PG 2nd Grade Phonetic Connections Scope & Sequence.xlsx
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
ABCDE
1
Spiral Up Kit: 2nd Grade
2
WeekFocus for the WeekReviewHigh Frequency WordsTeacher Notes
3
1Review Lessons: 1-5Initial blends, final blends, consonant digraphs (ch, sh), consonant digraphs (th, wh, ng, ck), initial 3-letter blends
4
2Unit 1: Closed syllable patternsShort Vowelsalways, yourVowel followed by a consonant makes the syllable closed and the vowel says its short sound. Syllabication Rule: VC/CV, when two consonants are between the vowels, split between the consonants, this makes the first syllable closed and the vowel short. (See Word Division Generalizations; Syllabication poster; and When Students are Ready for Syllabication)
5
BOY: Administer the DSA:
6
3Unit 2: CVCe syllable patternsLong Vowelsaround, writeVowel followed by Consonant-e; e is silent and makes the vowel say its long sound
7
4Unit 22: -ed, -ing endings (doubling rule, e drop)Vowel digraph syllable patterns (DO NOT Work On Review because it hasn't been taught yet)because, wouldDay 1: Spelling rule- When the base word has a short vowel or vowel team and ends in two consonants, just add the suffix. Example: help + ed = helped Example: clean + ing = cleaning Only use words with short vowels and vowel teams for decoding and encoding. Day 2: Spelling rule- When the base word has a VCe vowel pattern, drop the e and add the vowel suffix. Example: slice + ed = sliced Example: joke + ing = joking Day 3: Spelling rule- Introduce the doubling rule: When the base word has a short vowel and only one consonant, double the consonant and add the suffix. Example: hop + ed= hopped Example: clap + ing = clapping Day 4: The exception to the doubling rule, x, is taught on this day. When the base word has a short vowel and ends with a single x, do not double the x, only add the vowel suffix. A new frieze card has been created ( see 2nd grade folder in this google doc )
8
5Unit 3: Open-syllable patternsLong Vowelswork, beenWhen a vowel is followed by nothing, the vowel sound is long. Example : no, cry, go, she Day 3: Do not use the word polite in the lesson as an example because the 'o' makes the schwa 'u' sound. Use :humid as the word for your model. Syllabication: V/CV, when one consonant is between the vowels, split before the consonant first, this makes the first syllable open and the vowel long. (see: Word Division Generalizations and Syllabication chart in 2nd grade folder)
9
6Unit 17: Consonant -le Syllable PatternsVariant Vowel /o/ (lawn) Syllable Patterns, Soft C and G (DO NOT Work On Review because it hasn't been taught yet) Focus ONLY on the spelling for Consonant -le (DO NOT FOCUS ON SPELLING FOR -al or -el) Spelling Rule for C-le: When the first syllable has a short vowel, the syllable is closed, ex: puddle When the first syllable has a long vowel the syllable is open, ex: table *al and el will be taught again in 3rd and 4th grades
10
Post Test Units 1, 2, 3, 17, 22 Spiral Up Overview & Assessment Handbook *** Note: To become a great speller, students must have many encounters with a word. It is through more reading of texts and seeing these patterns that students will know which spelling to use correctly. This will happen over time.
11
7Unit 4: Long a digraph syllable patternsConsonant digraphs th, wh, ck, ndwhy, bestNote: ei should be taught eigh to make long a not just ei with gh Spelling rule: When determining ai versus ay: ai is used in initial or medial position and ay is at the end. With this lesson it is focused specifically on digraphs that say long a. Note: aCe is used most often in medial position See link in folder :English-Language Spelling Pattern Generalizations Syllabication Note: Remember to treat vowel teams as 1 vowel , underlining both letters and marking it with a V, within syllabication.
12
8Unit 4: Long a digraph syllable patternsConsonant digraphs th, wh, ck, ndboth, which
13
9Unit 5: Long o digraph syllable patternsLong Vowelsbuy, washCommon Spelling Rule: oa is found in initial or medial positions, ow is found in medial positon or final position, and oe is found in final. Note: oCe is used most often in medial position, while o is most often found in final position as an open syllable (robot) or in words that end in -ost, -old, -olt
14
10Unit 5: Long o digraph syllable patternsLong Vowelscall, very
15
11Unit 6: Long e digraph syllable patternsLong O Digraph Syllable Patternscold, use, fullCommon Spelling Rule: digraphs ee and ea are found about equally in the English language. ey and ie are not as common
16
12Unit 6: Long e digraph syllable patternsLong O Digraph Syllable Patternsdoes, us, got
17
13Unit 7: Long i digraph syllable patternsLong e Digraph Syllable Patternsdon't, upon, growCommon Spelling Rule: the digraphs for long /i/ found in this lesson are not regular for spelling. i in an open syllable (except at the end of a word where it changes to y) and iCe are the most common spellings of the long /i/ sound.
18
14Unit 7: Long i digraph syllable patternsLong e Digraph Syllable Patternsthose, fast, hold
19
Post Test Units 4-7 Spiral Up Overview & Assessment Handbook
20
15Word Study and Vocabulary Start 1 Kit
Unit 1: Compound Words
these, first, hot
21
16Unit 19: ContractionsClosed Syllable Patternsfive, their, hurt
22
17Unit 20: Regular pluralsCVCe Syllable Patternstell, found, ifAdd s most of the time. If the base word ends with the sounds /s/, /sh/, /x/ or /ch/ add -es. If the base word ends in consonant y , change the y to and i and add es.
23
18Unit 21: Irregular pluralsOpen Syllable Patternsgave, sleep, keep
24
Post Test Units 18-21 Spiral Up Overview & Assessment Handbook
25
MOY: Administer the DSA (if applicable): This assessment can be moved based upon MOY assessments windows within the district.
26
19Unit 8: R-Controlled a Syllable PatternsLong i Digraph Syllable Patternssit, goes, kindWhen a single vowel is followed by the letter r, the r controls the vowel sound. ar is regular for reading and spelling Syllabication Note: Remember to treat r-controlled vowels as 1 vowel , underlining both letters and marking it with a V, within syllabication.
27
20Unit 8: R-Controlled a Syllable PatternsLong i Digraph Syllable Patternsgreen, sing, laugh
28
21Unit 9: R-Controlled o Syllable PatternsR-Controlled a Syllable Patternsright, its, lightor is regular for reading and spelling
29
22Unit 9: R-Controlled o Syllable PatternsR-Controlled a Syllable Patternsmade, read, long
30
23Unit 10: R-Controlled e, i, u Syllable PatternsR-Controlled o Syllable Patternsmany, pull, muchReading Rule: er, ir, and ur all say /er/. Spelling Rule: er is the most common spelling for the /er/ sound. It is through more reading of texts and seeing these patterns that students will be able to know which spelling to use correctly. This will happen over time.
31
24Unit 10: R-Controlled e, i, u Syllable PatternsR-Controlled o Syllable Patternsor, off, myself
32
25Unit 11: R-Controlled /ar/ Syllable PatternsR-Controlled e, i, u Syllable Patternsabout, warm, neverWhen Vr is contained within a syllable with a vowel team or vCe, the vowel team or vCe takes on their rule for reading
33
26Unit 11: R-Controlled /ar/ Syllable PatternsR-Controlled e, i, u Syllable Patternsbetter, try, only
34
Post Test Units 8-11 Spiral Up Overview & Assessment Handbook
35
27Unit 23: -er, -or endingsR -Controlled Syllable Patternsbring, carry, own suffix -er is more common than -or. It can be easily attached to any English verb to form the corresponding noun. Ex: drive = driver, run = runner. The suffix or is derrived from Latin and is used much more seldom.
36
28Unit 24: ComparativesConsonant + le, al, el Syllable Patternstogether, clean, pick Spelling rule- When the base word has a short vowel or vowel team and ends in two consonants, just add the suffix. Example: help + ed = helped Example: clean + ing = cleaning Only use words with short vowels and vowel teams for decoding and encoding. Spelling rule- When the base word has a VCe vowel pattern, drop the e and add the vowel suffix. Example: slice + ed = sliced Example: joke + ing = joking Spelling rule- Introduce the doubling rule: When the base word has a short vowel and only one consonant, double the consonant and add the suffix. Example: hop + ed= hopped Example: clap + ing = clapping When the base word has a short vowel and ends with a single x, do not double the x, only add the vowel suffix.
37
29Unit 25: -y endingsContractionscut, today, seven
38
30Unit 26: -ly endingPluralsten, done
39
31Unit 27: Prefix un-Review -ed, -ing, -er, -or Endingsdraw, start
40
32Unit 28: Prefix re-Comparativessmall, drink
41
33Unit 29: Prefix dis--y, -ly Endingseight, six
42
34Unit 30: Suffix -lessReview Prefixes un-, re-, dis-fall, show
43
35Unit 31: Suffixes -sion, -tion, -ionReview Suffix -lessfar, shallFor decoding only, not encoding.
44
Post Test 23-31 Spiral Up Overview & Assessment Handbook
45
EOY: Administer the DSA: This assessment can be moved based upon MOY assessments windows within the district.
46
IF students are proficient with the above lessons and are able to get through lessons in 1 week vs. 2 weeks, go to the following lessons in Spiral UPSpiral Up Unit 12: Vowel diphthong /oi/ syllable patternsDiphthongs are two vowels blended smoothly together in the same syllable. Common Spelling Rule: When determining oi versus oy: oi is used in initial or medial position and oy is at the end.
47
Spiral Up Unit 13: Vowel diphthong /ou/ syllable patterns Diphthongs are two vowels blended smoothly together in the same syllable. Common Spelling Rule: when you hear /ou/, in initial or medial position it is spelled ou and in final position it is spelled ow
48
Spiral Up Unit 14: Variant vowel oo (moon) syllable patternsew, ou, oo, ue
Focus on the most common spellings. Spelling Rule: oo is found most often for the long /oo/ sound
49
Spiral Up Unit 15: Variant vowel oo (book) syllable patternsCommon Spelling Rule: u is found most often for the short /oo/ sound
50
Spiral Up Unit 16: Variant vowel (au) syllable patternsReading Rule: augh, a adjacent to w or l, aw, o, ough, au, and aw all say the /o/ sound. Spelling Rule: o is the most common spelling for this sound.
Loading...
Main menu