual income and economic empowerment, but can have ripple effects at the household, community, and national levels. When girls are able to go to school, learn the skills they need to secure a job, and have access to the same economic opportunities as boys, they will be better able to support themselves and their families and help to break the cycle of intergenerational poverty.

When women have economic decision-making power, they are also more likely than men to spend more money on food, housing, education for their children and income-generating activities, all of which reduce poverty levels and promote sustainable development. Child marriage also has an economic cost. A study by UNICEF in Nepal found that the economic cost just from a labour market perspective due to child marriage was 3.87% of GDP.

The continued practice of child marriage around the world continues to impede global progress towards ending forced labour, modern slavery and human trafficking.
A lack of attention to child marriage undermined the achievement of six of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). We have since learned that child marriage is a core development and human rights issue, which hinders the achievement of many other development goals: half of the SDGs will not be achieved without significant progress on child marriage, including those related to poverty, health, education, nutrition, food security, economic growth and reduction of inequality, and other manifestations of gender inequality.
41
Unio
Workers & Trade Unions
The goals should be institutionalised nationally by way of a wide-reaching white paper as a first step towards a national plan for realising the sustainable development goals.
Further: The social partners must be involved in the planning, execution and evaluation of the government’s work on the UN’s sustainable development goals.
And: special parliamentary hearings on the realisation of the sustainable development goals should be held in connection with the presentation of the proposed annual budget.
• Weakness in coordination. Need of national plan.
• The sustainable development goals still not incorporated in education at all levels – from kindergarten to higher education – and enable the institutions to exercise this mandate.
• Cooperation through social dialogue is discussed, but not implemented
Highlight and emphasis on social dialogue.
Implement knowledge about SDG s in education om all levels. Intersectionality and interdiciplin in education embedded in practice
Focus on Just changes/transition and decrease wealth gap in society in general
• Ensure that the sustainable development goals are introduced to the social partnership.
• Use joint fora that bring together labour unions, employer organisations, civil society and business to highlight and strengthen the efforts to realise the sustainable development goals.
• co-operation with key social institutions such as research/educational institutions, museums, archives and libraries to reach the sustainable development goals.
• involve the local and regional level
• Social dialogue
• extensive financing.
42
Planet Life Economy Foundation
Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
Action with profit and not profit enterprises
the issue that growth may be achieved without employment
using really a performance control based in the mean time on GDP and WELL BEING
a municipality planning like in Capannori an italian municipality in the Lucca provincy with a industrial district for paper production
Lack of national engagement in the annual budget and parliament discussion
43
Embrace Relief
Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations
The most effective ways to accelerate progress towards SDG 8 would be through empowerment of women’s economic rights. Breaking down barriers, such as access to education, land, capital, and employment opportunities would promote opportunities for women to become productive members of their communities. Empowering women and their economic rights drive long-term sustainability and growth, where women take center stage.
The biggest shortfalls toward making progress would be the lack of funding, skills, education, home and policy barriers. Evidence show lack of proper public support for women, the main contributor of women’s underrepresentation in the labor market.
Women’s empowerment drives sustainability and growth, which subsequently closes the gap of gender equality, as well as reduction in poverty. It increases the quality of education and knowledge skill sets, necessary to promote lifelong opportunities. Women’s representation in various sectors and the increase of women’s entrepreneurship opportunities are effective drivers toward combating climate change and the production of environmentally clean products. Increasing women’s access to knowledge and good education decrease inequality.
Effective models for engagement are established through building partnerships in the field and continue to implement mentorship programs. They are effective tools for monitoring and tracking progress. Our model consists of dedicated professionals focused on providing access to information and knowledge of available resources in the region. Feedback and multilevel of communication is the core of success.
44
Equipo de Relaciones Internacionales CGT RA
Workers & Trade Unions
El desarrollo económico sostenible requiere de políticas dirigidas al desarrollo de una economía dinámica, con mercados internos robustos, una distribución de la riqueza más equitativa, soberanía alimentaria y una industria pujante.

Fortalecer instituciones del trabajo, fundamentalmente la inspección laboral, a los efectos de combatir el fraude laboral y todas las formas de precarización.

Promover los derechos de sindicalización y negociación colectiva.

Promover políticas activas de generación de empleo de calidad con trabajo decente. Generar políticas para atender los retos que enfrentan en materia de empleo los colectivos de jóvenes, mujeres y migrantes.

Fortalecer las políticas orientadas a la erradicación del trabajo infantil, el trabajo forzoso y la esclavitud moderna.

Regular los sectores de economía de plataforma con el objetivo de favorecer la transición hacia la formalización de los trabajadores, garantizando el ejercicio pleno de los derechos humanos, laborales y sindicales.

Promover el diálogo social institucionalizado para la concertación de políticas de desarrollo productivo con matrices productivas diversificadas.

Desarrollar estrategias nacionales para la consolidación de una cultura preventiva en materia de salud y seguridad en el trabajo.

Reforzar e invertir en sistemas universales de protección social para que las personas puedan obtener empleos libremente elegidos.
A nivel regional representan desafíos la persistente desocupación y la incertidumbre respecto de la evolución económica.

Asimismo el desempleo joven, habida cuenta que la tasa de desocupación juvenil triplica la de la población adulta.

Por otro lado, la desigualdad remunerativa persiste. Todavía los salarios de los hombres superan a los de las mujeres siendo en Arentina superior a 35%.

La informalidad laboral en la región alcanza prácticamente a la mitad del empleo. La precarización laboral constituye el mayor déficit de trabajo decente en la región.

Los trabajadores en economías de plataforma sufren déficits de trabajo decente y condicionamientos para el ejercicio efectivo de derechos laborales y sindicales.

En Argentina se sostiene la pérdida de puestos de trabajo. En el 3°trimestre del año 2018 se verificó un aumento interanual significativo en la tasa de desocupación, que se ubicó en el 9,0% mientras que había sido 8,3% en el mismo trimestre de 2017.

En los últimos años, los déficits de calidad de empleo se mantuvieron elevados para los jóvenes.

Por otro lado, a partir del Decreto 801/2018 de fecha 5 de septiembre de 2018 se definió la disolución del Ministerio de Trabajo, Empleo y Seguridad Social de la República Argentina. El mismo pasó a ser una Secretaría de Estado, lo cual trasluce la reducción del papel del trabajo humano en el conjunto de las políticas públicas.
El empleo productivo y el trabajo decente son esenciales para reducir la pobreza, como se expresa en el Objetivo 1 de la Agenda 2030.

En ese sentido, la protección social expresada en la meta Meta 1.3 del Objetivo 1, forma parte del concepto mismo de Trabajo Decente constituyendo uno de sus pilares fundamentales.

Por otro lado, el Trabajo Decente expresado en el Objetivo 8 puede contribuir a alcanzar las metas propuestas en los Objetivos 5 – Igualdad de género y Objetivo 10 – Reducción de desigualdad. El concepto de Trabajo Decente incorpora entre sus pilares fundamentales a las normas internacionales del trabajo, que se expresan en los convenios fundamentales de la OIT, entre los que se destacan el Convenio número 100 sobre igualdad de remuneración y el Convenio 98 sobre negociación colectiva, siendo ésta una herramienta fundamental en la construcción de igualdad.

Del mismo modo, y en el mismo sentido, la meta 8.5 del Objetivo 8 expresa la importancia de lograr el empleo pleno y productivo y el trabajo decente para todas las mujeres y los hombres, incluidos los jóvenes y las personas con discapacidad, así como la igualdad de remuneración por trabajo de igual valor.

El objetivo 8 y su cumplimiento impacta en forma integral con el ODS 3 de salud, el ODS 4 de educación, así como los ODS 9 (promover la industrialización inclusiva y sostenible y fomentar la innovación) y el ODS 11 (ciudades resilientes y sostenibles).
La Alianza 8.7 es una iniciativa multisectorial global, conformada para asistir a los estados miembros de las Naciones Unidas en lograr el Objetivo 8.7 de la Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo Sostenible y acelerar el apoyo político e internacional para la erradicación del trabajo infantil, trabajo forzoso, esclavitud moderna y la trata de personas a nivel regional.
La conformación de la Plataforma Argentina de Monitoreo para la Agenda 2030 (PAMPA 2030) , coordinada por el movimiento sindical en articulación con actores de la sociedad civil representa una experiencia destacable en materia de monitoreo de la Agenda 2030.
Diálogo social institucionalizado es la herramienta para concertar políticas de empleo y desarollo.
45
Comite Juventud de CSI - Secretaria Relaciones Internacionales de CGT RA
Workers & Trade Unions
El desarrollo económico sostenible requiere de políticas dirigidas al desarrollo de una economía dinámica, con mercados internos robustos, una distribución de la riqueza más equitativa, soberanía alimentaria y una industria pujante.

Fortalecer instituciones del trabajo, fundamentalmente la inspección laboral, a los efectos de combatir el fraude laboral y todas las formas de precarización.

Promover los derechos de sindicalización y negociación colectiva.

Promover políticas activas de generación de empleo de calidad con trabajo decente. Generar políticas para atender los retos que enfrentan en materia de empleo los colectivos de jóvenes, mujeres y migrantes.

Fortalecer las políticas orientadas a la erradicación del trabajo infantil, el trabajo forzoso y la esclavitud moderna.

Regular los sectores de economía de plataforma con el objetivo de favorecer la transición hacia la formalización de los trabajadores, garantizando el ejercicio pleno de los derechos humanos, laborales y sindicales.

Promover el diálogo social institucionalizado para la concertación de políticas de desarrollo productivo con matrices productivas diversificadas.

Desarrollar estrategias nacionales para la consolidación de una cultura preventiva en materia de salud y seguridad en el trabajo.

Reforzar e invertir en sistemas universales de protección social para que las personas puedan obtener empleos libremente elegidos.
A nivel regional representan desafíos la persistente desocupación y la incertidumbre respecto de la evolución económica.

Asimismo el desempleo joven, habida cuenta que la tasa de desocupación juvenil triplica la de la población adulta.

Por otro lado, la desigualdad remunerativa persiste. Todavía los salarios de los hombres superan a los de las mujeres siendo en Argentina superior a 35%.

La informalidad laboral en la región alcanza prácticamente a la mitad del empleo. La precarización laboral constituye el mayor déficit de trabajo decente en la región.

Los trabajadores en economías de plataforma sufren déficits de trabajo decente y condicionamientos para el ejercicio efectivo de derechos laborales y sindicales.

En Argentina se sostiene la pérdida de puestos de trabajo. En el 3°trimestre del año 2018 se verificó un aumento interanual significativo en la tasa de desocupación, que se ubicó en el 9,0% mientras que había sido 8,3% en el mismo trimestre de 2017.

En los últimos años, los déficits de calidad de empleo se mantuvieron elevados para los jóvenes.

Por otro lado, a partir del Decreto 801/2018 de fecha 5 de septiembre de 2018 se definió la disolución del Ministerio de Trabajo, Empleo y Seguridad Social de la República Argentina. El mismo pasó a ser una Secretaría de Estado, lo cual trasluce la reducción del papel del trabajo humano en el conjunto de las políticas públicas.
El empleo productivo y el trabajo decente son esenciales para reducir la pobreza, como se expresa en el Objetivo 1 de la Agenda 2030.

En ese sentido, la protección social expresada en la meta Meta 1.3 del Objetivo 1, forma parte del concepto mismo de Trabajo Decente constituyendo uno de sus pilares fundamentales.

Por otro lado, el Trabajo Decente expresado en el Objetivo 8 puede contribuir a alcanzar las metas propuestas en los Objetivos 5 – Igualdad de género y Objetivo 10 – Reducción de desigualdad. El concepto de Trabajo Decente incorpora entre sus pilares fundamentales a las normas internacionales del trabajo, que se expresan en los convenios fundamentales de la OIT, entre los que se destacan el Convenio número 100 sobre igualdad de remuneración y el Convenio 98 sobre negociación colectiva, siendo ésta una herramienta fundamental en la construcción de igualdad.

Del mismo modo, y en el mismo sentido, la meta 8.5 del Objetivo 8 expresa la importancia de lograr el empleo pleno y productivo y el trabajo decente para todas las mujeres y los hombres, incluidos los jóvenes y las personas con discapacidad, así como la igualdad de remuneración por trabajo de igual valor.

El objetivo 8 y su cumplimiento impacta en forma integral con el ODS 3 de salud, el ODS 4 de educación, así como los ODS 9 (promover la industrialización inclusiva y sostenible y fomentar la innovación) y el ODS 11 (ciudades resilientes y sostenibles).
La Alianza 8.7 es una iniciativa multisectorial global, conformada para asistir a los estados miembros de las Naciones Unidas en lograr el Objetivo 8.7 de la Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo Sostenible y acelerar el apoyo político e internacional para la erradicación del trabajo infantil, trabajo forzoso, esclavitud moderna y la trata de personas a nivel regional.
La conformación de la Plataforma Argentina de Monitoreo para la Agenda 2030 (PAMPA 2030) , coordinada por el movimiento sindical en articulación con actores de la sociedad civil representa una experiencia destacable en materia de monitoreo de la Agenda 2030.
Diálogo social institucionalizado es la herramienta para concertar políticas de empleo y desarollo.
46
ITUC
Workers & Trade Unions
- Comprehensive national employment policy frameworks, built upon the principle of policy coherence for development, are needed. Governments need to design and implement pro-employment macroeconomic strategies supported by progressive trade, industrial, tax and infrastructure policies, including investments in education and skills development, youth employment, equality and the care economy. Such policy frameworks should be developed through tripartite consultations, including governments and social partners.
- Guarantee decent work conditions, including comprehensive social protection, adequate minimum living wages, occupational health and safety, reasonable working hours and job security. As well as ensure the implementation of ILO Conventions 87 and 98.
- Address forced labour and modern slavery, with due diligence and transparency as key drivers for it, as well as coordination among countries to prevent and eliminate forced labour.
- In the context of digitalization, governments need to develop adequate industrial and employment policies through social dialogue and a Just Transition approach, so that real discussions and negotiations related to changes in the organization of work are possible.
- Ensure business accountability and transparency in investments and ‘due diligence’ in global supply chains as prescribed by the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and the Tripartite declaration of principles concerning multinational enterprises and social.
- Working poverty remains a major challenge across the globe. Considering that the working poor account for more than 700 million people, meeting SDGs by 2030 will be impossible if this issue is left unaddressed. Implementing and enforcing a statutory minimum wage guaranteeing an income that allows people to live with dignity and is essential to reducing poverty. Also, the decline in the wage share in many countries has contributed to deficiencies in aggregate demand, which has been detrimental for growth and employment at the national level as well for the global economy.
- The weakening of labour market institutions, following 'structural adjustment' programs, has been contributing to increasing inequality.
- The ILO estimates that only 29% of the world’s population enjoy a comprehensive level of social protection. The low global coverage of social protection occurs despite the legal and operational basis for governments to ensure an adequate level of social protection for all.
- The integration of national economies into global markets and the expansion of global supply chains have intensified competition and caused leading firms to cut labour costs through restructuring, outsourcing and off-shoring. These changes also accompanied by the deregulation of labour markets and a rollback in policy support for protective labour market institutions and collective bargaining.
- The need to address the informal economy - in 2016, 61.2% of workers worked in the informal economy.
Roughly half the world’s population still lives on the equivalent of about US$2 a day. Still today in too many places, having a job doesn’t guarantee the ability to escape from poverty and inequality.

Putting the creation of decent work at the heart of economic policy-making and development plans, would not only generate opportunities for quality jobs (decent work) but also more robust, inclusive and poverty-reducing growth.

The ITUC also has several examples on how Social Dialogue can play a pivotal role in achieving the SDGs - Social dialogue at both bipartite and tripartite levels is vital for harmonious industrial relations and solid economic growth and inclusive development in increasingly complex societies: https://www.ituc-csi.org/social-dialogue-to-achieve-the-20691
Participation is a pillar of sustainability, and so it is recognised in the 2030 Agenda. In this light, social dialogue is a mechanism for participation that contributes to sustainability in many different ways. One example is its potential to build innovative approaches that enable progress with the formalisation of the informal economy.

Examples of Social Dialogue contributions to achieving the SDGs: https://www.ituc-csi.org/social-dialogue-to-achieve-the-20691
47
CGSLB-ACLVB
Workers & Trade Unions
1. Commitment from government to mainstream and allocate structured budget towards the SDG 8
2. To acknowledge the role of (and give space to) social partners as priority stakeholders to work towards achieving SDG 8
3. To have a clear M&E system
4. To have mid-term indicators, not only work towards 2030
5. Respecting international laws & frameworks like the ILO conventions & recommendations
1. Governments not giving space within the tripartite social dialogue to achieve the indicators set out under the SDG8.
2. Non compliance of international laws like the ILO conventions & recommendations
2. Some actors in Private sector just using the SDG's as a marketing tool within their year/sustainability reports, without any monitoring mechanism to confirm if real achievement was reach. Through put it for example on the social dialogue agenda on the company level with the trade union representatives
3. Not to have ambition. Some actors in private sector have been doing the same investment towards better health & safety on the work floor and now it suddenly falls under achieving the SDG's. It is nothing new, innovative or additional...
Through the 4 pillars of the ILO Decent Work agenda
Tripartite social dialogue (government, employees & employers)
48
CGT COLOMBIA
Workers & Trade Unions
We need more stronger unions and promote association right
Subcontracting workers without fundamental rights added labour informality
Whit a gender mainstreaming,
If the conditions of women are better it to open the doors to the 2030 agenda
In Colombia unions are not part of this spaces
49
BASAB BD
Women, Children & Youth, Business & Industry, Volunteer Groups, Education & Academic Entities
Building Awareness program, training for sustainable products by available resources and wastage.
Connectivity with peoples, Awareness of SDG impact and value chain creating
Making awareness via Training program from children to adult with sustainable and economy products and handicrafts.
Awareness Program for all stakeholders, Training Schedule to Children and Rural Women, Connection with Trade Bodies, Making Value Chain and Focus the green world, Green Products
We have to use our available cheap raw material, even wastage and by waste management is important.
50
Green Creation
Women, Volunteer Groups, Education & Academic Entities, individual
Make everyone listen to head of Oxfam and historian Bregman contributions at Davos 2019. Honest/ true SDG roll out/ implementation requires changes to current economic
The global neoliberal economic paradigm remains significantly untouched which ultimately is putting a plaster on the wound and not affecting.
by encouraging a holistic approach.
cross-sector collaboration and each stakeholder as seeing others as complementary (not [potential] competition) ... more than enough to do for all players
All the best!
51
IFBPWWomen
- ensure (sex-) aggregated data collection to better analysis and policy measures
- use tools like gender sensitive budgeting to plan better and know more about impact of measures
- implement methods and certification schemes to acknowledge earlier acquired competences thus for people to get better access to the labor market and/ or formal vocational education
- develop schemes to pay for services to the eco-system and support for all basic services (also like water and sanitation) - which means more paid work especially for women and youth
- motivate companies to sign-up / adhere to the Women empowerment principles (Global Compact/ UN Women)
- ensure women friendly working conditions and availability for appropriate equipment for their protection
- ensure women have equal access to grants and loans to set-up a business and - ensure women's equal access to tenure, land ownership and water rights (so to have access and collateral)
- "tap the resource" of women for / to the labor market to fill the huge gap in qualified professionals at all levels (especially in water and energy related sectors)



- not enough women have a say over their own finances and access to a bank account
- women need to have more " say" over ownership and use of natural resources like land and water
- a lot of working conditions are women unfriendly (lack of acceptance and appropriator equipment e.g.)
- lack of dis-aggregated data and citizens science/ data acknowledgment
- "tap the resource" of women for / to the labor market to fill the huge gap in qualified professionals at all levels (especially in water and energy related sectors)
- give women better access to vocational training and acknowledge earlier acquired skills and competences (RENFIL)
- do labor market analysis for all (local) activity proposals
e.g. " women plumbers" scheme(s) in Jordan and South Africa
52
Rainy River District Women's Shelter of Hope
Women
All organizations need to adopt an anti-racist, anti-oppression policy and hire people with lived experience.
Lived experience is not recognized as valid in terms of hiring
They are all very interconnected. Improvement in one area - SDG#5 will improve the outcome in another area such as SDG #8.
Governmental bodies have provided NGOs with their own ability to set hiring standards; however, even local Boards of Directors may not be willing to be as inclusive as one might like or expect.
We must recognize all people as truly equal.
53
International Presentation Association
religious Faith Based Communities
Allow asylum seekers to work and rent property.
There has been a ban on zero hours contracts (last month) and this is to be commended.
There must be s decent wage for work done and the race to the bottom in ever increasing and wages at this stage are so low in too many instances that hope of ever buying a home is out of the question.
Wage levels are too low, even though we are coming out of austerity here in Ireland we are being hounded by an impending Brexit and is shaping and thwarting all possible and improving standards of living for all.
By engaging with all departments of government and ensuring that all departments are engaged.
By ensuring that Civil Society can do more than be consulted, we must be allowed and encouraged to participate.
We need to created a much better awareness of the SDGs at home and abroad.
We must not be afraid to copy some of the best practices around the world rather than feel we must invent our own.
There is currently in Ireland a stakeholder forum which as recently met for the third time and this time there is an energy that was there previously. There are many who want to engage and all they need is leadership and direction and we are hoping that this stakeholder forum will offer that. The Civil Society Coalition 2030 in Ireland is an effective networking model of interaction that can be better utilised by the government in their efforts to drive the SDGs at home and abroad.
Brexit and austerity are the engaging agenda in Ireland and we need a focus on the SDGs.
54
Women for Water Partnership (WfWP)
Women
- give women equal access to water and sanitation for and at work / also for productive uses
- ensure (sex-) aggregated data collection inter alia in labor market research to better analysis and policy measures - use tools like gender sensitive budgeting to plan better and know more about impact of measures
- implement methods and certification schemes to acknowledge earlier acquired competences thus for people to get better access to the labor market and/ or formal vocational education
- develop schemes to pay for services to the eco-system and support for all basic services (also like water and sanitation) - which means more paid work especially for women and youth
- motivate companies to sign-up / adhere to the Women empowerment principles (Global Compact/ UN Women)
- ensure women friendly working conditions and availability for appropriate equipment for their protection
- ensure equal pay for equal work by men and women for instance by making job descriptions gender neutral
- ensure women have equal access to grants and loans to set-up a business and
- ensure women's equal access to tenure, land ownership and water rights (so to have access and collateral)
- "tap the resource" of women for / to the labor market to fill the huge gap in qualified professionals at all levels (especially in water and energy related sectors)
- not enough women have a say over their own finances and access to a bank account
- women need to have more " say" over ownership and use of natural resources like land and water
- a lot of working conditions are women unfriendly (lack of acceptance and appropriator equipment e.g.)
- lack of dis-aggregated data and citizens science/ data acknowledgment
- "tap the resource" of women for / to the labor market to fill the huge gap in qualified professionals at all levels (especially in water and energy related sectors)
- give women better access to vocational training and acknowledge earlier acquired skills and competences (RENFIL)
- do labor market analysis for all (local) activity proposals
- ensure that there is horizontal coordination between ministries and measures in one domain are checked against impacts in others
- show e.g. in the media that work of women inter alia as water management is crucial, should be paid and will create more jobs and better management
e.g. " women plumbers" scheme(s) in Jordan and South Africa; women vocational schools jointly managed by women's organisations, ministry and local government
55
European Youth ForumChildren & Youth
Securing a quality transition from education to employment, by adopting national or regional quality criteria for internships and apprenticeships.

Banning all unpaid internships.

Investing in quality and sustainable job. Furthermore improving the legal requirements on decent working conditions, for example by putting greater limitiations of the cycle of temporary contracts that employers give young people.

Abolishing youth minimum wages to end discrimination against young people and to ensure equal pay for work of equal value.

Adapting social protection systems to young people’s reality in the labour market.

Extending social protection coverage to all workers, including those in new forms of work, and the self-employed.

Investment in programmes that specifically target NEETs, providing individualised support and learner centered approaches.

Ensuring that young people can receive free and accessible information on the different employment statuses and what they mean for basic workers’ rights and social protection coverage, with particular attention to new forms of work.

Investing in quality youth employment through national and regional budgets.

Participation of young people and youth organisations in the implementation of SDG 4.

Protecting the space for collective bargaining through legislation, and ensuring the possibility for all workers, including those in new forms of work, to organise themselves.
Not enough attention is given to quality job creation and to ensuring that jobs, when they do exist, adequately match the reality of young people. Entry-level jobs are disappearing, and they are increasingly being replaced by internships and apprenticeships.

Internships often do not comply with minimum quality standards.

Moreover, several European States have youth minimum wage policies in place, often well below the national minimum wage standard. These perpetuate age-based discrimination and conflict with the right to equal remuneration for work of equal value.

Precarious employment is also disproportionately affecting youth: due to longer transition periods, young people are more likely to take up non-standard forms of employment (e.g. zero hour contracts; platform work). In 2017, 44% of young workers in Europe were on a temporary contract (Eurostat).

Youth employent Initiatives, such as the Youth Guarantee in the EU context, often fail to reach those who are socially excluded. This is due to many factors: lack of available and understandable information, lack of holistic approach and inter-sectoral cooperation, and lack of involvement of youth organisations and young people in the design, implementation and monitoring of measures targeting youth.
Much of the barriers young people in Europe face to accessing decent and quality work is the result of discrimination based on age. This age-based discrimination as experienced by young people is often intersectionally linked to other forms of discrimination they face on the basis of gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity, migration status, etc. As such the linkages to SDG 10 are clear. Unequal access to quality employment has perpetuated the inequality that Europe's youth experience, and vice versa, the inequality that young people face in attaining their social and economic rights perpetuates their inability to access decent employment or to achieve social mobility.
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