Math Mock Exam_Data Analysis Kit
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1
Math
Mock Exam
Data Analysis Kit

Grade 3
Learning Standard Description
Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g. by representing the problem on a number line-diagram.Represent a fraction 1/b on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole and partitioning it into b equal parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the number line. Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table), and explain them using properties of operations. For example, observe that 4 times a number is always even, and explain why 4 times a number can be decomposed into two equal addends.Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (e.g., X 80, 5 X 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b.Find the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths by tiling it, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths.Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. For example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets.Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 X 5=40, one knows 40 ÷ 5=8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 X 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 X 7.Multiply side lengths to find areas of a rectangles with whole-number side lengths in the context of solving real world and mathematical problems, and and represent whole-number products as rectangular areas in mathematical reasoning. Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.Recognize area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems.Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 X ? = 48, 5 = __ ÷ 3, 6 X 6=?Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.Represent a fraction a/b on a number line diagram by marking off a lengths 1/b from 0. Recognize that the resulting interval has size a/b and that its endpoint locates the number a/b on the numbr line.Understand two fractions as equivalent (equal) if they are the same size, or the same point on a number line.Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide. Examples: If 6 X 4=24 is known, then 4 X 6 =24 is also known. (Communicative property of multiplicatin.) 3 X 5 X 2 can be found by 3 X 5=15, then 15 X 2= 30, or by 5 X 2 =10, then 3 X 10=30. (Associative property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 X 5 =40 and 8 X 2 =16, one can find 8 X 7 as 8 X (5+2) = (8X5) + (8 X 2)= 40+16=56. (Distributive property.)Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide. Examples: If 6 X 4=24 is known, then 4 X 6 =24 is also known. (Communicative property of multiplicatin.) 3 X 5 X 2 can be found by 3 X 5=15, then 15 X 2= 30, or by 5 X 2 =10, then 3 X 10=30. (Associative property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 X 5 =40 and 8 X 2 =16, one can find 8 X 7 as 8 X (5+2) = (8X5) + (8 X 2)= 40+16=56. (Distributive property.)Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator b reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, = or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.Express whole numbers as fractions, and recognize fractions that are equivalent to whole numbers. Examples: Express 3 in the form 3=3/1; recognize that 6/1=6; locate 4/4 and 1 at the same point of a number line diagram.Understand division as an unknown-factor problem. For example, find 32÷8 by finding the number that makes 32 when multiplied by 8.Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. For example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets.Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole. For example, partition a shape into 4 parts with equal area, and describe the area of each part as 1/4 of the area of the shape.Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b.Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, substract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beakerwith measurement scale) to represent the problem.Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 X 5=40, one knows 40 ÷ 5=8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 X ? = 48, 5 = __ ÷ 3, 6 X 6=?Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. For example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets.Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions, e.g., 1/2=2/4, 4/6=2/3. Explain why the fractions are equivalent, e.g.,by using a visual fraction model.Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator b reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, = or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator b reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, = or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.Use tiling to show in a concrete case that the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths a and b+c is the sum of a X b and a X c. Use area models to represent the distributive property in mathematical reasoning.Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide. Examples: If 6 X 4=24 is known, then 4 X 6 =24 is also known. (Communicative property of multiplicatin.) 3 X 5 X 2 can be found by 3 X 5=15, then 15 X 2= 30, or by 5 X 2 =10, then 3 X 10=30. (Associative property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 X 5 =40 and 8 X 2 =16, one can find 8 X 7 as 8 X (5+2) = (8X5) + (8 X 2)= 40+16=56. (Distributive property.)Understand division as an unknown-factor problem. For example, find 32÷8 by finding the number that makes 32 when multiplied by 8.Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions, e.g., 1/2=2/4, 4/6=2/3. Explain why the fractions are equivalent, e.g.,by using a visual fraction model.Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56÷8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56÷8. Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, substract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as a beakerwith measurement scale) to represent the problem.Measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square in, square fit, and improvised units.)Understand two fractions as equivalent (equal) if they are the same size, or the same point on a number line.Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole. For example, partition a shape into 4 parts with equal area, and describe the area of each part as 1/4 of the area of the shape.Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56÷8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56÷8. Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table), and explain them using properties of operations. For example, observe that 4 times a number is always even, and explain why 4 times a number can be decomposed into two equal addends.Multiply side lengths to find areas of a rectangles with whole-number side lengths in the context of solving real world and mathematical problems, and and represent whole-number products as rectangular areas in mathematical reasoning. Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. For example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets.Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole. For example, partition a shape into 4 parts with equal area, and describe the area of each part as 1/4 of the area of the shape.
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Learning Standard(s)
3.MD.A.13.NF.A.2a3.OA.D.93.NBT.A.33.NF.A.13.MD.C.7a3.MD.B.33.OA.C.73.OA.A.13.MD.C.7b3.NBT.A.13.MD.C.7d3.OA.A.43.NBT.A.23.NF.A.2b3.NF.A.3a3.OA.B.53.OA.D.83.OA.A.33.OA.B.53.OA.D.83.NF.A.3d3.NF.A.3c3.OA.B.63.MD.B.33.OA.A.33.NBT.A.13.G.A.23.NF.A.13.OA.D.83.MD.A.23.OA.C.73.OA.A.33.OA.A.43.MD.B.33.NF.A.3b3.NBT.A.23.OA.A.33.NF.A.3d3.NF.A.3d3.MD.C.7c3.OA.B.53.OA.B.63.NF.A.3b3.OA.A.23.MD.A.23.MD.C.63.NF.A.3a3.G.A.23.OA.A.23.OA.D.83.OA.D.83.OA.D.93.MD.C.7b3.MD.B.33.G.A.2
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Question No.1234567891011121314151617181920212223242526272829303132333435363738394041424344454647484950515253545556
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Correct Answer
BDACBADCBCADDDACBCDBDCCCBDBACACDDACADCBAACACABDDCRCRCRCRCRCRCRCR
5
Point Value11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111132232322
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Student NameRaw ScoreScale ScorePerformance LevelBOOK 1BOOK 2BOOK 3
7
Student name redacted242761DBBBCABABABCABCBAACDBCCCCABBDCBDBACACCACBCACADCB22001121
8
Student name redacted192641CAABDADDBADAADADCCDCDCACBBDABADCCAAAAD20010010
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Student name redacted172581ABABCADABABABCADABABCADABABBCADABBACADABABBCADAB12000010
10
Student name redacted172581DABAACBDADCAAABDBADCCADDAADBAABDDACABABADBCCADDA02000001
11
Student name redacted282842ACACBADDAAAABDDCCADBCCDCBDCABDADAACAACDBABCACBAC02200101
12
Student name redacted212691ABCBDAACDABADABCBDCDCACCBACACBADBCCBBAABACDCABBC10001201
13
Student name redacted172581BDABDADBCCDACCABADBCABADBCABCBCDCBBBCADCDADDCBAD10000011
14
Student name redacted473173CCACAADCBBBADDABCDDBBCBCBDCACACDDACADBAAACACACDD22112222
15
Student name redacted212691DCBBCADDABADABADBDDDBCCDCCBBDDADDCBBAACBBCDDBDDA30010012
16
Student name redacted192641BDCADBDCDAABDCACCBCDBACACDABCBADCACAAACDABCABDDB10000000
17
Student name redacted332932CDABCADCBABACDADADCBCADCBDDACADDDAADDACCACACABCC32110100
18
Student name redacted152501AAABADCCABABDDACABBBACD32100000
19
Student name redacted222721DBADBADDBDADDAADCDDBCCACADABCDBDABABAABDAADDCACB10020000
20
Student name redacted122341ABBAAAAAADABAAACDBAADCABCBABACCABDAAAABCDBADDB01000000
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Student name redacted272831CBBBAADCDBDABACACADDDCBCBABACDCBDDABCDBCAABCDBDA21011022
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Student name redacted282842BAADBAACDADAAACBAABBDABCACDAAACDDAABAACABCACABDB31000310
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Student name redacted182611DCCCDADDABDBADDCCDBBCBBCBAAADCBADDCABAABCCADDBCC11000011
24
Student name redacted433102BDCCBADCBBAAADADADDBDBDDBDBACAADDACBDABBACADACAD22101312
25
Student name redacted172581AABBCADBCABDACABDCDADCDCBAAABBCADBBBCACCAC01100000
26
Student name redacted202671BBDCAABBBABAACAAABDDCADCBABBCDBDADDCDABDADAACAAB02200001
27
Student name redacted142461ABCABDBCADBCACDBCBCABCDBBCCBDABCBDBBCBDABCCDCABD10110111
28
Student name redacted383012BACCBADCBAADBDABADBADADCDDCAAACDDACADCCAACCCBADA31020012
29
Student name redacted212691BABADAABBCBDBCCDBCDBADBDACAABDCDADAAADBCABCCDDDC10000211
30
Student name redacted342952ACACDADBBAAACCCBBCDDDADDBDBACDCADBDBDAAAACACABDD21100211
31
Student name redacted352962ADACBADABCBAABBCADDAAACBBDBACAADDACBDCDACACCBDB21101001
32
Student name redacted272831BACAAADCABBACDADBDDBCCACADAACAADCDBAAAADBADCABDA30000012
72
Percentage of Points Earned Per Question
31%19%42%31%27%85%65%42%46%12%31%20%16%32%56%21%24%20%60%44%28%40%20%60%62%42%31%62%54%46%31%65%46%50%42%38%28%16%25%33%61%58%39%57%48%43%52%22%51%50%23%13%13%23%35%44%
74
75
SUMMARY OF RESULTS
76
Common Core
Learning Standard
#
of Points
Available
#
of Points Earned
%
of Points
Earned
77
3.G.A.21567951%
78
3.MD.A.126831%
79
3.MD.A.2521835%
80
3.MD.B.31306248%
81
3.MD.C.6261246%
82
3.MD.C.7a262285%
83
3.MD.C.7b1042120%
84
3.MD.C.7c261454%
85
3.MD.C.7d26519%
86
3.NBT.A.1521631%
87
3.NBT.A.2521529%
88
3.NBT.A.326831%
89
3.NF.A.1522140%
90
3.NF.A.2a26519%
91
3.NF.A.2b261454%
92
3.NF.A.3a521019%
93
3.NF.A.3b522344%
94
3.NF.A.3c26519%
95
3.NF.A.3d782431%
96
3.OA.A.1261246%
97
3.OA.A.2783747%
98
3.OA.A.31044240%
99
3.OA.A.4521733%
100
3.OA.B.5783140%
101
3.OA.B.6522446%
102
3.OA.C.7522854%
103
3.OA.D.82084622%
104
3.OA.D.9781823%
105
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