E-Consultation on SDG 13: "Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts", to be reviewed at the HLPF 2019 under the auspices of ECOSOC (Responses)
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

View only
 
 
CFGHIJKMNOPQR
1
Inputs Received for E-Consultation on SDG 13: "Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts", to be reviewed at the HLPF 2019 under the auspices of ECOSOC
2
This file compiles inputs from MGoS on SDG 13, which will be under in-depth review at the HLPF 2019. Outcomes may contain advice, opinions and statements of various information providers. The United Nations does not represent or endorse the accuracy or reliability of any advice, opinion, statement or other information provided through this e-consultation. Our office reserves the right to delete any content/input that is not aligned with the United Nations Charter and/or the principles and purposes of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
3
2. Name of Organization5. If you represent a major group or other stakeholder constituency, please indicate which one?6. Based on the evidence, and keeping the regional/local context in mind, what are the most effective ways to accelerate progress towards SDG 13? 7. Based on the evidence, and keeping the regional/local context in mind, where are the biggest shortfalls/gaps towards making progress towards SDG 13?8. How can one best leverage the interlinkages between SDG 13 and the rest of the 2030 Agenda?9. Can you share examples of effective models of multi-stakeholder engagement for the implementation of SDG 13?10. Please, add here any additional comment related to SDG 13.
4
Uganda Coalition for Sustainable Development
Non-Governmental Organizations
Widen the scope of climate action to promote Local poverty reducing climate solutions if participation of ALL and cumulative impact is to be realized by 2030
Overall, it is lack of Means of Implementation (climate finance, technology transfer and capacity)
SDG 13 provides a fulcrum for rural development in the sense that addressing Poverty (SDG1) in all its forms starts with securing no hunger (SDG2), reduces inequalities arising from vulnerability to climate change among others. It is therefore important to review / develop climate sensitive development interventions and strategies when rolling out all SDGs.
In the current review of the East African Community (EAC) Climate Change Framework, we call for institutionalization of wider stakeholder involvement to include vulnerable groups, communities like pastoralists, fishers, urban poor people, mountain-based communities, farmers, women, youths, disabled persons, among others, in the current engagement mechanisms and processes. This should enable input into the periodic adaptation communication on adaptation priorities, needs, plans and actions at national level while informing EAC interventions at the regional level, in line with the bottom-up structure of the Paris Agreement, where action is not conditional upon international rules, adaptation support (from the Green Climate Fund, Adaptation Fund and others facilities) will also be better defined in a timely fashion, and targeted to hot spot areas / vulnerable sectors. More: https://www.change.org/p/include-paris-agreement-provisions-in-the-eac-climate-change-policy-proposed-climate-law
5
Non-Violence Foundation
Non-Governmental Organizations, Volunteer Groups, Education & Academic Entities
Ban of single use of palstics on its all form.
Lack of awarness and pltical will power at govt level
Involvement of youth at all the level and training youths in this feild.
Railway using platform to generate energy, installing more solar and ensure tree plantation as much as we can.
Need inovative way to involve pubblic at grassroots level.
6
Non-Violence Foundation
Non-Governmental Organizations, Volunteer Groups, Education & Academic Entities
Ban of single use of palstics on its all form.
Lack of awarness and pltical will power at govt level
Involvement of youth at all the level and training youths in this feild.
Railway using platform to generate energy, installing more solar and ensure tree plantation as much as we can.
Need inovative way to involve pubblic at grassroots level.
7
Non-Violence Foundation
Non-Governmental Organizations, Volunteer Groups, Education & Academic Entities
Ban of single use of palstics on its all form.
Lack of awarness and pltical will power at govt level
Involvement of youth at all the level and training youths in this feild.
Railway using platform to generate energy, installing more solar and ensure tree plantation as much as we can.
Need inovative way to involve pubblic at grassroots level.
8
Community Water Alliance
Non-Governmental Organizations, Volunteer Groups, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development, Civil Society Organizations
Building an informed and willing citizenry that demand accountability and responsiveness of duty bearers to climate issues. Duty bearers who in most countries are politicians act on issues when there is a critical mass of people demanding responsiveness and accountability. Researches and technical expertise should be backed by an informed citizenry raising the voice on climate change issues and acting as stewards of the environment.
Supremacy of financial vitality in the economic development discourse by nations particularly those aiming to grow the economy without due regard to ecological sustainability.
Coalition building, community stewardship and the development of common advocacy agendas can leverage the inter-linkages between SDG 13 and the rest of the 2030 Agenda..
Community Stewardship where Community Based Organizations have built capacity and strong governance structures to sustain their advocacy initiatives. The advocacy initiative should be privy to a well thought out stakeholder mapping exercise.
SDG 13 speaks to SDG 6 on access to water . Water, environment & climate are inseparable triplets.
9
Amis des Étrangers au Togo: ADET
Non-Governmental Organizations
Nous avons créé des équipes pour des actions contre le changement climatiques dans toutes les régions économiques du Togo. Il y a une équipe de coordination nationale.
D'autres équipes sont en train d'être créé dans les préfectures et dans les communes. Après, il y aura à créer des centres ODDs dans chaque commune et ces centres auront chacun 3 départements. 1 pour le développement social, 1 pour le développement économique et 1 pour le développement environnemental. Ce dernier département aura à élaborer des projets concrets de lutte contre le changement climatique.
Financement
Le changement climatique est grave pour l'humanité.
Déjà décritFini
10
Green Tag Africa
Private Philanthropic Organizations
Allow free but coordinated play for all players. Having a framework for inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary action where each player clearly has a mandate and a way of measuring each input and output against a general input and output. Hope am not so vague. Many important players are sidelined by a number of factors and reasons yet everyone is vital in their small capacity.
Communication, equality, tools for evaluation, Technical input, ownership
By getting all players working towards a major goal other than having fragmented efforts that sometimes inhibit or replicate whats already done. That's why joint events like COP where all players come to one place end up in disarray and disagreement simply because every group is working shooting in a different goal
COP should not be an annual gig. There should be about 4 build up events which directly pour into COP as the main deal making platform. COP should not be a negotiation platform. Negotiation should be done in domain specific sub platforms that build into COP. I suggest Mitigation, Adaptation, Damage and Loss etc must be negotiated separately. There should be an online platform either by email or web/ mobile application where all stakeholders pour in and interact almost on a monthly basis.
Streamline primary, secondary and tertiary school curricula by adding in Gender and Climate Change
11
HDS natural systems design science
Science & Technological Community, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
The truth is, to speed up our climate response we need to see the barriers to it we let develop. The crisis snuck up on us as we tried to live in the past as we managed our world to change ever faster.

I'm a senior physicist and architect with a lifelong specialty of original research on the designs and behaviors of complex naturally evolving systems. The way I discovered to study them is to focus on how their self-organizing growth also creates their environmental place. Growth is observed in the building process of new organisms, cultures, movements, and storms, as well as businesses, economies, and even the climate crisis. The first step is simple, just to ask: "What's growing?" That is where you will find the changing *organization* of the system you will need to work with.

It does NOT pay to treat growth systems as your theory. It ONLY pays to recognize the working parts of the natural system itself. We have not done that with climate change. That led to the terrible mistake of assuming climate change is a technical problem,... as if the economic growth system accelerating it could be “decoupled”. The real solution lies in INFORMING AND TRUSTING THE NATURAL STEERING OF THE SYSTEM, the “profit motive” that got us in trouble, can also get us out. Once EVERYONE is given the real life-saving cost/benefit data needed, it can then steer the economy to a healthy future.

But,… first look at where climate change really came from: https://bit.ly/2VZGq9r
I mentioned our great mistake in #6, assuming climate change is a technical problem, and... hoping economic growth can be "decoupled". The graph (https://bit.ly/2VZGq9r) shows Atmospheric CO2 PPM growing at ~1.48%/yr from 1780 up to WWII, and then after WWII quickly accelerating to ~2.15%/yr. We "upgraded" the growth system. How that is coupled to GDP growth is not just statistical. We actually built our whole complex world economy around growing fossil fuel use, making the system and its growth *organizationally* coupled to fossil fuels.

What fully confirms that is tracing the growth of some structurally coupled dimensions of the world economy, from 1971 to 2016. (https://bit.ly/2AVYFDP) The proof is simpler than studying the system organization that links these seven curves. It relies instead on this demonstration that for at least the past 45 years these seven variables have been 1) *growth constants* of the world economy, and 2) that despite all efforts to "decouple" some of those constants from growth, they have had ZERO effect. The effort to pursue sustainability in that time despite local benefit, largely by improving efficiency, has a) produced NO EVIDENCE OF EFFECT GLOBALLY, and b) even shows ZERO displacement of fossil fuels despite our also huge effort to develop renewables. As a result the economy's many increasingly disruptive impacts, along with climate change, keep rapidly accelerating.

We very much need to rethink.
How SDG 13 efforts can foster “the Nexus of the 17” is by find inspiration from learning to rethink in the middle of a crisis. That is something all our lives are increasingly facing globally, because of the compound acceleration of change in how we live that is driven by the economy. Demonstrating how to respond to that will help the nexus of the whole pursue healthy global cultural and economic development, reviving the original vision in the spirit of Rio and in drafting the SDGs

The likely struggle will first be for people in too much of a hurry to consider our mistakes. Our cultures define our views of reality and they've made mistakes. We certainly do need our cultures to guide us too, but need to BOTH patience AND impatience with the tendency for cultures to be slow to open up and slow to learn once open. Why is that there are also very good reasons for cultures to cling to the past, as well as to adapt and lead in the future. It is generally very much in their interests to resist arbitrary change, and even to react with fierce opposition to being pushed in the wrong way. So learning to speed our learning without "stepping on toes" for climate change will also help many others see how to do it in their own struggles.

The world is just working out differently than expected, as with LIFE so often seems to be what happens when planning something else.
We are surrounded by wonderful working examples of multi-stakeholder partnerships. The ones that work brilliantly, like businesses, collaborative scientific research, architectural design, and natural examples like healthy economies and natural ecologies, have many design features in common anyone can learn to use.

Take the toughest one first, natural ecologies. Living species all understand the world in their own quite different ways, but that becomes the glue that holds ecologies together. What is often overlooked is that niche-making for any species is an active learning process, of finding where to fit. Ecologies overcome differences far greater than people face. The work relationships needed for complex teams provide more accessible examples. The flow of any kind of successful project also displays hints on how to integrate diverse resources and constraints.

One hidden key to success is to start WITHOUT a real plan, simply with an impetus that initiates a process of exploring what’s possible, in which every part needs to fit. In professional teams you might do an exercise of intentional assumption-breaking, to assure that everyone is starting fresh. Every project also has a natural time and budget limit too, forcing a choice between the initial explorations of which one(s) to take to completion.

A quite readable recent paper on how to look at these kinds of learning processes is called “Systems thinking for Systems making” https://bit.ly/2Mr7utW
What we're after is a *stable world system* for nurturing creative lives, not burning them up.
12
Chairman of Elmoustkbal organization for Media Studies
Non-Governmental Organizations, Media
Media campaigns to educate citizens, especially Egypt, on the implications of climate change and its impact.
The lack of public interest in the issue of climate change and lack of media attention is sufficient.
In Egypt, the delta region and some coastal cities are threatened with drowning due to climate change, leaving at least 2 million displaced people, which impedes achieving the rest of the goals of sustainable development in Egypt and perhaps the region.
Link for My CV:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/cg1294bvrireph5/Amro%20Selim%20CV.doc?dl=0
13
MESA COLOMBIANA DE INCIDENCIA POR LAS ENFERMEDADES CRONICAS
Women, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Workers & Trade Unions, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Education & Academic Entities, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development, CONSUMERS
SUSTAINABILITY SHOULD BE REALITY AND NOT ONLY A DISCOURSE.
STRENGTHS: PROMOTE SUCCESSFUL SMALL EXPERIENCES. DIFFICULTIES: COMPANIES ARE DECIDING ON GOVERNMENTS BASED ON THEIR PRIVATE INTERESTS
THE PROTECTION OF NATURE MUST BE PLACED ABOVE ALL CONSIDERATIONS
MANY INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES AND PEASANTS ARE TESTING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT STYLES PROTECTING THE NATURE
IT IS URGENT TO PROTECT WATER SOURCES. MITIGATION OF ALL THE FACTORS THAT AGGRAVATE CLIMATE CHANGE
14
WWF-Kenya
Non-Governmental Organizations
Mainstreaming of climate change in all government sectors and development plans and following this with adequate budgetary allocations
There's inadequate integration of climate change into development agenda.
Climate change is not only a challenge but an opportunity for sustainable development as defined under the 2030 Agenda. Therefore, development plans must be climate-smart or climate-proof; in so doing implementation of the same will provide two-fold benefits - a development benefit as well as a climate resilient solution.
Climate Investment Funds (CIF) model of multi-stakeholder engagements where funding of climate-smart government projects is administered through CIF Trust fund committee comprising donor countries, recipient countries, MDBs and Observers (from CSOs, private sector and Indigenous communities).
None
15
Le Verrier
Private Philanthropic Organizations
Legislation, Education and Incentives for Early Adopters
Political Will
Identify and map the value-added interdependencies
N/AN/A
16
ONG WIÑOY LEPAY KIMÜN
Women, Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Older Persons, desarrollo indígena; salud, cultura, educación y cambio climático
aumentar la plantación de árboles nativos y evitar tala de los que hay.
en el estado de chile. ya que con la ley actual no protege los nativos sólo fomenta los monocultivos
educando mas a las personas.
comunidades indígenas protegen con sus vidas los árboles nativos.
aumentar recursos para plantar nativos y educación.
17
UNSAS
Workers & Trade Unions
Investing in clean energies having a common regional policy for green energies and fighting for the preservation of nature
Not enough investment in our countries to fight climate change and add that African countries suffer a lot in this area because the most polluting countries are not on the continent
Climate change creates a lot of damage to our economies especially in the agricultural environment so solving this problem would contribute strongly to sustainable development, poverty reduction
18
Sukaar welfare organization
Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Private Philanthropic Organizations
Yes YesYesYesNo
19
Hivos
Non-Governmental Organizations
Access to decentralised renewable energy - as it is a way to leapfrog the fossil fuel fase, prevents deforestation and reduces emissions from use of dirty fuels, esp for cooking.
1billion people still lack access to energy – 3 billion lack access to clean cooking, esp in Sub Sahara Africa and rural areas. Causing negative environmental and climate impact because of deforestation, loss of biodiversity,and emission of CO2, methane, black carbon and other short-lived climate pollutants, some of the most important contributors to global climate change
through strongly connecting SDG7 and SDG13, including the focus on energy access for the more poor and remote, as these groups are often neglected. There is potential in the NDCs, as these are now often the sole responsibility of Min of Environment, without involvement of Min of Energy or Finance, and without focussing on access. Room for improvement.
20
HETAVED SKILLS ACADEMY AND NETWORKS
Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Business & Industry, Science & Technological Community, Volunteer Groups, Education & Academic Entities
To accelerate action on SDG 13, what the world people need most is information on their personal, domestic, farming and corporate actions that are resulting to negative impact on the environment. Secondly and most importantly, the course organic farming and sustainable development systems should be introduce in schools from elementary to the university. Please kindly refer to the book: ORGANIC PRODUCTION AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT SYSTEMS at https://www.amazon.com/author/amosobi
The biggest shortfalls/gap towards making progress to actualizing SDG 13, is the ignorance of the over 60 -80 percent of the citizenry especially among the developing nations of the world. Also, the lack of committed volunteers and funding of even initiated programs are really serious obstacles to this end. To solve this issue, we have initiated the A B C AND 1 2 3 ON THE SDGs CAMPAIGN Programs which could be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/c/AMOSAOBI
To leverage on the inter-linkages between SDG 13 and the rest of the 2030 Agenda, we need innovations and new solutions to bridge the gap. The 17 SDGs have direct bearings to to SDG13 in the sense that short falls in one affect the other. Education for instance, make people to be informed and remove the obstacles to achievement while poverty on the other hand, make people to live and abuse the earth and thereby causing climate impacts consequences.
A typical multi-stakeholders engagement in the implementation of SDG 13 is the collaborations between the HETAVED SKILLS NETWORKS and the Delta State Government, Local Governments and some private sector players in the SKILLS FOR SDGs-PRENEURSHIP Campaigns. Through this campaigns, we are tackling the issues of climate change, poverty and hunger with social injustices eradication through enlightenment and empowerment of the common citizenry. Please kindly refer to the blue-print at https://www.amazon.com/author/amosobi
Making people to take responsibility for their actions for or against the earth counts.
21
logorep
Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
Engagement at Local level
Lack of incentives for implementation at local level in particular citizens
22
Jeunes Volontaires de Grands Lacs pour l'Environnement
Children & Youth
Improving youth participation in climate adaptation and mitigation processes, accelerating education on climate action and sustainable development for the young generation.
Inequality within the Northern and Southern World
Political will
We are leading and working with indigenous youth in Eastern of DR Congo for their involvement in climate resilience, REDD+ program through forest sustainable mangement.
23
Union of Education Norway
Workers & Trade Unions, Teacher union
To use the position we and other unions enjoy as social partners whereby we have a defined role in negotiations, discussions and decision-making fora.

In Norway it is a big shortfall that a national plan on how to reach the SDG is not elaborated. The work done to acheive the SDGs are in many instances ʺoutsideʺ the ordinary cooperation and organized work life.
As a union for teachers we see the other goals in light of education, and how we can contribute as a union. We believe it is important for an organisation to identify or see the goal of particular interest in light of the other sustainable development goals
Cooperation through social dialogue is discussed, but not implemented
24
Gatef organization
Non-Governmental Organizations
i have a good ideas and knowledge
i will tell you at meetingat the meetingokayno thanks
25
cso
Non-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological Community, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
one dollar for carbon capture emissions on cars
two-dollar refrigeration for agriculture development
it cost very expensive.3rd world countries can't afford it
kindly take a second look on raw and obsolete solutions from 3rd world countries
26
OSI
Non-Governmental Organizations, Education & Academic Entities
Prevent the soil erosion
Soil lossingClimate change
globalsymposium on soil pollution - FAO

PDFwww.fao.org › ...

May 4, 2561 BE · Mr.Pathawit Chongsermsirisakul1, Siripen Iamurai, PhD2. Panyapiwat Institute of Management and ...
Select me
27
Global Institute for Circular Economy and Sustainable Development Goals
Business & Industry, Science & Technological Community
1. Circular economy
2. Effective management of waste
3. Live natural
The focus remained on Energy and in this process many other sectors like waste management are missing, that are one of the biggest emitters.
1. SDG mapping shall be implemented by all businesses and industries- as a monitoring tool
2. Progress in terms of implemented actions and investment made- shall be monitored
1. Engage with industry clusters to develop ‘climate friendly industry clusters’
2. Promote bio-based products
28
Shurugwi Partners
Non-Governmental Organizations
The approach needs to start at household level, building their capacity on best practices on Climate change impacts. This can be integrated in Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction Management Planning Forum.
Resources allocation or support especially in developing nation when it comes to marginalized community.
A holistic approach of wide consultations and run away from the blanket coverage approach, each local community has its unique life system.
Participatory Rural Appraisal and media coverage
Climate change is real, however there is need to build awareness on individual people or farmers
29
Stockholm Environment Institute
Non-Governmental Organizations
Collaboration, Capacity Development and Pilot Funding
Lack of capacity and funding
Inter-sectoral team or working groups should be established across multiple levels
30
Manchester MuseumMuseums
Partnership and collaboration, clearer link of work of museums with goals of Paris Agreement, greater support from governments
lack of government action- people waiting for governments to take the lead
Through clear alignment of policies and opportunities of cross-sectoral working- e.g. museums programming events and exhibitions that help people progress climate change education, research, action and partnerships
Museums, UNFCCC, IPCC and others put together a submission for the Talanoa Dialogue in 2018. This is a foundation for further collaboration and activity.
It is crucial. I am very dedicated to it.
31
LAYA
Non-Governmental Organizations
1.5 deg compatible development trajectories to be developed at the national, federal/ state/ district level in india together with climate education and various levels with stakeholders.
Lack of decentralised climate resilient responses
Aligning Climate change through cross sectoral initiatives across Goals
Yes. Concrete Actions with stakeholders at the level of grassroots Climte education, local level research and technology innovation , sustainable farming practices and local level advocacy models demonstrate potential for effective implementation of SDG 13
The sense of urgency is grossly missing.
32
ECOS
Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Education & Academic Entities
Focus on developing the capacity of community to urban areas, and especially metacommunities (~100,000 people) to make informed climate action.
The focus has been largely on top-down nation state driven efforts, which haven't led to metacommunities being empowered to reduce climate risks and increase resilience. While top-down policies and funding as well as bottom-up individual and household efforts are vital, the "sweet spot" for climate action is at the metacommunity scale.
Focus on informing, inspiring, and empowering metacommunities so they can localize and achieve SDG targets within their own context (language, values, culture).
Still in development, but the Collective Impact model has massive potential in this area.
The action is best optimized where local and global converge, ~100,000 people.
33
World Indigenous Teaching and Learning Centre Circle (WITLCC)
Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Persons with Disabilities, Education & Academic Entities, Families; Metis/Mestizaje, Human & Environmental Health Practitioners
Begin acknowledging the greatest meteorological causes.
Denial of the greatest meteorological causes which causes a waste of time and effort in industry that cannot change what cannot be changed. Educate people on human and environmental health and disaster preparedness/survival.
See answer to question 7
The meteorological causes need to be acknowledged in order for those who have the traditional and contemporary scientific knowledges to mitigate. Again, the Giving Principle/Gift Economy seems to have the best solutions.
Begin different attitudes towards and sources of power supply.
34
Global Change Impact Studies Centre
Government ServantPolitical commitment
Access to Climate related finance
Integrated growth
Local, provincial, national and regional approaches at once
35
Happy Community
Women, Children & Youth, Volunteer Groups, Private Philanthropic Organizations
By localizing SDG 13 to to have local communities at the centre of Climate Action through programs that have direct benefits to communities especially the marginalized. Eg we are using beekeeping to help end the practice of burning acacia trees for charcoal in Kenya by educating and giving bee hives to ASAL communities hence addressing climate action through innovation while providing an alternative sustainable economic activity.
The major gap within local levels is the lack of capacity building for local communities. Most communities are aware of climate change but lack the needed capabilities to tackle the same largely due lack of forums to create awareness within the local context.
Climate action should be approached through a down-up methodology. Local communities must feel engaged rather than having decisions brought down to them.
A multiple sector approach to involve young person with institutions of high learning to be the champions of Climate Action within their communities through capacity building. Eg by training.
SDG 13 is achievable. However, young people must be at the centre of its implementation.
36
Forest Friends Ireland part of Irish Environmental Network
Non-Governmental Organizations
Irish Givernment to take action across all departments, climate change evaluation on all departments actions and spreading. Budget climate change audited. Habitats are evening destroyed, hedgerows cut in breeding season ancient native forests cut to widen roadways. Lack of credible investment in public transport, cycling and walking. Peat is still being extracted to produce electricity. No way for community renewables to sell energy back into the grid. Most existing housing still not energy efficient and grands still not making it possible for low income families to afford retrofitting and change to renewables. Forestry still seen as a crop not a mixed (none clear felling) native trees. The national herd cattle increased rather then farmers incentive to diversifying lower CO2 farming methods and providing food security and local produce. More urban land needed for community growers. More investment in communities needed to become resilient to effects if climate change. National Maternity Hospital been built as cost of 3.5 billion is not energy efficient was started late December 2018 in order to not have to comply with EU building energy efficiency regulations Near Zero energy rating for public buildings. Building estimated to cost 1 million per year on energy.
Energy rating buildings public and existing housing. Lack of urgency to move to low carbon renewables energy, transport spend focused on private motor car, farming not diversifying. Not protecting exciting hedgerows and native forests or planting new native forests.
Strength and empowering communities to more to zero carbon and produce their own energy, homes, food grown locally. Plans for extreme weather events.
Not in Ireland, we need actions not more talking to each other in over hot hotel rooms where childcare and expenses are not paid for and volunteers and NGO's to participate. The participation is not diverse enough.
Climate Case Ireland took Irish state to court on lack climate action in National Mitigation Plan.
37
FAO-Uganda
Science & Technological Community
Aligning delivery on SDG 13 to processes of development of policies, annual and medium term plans and budgets for governments and non-government institutions
Limited appreciation of how the SDG 13 is linked to and support national and regional development agenda
Limited technical capacity in climate change adaptation and mitigation planning and practical action
Through processes of alignment and mainstreaming of climate change in strategies developed under the different agenda
Joint development and implementation of climate change plans, with defined roles and responsibilities of different stakeholders
Climate change has a clear impact on delivery on 2030 agenda and needs special attention
38
IndustriALL Global Union
Workers & Trade Unions
• this is an existential threat to civilization and must be treated as such
• the Paris Agreement and the Katowice Rule Book, exist
• some of the best science ever done by humankind (tracing historical climate and linking it to human activities in a body of knowledge more stringently peer-reviewed than any other body of research I can think of), exists
• civil society has grown and become more unified in the fight to take action on climate change.
• our present path is steering us toward climate catastrophe
• the full spectrum of sustainability (social, economic and environmental) not always taken into account in climate talks
• arguments continue around finance, when it is a matter of priorities not resources
• failure to understand that addressing climate change means foregoing national interests in some cases: vulnerable ecosystems and vulnerable people are independent of national borders
• concerns of marginalized peoples and youth are routinely ignored
• the climate catastrophe can be considered a catastrophic failure of the so-called "free market" and a stinging rebuttal of financialization as a growth strategy
• globally, there is widespread support for action on climate change yet our political leaders are not leading; why is this? - corruption - when someone with public accountability is making statements or taking actions that are inconsistent with their public obligations, there can be only two explanations: stupidity/ignorance; or corruption
• general scientific illiteracy and an apparent inability of the media to treat climate science in a reasonable and rational manner
• all other SDGs must be considered contingent on this one. There are no jobs, no growth, no education on a dead planet
• delivering a Just Transition is the key to unlocking our climate dilemma
39
FEDWASUN
Non-Governmental Organizations
Water Resource Conservation and forest Conservation
Unbalanced development practices
Local good practices promotion and non polluting technologies adaptation
Water Supply and Sanitation Users Committees activities
Rules and regulations for good environment should be followed with integrity
40
MPIDO
Women, Indigenous Peoples
1. the recognition, respect and protection of Indigenous Peoples rights is fundamental to the realization and implementation of CC actions
2. The use and documentation of ITK in influencing CC decisions is critical to sustainable efforts.
3. Increase community based CC responses is critical to ensure "no one is left behind" in combating CC impacts
1. The biggest contributors to global warming are doing the least to combat it, while the least contributors are bearing the biggest impact.
2. there is little incorporation of Indigenous solutions to climate change, yet scientific research is continuously proving indigenous approach as the best solution.
Implementation of Adaptation and Mitigation activities in most developing countries will serve other SDGs such as economic empowerment, improved livelihoods, increased access to health services etc.
1. The role of IIPFCC in influencing state parties towards global decisions has been key in the Paris Agreement and the its rule book.
2. Protection of Forest reserves and other carbon stocks has a direct impact in sustaining livelihood
SDG 13 is the key to an increased realization of the 2030 agenda. CC is ingrained in each SDG
41
Lawyers' Association of Human Rights of Nepalese Indigenous Peoples (LAHURNIP)
Women, Children & Youth, Indigenous Peoples, Non-Governmental Organizations, Local Authorities, Workers & Trade Unions, Business & Industry, Volunteer Groups, Older Persons, Persons with Disabilities, Education & Academic Entities, Private Philanthropic Organizations
Nepal also involve in mitigation plan of carbon reducing plan. so, lots of community forest are using on under REDD program. So, ownership of these forest should be on indigenous peoples should be effective way
42
Resource Conflict Institute
Non-Governmental Organizations
Integrating traditional knowledge & practices with scientific knowledge to strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity.
Community engagement on climate mitigation and adaptation measures/ interventions.
Inadequate capacity by stakeholders on climate resilience and adaptation.
Inadequate resources especially in developing countries to fully implement the strategies on climate adaptation and mitigation.
SDG 13 if successfully implemented improves agricultural productivity hence ensuring sustainable food production patterns.
Sustainable resource use and management will be improved once SDG 13 is implemented through improved capacities, human and institutional on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning.
Kenya Climate Change Gender Action Group
Energy Forums including: SEAF Kenya, Energia Kenya
National and County based Environmental Climate Change Forums
Policies, Laws and Strategies are not enough; implementation of these is necessary
43
East Africa Trade Union Confederation
Workers & Trade Unions
Offering local solution to combat or reduce effects of climate change
Awareness of the whole discussions around climate change to the ordinary citizens
It is important to mainstream climate change in implementing the other SDGs, climate change has role in meeting the goal on poverty eradication, climate change a direct effect of access to clean water, we can not talk about affordable and clean energy without addressing the issue of climate change and our current energy consumption processes. Climate change is directly linked to food security which talks to the goal on hunger erradication
the COP conference provide a multi-stakeholder process that has brought relevant stakeholders together to influence policy
44
Union to Union
Workers & Trade Unions
In order to accelerate towards SDG 13, which is about taking urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts, the world need a transition to a low-carbon economy. It is crucial that this transition is based on social dialogue between working people and their unions, employers, government and communities, in order to secure decent jobs, social protection, and more educational opportunities for those affected by global warming and climate change policies. The transition must therefore be a ‘Just Transition’.
Ignoring or missing to take into account the social aspect of the transition towards new and green technology, industries and jobs, may create a gap in the progress towards SDG 13, since it fail to recognize the working people that will be affected of the changes, and may thus put in risk that large parts of the population will stay unmotivated to take necessary environmental steps.
It is crucial that labor has a seat at the table when planning for a ‘Just Transition’ to a low-carbon world, to make sure that ‘no one is left behind’ in the shift towards a low-carbon economy. However, even though climate actions must bring together a broad set of actors, it is still important to point out that governments will have a key role here to take initiatives for this ‘Just Transition’, and must therefore strengthen their capacity to deliver measures. Since many carbon intense industries are male dominated it is also of extra importance to work gender-sensitive and make a shift in masculinity roles
Since a ‘Just Transition’ towards a low-carbon economy and labor market is partly about investments in jobs and making sure that these jobs provide decent work and fair wages for the working people, this SDG can also be linked to SDG 8. A ‘Just Transition’ will also guarantee social protection, why it also can be linked to actions concerning inequality and the SDG 10. However, the urgent action to tackle the climate change is obviously something that is linked to the whole agenda, since it will need actions and efforts from all sectors in the society, from education and labor, to strong institutions and global partnerships.
‘Just Transition’ is a model that brings together unions, businesses and governments in social dialogue to ensure that labor are heard when planning for a shift to a low-carbon world. The model is based on an inclusive approach that brings together all the stakeholders into dialogue, in order to drive the concrete plans, policies and investments needed for a fast and fair-minded transformation. There are at the moment several unions, for example within the public sector, that are using this model.
It is crucial that labor has a voice in a transition, to make sure that ‘no one is left behind’.
45
Comision Huairou
Women, Non-Governmental Organizations, Farmer, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
Education and commitment of central governments and local governments through laws for the protection of natural resources.
Lack of concrete actions by governments, pre-eminence of large companies and lack of education for public officials and the population in general
Education and community programs for resilience from local governments. Recognition and promotion of the practices of indigenous peoples and women.
Implementation of local government laws prohibiting the use of platicos and promoting old economic models (San Juan La Laguna, Sololá, Guatemala)
Support for women's organizations in the local economy.
46
Unio
Workers & Trade Unions
The goals should be institutionalised nationally by way of a wide-reaching white paper as a first step towards a national plan for realising the sustainable development goals.
Further: The social partners must be involved in the planning, execution and evaluation of the government’s work on the UN’s sustainable development goals.
And: special parliamentary hearings on the realisation of the sustainable development goals should be held in connection with the presentation of the proposed annual budget.
• Weakness in coordination. Need of national plan.
• The sustainable development goals still not incorporated in education at all levels – from kindergarten to higher education – and enable the institutions to exercise this mandate.
• Cooperation through social dialogue is discussed, but not implemented
Highlight and emphasis on social dialogue.
Implement knowledge about SDG s in education om all levels. Intersectionality and interdiciplin in education embedded in practice
Focus on Just changes/transition and decrease wealth gap in society in general
• Ensure that the sustainable development goals are introduced to the social partnership.
• Use joint fora that bring together labour unions, employer organisations, civil society and business to highlight and strengthen the efforts to realise the sustainable development goals.
• co-operation with key social institutions such as research/educational institutions, museums, archives and libraries to reach the sustainable development goals.

• involve the local and regional level
• Social dialogue
• extensive financing.
47
International Institut of Industrial Ecology and Green Economy
Non-Governmental Organizations
Promoting policies which are encouraging implementation of industrial ecology represents an important step with a great leverage power. First this can be done on a local scale and progressively on a broader scale. This way it would lead to a progressive implementation of green economy.
The absence of effective mechanism for local financing (which would be dedicated for solution implementation) are pitfalls often slowing down the step to concrete action.
By promoting and enabling the access to training courses dedicated to new professions related to the environment or to industrial ecology, one could get a greater positive impact and tackle other challenges at the same time.
The creation of eco-parks, the shift from firms towards eco-design and proximity circuits are effective models of multi-stakeholder engagement for the implementation of SDG 13.
48
Maryknoll Sisters
Non-Governmental Organizations, Faith based organization with global presence and work.
Education of the youth, education of the community, ensuring SDG13 will be included in national climate action plans, national economic and development plans, broad range of stakeholders participation and actions, targeted actions: on shift to renewal energy, clean transport, science based and traditional based agriculture, closure of coal and stop fossil fuel, address unsustainable mining, address SCP, educate parliaments and lawmakers, include climate action in corporate responsibility of private and TNCs corporations.
Nations backing up from Paris Agreement; Non-implementation of planned action; Lack of funding.
Education.
Capacity building to grassroots communities and legislators about Climate change; organizing and training these communities in DRR and ecosystem-based adaptation and mitigation.
We need to act together as a human race to slow-down or reverse climate change NOW.
49
FEMUM ALC ( latino network member of Huairou Commission global network)
Women
Leadership, public budget and political commiment in the high level decision making spheres to avoid the causes and consequences of Climate Change/Disasters
the lack of political commiment of National and Local Gov with SDG13, also the lack of commiment from Private Sector and the lack of information of population and the knowlegde of causes and consequiences
the 2030 agenda need to include indicators on climate change in all the others SDGs, and innovative approachs, metodologies, tools, to mobilized financial support to SDG13 in each LAC countries
SDG 13 need to express the cost of climate change, linked with "economy of disaster" approach
50
Community Science Centre, Vadodara
Science & Technological Community
First and foremost is to examine how best to leverage advocacy, policies, programmes, implementation mechanisms, multi-stakeholder action, resources and partnerships for both the SDGs and for climate action, so that co-benefits are maximised and trade-offs minimised at all levels. Further advancing the coherence between the NDCs and the 2030 Agenda can help to place climate action firmly into a long-term development pathway that aligns national development priorities with the objectives of the Paris Agreement. This can help governments to prepare more ambitious NDCs when communicating or updating NDCs by 2020; and simultaneously accelerated progress towards many SDGs.
Secondly, improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning.
At the national level policy coherence across the various Ministries and all levels of government say for example in my home country t India it is an extremely complex and challenging task. A coordination mechanism that demands policy coherence is the key for smooth coordination of the SDG programs/schemes. A consistent and routinely measured aggregated datasets is critical for developing strategies and measure progress to connect the patterns of economic and thereby social growth. A combination of technological innovations that increase data availability, processing, analysis, and communication capabilities—make it now possible for real time data s that performances are gauged.
The Vaho Vishwamitri Abhiyan: An effective model of holistic development of reviving the River Vishwamitri by a stakeholders engagement mechanism has resulted in a reviving the River and conserving-its biodiversity and thereby the ecosystem. The Campaign implemented by the Vadodara-based Community Science Centre (Gujarat India, ) is to revive the 134 km long River, which is flowing from the foothills of Pavagadh Hills in central Gujarat towards the city and meets the Gulf of Khambat, is also home to scheduled animals 2 and 3 and prone to floods during the rains. A group of Multi Stakeholders through various Meets, Awareness Generation and Advocacy Programs were able to convince the Local Authorities to scrap the cemented River front on the River banks and in place implement a Biodiversity and Ecosystem Conservation Plan. The Holistic development demo model for River Revival has been submitted to the National Conservation Action Plan, Government of India. The VVA model was hailed by eminent personalities with the likes of late Sh Sundarlal Bahugana, President Abdul Kalam, Scientist Prof Chidambaram and many others.
Its scope is wide with significant domains being left out.
51
Equipo de Relaciones Internacionales de CGT RA
Workers & Trade Unions
Generar procesos de transición justa como eje de las políticas frente a los cambios que deben afrontar los sistemas de producción para reducir las emisiones de carbono en la atmósfera y su consecuente impacto en el empleo.

Adoptar y facilitar estrategias de desarrollo bajas en carbono y planes climáticos que tengan en cuenta los imperativos de una Transición justa de la fuerza laboral, derechos humanos y laborales y la creación de trabajo decente y empleos de calidad, al nivel gubernamental dentro de las respectivas capacidades y de acuerdo con las prioridades de desarrollo definidas a nivel nacional.

Incluir aspectos sobre trabajo y empleo en los Planes nacionales de adaptación y Comunicaciones nacionales a través de un proceso representativo de diálogo social implicando a los sindicatos, para garantizar los derechos de los trabajadores y sus comunidades.

Capacitar y formar a los trabajadores que se vean afectados por el cambio de actividad fortaleciendo el desarrollo de capacidades y la inclusión en trabajos decentes y ambientalmente sostenibles.

Desarrollar una estrategia nacional de explotación o aprovechamiento sustentable de los recursos naturales que incluya la reducción de la tasa de deforestación; la promoción de la creación de espacios de diálogo entre distintos sectores; el acceso al agua como derecho en la legislación nacional y garantía del acceso público de todos los ciudadanos a los bienes comunes.
En el marco del Acuerdo de Paris se presenta como desafío la necesidad de reducir las emisiones de Gases de Efecto Invernadero que de acuerdo al inventario nacional de ascendieron a 367 MtCO2eq en el 2014. Los sectores más comprometidos en la reducción de emisiones pertenecen a la generación de energía, el transporte, y el sector agropecuario.

Resulta necesario hacer frente a las consecuencias actuales de cambio climático mediante la implementación de medidas de adaptación que deberían estar establecidas por medio de un Plan Nacional de Adaptación que promueva políticas y programas de inversión, previa planificación sectorial de acuerdo a la urgencia de cada una de las zonas afectadas por los impactos climáticos adversos.

La posible re categorización de los trabajadores en las nuevas actividades productivas y ambientalmente sostenibles puede generar conflicto de intereses dentro de las diferentes organizaciones sindicales.

Los cambios necesarios para la reconversión de las actividades bajas en emisiones pueden provocar la pérdida de puestos de trabajo en las industrias carbono intensivas.
Las políticas para avanzar hacia economías más sustentables, en el marco de transiciones justas y de acuerdo a las metas que plantea el Objetivo 13 de la Agenda 2030 requiere se incluya la dimensión de Trabajo Decente expresada en el Objetivo 8.

Asimismo, el Objetivo 13 se vincula con el Objetivo 6 de Agua y Saneamiento en tanto el agua y el saneamiento son un bien común, esencial para la vida, un derecho humano universal. La carencia de conexión a la red de cloacas constituye un problema con consecuencias sanitarias de fuerte impacto epidemiológico.
-
Una Transición Justa de la fuerza laboral puede ayudar a lograr el apoyo de la opinión pública
52
Comite de Juventud de CSI - Secretaria Relaciones Internacionales CGT RA
Workers & Trade Unions
Generar procesos de transición justa como eje de las políticas frente a los cambios que deben afrontar los sistemas de producción para reducir las emisiones de carbono en la atmósfera y su consecuente impacto en el empleo.

Adoptar y facilitar estrategias de desarrollo bajas en carbono y planes climáticos que tengan en cuenta los imperativos de una Transición justa de la fuerza laboral, derechos humanos y laborales y la creación de trabajo decente y empleos de calidad, al nivel gubernamental dentro de las respectivas capacidades y de acuerdo con las prioridades de desarrollo definidas a nivel nacional.

Incluir aspectos sobre trabajo y empleo en los Planes nacionales de adaptación y Comunicaciones nacionales a través de un proceso representativo de diálogo social implicando a los sindicatos, para garantizar los derechos de los trabajadores y sus comunidades.

Capacitar y formar a los trabajadores que se vean afectados por el cambio de actividad fortaleciendo el desarrollo de capacidades y la inclusión en trabajos decentes y ambientalmente sostenibles.

Desarrollar una estrategia nacional de explotación o aprovechamiento sustentable de los recursos naturales que incluya la reducción de la tasa de deforestación; la promoción de la creación de espacios de diálogo entre distintos sectores; el acceso al agua como derecho en la legislación nacional y garantía del acceso público de todos los ciudadanos a los bienes comunes.
En el marco del Acuerdo de Paris se presenta como desafío la necesidad de reducir las emisiones de Gases de Efecto Invernadero que de acuerdo al inventario nacional de ascendieron a 367 MtCO2eq en el 2014. Los sectores más comprometidos en la reducción de emisiones pertenecen a la generación de energía, el transporte, y el sector agropecuario.

Resulta necesario hacer frente a las consecuencias actuales de cambio climático mediante la implementación de medidas de adaptación que deberían estar establecidas por medio de un Plan Nacional de Adaptación que promueva políticas y programas de inversión, previa planificación sectorial de acuerdo a la urgencia de cada una de las zonas afectadas por los impactos climáticos adversos.

La posible re categorización de los trabajadores en las nuevas actividades productivas y ambientalmente sostenibles puede generar conflicto de intereses dentro de las diferentes organizaciones sindicales.

Los cambios necesarios para la reconversión de las actividades bajas en emisiones pueden provocar la pérdida de puestos de trabajo en las industrias carbono intensivas.
Las políticas para avanzar hacia economías más sustentables, en el marco de transiciones justas y de acuerdo a las metas que plantea el Objetivo 13 de la Agenda 2030 requiere se incluya la dimensión de Trabajo Decente expresada en el Objetivo 8.

Asimismo, el Objetivo 13 se vincula con el Objetivo 6 de Agua y Saneamiento en tanto el agua y el saneamiento son un bien común, esencial para la vida, un derecho humano universal. La carencia de conexión a la red de cloacas constituye un problema con consecuencias sanitarias de fuerte impacto epidemiológico.
-
Una Transición Justa de la fuerza laboral puede ayudar a lograr el apoyo de la opinión pública
53
ITUC
Workers & Trade Unions
Bold climate action can deliver USD 26 trillion in economic benefits through to 2030 (compared with business-as-usual) while generating more than 65 million jobs and avoiding more than 700,000 premature deaths from air pollution in 2030.

ITUC supports Just Transition as an inclusive approach that brings together workers, communities, employers and governments in social dialogue to drive the concrete plans, policies and investments needed for a fast and fair transformation towards environmentally sustainable and socially responsible modes of production and consumption. It focuses on jobs and ensuring that no one is left behind in a collective bid to reduce emissions, protect the climate and biodiversity and advance social and economic justice. It builds social protection, provides skills training, redeployment, labour market policies and community development and renewal within a landscape of environmentally driven adaptation of the means of production on which societies rely.

Social dialogue creates local ownership of the transition, builds societal consensus and inclusion, eases policy implementation, and cements in agreed-upon measures. That is why unions are calling on governments to convene the social partners in order to establish national just transition plans with a public goods approach. This convening role of the government is also essential to maintaining the public oversight needed for the long-term stability of a national strategy.
The planet cannot be saved without ensuring employment and effectively addressing poverty as core parts of a zero-carbon world. Thus, Just Transition requires:
• Secure pensions for older workers facing displacement;
• Skills and redeployment /employment guarantees for all workers, including those entering the labour market, to support occupational mobility;
• Decent work guarantees – labour rights, minimum living wages and collective bargaining; as well as, universal social protection, including income protection for all;
• The right to work and equal treatment for migrant and refugees;
• A transition from the informal to the formal economy and combating the growing informalisation of work;
• Investment in quality jobs and sustainable communities;
• Implementation of social dialogue and efficient tripartite mechanisms (ILO C144).
The ILO’s Guidelines for a Just Transition Towards Environmentally Sustainable Economies and Societies for All provide a framework for achieving this. They provide advice to governments for the development of country policies and sectoral strategies towards environmental sustainability, the greening of enterprises, social inclusion and the promotion of green jobs.
Just Transition is yielding results. Examples of reorienting and retraining workers from polluting industries can be found around the world. In Australia, Canada, Ghana, Germany, New Zealand, the Philippines, Scotland, South Africa, Uruguay, unions are in dialogue with their governments about Just Transition climate initiatives. In Spain, the government recently signed a Just Transition agreement with the unions on the phase-out of coal in a way that respects the interests of the workers and their communities.
54
The Permanent International Secretariat of the Council of Baltic Sea States
Intergovernmental organization
Promote energy efficiency by demand side control measures; promote switch from fossil fuel use to renewables by phasing out subsidies for fossil fuels and by taxing carbon content in fuels and energy, adapt to climate change by capacity building of local governments on climate risks and effective measures to increase resilience.
Subsidies for fossil fuels
Research and awareness rising on interlinkages between SDG 13 and other SDGs, with empashis on reverse impacts of other SDGs to CC
Baltic Sea Region Climate Dialogue Platform, see http://haclimate.eu/about-us/bsr-climate-dialogue/ . Development of BALTADAPT Srategy, see http://baltadapt.eu/ and stocktaking on implementation of Baltic CCA Strategy at http://www.cbss.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Baltadapt-stocktaking-180308.pdf
More emphasis has to put on Climate Change Adaptation, both globally and locally.
55
CADIRE CAMEROON ASSOCIATION
Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Local Authorities, Workers & Trade Unions, Farmer, Volunteer Groups, Persons with Disabilities, Education & Academic Entities, Private Philanthropic Organizations
Sustainable development practitioners - as well as private sector actors, such as those working in the areas of sustainability and corporate responsibility or renewable energy - need to understand how climate change solutions are being implemented. successful work.
Some actions to take:
- Reduce global greenhouse gas emissions
- Decarbonize the economy
- Actions for communities and individuals

IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE / human, geographical and economic impacts:
1.State of observed changes and their impacts on water, ecosystems, agriculture, industry and insurance, health, and how it will affect the eight major global geographical areas. Possible answers for adaptation and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.
2.The expected effects, the experts emphasize the general reduction of agricultural yields in tropical and subtropical regions, a decrease in water availability, an increase in the number of people exposed to vector-borne diseases (malaria) or waterborne diseases (cholera) and increased mortality due to thermal stress, as well as a widespread increase in the risk of flooding due to both increased rainfall events and rising sea levels. geographically, coastal areas and some 634 million people living there will be particularly vulnerable.
3. Adaptation opportunities are generally low, adverse changes in seasonal stream flows, floods and droughts, food security issues, impacts on fisheries, health impacts and damage to the river. biological diversity are among the main vulnerabilities.
4. In Asian developing countries, human systems exhibit limited adaptive capacity and vulnerability. Declining agricultural productivity, water stress, floods, droughts and tropical cyclones will undermine food security.
5. Economic losses from catastrophic events increased 10.3 times from $ 3.9 billion a year in the 1950s to $ 40 billion in the 1990s.
Climate change is a human development problem that threatens the freedoms and choice of individuals and concerns all aspects of sustainable development and the entire 2030 Agenda. Climate solutions are transformational around 5 (five) themes integrating a dimension gender in governance. It is a gender-based transformation process, with community-led local development being more of a participatory project.
A platform is created, involving several partners (governments, private sector, local authorities, civil society, investors). The initiative will highlight the fundamental contribution of women and vulnerable people in locating the 17 SDGs and the need to mainstream political commitments to gender equality around the world that derive from international texts (Paris Agreement - Declaration de Sendai - Yamoussoukro Declaration - G20 Declaration - 1948 Declaration of Human Rights - Addis Ababa Action Agenda). These legal documents constitute an integral plan of action for people, our planet and our prosperity, which requires all countries and all stakeholders to act together in a fierce climate struggle.
Our efforts allow us all to integrate the gender approach and Business power for climate action.
56
IFBPWWomen
- provide people not just with " warnings" but also alternatives (what to do, where to go, other crops, etc)
- consult with women and other CSO groups to find workable solutions for the local context
- reward business that develop ways of working with less CO2 emissions, less water use, better water storage etc.
- we make the discussions and media coverage soo complicated that people think there is nothing they can do themselves
- lack of acknowledgement of local solutions (forestry, agriculture, water - even if they do not call them climate change measures)
- indigenous peoples, Youth and women are not listened to enough
- support " hosting" countries with their infrastructure so they can give support to migrants
- It is crucial to make the connection with SDG6 since most impacts of climate change are felt through " water" (extreme events); countries/ ministries in charge of water, river-basin organisations should be involved (more) in National plans development
- Incorporating " water" adaptation and mitigation into national action plans (NDRR strategies) is key
- map and take local solutions (forestry, agriculture, water - even if they do not call them climate change measures) serious and try to multiply/ up-scale
- in every plan incorporate SDG5 targets and considerations
- make climate change impacts issues as such part of all TVET curricula/ train the educators
57
UN Global Compact CEO Water Mandate
Non-Governmental Organizations
Continue to build on the development of the Paris agreement through international policy dialogue and dialogue at a country level, engage the private sector and their supply chains on climate change measures, and work with public and private sector actors to build climate resilience and adaption in areas like water risk, opportunity and management.
Funding for climate resilience and adaptation and raising awareness through natural capital frameworks that intersect with SDG13 objective
SDG6 is linked to many other SDGs in a tangible and practical manner e.g. water use in agriculture and achieving access to water and sanitation and also at national and international level e.g. transboundary issues, economic growth, improvements in public health and inclusive education (girls typically drop out of school to carry water for their families more than boys). SDG 6 and SDG13 are also interlinked in obvious ways. Climate impacts are likely manifested through water impacts. Water opportunities may also be climate adaptation and awareness opportunities. Working on SDG6 can also contribute to SDG13 and vice versa.
Business Alliance for Water and Climate (BAFWAC) that focuses on the private sector playing a role in fighting climate change through water risk and opportunity management. The Science-Based Targets Network is expanding from climate to water, biodiversity, etc., RE100 focuses on the private sector switching to renewable energy.
None
58
International Presentation Association
Faith Based Communities Ireland and and the UK
Produce a worthwhile Climate Mitigation Plan
Ensure policy coherence across all departments of government. e.g currently in Ireland we subsidise the production of producing electricity by burning peat while at the same time we commit to reduce our GHGs. This is currently insincere. We must also increase populations education of all that is climate related.
We must provide for a just transition in the context of agriculture in particular relative to our huge ghg emissions. Currently the worst in the EU by a long way.
Just Transition to the Renewable energies and financing for same, Agricultural emission, education in Climate Change,
There is a head of steam building and so many in Ireland and the UK are looking towards government for leadership but they are dithering over possibilities. We need to situate our climate mitigation measures in a creative strategy to implement the SDGs and to publicise and educate re the same.
We have embarked upon a stakeholder forum that commits to civil society around enhanced participation in all that the SDGs can and does offer.
Ireland has made a governmental commitment to divest of all fossil fuel investment.
59
Women for Water Partnership (WfWP)
Women, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
- provide people not just with " warnings" but also alternatives (what to do, where to go, other crops, etc)
- consult with women and other CSO groups to find workable solutions for the local context
- reward business that develop ways of working with less CO2 emissions, less water use, better water storage etc.
- promote schemes like water stewardship (standard) and hydropower sustainability assessment protocol to find sustainable, multi-stakeholder solutions
- acknowledge small scale local solutions of youth, women, indigenous peoples as adaptive workable solutions
- we make the discussions and media coverage soo complicated that people think there is nothing they can do themselves
- lack of acknowledgement of local solutions (forestry, agriculture, water - even if they do not call them climate change measures)
- indigenous peoples, Youth and women are not listened to enough
- support " hosting" countries with their infrastructure so they can give support to migrants
- It is crucial to make the connection with SDG6 since most impacts of climate change are felt through " water" (extreme events); countries/ ministries in charge of water, river-basin organisations should be involved (more) in National plans development
- Incorporating " water" adaptation and mitigation into national action plans
(NDRR strategies) is key
- map and take local solutions (forestry, agriculture, water - even if they do not call them climate change measures) serious and try to multiply/ up-scale
- in every plan incorporate SDG5 (and 6) targets and considerations
- make climate change impacts issues as such part of all TVET curricula/ train the educators
60
European Youth ForumChildren & Youth
All countries must adopt a long-term and ambitious target for net zero carbon emissions in line with the 1.5°C goal.

Financial means must be allocated to ensure a fast, comprehensive and just transition to a net zero carbon economy and to renewable energy. Institutions must end harmful subsidies for fossil fuels and divest from fossil fuel companies.

We need to shift from our current linear economic model towards a circular economy.

Beyond this, a larger shift to a critique of extractivism and a culture of sufficiency is vital. We urgently need a discussion on alternative economic models that are not based on GDP growth. Governments must move towards alternative measures of progress that reflect the real wellbeing of people and the health of our planet. Tools like the Youth Progress Index, one of the first instruments developed to give the full story of what life is like for a young person today, independent of economic indicators, must be used and supported.

Educating young people about the roots, impacts and solutions of climate change is crucial to empower them to take climate actions. Decision-makers must implement and support education for sustainable development in formal and non-formal settings, equipping students and young people with the knowledge and competences to shape a just and sustainable future.
Youth organisations are key in fostering the intergenerational dialogue that is necessary to face the climate crisis. For a common understanding of the risks and the opportunities it can give to build a fair, peaceful and sustainable Europe, the participation and commitment of all generations is required. However, youth organisations often lack adequate financing to unleash the full potential in tackling climate change .

Young people have the right to participate in the decisions shaping their own future. However, meaningful youth participation is not always guaranteed.

The single most important problem when it comes to tackling climate change is the elusive quest for economic growth of virtually all governments, in particular in the West, that will make it close to impossible to reach the Paris Agreement and SDG 13.
The urgency of the situation requires a dramatic shift in our priorities. Other goals should be evaluated through the lens of SDG 13, in particular Goal 8 on growth.
61
Huairou Commission
Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
1) Partnerships with different stakeholders, including private – public partnerships, and partnerships with local communities 2) Networks can also accelerate implementation, organized networks have global and regional political clout, including the national level; 3) Engage grassroots women in all of the political and monitoring spaces to provide feedback and input on the effectiveness of policies, all the related policies must be inclusive and benefit the grassroots communities
The government to community level awareness of the SDGs is lacking, we should invest more in local to government level actors SDG education and capacity building; development resourcing and financing need decentralization to more effectively reach the local level; political will is missing especially at the government level as it is vulnerable to government transitions, meanwhile, grassroots actors have the strongest political will and governments should be open to receive training from grassroots through local to local dialogues to familiarize to what is being done, good practices, etc.
SDG13 is connected to food security and other vulnerabilities, agriculture, and sustainable livelihoods, climate migration and displacement of the people is connected to food security and hunger, disasters negatively affect economy and security of tenure, urban development as well.
Formed a network of grassroots organizations into GROOTS Philippines, we connected and did partnership with the Climate Change Commission to develop joint climate change adaptation and mitigation programs in the Philippines, including education and awareness, livelihood programs, and accessing resources to build resilient infrastructures.
62
Partnership on Sustainable, Low Carbon Transport (SLoCaT)
Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
The transport sector contributes roughly one quarter of energy-related GHG emissions and is the fastest growing emissions sector. Combating climate change requires countries to scale up efforts to decarbonise their transport sectors. This means national development policies, climate change strategies, and planning at all levels and scales must include action on transport. Included in this planning, there must also be policy action around the resilience and adaptive capacity of transport infrastructure. Should a country’s transport infrastructure be especially vulnerable to shocks, recovery from climate-related hazards will be even more complicated as transport infrastructure is central to moving people, food, humanitarian aid, and other key services critical to rebuilding affected communities.

Specific ways to strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity in the transport sector include: a. Recognise the key role of integrating climate change into road asset management systems in enhancing adaptive capacity; b. Promote climate risk screening and vulnerability mapping, and assessments of existing transport systems, services, and all new projects; c. Include climate risk in environmental impact assessments of major transport projects and make risk and vulnerability part of design standards and norms.

Finally, we must promote effective/constructive synergies between different levels of government.
Efforts to decarbonise transport are simply not moving quickly enough. Overall, few countries are prioritising transport as part of their implementation of the 2030 Agenda and in their VNRs. As a result, one of the key sources of climate emissions, the transport sector, is not being given the attention necessary to properly ensure SDG commitments are being met. Mobility and transport are transversal, and it is essential that they are seen as integral to the success of SDG 13, and the 2030 Agenda as a whole.

Observed from the submitted Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) to the Paris Agreement process, transport adaptation has received much less attention than transport mitigation in government climate change strategies and plans. Specific adaptation measures for the transport sector are also not sufficiently highlighted in the National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) and National Adaptation Programme of Actions (NAPAs) submitted to date. Most low- and middle- countries also do not have a climate vulnerability and mapping study. Adaptation plans, especially those in developing countries, are often limited by insufficient technical capacity, a lack of reliable information on future climate impacts, and current inventories of transport assets and services.
Transport is key to linking climate action to the other goals and elements of the wider 2030 Agenda. Transport is essential for powering people’s lives and livelihoods, helping them access employment, food, and other goods that are essential to a decent life, while also providing the very foundations of international trade and commerce. The key then is to ensure that transport is sustainable so that it can continue to be the very engine of the global economy while operating within planetary boundaries.

SDG 13 can also go beyond the pages of the 2030 Agenda itself, and help leverage the interlinkages between sustainable development implementation and planning with the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. Communication between the relevant actors engaged in the work on each of the frameworks (sustainable development and climate change) is essential to achieving global sustainability commitments by 2030, and SDG 13 can help foster those linkages.
The Transport Decarbonisation Alliance (TDA), a platform that brings together countries, cities/regions, and companies, is certainly an excellent example of multi-stakeholder collaboration around climate action. By joining national, regional, and local governments, as well as the private sector, the TDA can have a unique impact on accelerating the worldwide transformation of the transport sector towards a net-zero emission mobility system before 2050. The leverage, influence, and impact each one of these groups of stakeholders has is immense, and together, they are working to make sure meaningful action is taking place on a large scale.

There are 22 transport initiatives under the Marrakech Partnership for Global Climate Action (MPGCA), which showcases a coalition of the broad range of stakeholders in the transport sector working to reduce transport greenhouse gas emissions and strengthen the resilience of transport infrastructure. The transport initiatives cover all modes of transport for passengers and freight. Collectively these initiatives, if widely supported by state-and non-state actors, and implemented at scale, can reduce the carbon footprint of an estimated half of all the passenger and freight trips made by 2025. Actions such as these can contribute to substantive savings associated with a shift to low carbon transport.
63
Healthy India Alliance (India NCD Alliance)
Non-Governmental Organizations
India was one of the first countries to adopt 10 national Non-Communicable Disease (NCD) targets under the National Action Plan, following the WHO Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of NCDs. In addition to the nine Global targets, India adopted an additional target “to reduce household air pollution by 50% by 2025”. Towards this, in 2015, India also made a commitment to reduce the emissions intensity of its GDP by 20-25% from its 2005 levels by 2020 and by 33-35% by 2030. The Government of India has also adopted a National Action Plan on Climate Change to address this issue directly. Globally, ambient air pollution has been recognised as the fifth major risk factor that leads to NCD related deaths and mental health as the fifth major NCD (the new 5X5 approach). Climatic adversities affect human health and air pollution is emerging as a threat to healthy living. Decoding the interlinkages between air pollution related hazards and human health is critically needed both in the Indian as well as regional contexts.

In light of the action being undertaken at the National level, it still is imperative to establish platforms that facilitate discussions between government and CSOs (health and non-health) to fast track action on achieving SDG 13. These stakeholders should convene brainstorming discussions with an aim to develop a joint action plan, identifying areas and opportunities of synergies and collaborative action.
Progress towards achieving Goal 13 is faced by challenges resulting from poor coordination and integration of climate change with in the actions and programmes of the health sector, specifically within the NCD agenda. Such integration in needed at all levels, local, national and regional, to ensure coordinated action and agenda development.

Efforts to combat the effects of climate change, in multiple regional and national contexts, require further strengthening and alignment with the global discourse. These efforts further need to be localised (for in-country and regional action) based on the needs, available resources and demographics of the local population. Efforts, such as, adopting green technologies, promoting use of clean and modern sources of energy, advocating for behaviour change for sustainable use of resources have to be complemented with international cooperation on climate change since the causes and effects of climate change transcend national boundaries. Promoting sustainable and renewable energy sources often meets with challenges of an individual’s priorities and at times cultural barriers.
Goal 13 is closely linked to Goal 1 (No poverty), Goal 2 (Zero Hunger); Goal 3 (Good Health and Well Being); Goal 4 (Quality Education); Goal 5(Gender Equality); Goal 6(Clean Water and Sanitation); Goal 7 (Affordable and Clean Energy); Goal 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure); Goal 10 (Reducing Inequality); Goal 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities); Goal 12 (Sustainable Consumption and Production); Goal 14 (Life below water) and Goal 15 (Life on Land). An integrated, multi-disciplinary and inclusive approach that engages with stakeholders from all of the above Goals will help transfer a sense of ownership towards climate related hazards to all sectors.
Achieving SDG Goal 3, Target 3.4 which states “by 2030 reduce by one-third pre-mature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment, and promote mental health and wellbeing” calls for improved integration of Goal 3 with Goal 13. The new 5X5 approach, adopted globally, provides an opportunity for greater synergy at the global, regional and national level to operationalise the NCD action plans and the national commitments to United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. It is important to promote synergies between FCTC Article 18 (Protection of the environment and health of persons) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to to address the environmental effects of tobacco.
Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India has developed the National Multi-Stakeholder Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of NCDs which aims to design a multi-stakeholder response to address the NCD burden in the country. The Plan identifies Ministry of Agriculture and Farmer’s Welfare; Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs; Ministry of New and Renewable Energy; Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change; Ministry of Chemical Fertilisers; Ministry of Petroleum and Gas; Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation as key stakeholders for implementation of intersectoral environmental intervention, with an aim to arrest the NCD related deaths and disabilities.
64
Global Forest Coalition
Women, Non-Governmental Organizations
Supporting and promoting gender-responsive community-led initiatives will accelerate progress on both SDG 13 and others like SDG 5 and 15 due to the strong interlinkages among them. The IPCC 1.5 report has pointed out that such initiatives to empower communities and their sustainable livelihoods create a pathway towards land sector based real solutions and the PA goal. These initiatives can also play a prominent role under PA Art 6.8 on “non-market approaches” in achieving non-carbon benefits and community rights, conservation, governance and sustainable livelihoods.

An example is the Community Conservation Resilience Initiative (CCRI), a project documenting and reviewing the findings of bottom-¬up, participatory assessments of 68 communities in 22 countries of the resilience of community conservation initiatives and the support that should be provided to strengthen these initiatives. The communities identify the main external and internal threats, and design plans, specific initiatives and recommendations to overcome those threats. The role that biodiversity, forests and ecosystems conservation play in climate change is well-known and hence, the findings of this initiative show effective ways to accelerate progress on SDG 13. For instance, in Nepal there are many success stories showing how the contributions by Community Forest User Groups at the local level are instrumental to achieving the SDGs and how women play a key role in this. More information about the CCRI here
One of the main shortfalls is the lack of legal, economic and technological support for communities. Likewise, absence of political will at different governance levels to support community-led initiatives and the prioritization of private sector interests over communities’ rights, needs and aspirations is still a huge gap. Insufficient and inadequate climate finance support, particularly at community level has to be addressed. Local communities’ ambition to share their success stories in international policy spaces and to continue with their initiatives should be supported and facilitated as well.

One of the recommendations made by the communities in the CCRI in Nepal that underlines this overall lack of support was that the central government should respect the forest tenure rights of local communities as recognised in the forest legislation. Communities also highlighted that government agencies, local governments and stakeholders including development partners should be required to provide technical and other needed support services to local communities, in this case, to facilitate the revision of their forest management plan, and empowering women and forest dependent communities.

Another key shortfall to make progress under SDG 13 is the increasing focus on false solutions such as bioenergy, carbon offsets and geoengineering, which are diverting the attention from real solutions and will only help to worsen the climate crisis.
It will not be possible to accelerate progress under a given SDG unless others are moving forward accordingly. For instance, addressing climate change cannot be done without mainstreaming gender equality and ensuring community tenure and resources access rights. Therefore, policy making, implementation and monitoring have to be done in an integrated manner, taking advantage of the synergies that would come up of such an approach.

The CCRI case in Nepal clearly shows how strong these interlinkages are and how community-led initiatives can effectively leverage them. After identifying the lack of gender equality as one of the main internal threats to their initiatives, the Community Forest User Groups agreed to revise their bylaws, forest management plans and other annual plans and programs to integrate gender equality and social inclusion into community forestry and secure the equitable sharing of benefits generated from community forests for poor households, leveraging SDG 5 and 15 as well.
A key element for effective multi-stakeholder engagement is to adopt participatory bottom-up approaches and go beyond mere consultation, ensuring women, indigenous peoples and local communities are effectively engaged. Also important is to make a distinction between stakeholders and rightsholders, two different groups that are, very often, wrongly grouped under the same category. The different interest among groups have to be acknowledged and this is especially important when the private sector is engaged in decision-making, programs and projects to address climate change. The interests of private companies will most likely differ from those of the communities that are the frontlines of climate change and hence, ignoring this fact would jeopardize effective multi-stakeholder engagement and the outcomes of such process.

The CCRI case in Nepal provides a good example of an effective model of multi-actor engagement and women’s empowerment and this model could be adapted to different contexts and scaled-up to include a broader range of rightsholders when necessary. In this case, different groups within a community participated and some of the bottom-up assessment processes that allowed for an effective engagement included interviews, plenary workshops, focus group discussions, individual story-telling and a literature review. Some of the participatory practices were adapted during the assessment based on the recommendations of the user group members, agencies and stakeholders.
65
National Association of Professional Environmentalists (NAPE)
Non-Governmental Organizations
Uganda's government has registered a lot of progress to address climate change at policy, planning, legal and institutional levels but there is need to step up sustained climate finance readiness and boost the capacity of implementing institutions.
Develop climate change awareness programmes involving all stakeholders including communities and disseminate climate-change and early-warning information in local languages, improving community disaster preparedness. Reach and educated grassroots countrywide on practices that lead to and effects climate change and advice on what can be done to adapt and mitigate climate change effects.
Support & encourage vulnerable groups to engage in sustainable adaptation mechanisms to cope with climate change impacts. Integrate climate change related issues into economic policies and action plans, addressing needs of vulnerable groups.
Improve disaster preparedness and knowledge management skills in regions prone to climatic disasters, promote and support community forest management which allows communities dependent on forests to benefit from them without depleting natural resources. Respect and include indigenous people’s views in plans to address climate change.
Diversify economic activities, improving the resilience of rural communities in sectors such as agriculture and livestock rearing.
Promote agroecology and growing of indigenous food crops resilient to climatic changes for community food sovereignty and ecosystem conservation
The severity of the effects of climate change are unevenly distributed across different age groups, genders, economic and social classes making the elderly, people with disabilities, women, youth and children the most vulnerable

At most, climate change interventions are general thus not focusing on the specific interventions tailored to the needs of the most vulnerable groups.

Lack of funding hinders the achievement of all the good plans.

Intergeneration exclusion is a big danger to the progress and achievement of climate resilient societies since the future depends on the youth today.

Sustainable ecosystems management is a collective responsibility of all landscape stakeholders including the private sector, which is lacking as yet.

Conservation and development be harmonized to achieve a win-win situation.

Promote and support climate change education, awareness raising and capacity development for stakeholders from the local level to the national level.
Provide support for information sharing and research to better understand the impacts of climate change and the vulnerabilities of particular groups and populations to better inform actions for adaptation to climate change.
Mainstream gender issues in climate change adaptation and mitigation approaches to reduce the vulnerability of women and children to the impacts of climate change and recognize their key role in tackling climate issue
There should be free prior and informed consent from host communities for any planned development activity that will alter and negatively affect the landscape and biodiversity in general
Improve local and readily available capacities to handle and manage climate related impacts.

66
LaRRI (Labour Resource and Research Institute)
Workers & Trade Unions
All countries or states should provide a road-map for climate actions that will reduce emissions and build climate resilience until at a local level. A road-map for each state or regions/provinces within countries.
The gap exist in the knowledge on climate change. Not many are really concerned about climate change and its impact thus, they undertake practices that contribute to climate change unknowingly/unintentionally. Awareness need to be created and technologies need to be introduced in the agricultural sectors such as improvement of seeds, and encouraging the growth of organic food as well as promoting conservation agriculture.
Subsidise renewable energy and encourage a range of other measures that will reduce emissions and increase adaptation efforts. Wide array of technological measures including in agriculture sector as well as manufacturing and changes in behavior are needed, to limit the increase in the global temperature. Major institutional change will give a better than even chance that global warming will not exceed beyond the current status.
All stakeholders should take action by doing and not by word or paper only, toward reducing the impacts of climate change. Leaders of national governments, cities, states, business, investors, NGOs and civil society.
Adoption of conservation agriculture strategies will help a country like Namibia.
67
Sightsavers
Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
Inclusive, people-centred approaches that enhance resilience through considering the individuals in societies who are likely to experience contextual marginalisation, and ensure their engagement in the design of effective sustainable development, humanitarian and climate change adaptation are required.

Inclusive, integrated approaches to humanitarian response, climate change adaptation and sustainable development are more effective. They recognise that factors intersect to shape risk and that the long-term challenges posed by environmental hazards, climate change, conflicts, and development cannot be separated, so require complementary approaches that enhance resilience and coping capacities in everyday life.

Broader forms of context analysis, tools and assessments that ensure processes for participation in all stages of preparedness, response and resilience building help to ensure the voice and perspectives of contextually marginalised people inform appropriate interventions.

Continued engagement and representation on decision-making bodies from marginalised and minority groups leads to greater understanding, continued co-ordination around key issues, and effective collaboration moving forwards.
People with disabilities face increased risk to the impacts of environmental hazards associated with climate change as they expose existing inequality and discrimination; there is lack of information and data; which result in inaccessible interventions that exclude people with disabilities from accessing vital information and services, and undermine resilience.

Stigma and discrimination also impact resilience. Families may isolate or abandon relatives with disabilities on a daily basis and during crises, and institutional discrimination can prevent people with disabilities from accessing emergency health, education and other vital services.

Disasters tend to severely impact people with disabilities due to the lack of information and data on disability impacting the way disasters are planned for and responded to; inaccessible interventions, facilities and relief distribution; increased risk factors, violence and discrimination.
Climate change and climate-related hazards, conflict and protracted crisis tend to become disasters for people with disabilities – and other contextually marginalised groups – as they expose and exacerbate existing inequality and discrimination that exist in everyday life.

Climate change can place pressures on households which impact decision making, for example leaving family members with disabilities at home in disaster-prone areas whilst seeking an income, due to high levels of poverty or hunger.

Critically, exposure to climate risk is shaped by everyday life, which again demonstrates the indivisible nature of the SDGs. Effective climate action will be shaped by progress made across the 2030 Agenda.

It is also critical to ensure progress on SDG13 is tied to implementation of the Sendai Framework for DRR, and Paris Agreement, both of which emphasise the importance of human rights and people-centred approaches.
A Sightsavers and DRRA disability inclusive disaster preparedness programme in Bangladesh fostered participation in self-help groups and DPOs and led to various forms of empowerment amongst participants, including access to social protection, increased knowledge of disaster preparedness and disability rights. Critically, the programme fostered the increased representation of people with disabilities on the bodies responsible for disaster preparedness, ensuring people with disabilities were able to ensure their views informed local measures addressing climate action.

UNHCR, working with DFID and Humanity and Inclusion, have demonstrated the value of a disability-inclusive approach to working with Syrian refugees in Jordan. By integrating an appropriate data collection methodology for disability into vulnerability assessment tools – the Washington Group Short Set of Questions – the identification of disabilities among people of concern to UNHCR has increased from 2.36% to 27.55%, giving a far more accurate picture on which to target and improve the delivery of humanitarian assistance and climate action.
68
The Brooke
Non-Governmental Organizations
The most effective ways to accelerate progress towards SDG 13 is include Livestock in Emergencies Guidelines and Standards training into all country Disaster Risk and Resilience plans. As was mentioned in HLPF last year, people recover from shocks and disasters quicker if they can return to their livelihood quickly, therefore including planning for one of the industries that supports some of the poorest communities around the world will help countries be more resilient to shocks.
Training of local governments to adopt and enhance local disaster risk reduction strategies in line with national disaster risk reduction strategies and then promoting it within communities
SDG13 links to education as climate change impacts are not taught enough even in the developed world. There is also evidence that climate change has made countries and regions worse off economically because of its contribution to land degradation and access to water
Brooke in Nicaragua works with local and national government training them on how to integrate Livestock in Emergencies Guidelines and Standards into their Disaster Risk and Resilience plans. We also work with communities to train them on this same framework and promote it as part of a country comprehensive DRR plan
69
French Water Partnership
Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
- Translate commitments made under the Paris Agreement into inclusive national and local policies and strategies. Water should feature as a priority in these public policies integrated with other key areas like energy, food security, health, education, solid waste management and sanitation.

- Increase the mitigation ambitions, as all the current nationally stated mitigation ambitions put the planet on a pathway to a global warming of between +3°C and +3.2°C by the end of the 21st century. Yet as the IPCC reminds us in its special report published in October 2018, going from 1.5°C to 2°C would already very seriously worsen risks related to heavy rainfall, extreme events, droughts and rising sea levels. Adaptation has its limits and some losses will be inevitable from 1.5°C, in particular for ecosystems and in the most vulnerable regions (small islands, etc.).

- Strengthen the resilience of territories and populations to the impacts of climate change (extreme events etc.), especially by:
o Ensuring the necessary funding for adaptation to climate change in the water sector, especially for the most vulnerable populations;
o Strengthening the capacities of stakeholders at all levels, improve the governance of water, sanitation and waste management and knowledge of available resources.
- Knowledge gap: we need to improve our knowledge of the climate and its consequences on water management, in particular at local level. This means getting hold of maximum information to act appropriately on the basis of measured data, projected data and water information systems. New data-acquisition tools, such as satellite measurements, should be developed at the same time as improving on-site data-acquisition systems. In addition, the value of local knowledge and traditional know-how should be taken into account when drawing up and implementing policies at all levels.

- Financing gap
Developing countries will need to respect their financial commitments of 100 billion USD per year by 2020, as reiterated at COP21. Water should be a major priority of funding for adaptation, with a focus on Least Developed Countries (LDCs) through grant instruments. This funding should also take into account needs in terms of building stakeholder capacities, improving knowledge, and monitoring and evaluating water management policies. To this end, appropriate funding tools, should be sought for the various project contractors, in particular for the most disadvantaged countries, regions and communities. These funds should be additional to development aid.
As well as international funding, national, basin and local financing mechanisms will need to be put in place or improved, including private funding (cf. One Planet Summit) etc.
Climate change is contributing to modifying the spatial and temporal distribution of water and exacerbating existing pressures caused by demographic growth, changing lifestyles, inadequate solid waste management etc. In many regions, extreme weather events are becoming more intense and frequent, thereby posing a threat to territories, economic and social development, and the environment.
The success of SDG6 on water will therefore depend on our capacity to combat climate change. Similarly, numerous water-related projects will contribute to achieving the SDG13 targets because water plays a crucial role in adaptation and mitigation:
- reaching 6.4 target would contribute to adapt to the climate risk of a decrease in the availability of water. Example of actions: reduce leakage in water supply networks, micro-irrigation, agro-ecology, reuse and recycling of treated wastewater, etc.
- Reaching 6.6 target would contribute to reinforce the resilience of ecosystems to climate change. Example of actions: protecting and repairing ecosystems hit by extreme weather events (mangroves etc.), etc.

Furthermore, the connection that the IPCC makes with SDGs highlights the need to move towards sustainable management of territories to improve synergies between mitigation, adaptation and development. For example, it will be necessary to limit competition between land use for negative emissions on the
one hand, and other land uses related to human development on the other.
- CREWS projects (climate risk and early warning system), for example in Niger, associating numerous international organizations (WMO, UNISDR, World Bank), countries (including France) and national authorities (for Niger case : ministry of humanitarian action and risk management), national meteorological service, civil protection, national hydrological service)

- Integrated Water Resources Management of the Senegal river through support to OMVS (Organisation de mise en valeur du fleuve Sénégal) by the French Development Agency

- project for the comethanization of sewage sludge and the fermentable fraction contained in the residual household waste carried by the two major public services in the Ile-de-France, Syctom and SIAAP, in order to maximize the conversion of carbon into gas to produce a energy recovery, and transform nitrogen and phosphorus into valuable by-products.
70
CBM International
Persons with Disabilities
Recommendations:
• Integrate human rights obligations into climate-related policies and programs so that the principles of non-discrimination and equal opportunity apply, meaning there is accountability in how state and non-state actors implement measures in response to changing environments that can be attributed to climate change.
• Ensure Article 3 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is read with Articles 11 and 32 to those responsible for funding and implementing programs that address both the risk of natural disasters and the response in a non-discriminatory way for all persons with disabilities.
• Disability inclusion must be systematically taken up across all aspects of the disaster management cycle and provision made for disability awareness and inclusion training of personnel, involving local organizations of persons with disabilities and disability NGOs (refer to CRPD Articles 11 and 32).
• Include persons with disabilities meaningfully in raising awareness and providing technical capacity within communities about climate change and the absolute necessity to protect local environments within the framework of the Paris Agreement.
• As part of climate programs, ensure persons with disabilities meaningfully contribute to and benefit from activities designed to strengthen security in: food and nutrition; water, sanitation & hygiene; energy; resilient, accessible shelter and other infrastructure; livelihoods and human security.
Climate change continues to accelerate. The five-year average global temperature 2013 to 2017 was the highest on record, with concentrations of greenhouse gases continuing to increase, ongoing sea level rises, and significant weather events becoming more severe, unpredictable and frequent. Climate change is having the largest impact on the world’s poorest people. It also has the power to push more than 100 million people back into poverty by 2030. Furthermore, projections indicate that by 2050, climate change will have displaced at least 200 million people. Given their overall levels of poverty, persons with disabilities and their families are among the groups most affected by each of these issues.

Collectively, persons with disabilities are one of the most resource poor groups in the world, and often face other marginalization due to intersecting factors such as their gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religious adherence, or level of education. Hence, they are globally among the most at risk people to the impacts of accelerating climate change. Practically this means they and their communities are facing significant climate-related issues including: increasing storms, floods and landslides; coastal inundation; droughts; wildfires; degradation of land, resources, infrastructure and living environments; extremes of temperature; and growing unpredictability and uncertainty.
The consequences of climate-related issues for persons with disabilities and their communities include:
• Increasing humanitarian emergencies, both fast and slow onset;
• Increasing food, energy and water insecurity;
• Reducing access to shelter, infrastructure and basic services;
• Increasing displacement or being left behind in degraded environments;
• Declining health and an increase in the prevalence of many impairments, due to changing disease patterns and other impacts on health. These diseases are now endemic in new areas, with the transmission season often lengthening; furthermore, extreme temperatures, increasing hardship and climate-induced mobility are likely to negatively impact mental health; and
• Increasing human security issues, due to competition and conflict over increasingly limited resources, as climate change accelerates and populations increase.

The wide range of consequences outlined above demonstrate that empowering persons with disabilities and ensuring inclusiveness and equality needs a broad approach with their participation in the development of socially inclusive climate change policies, which recognize climate resilience as part of broad socio-economic transformation, not simply as infrastructure or technological fixes. Furthermore, they need to participate in the development of, and benefit from socio-economic resilience strategies aimed at reducing vulnerability to climate risks.

• In Bangladesh a Youth-led Network is active in a joint initiative under UNDP working to promote and map disability-inclusive policies for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation and Climate Adaptation in local institutions.

• The Norwegian Association of Disabled together with the National Union of Disabled Persons in Uganda and the Federation of Disability Organisations in Malawi have produced a comprehensive manual for Organizations of Persons with Disabilities and mainstream organizations seeking to build inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction, entitled Disability inclusion and disaster risk: Principles and guidance for implementing the Sendai Framework.

• CBM has launched a good practice guide for disability-inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction, based on its longstanding experience in the flood affected communities of Gaibandha in northern Bangladesh. The guide focuses on strengthening the capacity of people with disabilities to become agents of change for inclusion in disaster risk reduction, in their communities.
71
Realising Just Cities, Urban Institute, University of Sheffield
Education & Academic Entities
Diverse coalitions of multi-sectoral groups are an effective way to accelerate progress towards urgent climate action. Diverse groups are able to provide the variety of knowledge, experience, understanding and creativity needed to make informed decisions related to climate change. These diverse coalitions are also able to provide leadership and disseminate the learning from these groups into their sector. Examples in the UK context include the Greater Manchester Green Summit Steering group; the Yorkshire and Humber Regional Trade Union Low Carbon Taskforce and the Sheffield Green City partnership board.

The role of academia is important and can build capacity and act as a critical friend. An innovation of our work is understanding how embedded PhD students within these partnership settings can support and challenge local progress towards Goal 13. Researchers are also co-producing responses to climate change with local councils through supporting transdisciplinary knowledge production and new forms of public engagement. Work funded around energy futures in Greater Manchester, bringing an artist, ethnographer and climate activist together, is one example.
Based on our work in the North of England, we identify the following:
(1) A lack of leadership. The general void in strong leadership from power interests to demand or require urgent action, makes voluntary action more difficult and unlikely.
(2) A fear of the unknown. While urgent action on climate change is needed, that action needs to be transformative and rooted in long-term thinking. As technologies and governance structures change relatively rapidly, urgency action is hampered by the fear that the future will be different than the present.
(3) Siloed government and mindsets. Local government and business self-divides into distinctive ’sectors’ which are often removed from one another.
(4) Reliance on market mechanisms. In the UK there is a strong reliance by government on market mechanisms, competitive bidding, and 'regional beauty contests' to achieve climate action.
(5) Insufficient local capacity. Local Authorities have had any existing strategic capacity around sustainability decimated or abolished by austerity.
(6) Insufficient public appetite for change. Many channels for public participation and stakeholder consultation have been lost - although the devolution agenda may be bringing some opportunities.
(7) Absence of a powerful story by the media. The 'story' of climate change is not reflected in popular media, not seen as urgent or relevant to peoples' lives.

This all lead to a lack of strategy and participation in favour of competitive approaches.
SDG 13 is deeply intertwined with most of the other SDGs — particularly when climate action is framed with the discourses of a just transition, environmental justice, and ecological development. A clear articulation - in policy strategies, narratives and the public sphere - is needed of why we need to work across different SDGs and what the benefits may be. For instance, instead of leading with the energy transition from fossil fuels to renewable sources as meeting SDG13, the importance of an energy secure society, better jobs and local economic development, improvements in air quality and health, tackling energy poverty etc need to be equally prioritised. A related point here is multiple deprivation - meaning several SDGs need addressing together. Workers in energy-intensive industries in Yorkshire and the Humber are suffering not only from lack of climate action, but related problems in the UK economy re investment, trade, income inequality, and regional inequalities ('Out of Shape' IPPR 2016). There are thus links to gender, poverty and skills, for example.

All this requires working to improve institutional cultures within relevant organisations to ensure that global value is articulated rather than departmentalised and does not need to be attributed to any single sector. What is required is a more strategic, participatory and transdisciplinary approach with a change in indicators, targets and incentives to work for collective benefit.
Co-productive decision-making and policy initiation and design is one approach being tried to support multi-stakeholder engagement to tackle climate change. Two examples we have supported through our work include the Greater Manchester Green Summit Steering Group (of which Perry is a member and Bellinson supports) and the Greater Manchester Climate Action Network (which we are also supporting). In the case of the Greater Manchester Green Summit Steering Group, learning is ongoing. Some of our initial evaluation suggests that decision-makers in the Greater Manchester Combined Authority are convinced of the value of bringing stakeholders together across sectors and with different kinds of expertise and that this marks a new mode of operation for the city-region. We are happy to share more lessons from this research - please contact us for further information if you would like to know more.
Please see www.realisingjustcities-rjc.org for more information.
72
Coalition2030
Non-Governmental Organizations
• In 2018 Ireland became the first country to introduce a Fossil Fuel Divestment Bill, seeing Ireland removing all state investments from fossil fuel related funds. Aims to minimise investment in climate disrupting fossil fuels and protect Ireland from stranded assets
• Incentivising measures for uptake of electric vehicles including targeted help-to-buy schemes, reductions in motor tax for electric vehicles, and lower or free motorway tolls. Quality recharging network necessary
• Selling back to the grid electricity from micro-generation by citizens generating electricity at pieces at least equivalent to the wholesale price
• Climate actions must be proofed to ensure consistency with both targets under the UN CBD and of the UNFCCC. Climate mitigation and biodiversity protection and restoration are complementary, but not inevitably the case.
• Nature-based solutions to greenhouse gas emissions and climate mitigation. Restoring nature is cheapest and most effective tool for reducing emissions of GHGs, helping to adapt to extreme weather, building resilience in food production, and providing a lifeline to rural communities
• Just Transition is critical pillar of climate action, premised on inclusive approach that brings together stakeholders towards plans, policies and investments needed for a fast and fair transformation towards a low carbon economy. Provide income support, training and redeployment services for workers who lose their jobs as a result of transition
• Implement the recommendations of the Citizen’s Assembly
• Political context and will –The development and implementation of a plan to address climate change may be postponed in event of a no-deal Brexit
• Continued reliance on fossil fuels –Fossil fuel combustion remains the principle source of GHG emissions and emissions are rising again with the recovery
• Lack of coherence across policies and sectors –The National Planning Framework fails to recognise the incoherence between plans for agriculture and energy, and those for environmental objectives. Lack of movement to shift Irish agriculture away from dairy and beef. Continued subsidisation of climate damaging fossil fuels
• The National Mitigation Plan lacks clear targets or specifications of how to manage GHG emissions or removed to meet targets. No timeframe for phasing out peat and coal in electricity generation
• Meeting Ireland’s responsibility in terms of international solidarity, Contribution to GCF remains small, falling below average of developed countries
• Absence of a progressive and equitable environmental taxation system–Taxation enforcing polluter pays principle and encouraging waste prevention helps decouple growth from use of resources and support shift to low carbon economy. Need to take account of the need to protect vulnerable people from impact of increase
• Failure to improve Biodiversity Co-benefits of Afforestation. Ecological assessments should be undertaken of all afforestation applications
Goal 13 and the imperative to stop runaway climate change is intrinsically linked to protecting against the destruction of the oceans and the land as well as to protecting fresh water, all of which are crucial elements to avoiding poverty and desperation. Achievement against Goal 13 is also closely linked to that of goal 7. Allocation of resources should reflect moves towards this goal, including expansion of public transport spending and allocations towards green methods of transport over new road infrastructure spending at a ratio of at least 2-to-1. The number of bus and cycle lanes and park and ride facilities should be greatly increased and priority given to these modes of transport over cars

Failure to achieve progress in SDG 13 threatens to undermine all efforts towards achieving Agenda 2030. The impacts of which will be experienced by those most vulnerable and least responsible. Leveraging interlinkages requires building Policy Coherence across government departments. Adopting approaches to address the cross-cutting nature of climate change is needed through Ireland’s overseas programming, including supporting sustainable food production that is climate sensitive. Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration that considers environmental sustainability and sustainable livelihoods at local level are important in this regard. Approaches need to consider how they are increasing a community’s resilience to shocks that can be generated by the impacts of climate change.
A National Dialogue on Climate Action (NDCA) is being established, although is slow in getting momentum. Two regional events have taken place so far. This national dialogue is designed to be a useful tool to engage people with the challenge of climate change; motivate changes in behaviour; and create structures at local, regional and national levels to support the generation of ideas and their translation into appropriate cost-effective actions. The NDCA will run initially for a period of two years with administrative support to be provided from a secretariat within Environmental Protection Agency.

Public Participatory Networks (PPNs) are facilitating a wellbeing process in order to develop a ‘vision for community wellbeing’ https://www.communitywellbeing.ie/wp/. These set out the vision and the main issues of member groups to inform the PPN and its work, as well as external agencies and policy makers.
73
Mainstreaming Adaptation, Resilience and Sustainability into Development and daily life
Non-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological Community, Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
link with action on climate change under UNCCD and have effective coordination with UNISDR and organisations working on Disaster Preparedness and Risk reduction- DPRR and CC
coordination at national level and with other parts of the international agenda
link both ways and thru organisations working on CC, SDGs and DRR
national actions in India and Myanmar
74
Self
Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
Establish a climate authority that requires adherence to regulation, declare SDGs crisis mode for Climate, increase financing
Business and/or individuals are not doing what is needed on their own.
Hierarchical infographic with Climate on bottom - must be addressed first - if no inhabitable earth then no life on it, pre-installed guidlines on accessible mobile devices
Unfortunately I cannot
Must be made a priority over the other goals until we are in right course
75
ASEDUCA
Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Volunteer Groups, Education & Academic Entities
cumplir con el Acuerdo de Paris, para hacer que se cumpla la Acción por el clima
los desastres naturales provocados por las tormentas y los Huracanes
una cultura de cuidado y proteccion del ambiente, y de los ecosistemas
76
Soka Gakkai International
Non-Governmental Organizations
-Education, in formal and non-formal settings, for all age groups helps us learn about climate change and environmental degradation as well as their underlying causes, reflect on them and empower individuals to take action and exercise leadership.
-Disseminate broadly stories of individual empowerment who led to local action to change their environment and combat climate change
-Lack of implementation of commitments to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases
-Lack of investment in “green” sources of energy and jobs
-Slow implementation of states’ financial commitments to the UNFCCC Green Climate Fund
-Focusing on education/lifelong learning through formal and non-formal education
-Investing in action-oriented education and learning about climate change and environmental degradation: focusing on SDG 13.3 (climate education) is directly related to SDG 4.7 (education to sustainable development), creating the ground leading to the realization of all 17 SDGs
-Strengthening cooperation at regional level for SDG 13.1, including through the sharing of good practices, capacity building will reduce extreme poverty (SDG 1) and vulnerability that may result from disasters and other society-wide shocks.
-Green Investment Funds, which have multi-stakeholder decision-making boards (including civil society organizations representatives)
-Local governments networks (such as C40 Cities, US Conference of Mayors) and exchange of good practices and lessons learned.
77
World Water Council
Non-Governmental Organizations
• Capacity building and technology transfer;
• Enhance the role that integrated water resources management can play for both adaptation and mitigation and DRR actions;
• Mobilize finance flows especially toward water-wise projects, being a good investment for all and providing significant economic and social returns;
• Include all levels and domains of governance from early stages of planning to the implementation phase;
• Engage with the private sector in fostering water infrastructure finance as well as bringing new perspectives in terms of innovative water and climate technologies and processes;
• Raise awareness both at policy and at citizen levels through interdisciplinary multi-stakeholder engagement processes.
The major gap is neglecting the role that freshwater resources management could play for both climate change mitigation and adaptation. Adaptive water measures offer a variety of co-benefits. Systematically addressing water issues is key to adapting to climate change and reducing negative impacts of water-related disasters. In addition, water is critical for successful climate change mitigation, since many efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions depend on reliable access to water resources. Therefore, climate goals are strictly linked to water security, especially moving into the implementation phase of the Paris Agreement.
Both the Paris Agreement as well as the Agenda 2030 paradigms need to recognize the catalytic role of water to create beneficial synergies enabling a necessary shift from isolated approaches to more integrated ones. Water resources and water-intensive investments are highly impacted by climate change making climate resilience impossible to achieve without considering water security. At the same time, water is a pre-requisite to the achievement of nearly all SDGs. Water security and sanitation is essential for ending poverty and ensuring good health and food security, enabling and strengthening results for securing access to affordable energy, inclusive industrialisation and making cities safe and resilient. Consequently, sound water management increases resilience to climate change, connecting sectors and enabling sustainable development and economic growth through all the SDGs.
The #ClimateIsWater initiative was launched in late-2015, based on the premises that the obvious links between water and climate change have for a long time been ignored in international climate summits and to federate members of the water community from around the globe to speak with one voice for water. The objective is to reach out to the climate community for better consideration of water issues through the support of more than 70 organizations.

In collaboration with other partners, the Council has also convened International Conferences on Water and Climate. The second edition was held in October 2018 under the theme ‘Fostering dialogue on the road to CoP23’. The ICWCs were extremely valuable in fostering dialogue between the water and climate communities. The outcomes were released and ICWC recommendations fed directly into the broader discussions that followed at CoP22 and CoP23.

In addition to this, the Council has long-lasting experience in catalyzing collective action during and in between each World Water Forum – the world’s largest gathering on water. Co-organized every three years in collaboration with a host country, the Forum is a unique platform for the water community and key decision makers to work together to overcome global water challenges. The Forum brings together participants at all levels and from all spheres, as well as a whole variety of themes including climate change. The 9th World Water Forum will take place in Dakar, Senegal, in 2021.

78
Stockholm International Water Institute
Non-Governmental Organizations
People and nature alike experience climate change primarily through impacts to the water cycle. Changes to the frequency, timing and magnitude of hydrologic events as a result of increasing temperatures are becoming the new normal. In 2017 alone nearly 100 million people were directly affected by natural disasters, 78% of which were the result of floods, storms or drought. While water is often the instrument of disaster, it is also a key to resilience in the face of climate change and essential to sustainable development, peace, security, and economic wellbeing. (13.1). Water is thereby key in addressing and achieving SDG13.

Reducing risk to infrastructure, people and the ecosystems upon which they depend requires the adoption of risk-based approaches to adaptation and the pursuit of no- or low-regret options that will protect against a range of future climate scenarios. Traditional grey infrastructure often has an operational lifetime of 30-100 years or more; climate-proofing infrastructure in ways that also take into account changing water availability and timing will be essential to ensure that infrastructure remains viable over its lifetime and doesn’t exacerbate water stress or reduce resilience (13.2, 13.3, 13B).
Accounting for water use in our climate mitigation and adaptation activities is essential, but currently not done. While water is not mentioned in the Paris Agreement, it is necessary for nearly all of our mitigation and adaptation strategies – from carbon storage in terrestrial ecosystems, to emerging clean energy technologies, to adapting to new extreme weather events – water is an essential and often overlooked component. Our strategies, policies and solutions must, at a minimum, ensure that they do not exacerbate existing water stress, particularly for poor and marginalized communities, and ideally help to alleviate those stresses. (13.2)
According to climate change projections, 3.9 billion people – 40% of the global population – will soon reside in basins experiencing severe water stress, including nearly all of Central and South Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and much of China (OECD, 2012).
Climate change fundamentally alters the ways in which we manage water. We can no longer use past models to predict future supplies with the same level of confidence. The uncertainties we face around future water availability means that in order to achieve positive sustainable development outcomes, we must implement robust and flexible poverty reduction and economic growth strategies that take this uncertainty into account. (13.1)
Marine, riparian, and aquatic ecosystems provision critical adaptation and ecosystem services for communities and economies. The Action Platform for Source-to-Sea Management (S2S Platform) is a multi-stakeholder initiative that helps freshwater, coastal and marine experts to contribute to global knowledge generation on source-to-sea interconnections, connect and engage in collaborative projects, promote best practices, and take action for improved integrated management. Sustainable management of water in the landscape can contribute to both climate change mitigation and adaptation, as it can enhance carbon stocks and sinks, as well as support adaptation of forest management and agriculture. The Ethiopia Water and Landscape Governance programme hosted by SIWI is developing a water governance program in selected river basins. One of the components of the program is landscape restoration through stakeholder dialogues involving farmers, foresters, pastoralist and local communities. UNESCO recently released a handbook for decision-making under climate uncertainty called Climate Risk-Informed Decision Analysis or CRIDA. This bottom-up approach to decision-making under climate change engages local stakeholders from the outset to identify risks and solutions. It has been piloted in over a dozen countries and is currently being used by cities as diverse as Lusaka, Zambia and San Francisco, California to increase the resilience of local populations, ecosystems and infrastructure.
79
World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF)
Non-Governmental Organizations
Enhancing action and ambition by all actors (countries and non-state actors) at all levels (international, regional, national, local). The recent IPCC Report of Global Warming of 1.5 shows that dramatic emissions cuts by 2030 will be needed to keep temperature at 1.5.
Achievement of SDG 13 will require dramatic changes on the energy sectors (phasing out fossil fuels and transitioning to renewables). A big shortfall is the lack of political will by the biggest emitters, who should be taking the lead in reducing emissions. Climate finance is also a gap, as the goal of $100bi/year has never been achieved.
What is needed is a higher level of awareness of those interlinkages, coordinated approaches by international and national institutions and financial and technical support for implementing such approaches. If the SDGs are implemented in full by all countries and stakeholders then major steps towards a 1.5°C future would have been made. Some specific examples include Goal 15 (halting deforestation, restore degraded forests and reforestation); Goal 7 (increasing the share of renewable energy and doubling energy efficiency); Goal 8 (fast and radical transformation of the economy, decoupling economic growth from environment degradation and improving resource efficiency) Goal 9 (upgrading infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency); Goal 11 (making cities and communities sustainable), goal 12(sustainable consumption and production). Goal 1 on Reducing poverty also supports people in responding to climate change.
WWF is promoting "Alliances for Climate Action", which are non-state actors coalitions with a focus on enhancing ambition and improving countries Nationally Determined Contributions under the Paris Agreement. Such alliances have already been launched in Mexico, Japan and Argentina.
80
United Nations Association of Chad
Women, Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Volunteer Groups
YesYesYesYes
81
Misean Cara
Missionaries in development
There needs to be a clear and stronger focus on Climate Action through a climate justice lens. There needs to be more climate mitigation (reduction of Green House Gas emissions) in the so-called developed North and increased support for climate adaptation in the Global South.

To accelerate progress, developed countries should be encouraged to support climate projects in the Global South which can be counted as developed country contributions to reducing their national carbon footprint (OECD Rio Climate markers).
Farmers require assistance to adapt to the impacts of climate change, by focusing on Climate Smart Agriculture or Climate Resilient Agriculture or similar approach.
The close relationship between agriculture and the environment means that increasing productivity is only sustainable if we do it in a way that reduces environmental impact, and promotes effective natural resource management and resilience to shocks such as the impact of climate change.
82
WaterAid
Non-Governmental Organizations
Access to sustainable water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services is essential for adaptation to climate change. Reliable WASH services are a foundation for recovery after disasters and also help people deal with slower-onset changes in the environment. To be resilient to climate change, communities need WASH services that are well designed and maintained to last.
UN-Water has estimated that 3.6 billion people lived in water-scarce areas in
2016, a number expected to increase to around 5 billion by 2050. This increasing water stress is exacerbated by longer and longer dry seasons, unpredictable rain patterns caused by climate change, and the subsequent damage to water points and sanitation facilities. Women and girls are disproportionally affected by the impacts of climate change on clean water and decent toilets, as they typically bear the heavy burden of water collection – up to four hours a day in many communities. 
The result is that people without access to good quality, reliable water and sanitation, some of the poorest people in the world, are effectively footing the bill for the carbon emissions of much wealthier countries.
Climate conferences have repeatedly resulted in billions of dollars pledged to support developing countries to adapt to climate change. But although pressure is coming from an international level, impacts are not visible on the ground – money is often not getting through to where it is needed most.
While every country has a plan for reducing emissions, helping countries to adapt has been neglected. Funding beyond regular foreign aid and without removing funding from existing foreign aid budgets is urgently required. Existing ODA is not enough, and additional funding needs to be made available by wealthy industrialised nations that created this crisis.
Floods, droughts and unpredictable weather patterns exacerbated by climate change are already making it harder for people to get clean water and decent sanitation systems. These growing threats combined with rising temperatures also make it easier for some waterborne diseases, such as cholera, to spread.
Urgent action is needed to make sure that every community has a reliable and sustainable source of clean water and a climate resilient sanitation system. This will make poorer communities better able to adapt to their changing climate.Governments and their development partners should prepare climate-resilient WASH strategies, especially in LDCs. These strategies should clearly outline the role of WASH in climate change adaptation and identify the main actions needed to make WASH services sustainable and resilient to climate impacts. These can in turn inform commitments in future NDCs and NAPs, as well as proposals to secure climate finance.
Governments should commit to and incentivise better cross-institutional cooperation on climate change and WASH issues. If the traditional decision-making silos endure, countries risk developing multiple climate action plans that don’t align with sectoral priorities or broader domestic sustainable development targets. We need climate change adaptation planners to include WASH experts in developing the NDCs and NAPs. This is also vital for ensuring that adaptation plans reflect good practices and lessons learned on WASH to date.
83
CARE International
Non-Governmental Organizations
- highlight the cross-cutting importance of gender equality and strengthen women empowerment: evidence-based publications such as “Resilience champions” (https://bit.ly/2V7JOhc) show how power dimensions in households and communities are shifting due to continued shocks and stresses (incl. from climate disasters); strong evidence that Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLA), are a very successful way of building resilience of individuals, communities and societies;
- create awareness about the extremely harmful risks of lack of climate action, which justify efforts to keep global warming to 1.5°C (see IPCC Special Report) - demonstrate and highlight the socio-economic benefits of climate action to other SDGs, e.g. in the area of building climate resilience in issues which are critical to the needs of the poor, especially women and girls; e.g. a study carried out by CARE found that investing $1 in adaptation can generate between $1.45 and $3.03 of wealth accruing to the communities; https://bit.ly/2VgeMns )
- Bring multiple governmental and other stakeholders together to define common benefits of more ambitious climate action for various SDG areas: (see https://bit.ly/2twf0ea )
- Emission reductions: The ability of many countries to achieve their SDGs will be significantly compromised, with likely high human and economic costs, if the global community fails to limit global warming towithin the 1.5°C. All evidence as well as political decisions, such as those taken at COP24, point to a continuously glaring gap between what is needed in terms of emission reductions to stay within 1.5°C, and what the collective national plans currently lead to (above 3 degrees warming, see https://climateactiontracker.org/global/temperatures/ ). Thus, stepping up emission reductions everywhere, but particularly inin particular the most powerful and emission intense countries, is essential to globally be able to achieve the SDGs;
- Climate finance: the lack of demonstrable and sufficient progress of scaling-up climate finance by developed countries towards the 100bn goal, and its greater delivery towards local actors and civil society, impede more effective climate action in developing countries
- Government commitment: government capacity and policy in developing countries are varied. Weak capacity to understand the climate related issues, the ability to articulate the agenda to policy setting and the commitment to implement the policy are often hindered on achieving SDG 13.
- promote gender equality across the board, including climate action: there is a strong link between climate injustice and gender inequality. It is vital to find joint approaches to address both needs;
- integrating adaptation and climate resilience into work in other SDG areas (gender equality, food security, protecting the environment), is essential as it can protect measures in those areas from climate risks,
- Implementing climate finance (SDG 13b) mostly happens through activities in thematic areas of other SDGs, for example through specific sectoral actions; thus by developed countries providing larger amounts of climate finance, and by governments establishing new and innovative sources which can generate additional resources, more measures can be financed which also tackle critical challenges in other SDGs
- in their VNRs and the reports that Governments will present to the HLPF and the SDG summit, governments should take a very inclusive approach nationally and in particular also bring stakeholders from the climate community (Civil society, academia, development partners etc.) to the table to strengthen the link between climate change and the SDGs; make use of the recent IPCC report on 1.5°C when reflecting on the national sustainable development implications both in terms of climate change impacts (and the harms that a 3°C global increase might mean), as well as the benefits of climate action, as the IPCC report applies an SDG lens to much of its analysis
Since 2011, CARE Indonesia has intensively work in partnership with CSOs in regard to the work of climate-change adaptation. Through the programme of Partners for Resilience (PfR) , Indonesia working in partnership with local Non-Government Organizations (NGOs) named CIS Timor. This partnership has spanned from project implementation of smart agriculture, vslas, policy advocacy and dialogue (sdg16) on village development fund, gender transformative responsive on Integrated Risk Management. Further, the initiative also engage local multi-stakeholders forum such as DRR Forum, Gender Working Group, Village Development Forum and Village Development Plan Team. PfR aims at enabling communities at subnational and national levels to create interlinkages between the different relevant agendas (SFDRR, Paris Agreement, Urban agendas, among other) by creating those interlinkages, PfR partners ensure governments align complementary efforts to achieve targets of the SDGs agenda 2030.
fits CARE vision of world "where poverty has been overcome & all people live in dignity & security”
84
Jam & Justice Action Research Collective (via the University of Sheffield, Urban Institute)
Non-Governmental Organizations, Education & Academic Entities
As an Action Research Collective (ARC) composed of academics, practitioners, public servants, and committed citizens, we have found creating shared space outside our individual domains valuable as a means of enabling innovative responses to climate change in a British city-region.

Our People's Republic of Energy project (detailed below) mapped local geography, researched local energy history, and surveyed best practice globally in order to make the case for a democratically governed municipal energy company. We found creative techniques and non-traditional settings (both features of our immersive energy walks) to be constructive in brokering different conversations and creating space for better relationships between active citizens (e.g. campaigners) and key stakeholders.

Some learning from our wider collaboration is documented here:
https://jamandjustice-rjc.org/sites/default/files/Co-Producing_the_City_brochure.pdf

--This work is funded by the UK Economic & Social Research Council and Mistra Urban Futures, with support from the Universities of Sheffield, Manchester and Birmingham, the Greater Manchester Centre for Voluntary Organisation, and other bodies
In England, the private ownership of much energy supply infrastructure inhibits radical adjustments necessary to combat climate change. The historical and contemporary context of this is treated well in a short animated video from our delivery partners Carbon Coop, viewable at the bottom of this web page:
https://carbon.coop/2019/01/green-summit-2019-what-will-greater-manchesters-energy-future-look-like/

Equally, the general population are not well informed about what they can do (including in terms of influencing decision-makers). This is also something we have worked to tackle.
Our action research focuses on inclusion & participatory democracy in urban governance (SDGs 10, 16, 17). The work that relates most directly to SDG13 is the "People's Republic of Energy" project (along with the Green Summit work undertaken by a sibling project at the Sheffield Urban Institute). Increasing citizen engagement and power in decision-making naturally increases people's capacity to engage meaningfully with climate change.

The work of the People's Republic of Energy project has impacted on other SDG targets. For example:
- immersive energy walks offer a prototype for sustainable urban tourism (8.9), enabling people to discover and understand the nature of local energy supply and enter into informed debate about the potential for change.
- exploring energy supply in a locality also opens up conversations about fuel poverty & universal access to clean energy (7.1, 7.A)
- the range of creative activities undertaken within the project promoted a wide range of citizen engagement, notably increasing the representation of women within the conversations (5.5)

Making space for social innovation through co-production enables multi-faceted action on the SDGs.
The "People’s Republic of Energy" brought together campaigners, policymakers, politicians, academics and other citizens to develop a participatory approach to municipal energy supply. Their 16-page report, "GM Energy Futures", imagines the formation & governance of a public energy company for Greater Manchester in the form of future company prospectuses. It draws on best practice from around the world (informing a second literature review by the Transnational Institute in Amsterdam), showing what can happen and helping citizens lobby for such collaborative energy-ownership.

As part of the project, theatre-maker Britt Jurgensen co-designed an immersive walk, taking participants through Manchester’s energy history on foot. A revised version is now re-running with key stakeholders ahead of Greater Manchester's 2019 Green Summit, aiming to influence the shape of a new municipally-owned energy company and address fuel poverty.

Lead collaborators Carbon Coop are also re-applying learning in mPOWER, a Horizon 2020-funded peer-learning programme assisting municipalities in creating a fair, clean & democratic energy future.

For further information see:
(i) https://jamandjustice-rjc.org/peoples-republic-energy
(ii) https://carbon.coop/portfolio/power-in-the-city/
(iii) https://carbon.coop/portfolio/mpower/
(iv) https://carbon.coop/2019/01/green-summit-2019-what-will-greater-manchesters-energy-future-look-like/
Additional information about the Jam & Justice project has been submitted under SDG 16.
85
World Farmers' Organisation - WFO
Farmer
WFO believes that the most effective way to accelerate progress towards SDG13 is to involve those who are the most affected by its devastating effects: the farmers.
The agricultural sector is part of the problem with its greenhouse gases emissions, but it is also the sector that can provide solutions in the shortest time possible. To achieve these solutions, huge adaptation and mitigation efforts are needed and farmers are already implementing innovative solutions to tackle this challenge. However, the efforts farmers are making as well as the impact climate change has on their daily activities and livelihoods is not always properly captured in the ongoing international debate on climate change. We think that farmers deserve to be at the centre of the global political debate, in order to achieve concrete solutions. Partnerships across all sectors of the global value chain in agriculture, from the private sector, to research institutes, to international organizations, must include the farmers with a strong bottom-up driven approach. This is the way to maximize the regional relevance of the policies and investments made. When giving farmers the platforms and tools they need, they can tackle climate change in all its forms. Moreover, when farmers are informed and inform, the synergies created expand across the other SDGs.
One of the biggest shortfalls can be identified in the gaps between the policies and documents that are adopted at the international level and the farmers on the ground in their daily life on the farm. Although the efforts made, we think that the organizations and actors involved should take more initiative in ensuring farmers receive the proper information so that they are aware and can join their voices, bringing their concrete experiences into the debate. Capacity building and knowledge sharing are key elements in this process of making progresses towards the achievement of all the SDGs. WFO, for example, regroups farmers from across the globe, and works to provide them with the latest information and research while also providing a platform for their voices to be heard in the global arena. In order to make lasting progress towards SDG 13, the work must be internalized and assumed by farmers themselves, so that they can lead the changes in a sustainable, viable, long term, and informed manner.
We believe one of the best ways to leverage the interlinkages between SDG 13 and the rest of the Agenda is to focus on the synergies between the different international frameworks and ongoing processes (i.e. Paris Agreement, Sendai Framework on Disaster Risk Reduction, UN Decade of Action on Nutrition 2016-2025, UN Decade on Family Farming 2019-2028). Fostering joint opportunities to discuss about SDGs across processes, from the agricultural perspective, is a way to destroy siloes and favour not only the creation of interlinkages between different SDGs, but also a comprehensive, forward looking and innovative approach for the wider agricultural sector, driven directly by the farmers’ needs and expectations and coherent with the international commitments for sustainability. Agriculture is a multifaceted sector that has strong interlinkages with all the SDGs and making it sustainable (environmentally, socially and economically) is key to achieve sustainable development for all.
Although the agricultural sector is often identified as a cause of climate change, farmers hold an important part of the solution to address the challenges of combating climate change and its impacts. That is why farmers want that the political decisions take into consideration their needs and expectations.
Considering the above, WFO has launched “The Climakers” initiative according to which all the actors in the food value chain work together with the farmers, to advance the global political dialogue on agriculture and climate change, promoting farmers’ contribution to the Paris Climate Agreement.
“The Climakers” initiative is a multi-stakeholder alliance that regroups all the interested members surrounding agriculture, be it farmers, researchers, international organisations, private sector and public sector actors. Together with the other partners in this agenda, WFO aims at promoting a reverse paradigm in the global agenda on climate change, based on the bottom up approach, where farmers have a key role to play in the global policy process on climate change and they bring forward the best practices they are already implementing on their farms to adapt to and mitigate climate change. Similar alliances should be made, at national and international levels, in the hope of establishing networks where all members have equal footing and can share their expertise. Instead of a top-down approach, the SDGs should be oriented to empowering those at all levels of the discussion.
For policies to be really effective, farmers should have a voice in negotiations.
86
HaritaDhara Research Development and Education Foundation
Children & Youth, Non-Governmental Organizations, Science & Technological Community, Education & Academic Entities
Education to address climate change and sustainable development for All. Government should create point based reward system for bringing Sustainability in everyone life
Proper coordination and policies are missing links, no connection with every stakeholders, linkages are missing with knowledge and actions at every level
SDG 13 interlinked with several other SDGs in 2030 Agenda and thorough joint work can improve situation in related goals. We need synergy between goals to reduce effects of climate change that will improve overall scenario
Various organization are working in this area such as The Climate Reality Project (having two leaders in our org.) and others organizations that are creating a network of Climate Ready Citizens. But, we need more grassroots level involvement, implementation and reach to address their issues for Sustainable Future
Partnerships are required to bring Quantum Change
87
Grupo de Trabalho da Sociedade Civil para a Agenda 2030 (GT Agenda 2030)
Non-Governmental Organizations
- Fortalecer a implementação da Agenda Nacional de Adaptação à Mudança do Clima (ProAdapta) e Garantir o investimento necessário para a implantação de
- Políticas Nacionais de Adaptação e para a prevenção de desastres e resiliência das comunidades frente às mudanças climáticas.
- Reduzir o custo de capital de instrumentos de financiamento público, para investimentos que promovam remoções ou menores emissões de GEE e eliminar subsídios e incentivos fiscais aos combustíveis fósseis e a agentes de mercado que não cumpram com a legislação ambiental.
- Instituir metas de renovabilidade para a matriz energética e cadeias produtivas para além dos compromissos assumidos na Contribuição Nacionalmente Determinada (NDC da sigla em inglês), viabilizadas pela criação de mercado de certificados lastreados na produção de energia ou produtos de base renovável.
- Desenvolver e financiar um projeto de educação ambiental orientado pelo Tratado de Educação Ambiental para Sociedades Sustentáveis e Responsabilidade Global.
- Mecanismo de remuneração por serviços ambientais.
- Implementação de políticas como como a RenovaBio e a PlanaVeg.
- Falta de atuação sobre os principais gargalos da Agricultura de Baixo Carbono, expandindo a assistência técnica, extensão rural e difusão de tecnologia em sinergia com outras fontes e mecanismos nacionais e internacionais.
- O combate ao desmatamento no Brasil.
- Geração e estocagem de energia limpa.
- Transporte.
- A implantação de legislação ambiental regulamentada de forma NÃO participativa e transparente.
- Falta de produção relatórios anuais relevantes, como o de desmatamento.
- Houve retrocesso através do desmantelamento da governança climática do país com a extinção da Subsecretaria de Meio Ambiente, Energia, Ciência e Tecnologia e suas subdivisões de Clima, de Recursos Energéticos Novos e Renováveis e de Desenvolvimento Sustentável do Ministério de Relações Exteriores. Suas atribuições foram pulverizadas em outras estruturas. Já o Ministério do Meio Ambiente também perdeu a Secretaria de Mudança do Clima, de Florestas e de Combate ao Desmatamento e de Monitoramento, Apoio e Fomento de Ações em Mudança do Clima. Portanto, esse passa a ser um déficit importante para cumprimento do ODS 13.
- Regulamentar e operacionalizar mercados nacionais de redução de emissões.
- A formulação do planejamento energético, do planejamento econômico, da infraestrutura e das cidades precisam incorporar a questão da mitigação e adaptação climática no seu processo.
- Fórum Brasileiro de Mudança do Clima
- Comissão Mista dos ODS no Congresso (com ressalvas?? Não sei como está sendo o trabalho)
- C40
- Iclei
- Coalizão Brasil Clima, Florestas e Agricultura (http://www.coalizaobr.com.br/)
- Observatório do Clima (http://www.observatoriodoclima.eco.br)
88
Women Educators Association of Nigeria (WEAN)
Women, Non-Governmental Organizations
The most effective ways to accelerate progress towards SDG 13 among others require:
• Global framework to set clear guidelines for countries towards the implementation of SDG 13 and targets, to enable National governments set realistic midterm plan and milestone for effective implementation of SDG 13.
• National development planners to compare countries’ indicators with the UN global indicators framework for measuring SDG 13 progress.
• The global framework to indicate the extent to which countries are free to overlook any of the targets amidst the countries’ context differentiation or what are supposedly irrelevant to the countries’ context.
• Cross sectoral coordination centers in cooperation with experts from line ministries/technical experts in other SDGs nested with Goal 13, for policy coherence in respective policy documents, outcome and their performance indicators at the level of the 169 targets.
• National development planners to take into action the potency of SDG 13 to negatively impact the effective implementation of other SDGs and give it the relevant priority in the hierarchy of national government development plan within the available resources.
• Environmental policy with deliberate express intent of balancing the economic and social processes with environmental needs.
The biggest shortfalls or gaps mitigating against progress towards SDG 13 include factors stated herewith (but not limited to these):
• Inadequate assessment of level of ambition by current and historic National governments’ targets compared to the global targets, to bridge the gap of knowledge and to provide information required for realistic/feasible targets/indicators for future use towards the implementation of SDG 13.
• The issue of aligning the SDG 13 to national processes and policy timescale; this is because national processes may not coincide neatly with the 2015 – 2030 period of the SDG. Thus, most national targets are likely to be reviewed upwards making the level of ambition reflected in the national target to be stretched to work in tandem with the upward review. Also, most of the national targets with an end date after 2015 will lapse before 2030 because some countries set targets for 5 or 10 years instead of 15.
• The problem of not comparing SDG 13 targets and global indicators with countries’ historic policy goals and target indicators by some National government planners in order to identify relevant SDG 13 implementation gaps, also impedes implementation of SDG 13.
• The huge stretch required of LICs to achieve the global targets which is greater than that of MICs and HICs is another limiting factor.
• Variation between targets in the same goal (SDG 13) area may also mitigate against progress in implementation.
Being cognizant that climate change (SDG 13) cuts across all other SDGS, addressing its impact is indispensable for achieving the rest of the 2030 Agenda. To this end, National development planners should take into action the potency of SDG 13 to negatively impact the effective implementation of other SDGs and give it the relevant priority in the hierarchy of national government development plan within the available resources and establish cross sectorial coordination centers in cooperation with experts from line ministries/technical experts in other SDGs nested with Goal 13, for policy coherence in respective policy documents, outcome and their performance indicators at the level of the 169 targets.
Thus, addressing climate change (SDG 13) will have the co-benefits of alleviating poverty and food insecurity (SDG 1 & 2); improving health and wellbeing (SDG 3), ensuring availability and accessibility of clean water (SDG 6); reducing pollution and making energy more affordable and clean (SDG 7); stimulating economic growth and employment (SDG 8); building sustainable infrastructure (SDG 9); regulating consumption and waste (SDG 12); revitalizing and restoring vital land and marine ecosystems (SDG 14 & 15); leading to a more peaceful global society (SDG 16); and other relevant SDGs.
89
Women Educators Association of Nigeria (WEAN)
Women, Non-Governmental Organizations
The most effective ways to accelerate progress towards SDG 13 among others require:
• Global framework to set clear guidelines for countries towards the implementation of SDG 13 and targets, to enable National governments set realistic midterm plan and milestone for effective implementation of SDG 13.
• National development planners to compare countries’ indicators with the UN global indicators framework for measuring SDG 13 progress.
• The global framework to indicate the extent to which countries are free to overlook any of the targets amidst the countries’ context differentiation or what are supposedly irrelevant to the countries’ context.
• Cross sectoral coordination centers in cooperation with experts from line ministries/technical experts in other SDGs nested with Goal 13, for policy coherence in respective policy documents, outcome and their performance indicators at the level of the 169 targets.
• National development planners to take into action the potency of SDG 13 to negatively impact the effective implementation of other SDGs and give it the relevant priority in the hierarchy of national government development plan within the available resources.
• Environmental policy with deliberate express intent of balancing the economic and social processes with environmental needs.
The biggest shortfalls or gaps mitigating against progress towards SDG 13 include factors stated herewith (but not limited to these):
• Inadequate assessment of level of ambition by current and historic National governments’ targets compared to the global targets, to bridge the gap of knowledge and to provide information required for realistic/feasible targets/indicators for future use towards the implementation of SDG 13.
• The issue of aligning the SDG 13 to national processes and policy timescale; this is because national processes may not coincide neatly with the 2015 – 2030 period of the SDG. Thus, most national targets are likely to be reviewed upwards making the level of ambition reflected in the national target to be stretched to work in tandem with the upward review. Also, most of the national targets with an end date after 2015 will lapse before 2030 because some countries set targets for 5 or 10 years instead of 15.
• The problem of not comparing SDG 13 targets and global indicators with countries’ historic policy goals and target indicators by some National government planners in order to identify relevant SDG 13 implementation gaps, also impedes implementation of SDG 13.
• The huge stretch required of LICs to achieve the global targets which is greater than that of MICs and HICs is another limiting factor.
• Variation between targets in the same goal (SDG 13) area may also mitigate against progress in implementation.
Being cognizant that climate change (SDG 13) cuts across all other SDGS, addressing its impact is indispensable for achieving the rest of the 2030 Agenda. To this end, National development planners should take into action the potency of SDG 13 to negatively impact the effective implementation of other SDGs and give it the relevant priority in the hierarchy of national government development plan within the available resources and establish cross sectorial coordination centers in cooperation with experts from line ministries/technical experts in other SDGs nested with Goal 13, for policy coherence in respective policy documents, outcome and their performance indicators at the level of the 169 targets.
Thus, addressing climate change (SDG 13) will have the co-benefits of alleviating poverty and food insecurity (SDG 1 & 2); improving health and wellbeing (SDG 3), ensuring availability and accessibility of clean water (SDG 6); reducing pollution and making energy more affordable and clean (SDG 7); stimulating economic growth and employment (SDG 8); building sustainable infrastructure (SDG 9); regulating consumption and waste (SDG 12); revitalizing and restoring vital land and marine ecosystems (SDG 14 & 15); leading to a more peaceful global society (SDG 16); and other relevant SDGs.
90
Co-Multiversity, ULAP, and Huairou Commission
Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
To accelerate the progress of SDG 13 are reforms in policies to establish inclusivity , good governance and to scale up bottom up /community led in initiatives. Also, to recognize the central role of organized grassroots women in implementing and monitoring of targets of the SDGs ,8,10,13,16
Effective budget spending for infrastructure for citizens in water, roads, health facilities, education ,small and medium enterprise investments in cooperation with private sector supporting productivity of communities with sustainable development framework .
The biggest gap towards progress of SDGs 4/8/10/13/16 in the Philippines regards the work of state agencies. This is especially relevant to local government agencies’ lack of awareness of Agenda 2030, absence of political recognition for organized grassroots organizations and their work in the area, including their networks participation in multi-stakeholder partnership mechanisms for implementing and monitoring the SDGs across local, national, regional and global dimensions. Grassroots groups are the actors on the ground and with capacity building investments their work can be scaled up, and the Agenda 2030 implementation can be enhanced through local data collection scaled up for data collection to reflect priorities on the ground. Advocacy and policy capacity investments are also lacking towards grassroots actors. Donor and partner support could help them engage in policy reforms and undertake community led - bottom up and inclusive sustainable development initiatives.
The challenge /question of what must come first, one SDG or another SDG ? Each of these SDGs are pillars to transform households/communities/ cities/ countries and to nurture the chance for Sustainable Development to be accomplished.

Established engagement between grassroots organizations and the national agency (National Economic Development Authority (NEDA) / and Philippines Stat Authority designating Municipal Development Planning offices across municipalities) . In our partnership, we host local to local dialogues to inform NEDA of community priorities in DRR-CCA, including capacity building , infrastructure to prevent flooding, locations for evacuation centers, hazard mapping, emergency drills, livelihood restoration
funds/enterprise.
Local level community already serves as Resource Persons for village level DRR-CCA orientations. Community leaders are designated to serve on Village Councils for Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction Programs that have the authority to allocate resources as well.

As members of a national network ,members of a global grassroots coalitions namely Huairou Commission, ,local grassroots groups and NGOs have established initial engagement with the Climate Change Commission . Our national network aims to establish grassroots representation in the Commission , since it is the Vulnerable Population affected by Climate Change.Likewise, the People's Survival Fund under mandate of CCC is a strategic opportunity to engage the grassroots in contributing to the designing and budgeting to upscale community led, DRR-CCA initiatives .


This is a local- national- global partnership involving these stakeholders cited above.
91
German WASH Network
Non-Governmental Organizations
Most people will experience climate change in the form of water – higher frequency and intensity of floods and droughts, an increase in waterborne diseases, and overloaded sewage systems that are unable to cope with new demands.
Facilitate the inter-sectoral dialogue und joint programming between stakeholders of SDG 6, SDG 13, SDG 14 and SDG 15. Ensure that projects aiming at one of these SDGs include the knowhow of the other and integrate best practices from their fields. Translating water knowledge into global climate policy is needed. Suggestions on how resilient water management can be integrated into the UNFCCC programmes and implementation mechanisms are available.
92
Animal Issues Thematic Cluster of the NGO Major Group
Non-Governmental Organizations
An effective way to accelerate progress is with a focus on indicator 13.3: This will have more impact in places where there are communities that have been ‘left behind’ as a direct result of climate change. Brooke has been doing this by training Ministries of Agriculture and Livestock in Nicaragua, Honduras and Guatemala using the Livestock in Emergency Guidelines and Standards. This training should be cascaded to schools and workplaces so that plans are in place.

Another way to accelerate progress is to consider the role animals play in maintaining a healthy ecosystem. Though much is known about the effect of climate change on ecosystems, it is important to note that biodiversity loss exacerbates the effects of climate change. About 40% of the world’s carbon is stored in tropical rainforests, and climate mitigation relies on healthy forest ecosystems to serve as a carbon sink.

While many policies focus on climate change mitigation and adaptation, it is vital to strengthen preventative action in policies and regulation, supported by research/analysis to identify the root causes of climate change. This enables potential impacts to be addressed at the source. In our food and agricultural systems, we must move away from systems, products, and practices which impact climate change and instead move towards solutions like increased agro-ecology, silvopastoral systems, more climate-friendly food choices etc.
Gaps in progress towards SDG 13 have been found in countries who are not creating comprehensive disaster risk and resilience plans with accompanying training materials which are integrated into school, workplace and institutional training programs.

A gap where disaster risk and resilience plans are established is that they exclude wildlife and domestic animals. 44% of those that refused to evacuate during Hurricane Katrina did so mostly because they refused to leave their pets behind. A lack of animal shelters, as well as the absence of animal considerations from disaster plans, endangers families with pets. As disasters become more frequent, it will become more important to consider wildlife and domestic animals in planning.

While such measures are needed to cope with the existing impacts of climate change, there is also more that could be done for prevention. Major climate change aspects relating to livestock production remain largely unaddressed. The proposed follow-up work from Korovonia, which is scheduled for 2019 and 2020, speaks in terms of improved livestock systems and socio-economic and food security dimensions of climate change in the agricultural sector.

Prevention should be a major objective across relevant sectors with proactive work beginning in the areas which have the most impact on the climate. These aspects should also be incorporated into development policy support and development funding, particularly agriculture and food security programs.
Climate change affects progress toward every other SDG and must be included in any program that attempts to sustainably develop any area. This fact is well known among development professionals. However, the link between animals and climate change, both as a cause and as a victim, is not as widely understood. Using that link to achieve climate friendly and sustainable solutions could be a path to success. Additionally, because SDG 13 requires a multi-pronged approach, this goal links strongly with SDG 17, SDG 16 and SDG 15.
In 2015, record flooding affected several regions of Myanmar during the monsoon season. Human losses were devastating. Additionally, domestic animal losses caused distress to local economies. AITC member International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) explored opportunities to develop a long-term disaster preparedness plan for the region. With IFAW’s support, Ingapu Township (the most affected township in the region) formed an Animal Disaster Risk Reduction Committee and embarked on a project to build an earthen platform named the “Safeland,” where cows could be taken for refuge during floods. Construction began in January 2016 and was completed in June. Due to the success of the first Safeland, the project has been replicated in other townships.
By improving conditions for cattle in the whole region, the project has significantly reduced the economic and emotional effect that seasonal flooding and climate change-related flooding has on the people there.
93
ATD Fourth World
Non-Governmental Organizations
Despite the urgent threat, most Nationally Designed Contributions (NDCs) are not ambitious enough to hold the increase in the global average temperature to below 2°C. Countries should devote more efforts to gather support from the citizenry in favor of climate action. To that end, they should strive to design policies and programs that are socially acceptable. To ensure that the activities of climate change education, training, public awareness, public participation and public access to information, as spelled out in Article 6 of the UNFCCC and restated in the Paris Agreement, are inclusive they should reach out to people and communities who are prone to or directly affected by climate change phenomena and by inadequate response measures, and involve them as ‘stakeholders’ and ‘partners’.
Many States have not captured the intrinsic relationship that climate change actions, responses and impacts have with equitable access to eradication of poverty and sustainable development, even though the connection has been clearly stated in the Paris Agreement.
Effective policy actions that “leaves no one behind”
a) Involve those in poverty in determining prevention, adaptation or mitigation strategies. Hold meaningful consultations with local residents including people living in poverty to discuss safety measures and relocations plans to be put in place.
b) Ensure that people living in poverty access to better energy and technology options, and to new scientific developments and products that can improve their living standard.
c) Design policies which avoid or lower adverse impacts of climate projects on people living in extreme poverty and their communities.
Energy efficiency is a cross-cutting issue linking SDG13 with SDG7 Energy and SDG11 Resilient human settlements. It is an area where policies and programs can aim at the least advantaged and achieve the Leave No One Behind ambition of 2030 Agenda. For instance, will very low-income households have access to subsidies for the thermal insulation of their housing? Will they access to energy-efficient new housing made possible thanks to innovative technologies? Will they benefit from the renovation of the existing building?
Renewable energies and clean public transport - Admittedly, the price of energy must be higher than at present in order to quickly turn away from fossil fuels. This will inevitably have an impact on the cost of transport and the electricity bill. How can we be socially equitable and supportive, so that the fight against global warming does not come at the expense of the poorest people?
Linkage between SDG13 and SDG8 Employment. Climate actions pursuing the promising prospect of a Green Economy sometimes fail to take account of their social impacts on vulnerable populations. In many countries, installation of industrial waste-processing plants has eliminated work of people who used to make their living through retrieving and selling reusable materials from garbage dump. No plans from governments and no offer from the companies to provide skills or retrai these workers or propose an alternative source of livelihood.


In Dole, France, ECCOFOR is a production school where young school drop-outs and unaccompanied children refugees can acquire the skills of vulcanization/repair of tires and welding-metalwork to recycle, reuse objects, thus preventing waste and saving resources. It is a contribution to mitigation actions in the global warming context (SDG13).
In addition to being a production school, ECCOFOR is also a company that creates sustainable development AND a place to educate people about this issue. It protects the environment by recycling, avoiding over-polluting; it offers qualified academic and vocational training; it promotes the social participation of young people who were excluded from school and who have difficulty in finding jobs on the labour market. It Illustrates that a Just Transition for all, leaving no one behind is possible!

94
Climate Change Centre Reading (NGO)
Disaster Activism
Through tough National Planning Policy Frameworks

References
This is a very important 'UK housing: Fit for the future?-report' that must pave the way for some tough Government decisions,
https://www.theccc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/UK-housing-Fit-for-the-future-CCC-2019.pdf

Our homes aren’t yet fit for the future, but we can change that - and we know the multiple benefits of doing so (There’s a great infographic too).
https://www.theccc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Homes-of-the-future-are-needed-today-Infographic-A4.pdf

10 recommendations for Planning for the climate challenge
https://www.tcpa.org.uk/planning-for-the-climate-challenge
While, The UN’s stark warning on the IPCC 1.5C degrees report that we have 12 years left to limit climate catastrophe was preceded by countless extreme weather events and swiftly followed by the worrying finding that over half of vertebrates species globally have been killed off in less than 50 years. The urgency of the crisis we are facing could not be clearer.

Climate Change Centre Reading’s Contribution to the UK’s Voluntary National Review process and progress of the Sustainable Development Goals

Please see our SDGs paper and case study
https://tvb-climatechallenge.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/ClimateChangeCentreReading-Contribution_UKs-Voluntary-National-Review-process-and-progress-of-the-SDGs.pdf

https://tvb-climatechallenge.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/ClimateChangeCentreReading-CASE-STUDY-SDGs-2-8-10-13-16-17-and-11_UKs-Voluntary-National-Review-process-and-progress.pdf
Cross/cutting SDG 11 and SDG 13

Dedication of city areas to carbon neutrality (district heating). Garden cities with walkable (modal access only) green city centres and water infiltrations areas. Geothermal energy/Heat pumps enough for all urban dwellers!

Ban and shale gas extraction – it pollutes our environment, it’s incompatible with climate targets, and it’s not necessary for energy security. UK to announce IMMEDIATE divestment from all fossil fuels. 50% Green public institutions that have divested/invested. The Borough Council's involved in own local divestment campaigns, pensions, UNI etc.

Dramatically increase the roll-out of electric vehicles – bring forward the target for all new cars and vans to be fossil free from 2040 to 2030. Introduce a comprehensive package to retrain and re-skill workers in the auto industry, increase leadership in expanding charging infrastructure, and increase public sector procurement of electric/hydrogen vehicles.

Boost energy efficiency and start decarbonising our heating – introduce a 10% net-zero carbon standard for all new buildings, make energy efficiency in existing buildings an infrastructure priority and provide funding to match, and increase investment in large scale heat trials over the next 6 months to test carbon free solutions - CO2lutions.
Climate Chance
Support the mobilisation of non-state actors and promote their common expression - https://www.climate-chance.org/en
Act as if your house is on fire. Because it is - Climate Emergency
95
Union des Amis Socio Culturels d'Action en Developpement (UNASCAD)
Civil society
Depuis bien des décennies, les 5 continents du monde sont confrontés à des situations très difficiles à cause de phénomènes naturels comme le séisme, l’érosion, la tsunami, les cyclones/tempêtes. En sus, le réchauffement climatique est venu ajouter à cette liste considéré comme une catastrophe qui provoque la sècheresse, la pénurie d’eau, le renversement de des saisons - dû surtout à l’émission du gaz à effet de serre. Identifié dans l’ODD 13 comme multiplicateur de menaces, il produit aussi des impacts physiques comme l’augmentation des évènements métrologiques extrêmes, la variation des courants marins, la salinisation. Les mesures d’urgence à prendre pour lutter contre ces dérèglements climatiques contiennent 2 grandes phases ;
6.1- accentuation sans perdre de temps sur la réduction des émissions du gaz à effet de serre du dioxyde de carbone, le plus abondant émis par les activités humaines, en exercant le plaidoyer de haut niveau sur le déboisement, l’utilisation de combustibles, l’élevage de bétail intensif, l’utilisation d’engrais synthétiques et de procédés industriels qui deviennent un danger menaçant l’écosystème
6.2- Accentuation sur l’adaptation face aux aléas climatiques et les catastrophes naturelles liées au climat.
A la lumière des grands penseurs, il est clairement déduit que les phénomènes d’origine naturelle et d’origine humaine se tend vers la destruction des vies et des biens et vers la production des contraintes sur tous les angles, sur tous fronts et dans tous les domaines méritent d’être pris dans la plus parfaite considération . Si le réchauffement climatique en est un, il faut absolument rendre opérationnel le Fonds vert- et ceci à partir de cette année 2019 pour que les moyens financiers nécessaires soient à la portée des pays surtout à faible revenu en ce qui concerne les mesures légales et concrètes de diminution suivant, d’une part, de l’esprit vital de la convention-cadre des Nations Unies et, d’autre part, celui du cadre de la COP21.
Les effets négatifs du réchauffement climatique n’ont pas pris en de très grande considération par tous les pays même ceux surtout qui sont très développés. Un bref coup d’œil sur la canicule au cours de la période estivale 2018, entre 24 juillet et 8 août, peut nous donner une large idée ou la chaleur intense a détruit de entre 1500 à 20000 personnes dans certains pays de l’Europe comme surtout la France. Pour combler ces lacunes, de manière obligatoire, il faut intensifier surtout l’éducation des populations à prendre très au sérieux le phénomène climatique dans tous les pays à revenus supérieur, moyen et faible.- et aussi bien, il revient à tous les pays qui ont signé le cadre de la COP21 de développer plus d’efforts pour l’application dudit cadre pour que l’ODD 13 soit en harmonie avec le reste de l’agenda 2030.
La présence de plus de 150 pays et de196 parties prenantes en France en novembre et décembre 2015 pour l’accord contraignant de la COP21 est une preuve tangible et palpable d’une implication multipartite dans le cadre de lutte contre le réchauffement climatique et les moyens d’y adapter. La vision de l’ODD 13 est très claire là-dessus :
9.1- Renforcer dans tous les pays surtout ceux à faible revenu, la résilience des populations mondiales et les capacités d’adaptation au changement climatique
9.2- Bien définir les stratégies et les plans d’action aux niveaux régional et local
9.3- Prioriser l’information, l’éducation et la communication dans les communautés urbaines et rurales
La population mondiale augmente d’année en année. Ayez une attention particulière à ce phénomène.
96
Education International
Workers & Trade Unions
By ensuring that education systems empower and support children, youth and adults to develop the skills, knowledge and attitudes necessary to transform their societies for the better and ensure a sustainable future. This requires an updating of curricula, teacher training, teaching and learning materials and assessments. In particular, it requires investment in the education workforce, ensuring that all teaching personnel has the tools and the support to deliver education for sustainable development. Crucially, education must go beyond the scientific facts of the climate crisis and look at the structural reasons for it and the different solutions, encouraging students to take action. Education systems and institutions must be at the forefront of the just transition and be sites for climate action as well as education.
In too many contexts, education systems are unable to teach students about climate change and environmental crises, oftentimes due to political interference and political forces denying climate change. However, even in countries where curricula includes climate change, many teachers lack the necessary support, such as continuous professional development, and teaching and learning materials, inter alia.
Teachers stress that access to quality training and professional development that is relevant and meets their needs is often lacking, as teacher unions are often not consulted in the development of training programmes. The training provided too often consists of one-off workshops rather than training and mentoring that is sustained over time, ensuring that the training improves teaching practice. Teachers want to be given opportunities to reflect on their practice, collaborate and network, both face-to-face and virtually.
Education is the key to transformative change. Yet in order for it to be transformative, governments must take urgent action to achieve target 4.7 by ensuring that their education systems allow their citizens to develop the skills, knowledge and attitudes necessary to transform their societies and ensure a sustainable future. The lack of approved methodology for monitoring targets 4.7, 12.8 and 13.3 is an urgent challenge that risks undermining the whole Agenda 2030.
97
NCD Alliance
Non-Governmental Organizations
Phasing out the use of fossil fuels and transitioning to renewable energy sources is crucial if temperature rises are to be kept within 2°C. And yet the Paris Agreement makes no reference to the term 'fossil fuel' (nor to coal, oil, or gas). Global meat production and consumption must also be urgently reduced including through public awareness raising, and active transport (walking and cycling) should be promoted over vehicle use through carefully considered urban planning.

References for food systems and climate interlinkages:
https://www.thelancet.com/commissions/global-syndemic
https://www.thelancet.com/commissions/EAT
The continued subsidisation of fossil fuels presents one of the greatest threats to climate change mitigation. Keeping in mind the importance of access to energy for all, including marginalised populations, subsidies allocated to fossil fuels must urgently be urgently reallocated, and ultimately phased out. Appropriate pricing of polluting fuels would more than halve premature deaths from air pollution, reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 20%, and generate tax revenues equivalent to >50% of government health spending globally. In 2017, global fossil fuel subsidies totalled >300 billion USD - fuelling harm to planetary and human health, with far high economic consequences. Revenue from remodelled fiscal policies can be invested in research and provision of renewable energy sources wherever possible, or even in social protection and universal health coverage, offering a double dividend for human and planetary health.

References for facts and statistics in this section:
http://apps.who.int/gb/ebwha/pdf_files/EB142/B142_12-en.pdf https://www.iea.org/weo/energysubsidies/
https://www.env-health.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/hidden_price_tags.pdf
Human and planetary health are intrinsically linked, and action towards achieving the targets under SDG 13 will also ensure progress towards achieving SDG3. In the words of Margaret Chan, “A ruined planet cannot sustain human lives in good health. A healthy planet and healthy people and two sides of the same coin.” Climate change and air pollution share many of the same root causes, and both present a clear threat to human health - air pollution causes approximately 7 million deaths per year. The protection and promotion of human health can be communicated as a motivation to increase support for the response to climate change. As well as the clear benefit to human health achieved by limiting global warming, many actions to mitigate climate change also promote human health, including sustainable diets and the facilitation of walking and cycling. Lessons learned from the health community in regulating unhealthy commodity industries such as tobacco can be applied to climate change and the fossil fuel industry, especially with regard to taxation / fiscal policies and separation of industry interests from policy making (as per article 5.3 of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control).

References for climate impacts and interlinkages on/with health:
https://www.who.int/globalchange/181008_the_1_5_healthreport.pdf
https://www.who.int/globalchange/mediacentre/news/cop24-event5Dec2018/en/
https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(18)32594-7/fulltext
98
MY World Mexico
We are part of the NGOMG and the MGCY
Agroecological techniques should be encouraged as using them improves soil quality, decreases the emission of greenhouse gases and supports the use of endemic crops to increase resilience in extreme conditions.
There is little to none evidence-based policies in our current national context, an example of this is the lack of support of green energies. Minimizing the current state of climate change and ignoring sustainable solutions in the context of post-truth politics is delaying climate action and exploiting the environment in a way is not longer viable.
Climate action has interlinkages with other SDGs and the implementation of them should be done transversally, for example, in the implementation of SDG 11, through the activation of public spaces, it is possible to rescue green areas that are key to reduce climate change, making cities and communities resilient to its effects.
The Network of Urban and Peri-urban Agriculture of Xalapa (RAUPX) is an agroecology learning community and an example of effective models of participation of multiple stakeholders for the implementation of SDG 13, because RAUPX is a citizen initiative widely open, with guests and members from different nations and municipalities, as well as participants from different sectors and backgrounds such as public servants, farmers, students, housekeepers and activists. One of the main contributions of RAUPX for SDG has been the collaboration with the local government in Xalapa, to include a department of agroecology and environmental education in the current administration.

Other example, is the implementation of the public bicycle-sharing system in Toluca, Mexico, where the local government and NGOs collaborated to create a sustainable transport system in the city that helps to reduce gas emissions and air pollution.
99
World Vision
Other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development
1.Children participation to lead climate change resilience: Children are willing and able to participate actively to tackle issues that affect their environment, their communities and the lives of others. Harnessing and supporting this enthusiasm is a moral obligation if climate change policy is to genuinely be in the best interests of the child. This requires appropriate education on climate risks, mitigation and adaptation that engages children, provides them with knowledge and skills and avoids creating the fear that may disrupt belief in their own agency.
2. Strengthening children's knowledge, capacity and voice: Not only will the impacts of climate change be felt disproportionately by children, older people and the displaced, future generations will be tasked with the continued implementation of climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. Knowledge of the issues and meaningful participation from an early age will lead to an informed and skilled generation of decision makers and greater potential for global solidarity. Working alongside children and promoting learning is also fundamental to bringing about urgent action on climate change today.Children are already accessing information on climate change and its associated impacts through the media and through formal and informal education. T
Migration: People are on the move. For a number of reasons including more frequent and intense natural disasters and a lack of job opportunities in rural areas, people are moving to urban areas in search of improved livelihood opportunities.
Conflicts: Climate change has the potential to contribute to heightened tensions and conflict, especially in fragile states.
Climate change and its impacts increase children’s vulnerability to violence (SDG16.2), while at the same time reducing the capacity of formal and informal systems to protect children from violence. As noted earlier, children are disproportionately affected by disasters, many of which are caused or exacerbated by climate change.
In implementing targets 13.1 and 13.3, States should strengthen the capacity of children, families, communities and institutions to reduce the risk of violence in climate-related disasters. In particular, States should:
• Develop emergency preparedness plans – including disaster risk reduction and resilience plans – which include a specific focus on child protection;
• Ensure that local and national child protection systems are resilient to disasters and can operate effectively across all levels at all times;
• Support education and awareness-raising of the increased risk of violence to children in disasters as part of disaster-risk reduction and emergency planning; and
• Build the resilience of children, families and communities to protect children in disasters, including by involving them in disaster risk reduction and emergency planning.
Climate-related disasters leave children at increased risk of various forms of violence.
100
NGO Committee on Migration
Non-Governmental Organizations
1. Leverage social media for popular education on impacts of climate change
2. Encourage wealthier nations to increase financial contributions towards the Paris Agreement
3. Address drivers e.g. fossil-fuel use, meat and dairy consumption, deforestation
4. Greater assistance for Small Island Nations
5. Establish/expand humanitarian visas for persons displaced by rising sea level and other effects of climate change
6. Address the impact of rising sea levels and short and long-term weather events on people’s right to self-determination/right to return
7. Source funding for capacity building and grassroots-level engagement in locally appropriate climate adaptation measures, drawing on traditional knowledge systems and community-based associations
8. Integrate and scale up existing local initiatives relating to sustainable agricultural practices
1. Gaps in funding for climate change mitigation and adaptation; assistance to LDCs in particular remains too low and is rising too slowly
2. Lack of political/legislative attention to the Warsaw International Mechanism on Loss and Damage
3. Rising global inequalities and absence of mechanism for financial and technical accountability of countries causing the worst carbon emissions to support emissions reduction and adaptation efforts
4. Insufficient educational efforts to bridge gap between the urgency of need for emissions reduction and public perception of the necessity for behavioral/lifestyle changes
5. More data needed to track/incite action on climate induced displacement
6. Insufficient emphasis on disaster risk reduction, especially in low-income communities (more planning regulations, building codes, land use guidelines needed, information and early warning systems)
7. Lack of international protection frameworks/regular migration pathways for persons displaced by slow and rapid onset disasters/environmental degradation
8. Rapid urbanization paired with less sustainable nature of current urban lifestyles
1. Proper data collection on root causes of human migration and points of origin and destination for those displaced by climate change and environmental degradation, especially those who come from regions experiencing slow-onset disasters (SDGs 1-4, 6, 8, 10, 13, 16)
2. Publicize and address Bertelsmann Stiftung and the Sustainable Development Solutions Network’s finding that no country is on track to achieve all SDGs and progress is slowest on environment-focused goals (SDGs 2, 6, 7, 11-15, 17)
3. Applying the Gender Action Plan and implementing gender sensitive climate policy and action steps at national and local level (SDGs 5 & 13)
4. Focusing public works programs on areas of climate change adaptation and mitigation, which address access to basic services and target those in the lowest quintile of income. (SDGs 1, 6-8, 10, 13)
5. Integrate climate change education in public school curricula to inspire youth to pursue careers in sustainability sectors such as clean energy and sanitation and promote a job creation shift toward environmental stewardship. (SDGs 13.3, 4, 6- 8)
6. Incorporate environmental impact assessments and corresponding constraints on national and subnational laws and action plans seeking economic growth (SDGs 7-9, 11-15)
7. Create practical mechanism allowing communities to affordably hold transnational corporations accountable for local environmental and livelihoods impacts of their projects (SDGs 2, 6, 8-16)
1. Climate-Induced Displacement section of "Concrete Policies, Practices, and Partnerships to Promote Implementation of the Global Compacts for Migrants and Refugees": https://bit.ly/2AXiLMY
2. Part C of "Putting Words into ACTion: Concrete Policies and Practices for the Implementation of a Civil Society Vision for the Global Compact": https://bit.ly/2E6xJBW
3. Tokelau-New Zealand partnership that allowed Tokelau Island to completely convert to solar power
4. Pacific Partnerships to Strengthen Gender, Climate Change Responses and Sustainable Development: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/partnership/?p=7765
5. Ecumenical Water Network - https://water.oikoumene.org/en
6. Women's Earth & Climate Action Network, International https://wecaninternational.org/news/1928/press-release_-visionary-%25E2%2580%2598living-forest%25E2%2580%2599-proposal-to-be-launched-by-kichwa-people-of-sarayaku-in-ecuador
7. Sustainable Energy for All (SE4ALL)’s People centered accelerator: https://www.energy4impact.org/news/se4all-people-centered-accelerator-bottom-approach-tackling-energy-poverty-emerges-cop23
8. Regeneration International: https://regenerationinternational.org/our-network/
9. GRAVIS, an NGO working with local leaders and state representatives to give sustainable water access to water scarce communities in India’s Thar Desert
10. Philippine Climate Change Commission
Loading...
Main menu