Shared Copy T75 SE Asia BSC
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

View only
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWX
1
Fishery Information
2
Improvement StatusFisheryFishSource RatingSustainability IssuesImprovement ObjectivesImprovements (2 years)FIP Rating & CommentAdditional Improvement Needs/Comments% of Sector
3
Sustainable (MSC-C or FS scores above 8)NA0
4
Improving (MSC FA)NA0
5
Improving (FIP A-C)Blue swimming crab - Indonesia FAO 57, 71
(FIP: Indonesia blue swimming crab)
High RiskCatch data has been under-reported, while bycatch are not accounted for in official statistics;
The use of non-selective gear that generates serious bycatch still persist; while the landing of under-size crabs and berried crabs are also still common;
As most BSC fishers are small scale fishers that operate boats < 5GT, by law they are exempted from applying for fishing licenses (SIPI) and fishing business licenses (SIUP), making it more difficult to monitor and control the fishery by system;
Fishers’ compliance to management regime is still low; lack of awareness on recently-decreed regulations seems to be an issue, among others.
Work plan and transition Indonesia Blue Swimming Crab Fisheries to MSC full assesment within the perscribed 3-years
Change practices (no take of small crabs/juveniles, no take of egg-bearing females), increase the stocks, develop policies that protect and sustain crabs (including protection of nursery ground, spawning area) by end of December 2022
Develop a management plan for Indonesian blue swimming crab that includes community resources management that protects nursery ground; produce a control document by end of December 2018
Implement FIP workplan that includes development of the management plan, community-based management, communication and awareness, nursery and spawning grounds protection projects, as well as a hatchery project by end of December 2018
FIP started in July 2012:

2 March 2018 —Increase in MSC PI scores 2.1.3; 2.4.2; 2.4.3
1 November 2017 — Governor Decree on Establishment of BSC Fishery Management Committee 2017-2022 for the region in November 2017 - (Governor of Central Java Decree No. 523/93 Year 2017)
14 July 2017 — The Governor Regulation on Fishery Management for Blue Swimming Crab, Lobster and Mud Crab for Central Java Province has been signed in July 2017
2 June 2017 — Government Decree on the establishment of BSC Fisheries Management Committee hase been signed
1 February 2017 — The control document has been independent audited by third party to assess the implementation - Control Document trials are having a positive effect on adhering to 10cm and berried female standard.
30 December 2016 — 2016 Stock Assessment for BSC published
27 December 2016 —Government of Indonesia issues management plan for Indonesia Blue Swimming crab K MKP No. 70/KEPMEN-KP/2016.
1 January 2015 —Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries established the Ministerial Decree No. 02/2015 regarding ban on minitrawl (in indonesian)
1 January 2015 —Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries established the Ministerial Decree No. 01/2015 regarding Minimum Legal Size for Blue Swimming Crab (10 cm) (in indonesian)
A - all goodRemind need for timely reporting12.17%
6
Improving (FIP A-C)Blue swimming crab - Vietnam FAO 71 (FIP: Vietnam Blue Swimming Crab bottom-gillnet/pot/trap)High RiskWhile fishing effort appears to have decreased slightly in the most recent assessment, it is still indicated to be over sustainable limits
Measures to limit effort are still not optimally implemented or effective, despite improvements
Chinese traps disproportionately exploit smaller, immature crab, and this gear is responsible for an increasing portion of the overall catch
Stock assessments are not yet robust enough to allow for an abundance based harvest control strategy
Based on a 2009 MSC Pre Assessment, the fishery was not recommended to proceed to full assessment.
Many key factors remain in need of resolution for the fishery to be able to undergo MSC assessment: signs of over-exploitation, a lack of precautionary management measures applied that would prevent a decline in the biomass, insufficient information available to allow for an assessment of impacts on other retained species, bycatch species, habitats and ecosystems; lack of a mechanism to limit expansion in fishing effort. Restrictions in place would require strengthening, and evidence of compliance.
While the fishery is indicated to have minor impacts on bycatch species, some interactions need to be carefully monitored (e.g. brownbanded bamboo shark which is "near threatened" according to the IUCN).
There is a need for increased publically available reporting on bycatch, habitat and ecosystem monitoring and evaluation.
The objective of this FIP is to achieve a standard necessary for MSC certification by the end of 2019. FIP has been launched in November 2013:
1 April 2018 —A co-management group has been established by Phu Quoc DPC in a step to empower the fishing communities to manage the fishing resources
1 April 2018 —DARD and RIMF cooperated and retrieved the logbook data collected now incoriporated into RIMF databes. THe database is now accessible to all the departmental stakeholders and those involved in data collection.
1 December 2017 —Scientific data collection research and sampling program - observer and research programs implemented
1 February 2017 — Milestone 28 (observer data collection) completed - provision of accurate and verifiable information on the catch of all secondary species confirming no species are thrown overboard as a bycatch
1 February 2017 —The 2016 stock assessment showed that the stock was below the Limit Reference Point, with an increase in the average size of crab caught and an improvement in the selectivity of gill nets but only marginal changes for the trap fisheries
B - all good3.10%
7
Improving (FIP A-C)Blue swimming crab - Philippines FAO 71 (FIP: Philippines blue swimming crab - bottom-set gillnet & pot/trap)High RiskStock structure is not well understood
There are indications of stock decline
There is no analytic assessment reference points or quotas
Compliance and enforcement is an issue
Known impacts to critically endangered marine mammals; as well as sharks and other species
The general objective of the FIP is to attain sustainability for Philippine blue swimming crab compliant with the MSC Fisheries Standard by 2021. In particular, it aims to:
Increase data collection efforts on the stock status and impacts of the Philippine blue swimming crab fishery to the environment
Promote and implement activities to help revive the stock of the Philippine blue swimming crab to a sustainable level
Minimize the impacts of the Philippine blue swimming crab fishery to the environment through protection of habitats and adoption of ecologically-sound gears
Promote and establish multi-stakeholder approach in the implementation of management schemes
Perform other tasks relevant to the advancement of the Philippine blue swimming crab industry
FIP has started in Jan 2013:
17 August 2018 —Increase in BMT score PI 2.1.3 and 2.2.3
31 October 2016 —BFAR has already turned over 5,000 crab pots to the select beneficiaries of the Gear Swap Program with new pot design for increased sustainability
30 September 2016 —2-day survey of crabbing conducted.
5 August 2016 —LGU of Bantayan and Madridejos and BFAR 7 signed the Memorandum of Understanding to implement species-specific assessment of blue swimming crab using the Length-Based Spawning Potential Ration (LB-SPR) in Bantayan Island, Central Visayas.
22 February 2016 —Adoption of crab pots to replace lift nets
1 February 2016 —Consolidation of database based on improved data collection
A - all good3.50%
8
Improving (FIP A-C)Blue swimming crab - Philippines FAO 71 (FIP: Philippines blue swimming crab - pot (Saravia Blue Crab))High RiskStock structure is not well understood
There are indications of stock decline
There is no analytic assessment reference points or quotas
Compliance and enforcement is an issue
Known impacts to critically endangered marine mammals; as well as sharks and other species
The Northern Iloilo Province Blue Swimming Crab (BSC) FIP serves as a catalyst for further stakeholder participation with a goal of adding NGO, Government, and other industry stakeholders, by the end of 2020.
Have up to 20 percent of the fleet tracked with vessel tracking systems and daily catch data from each tracked vessel to better spatially visualize and understand the fishery by the end of 2019.
Conduct surveys and research to better understand the impact the fishing activity has on the marine ecosystem, ETP species, other aquatic species, and by-catch by the middle of 2020.
Reduce the capture of undersized crab and berried (gravid) females thru better community-led education and enforcement by the end of 2021.
Development of fishing community-led, implemented and enforced no-take zones and partial fishery closure times by the end of 2021.
FIP has started in June 2018, published in FP in April 2019:
The FIP is in stage 2 (launch) still.
Not Available yetincluded in volumes above
9
Improving (FIP A-C)Marine crabs nei - China FAO 61 (FIP: China Fujian Zhangzhou red swimming crab - bottom trawl & pot/trap)Data Deficientno data available to evaluate sustainability status
lack of several key approaches—i.e., science based stock assessments, the implementation of a minimum harvestable size limit, and maximum sustainable yield (MSY) fishery management strategies—represents a serious risk to the fishery as little is known about the actual stock status of target species. Since 2012, many processors have found that large crabs reaching processable size, those with a carapace width of 8 cm or greater, have been decreasing in numbers. It’s estimated undersized crabs might account for as high as 80% of harvest.
The objective of this FIP is to transition the fishery management to science-based catch management strategies in order to increase the abundance, harvest size and sustainable yield of red swimming crab in the Zhangzhou region with the end goal of the fishery achieving a level of sustainable performance commensurate with the MSC standard by 2025-2027.FIP has started in August 2018, published in FP in March 2019:
The FIP is in stage 2 (launch) still.
Not Available yet1,9% (warmwater crab sector)
10
Improving (FIP A-C)Blue swimming crab - Thailand FAO 71 (FIP: Thailand Blue Swimming Crab - bottom gillnet/trap)High RiskStock status is likely to be over exploited for the fishery as a whole, but heavily over exploited in coastal areas;
Limit and target reference points have not been set nor incorporated into management;
There are no fishery specific harvest strategies, nor rules in place;
There are some localised management measures in place, including crab banks and voluntary no take zones, including the preservation of crab habitat (sea grass beds). These are by no means widespread throughout the coastal communities, but evidence suggests that initiatives such as these are being encouraged;
There is limited information on fleet structure;
There is limited data on retained and bait fish species affected or applied by the two fishing methods – traps and bottom set gill nets; and
There is no fishery specific management plan in place nor supporting management systems that would ensure appropriate management actions would be implemented.
Compliance by fishers is an issue
The objective of this FIP is to achieve a standard necessary for MSC certification by the end of 2021. FIP started in Jan 2017:
1 June 2018 — Advisory committee for BSC established and met three times in 2017 to take forward NPOA
1 June 2018 — Increase in BMT scores 2.1.3, 2.2.3, 2.4.3 and 2.5.3
A - all good3,3%
11
Improving but insufficient (FIP D-E)Blue swimming crab - Sri Lanka FAO 51, 57 (FIP: Sri Lankan Blue Swimming Crab (SEASL))High RiskStock assessment reports are not publically available, and there is no comprehensive stock assessment for the region.
The certainty of spawning potential ratios, presently the only tool for assessment of stock status, is unclear.
There are no advised catch limits or fishing mortality reference points.
There is no species-specific catch data.
Accuracy of multi-species catch data is questionable.
The fishery is open access, and there are effectively no constraints on fishing pressure.
There are anecdotal signs of decreased abundance.
There is no management plan or measures specifically for the management of Sri Lankan blue swimming crab.
Many regulations and restrictions (e.g. monofilament ban, bottom trawl ban, stake net bans in certain areas) are at best partially enforced; political influence is a hindrance.
There is no bycatch monitoring program, and very little documentation of non-targeted catch, including ETP and non-ETP species.
Information on habitat and ecosystem impacts is lacking.
ensure the long term economic, social and environmental sustainability of the seafood sector in Sri Lanka. To achieve this goal, the SEASL and its member organizations work in close collaboration with producers and suppliers, as well as with the agencies and authorities of the Government of Sri Lanka. The SEASL promotes and seeks to improve the sustainable exploitation and management of Sri Lanka’s marine resources.FIP started in Nov 2013:
31 December 2016 — Fishermen leaders from the three districts are working on a unified voluntary code of conduct for the BSC major fishery due to come into operation January 2017.
1 December 2016 —Studies to determine blue swimming crab fishery's impact on non-target species.
31 March 2016 —Stock assessments are being conducted on an ongoing basis using length based spawning potential ratio (LB SPR) with data collected from local fishers at landing site
D - The FIP dropped to from C to D rating in March 2019Contact the FIP Implementers to confirm your interest in progress made and reported.1.80%
12
Improving but insufficient (FIP declared inactive in May 2019)Blue swimming crab - Indonesia FAO 71 (FIP: Indonesia Jepara blue swimming crab - bottom gilllnet)High RiskCatch data has been under-reported, while bycatch are not accounted for in official statistics;
The use of non-selective gear that generates serious bycatch still persist; while the landing of under-size crabs and berried crabs are also still common;
As most BSC fishers are small scale fishers that operate boats < 5GT, by law they are exempted from applying for fishing licenses (SIPI) and fishing business licenses (SIUP), making it more difficult to monitor and control the fishery by system;
Fishers’ compliance to management regime is still low; lack of awareness on recently-decreed regulations seems to be an issue, among others.
The Jepara Regency Blue Swimming Crab FIP in Central Java, Indonesia serves as a catalyst for further stakeholder participation with a goal of adding NGO and Government participants by the middle of 2017 and other industry stakeholders, including fishermen by the end of 2017.
Continue to grow laterally from the current vertically integrated Harbor Seafood supply chain. It is the collaboration of all fishery stakeholders that offers the best opportunity for a successful and expanded FIP, to this end, it is the goal to add two more r/c plants in Jepara town by 2018.
Change gear type from gillnet to traps with escapes for undersize crabs by 2018 for fishermen in the Harbor Seafood/ KBT supply chain.
Significantly decrease the amount of illegal crab caught in the fishery by 2018 and end all illegal crab landing by 2019.
FIP had been launched in March 2017 and merged into the APRI Ind National BSC FIP in May 2019
1 March 2018 — FIP has signed MoU with Government Institute; the Brackish Water Research Institute (BBPAP)
1 March 2018 — An enumerator employed by the FIP participant; PT Kemilau Bintang Timur, has been stationed full time at the raw/ cook plant where incoming fresh/ live crab is documented and daily records kept and made available to the FIP managers on a monthly basis.
1 December 2017 — FIP outreach plan to fishermen discussed
1 July 2017 — Pelagic Data System's vessel tracking systems have been installed on three vessels in Jepara Regency - data correlated to the logbook data
30 May 2017 —Vessel tracking pilot trials conducted and completed
1 April 2017 —Collection of daily catch data to improve catch data through hire of an enumerator at the plant
inactive0.02%
13
Improving but insufficient (FIP declared inactive in May 2019)Blue swimming crab - Indonesia FAO 71 (FIP: Indonesia Maros blue swimming crab - trap)High RiskCatch data has been under-reported, while bycatch are not accounted for in official statistics;
The use of non-selective gear that generates serious bycatch still persist; while the landing of under-size crabs and berried crabs are also still common;
As most BSC fishers are small scale fishers that operate boats < 5GT, by law they are exempted from applying for fishing licenses (SIPI) and fishing business licenses (SIUP), making it more difficult to monitor and control the fishery by system;
Fishers’ compliance to management regime is still low; lack of awareness on recently-decreed regulations seems to be an issue, among others.
Engage all fisher groups and supply chains in the fishery by the middle of 2018.
Organize over ¾ of fishers in the fishery into associations by the end of 2018.
Reduce the capture of undersized crab thru imporved gear-type and develop mechanisms for the return of berried (gravid) females to the fishery by the end of 2019.
Development of fishing community-led, implemented and enforced no-take zones and partial fishery closure times by the end of 2020.
FIP was launched in November 2017 and merged into the APRI Ind National BSC FIP in May 2019
The Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries continues to encourage gear exchange to larger mesh size and traps with escape vents. However, there has been little interest and uptake from the fishers due to the fear this will decrease their catch. Escape vents are often sewn shut by the fishers.
Catch records continue to be maintained in log book. Biological records such as crab sex are not being maintained.
inactive0.03%
14
Fishery targets of SRBlue swimming crab (7) - India FAO 51, 57High RiskIncreasing effort and extension of fishing grounds with little information on stocks.
Landing of juvenile and berried crabs.
Likely inaccurate catch data.
The Crab Meat Processors Association of India was formed in 2017 to promote the crab meat industry in various aspects
Unite all crab meat processors to improve the crab meat industry in India
To involve in Fishermen Social improvement activities
To move with Govt. for Fishery regulations and for export promotions
To implement FIP for crab conservation in India
CMPA has taken up the FIP very actively in the Middle of 2017 after several meetings with Crab Council Representatives.
CMPA is taking lead in involving other organizations such MPEDA (Marine Products Export Development Authority), CMFRI (Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute), WWF (World Wide Fund for Nature) and MSC (Marine Stewardship Council) , Fisheries Colleges /Universities for achieving sustainable resource management.
project launched at NFI Crab Council website10.4%
15
Fishery targets of SRBlue swimming crab - Philippines FAO 4 - No FIPHigh RiskStock structure is not well understood
There are indications of stock decline
There is no analytic assessment reference points or quotas
Compliance and enforcement is an issue
Known impacts to critically endangered marine mammals; as well as sharks and other species
0.1%
16
Fishery targets of SRBlue swimming crab - Philippines FAO 71 - No FIPHigh RiskStock structure is not well understood
There are indications of stock decline
There is no analytic assessment reference points or quotas
Compliance and enforcement is an issue
Known impacts to critically endangered marine mammals; as well as sharks and other species
3.9%
17
Fishery targets of SRBlue swimming crab - Thailand FAO 57 - No FIPHigh RiskStock status is likely to be over exploited for the fishery as a whole, but heavily over exploited in coastal areas;
Limit and target reference points have not been set nor incorporated into management;
There are no fishery specific harvest strategies, nor rules in place;
There are some localised management measures in place, including crab banks and voluntary no take zones, including the preservation of crab habitat (sea grass beds). These are by no means widespread throughout the coastal communities, but evidence suggests that initiatives such as these are being encouraged;
There is limited information on fleet structure;
There is limited data on retained and bait fish species affected or applied by the two fishing methods – traps and bottom set gill nets; and
There is no fishery specific management plan in place nor supporting management systems that would ensure appropriate management actions would be implemented.
Compliance by fishers is an issue
2.6%
18
Fishery targets of SRBlue swimming crab - Thailand FAO 71 - No FIPHigh RiskStock status is likely to be over exploited for the fishery as a whole, but heavily over exploited in coastal areas;
Limit and target reference points have not been set nor incorporated into management;
There are no fishery specific harvest strategies, nor rules in place;
There are some localised management measures in place, including crab banks and voluntary no take zones, including the preservation of crab habitat (sea grass beds). These are by no means widespread throughout the coastal communities, but evidence suggests that initiatives such as these are being encouraged;
There is limited information on fleet structure;
There is limited data on retained and bait fish species affected or applied by the two fishing methods – traps and bottom set gill nets; and
There is no fishery specific management plan in place nor supporting management systems that would ensure appropriate management actions would be implemented.
Compliance by fishers is an issue
1.4%
19
Fishery targets of SRMarine crabs nei - China FAO 61Data Deficientno data available to evaluate sustainability status
lack of several key approaches—i.e., science based stock assessments, the implementation of a minimum harvestable size limit, and maximum sustainable yield (MSY) fishery management strategies—represents a serious risk to the fishery as little is known about the actual stock status of target species. Since 2012, many processors have found that large crabs reaching processable size, those with a carapace width of 8 cm or greater, have been decreasing in numbers. It’s estimated undersized crabs might account for as high as 80% of harvest.
Ocean Outcomes is working with the National Fisheries Institute, China Aquatic Products Processing and Marketing (CAPPMA) and Zhangzhou Aquatic Products Processing and Marketing Association (ZAPPMA) to initiate a FIP for this fishery in China's Fujian pro4,8% (warmwater crab sector)
20
Total:67.20%
21
Sustainable0.00%
22
Improving22,1%
23
Mobilise (FIP Catalysation Priorities)12,2%
24
Engage (Leverage Development Priorities)
25
Identify (Supply Chain mapping/Analysis)
26
Targeted 2019 status (Sust/Imp+ Mobilise)34,3%
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
Loading...