Copy of 7-Traits SAMR design rubric for sharing, Oct 2017
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Blended learning environment development guide
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SAMR/
7-Traits
SubstituteAugmentModifyRedefine
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OrganizationParts or sections of the course room are distinguishable through tabs, topic headings, or buttons.Units, topics, activities, resources, events and special features are easily identified and located; all course room items have purpose.Course room areas are personalized for students; content, communication channels, feedback, activities, and appearance.Organization of the course follows school standards, yet is agile to meet changing student needs and abilities.
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Resources and activities are noticeable through headings, subheadings, blocks, tags, and other design elements.Blocks on the margins of the course page, and other features are utilized to extend student engagement in the course room.Learning spaces to enable differentiation, inquiry, reflective learning, and special needs are being utilized.It is a boundaryless community environment where unique learning spaces develop to meet changing needs.
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Links to all external resources and websites are included: Managebac, Seesaw, myHomework, Mathletics, etc.Tags, folders, "fake students," colors, and other such systems are used to aid both navigation and personalization of the course room.The course room is a normal part of the learning environment; students interact within the BLE naturally with minimal guidance. The design of the course room allows for multiple theories and perspectives on learning and assessment.
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Course headings and information areas include needed curriculum resources, notifications and other required information.Links to external websites and resources are embedded in the course or open in a new window; the course page never closes.Course room settings and preferences aim to encourage student engagement and comfort within the environment.Course room, resources and tools are accessible and navigable through various mobile devices and online tools.
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ResourcesThe teacher has uploaded files for student use: PDFs, Docs, PPTs, Jpgs, etc.Resources that would normally be uploaded have been embedded within the environment so downloading is not required.Class and student produced resources are actively used to help students gain and strengthen understandings.Class resources evolve over time and are utilized in a manner that empowers independent student learning and inquiry.
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Websites, videos, and other external resources are included.Resources include interactive capabilities to enable notetaking, reflections, or question answering.Students develop glossaries, forum posts, wikis, blogs and other related tools to develop shared meanings and understandings.Students develop and take advantage of tools from any number sources to meet personal learning needs.
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Pictures, diagrams, and other embedded resources are easily viewable and add to the learning environment.Extension resources provide students with opportunities to develop curiosity, inquiry, and enrichment.Resources are designed and developed for use specific to particular units or topics to meet the different needs of students in class.Anytime anywhere learning resources provide interactivity for differentiated learning for different abilities and needs.
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Student generated resources and exemplars, as well as pictures, videos, and examples of student work are included.Student generated resources are used, developed, and referred to as a part of the learning process. Students make proper references to the owners and contributors of information that has been generated in class. Resources and knowledge developed in class contribute to the world's knowledge and are referenced by others.
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ExchangesStudents are asked to share ideas, questions, or examples of work.Students engage with one another and the teacher to develop or complete learning tasks, while providing support for others.Interactions encourage the development of complex meanings or understandings; shown in forums, wikis, and other such tools.Exchanges provide opportunities to build multiple literacies, promote inquiry, and develop critical thinking skills.
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Students may use such tools as forums, wikis, folders, or comments areas.Forums, wikis, glossaries, comments, common areas, blogs, photo galleries, and other such resources show the development of work.Students can work independently to complete work while reaching out to peers and experts for constructive feedback.Students have multiple, varied and regular opportunities to make exchanges with peers, teachers, and global society.
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Students upload and share files for other students and the teacher to view.The BLE shows evidence of students participate in peer review and peer tutoring activities.Evidence of exchanges show the development of new learning and knowledge; some "Aha!" moments are apparent.The BLE shows that students take on the role of mentor and teacher for others both in and out of the class.
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Students complete collaborative activities using text, images, video, and audio.Long lasting exchanges encourage students to make connections beyond a single topic or question.Rubrics, criterion guides, and checklists are used by students in peer review and peer tutoring activities.Exchanges in the BLE occur both independently and ubiquitously as students inquire and collaborate.
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ActivitiesTeacher posts instructions for students to complete tasks, work, or assignments; teacher views the student work.Students frequently complete assignments and tasks using a variety of tools, such as quizzes, lessons, wikis, and glossaries. Activities increasingly utilize various feedback channels: written, audio, video, computer generated, surveys, etc. Activities challenge students to learn through varied assessments designed for different learning styles and intelligences.
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Different stages of the learning process are evident in the course room..With some activities, feedback is autogenerated, while with others there is teacher feedback and self-assessment.Activities provide formative information to assess student development and support scaffolded learning opportunities. Information gathered through activities enables teachers to accurately report on student abilities and needs.
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Students complete simple assessment activities, such as upload a file or answer some questions.Rubrics, criterion guides, checklists, and other such feedback tools are integrated into activitiesActivities allow for personalized differentiation, and students pace their learning.Activities enable students to complete independent and personalized authentic assessments.
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Some teacher feedback, limited mainly to praise or generalized comments.Long term activities encourage students to utilize previous knowledge to make deep meanings and reflect on abilities.Students take independent opportunities to practice and test new understandings, receiving feedback from teacher and peers.Students develop and design learning activities and feedback channels to control the direction of their learning.
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SocialSocial media, such as a Twitter or Facebook feed, is embedded in the course page. Topic feeds are frequently included that provide current and relevant information related to class learning.The class is actively and constructively connected to groups outside of the classroom; outside experts are involved.The class, and members of the class, participate in meaningful inquiry and discussions through different networks.
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Feeds show showcases or learning or topical news, articles, and other matters.Information is gathered from like-minded people through Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Diigo, and other social networks.Students, or the class as a whole, make input into various networks, asking questions or making constructive comments.The class has an active social media presence, and students are engaged with a wide community on meaningful topics.
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Resources and outreach to the wider community is evidenced.Educational social networks are used to encourage students to interact with communities outside of their classroom.The class is involved in social networks to the extent that they are school ambassadors. The class has external influence and impact through social networks on groups beyond the classroom.
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Blogs are shared with the outside community: families, other classes, other schools, and/orvspecial groups.Blogs are developed with the support of others outside of the classroom; blog guests add content and feedback.Blogs are multimedia learning journals, developing and recording learning; blog use is an active component of the learning.Blogs and class media have contributors and followers that help increase student learning potential.
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CommunicationInformation and notices to students and parents are postedDifferent channels for communication provide students, teachers, and the family with opportunities to interact with one another. In the BLE students independently use and develop communication channels to meet particular learning needs.Students use best available channels and BLE features to develop multiple literacies.
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Some communication occurs through activities such as forums, journals, chats, wikis, or blogs, as well as email.Communication channels are designed with consideration given to time, place, formality, style, purpose, and urgency.Language use shows intellectual and social growth; language is nuanced for audience, technicality, place, time, and other factors.Students express critical thinking, problem solving, and creativity through various media.
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Calendars, bulletins, assignments, and/or homework details are included.Some communication is ongoing with long term topical discussions; participants keep certain topics or questions going.Connections to family and others outside of the class are developed to deepen student learning.Students demonstrate appropriate behaviors and attitudes for use with different communication channels and media.
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Communications include text, and perhaps different media with different tools.Students and teachers receive notifications when assignments are completed or events are about to occur.Student use of course planners, calendars, and notifications enable students to plan and prioritize learning to meet personal needs.Communication for different needs is demonstrated through both verbal and nonverbal channels across time and space.
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EngagementStudents enter the course room to access resources and information.Students enter the course somewhat regularly to access resources and participate in activities; accessing the BLE is part of classroom routine.The course room is becoming a learning center where students may inquire, receive extra help, and explore areas of interest.Students actively build personal knowledge and contribute to the collective knowledge of the class.
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Students complete tasks and activities as required by the teachers; it's possible that not every student completes required tasks.Some students return to the course in order to connect with other students, or get questions answered.Students actively engage with other students, family members, and people outside the class community.Students and their families demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and social behaviors of anytime anywhere learning.
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The teacher accesses the course room occasionally to update and develop the course.Certificates, badges, and other such rewards are used to encourage engagement and interactions.Students begin to take control of the direction of their learning, sometimes initiating exchanges, interactions, and communication.Students become active partner-participants in classroom decision making and the development of learning.
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Limited student-student, student-teacher, and parent-teacher engagement in the course room.The teacher is present in the course room, and is there to provide feedback, answer questions, and give help.The teacher is an active presence in the courseroom, engaging with students and parents, creating an inviting environment.Engagement of all sorts within the courseroom has become a ubiquitous element of the learning process.
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