20180228 List of PEs and EEI units.xlsx
 Share
The version of the browser you are using is no longer supported. Please upgrade to a supported browser.Dismiss

 
View only
 
 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
1
NGSS GradeUnit Cover/ Reading LevelPerformance Expectation (PE)
Performance Expectation (PE) Text
EEI UnitUnit DescriptionLink to Correlation Guide
2
KKK-ESS2-2Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals (including humans) can change their environment to meet their needs A Day in My LifeThe World Around Me gives students an opportunity to learn about Earth as a whole, as well as its major environments including California’s rivers, mountains, valleys, deserts, oceans, and coasts. It allows them to learn that living things need water, air, and resources from the land, and that they live in places that have the things they need. While they study the different environments, they discover that all animals need food in order to live and grow, and that they obtain their food from plants or from other animals. They also learn that plants need water and light to live and grow. The students have a chance to see that, like plants and animals, humans use natural resources from the Earth for everything they do.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/gradek/k3c/k3cnextgen.pdf
3
KKK-ESS3-1Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants or animals (including humans) and the places they live. The World Around MeThe World Around Me gives students an opportunity to learn about Earth as a whole, as well as its major environments including California’s rivers, mountains, valleys, deserts, oceans, and coasts. It allows them to learn that living things need water, air, and resources from the land, and that they live in places that have the things they need. While they study the different environments, they discover that all animals need food in order to live and grow, and that they obtain their food from plants or from other animals. They also learn that plants need water and light to live and grow. The students have a chance to see that, like plants and animals, humans use natural resources from the Earth for everything they do.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/gradek/k3a/k3anextgen.pdf
4
KKK-ESS3-1Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants or animals (including humans) and the places they live. A Day in My LifeA Day in My Life engages students through a “big book” that introduces them to the variety of resources that plants and animals, including humans, need to survive. They learn that all organisms need water, air, and food to survive, then dig deeper into the needs of people. The students soon discover that all of the everyday items on which they depend come from plants, animals, and other resources within natural systems in the environment. Finally, they talk and think about what they can do to help reduce the use of natural resources in school, at home, and elsewhere.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/gradek/k3c/k3cnextgen.pdf
5
KKK-ESS3-3Communicate solutions that will reduce the impact of humans on the land, water, air, and/or otherA Day in My LifeA Day in My Life engages students through a “big book” that introduces them to the variety of resources that plants and animals, including humans, need to survive. They learn that all organisms need water, air, and food to survive, then dig deeper into the needs of people. The students soon discover that all of the everyday items on which they depend come from plants, animals, and other resources within natural systems in the environment. Finally, they talk and think about what they can do to help reduce the use of natural resources in school, at home, and elsewhere.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/gradek/k3c/k3cnextgen.pdf
6
KKK-LS1-1Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive. The World Around MeThe World Around Me gives students an opportunity to learn about Earth as a whole, as well as its major environments including California’s rivers, mountains, valleys, deserts, oceans, and coasts. It allows them to learn that living things need water, air, and resources from the land, and that they live in places that have the things they need. While they study the different environments, they discover that all animals need food in order to live and grow, and that they obtain their food from plants or from other animals. They also learn that plants need water and light to live and grow. The students have a chance to see that, like plants and animals, humans use natural resources from the Earth for everything they do.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/gradek/k3a/k3anextgen.pdf
7
KKK-LS1-1Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive. A Day in My LifeA Day in My Life engages students through a “big book” that introduces them to the variety of resources that plants and animals, including humans, need to survive. They learn that all organisms need water, air, and food to survive, then dig deeper into the needs of people. The students soon discover that all of the everyday items on which they depend come from plants, animals, and other resources within natural systems in the environment. Finally, they talk and think about what they can do to help reduce the use of natural resources in school, at home, and elsewhere.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/gradek/k3c/k3cnextgen.pdf
8
KKK-PS3-1Make observations to determine the effect of sunlight on Earth’s surface.The World Around MeThe World Around Me gives students an opportunity to learn about Earth as a whole, as well as its major environments including California’s rivers, mountains, valleys, deserts, oceans, and coasts. It allows them to learn that living things need water, air, and resources from the land, and that they live in places that have the things they need. While they study the different environments, they discover that all animals need food in order to live and grow, and that they obtain their food from plants or from other animals. They also learn that plants need water and light to live and grow. The students have a chance to see that, like plants and animals, humans use natural resources from the Earth for everything they do.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/gradek/k3a/k3anextgen.pdf
9
111-LS1-1Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.Surviving and ThrivingSurviving and Thrivinggives students an opportunity to discover that there is an important connection between the physical features of plants and animals and the characteristics of the different environments in which they live. This unit allows students to examine the physical features of plants and animals and discover that all organisms have external parts. They also see that different animals use their body parts in different ways to see, hear, grasp objects, and protect themselves. At the same time, they learn that plants also have different parts (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits) that help them survive and grow. They learn about these physical features by analyzing different settings so they realize that there are many different kinds of living organisms in any area, and they exist in different places on land and in water.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade01/12a/12anextgen.pdf
10
212-LS4-1Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.Surviving and ThrivingSurviving and Thriving gives students an opportunity to discover that there is an important connection between the physical features of plants and animals and the characteristics of the different environments in which they live. This unit allows students to examine the physical features of plants and animals and discover that all organisms have external parts. They also see that different animals use their body parts in different ways to see, hear, grasp objects, and protect themselves. At the same time, they learn that plants also have different parts (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits) that help them survive and grow. They learn about these physical features by analyzing different settings so they realize that there are many different kinds of living organisms in any area, and they exist in different places on land and in water.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade01/12a/12anextgen.pdf
11
111-LS1-2Read texts and use media to determine patterns in behavior of parents and offspring that help offspring survive.Finding ShelterFinding Shelter uses a reader about the California least tern to give students an opportunity to learn about the similarities and differences between parents and their offspring. They examine how both the physical and behavioral traits of a species influence its survival at the same time that they discover how the habitats where animals live provide them with the food and shelter they need. While they study the California least tern, they consider how human communities can affect where animals live and the resources that are available for them to survive. The unit gives students the chance to design a house and yard in which both people and animals can find shelter, as well as discussing the creation of nature preserves. This activity helps them see some of the ways in which human activities can influence the availability of resources for food, shelter, and nesting areas needed by other animals. It also emphasizes that all living things, including humans, depend on natural systems for the resources they need to survive.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade01/12c/12cnextgen.pdf
12
111-LS3-1Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals areFinding ShelterFinding Shelter uses a reader about the California least tern to give students an opportunity to learn about the similarities and differences between parents and their offspring. They examine how both the physical and behavioral traits of a species influence its survival at the same time that they discover how the habitats where animals live provide them with the food and shelter they need. While they study the California least tern, they consider how human communities can affect where animals live and the resources that are available for them to survive. The unit gives students the chance to design a house and yard in which both people and animals can find shelter, as well as discussing the creation of nature preserves. This activity helps them see some of the ways in which human activities can influence the availability of resources for food, shelter, and nesting areas needed by other animals. It also emphasizes that all living things, including humans, depend on natural systems for the resources they need to survive.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade01/12c/12cnextgen.pdf
13
111-LS3-1Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.Finding ShelterFinding Shelter uses a reader about the California least tern to give students an opportunity to learn about the similarities and differences between parents and their offspring. They examine how both the physical and behavioral traits of a species influence its survival at the same time that they discover how the habitats where animals live provide them with the food and shelter they need. While they study the California least tern, they consider how human communities can affect where animals live and the resources that are available for them to survive. The unit gives students the chance to design a house and yard in which both people and animals can find shelter, as well as discussing the creation of nature preserves. This activity helps them see some of the ways in which human activities can influence the availability of resources for food, shelter, and nesting areas needed by other animals. It also emphasizes that all living things, including humans, depend on natural systems for the resources they need to survive.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade01/12c/12cnextgen.pdf
14
K,1,21K-2-ETS1-1Ask questions, make observations, and gather information about a situation people want to change to define a simple problem that can be solved through the development of a new or improved object or tool.Finding ShelterFinding Shelter uses a reader about the California least tern to give students an opportunity to learn about the similarities and differences between parents and their offspring. They examine how both the physical and behavioral traits of a species influence its survival at the same time that they discover how the habitats where animals live provide them with the food and shelter they need. While they study the California least tern, they consider how human communities can affect where animals live and the resources that are available for them to survive. The unit gives students the chance to design a house and yard in which both people and animals can find shelter, as well as discussing the creation of nature preserves. This activity helps them see some of the ways in which human activities can influence the availability of resources for food, shelter, and nesting areas needed by other animals. It also emphasizes that all living things, including humans, depend on natural systems for the resources they need to survive.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade01/12c/12cnextgen.pdf
15
K,1,21K-2-ETS1-2Develop a simple sketch, drawing, or physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve a problem.Finding ShelterFinding Shelter uses a reader about the California least tern to give students an opportunity to learn about the similarities and differences between parents and their offspring. They examine how both the physical and behavioral traits of a species influence its survival at the same time that they discover how the habitats where animals live provide them with the food and shelter they need. While they study the California least tern, they consider how human communities can affect where animals live and the resources that are available for them to survive. The unit gives students the chance to design a house and yard in which both people and animals can find shelter, as well as discussing the creation of nature preserves. This activity helps them see some of the ways in which human activities can influence the availability of resources for food, shelter, and nesting areas needed by other animals. It also emphasizes that all living things, including humans, depend on natural systems for the resources they need to survive.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade01/12c/12cnextgen.pdf
16
111-LS1-1Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.Open Wide! Look Inside!Open Wide! Look Inside! allows students to explore how animals in different habitats meet their needs in different ways. They consider how animals’ teeth and beaks differ and discover that teeth and beaks influence each species’ diet. Students explore the Channel Islands and how island animals find food by hunting, foraging, and grazing in a complex web of life. They also consider how physical features and parts, such as tooth structures, affect an animal’s feeding strategies and its ability to find the food and shelter needed to survive. Students see that an animal’s ability to survive in any habitat is related to the structure and function of their external body parts. They also see how human activity can influence an animal’s habitat and its ability to survive.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade01/12d/12dnextgen.pdf
17
222-LS2-2Develop a simple model that mimics the function of an animal in dispersing seeds or pollinating plants.Cycle of LifeCycle of Life focuses on pine trees and bald eagles as the basis for students discovering the common patterns found among the diverse life cycles of various plants and animals. They observe seeds and eggs to compare their structures and functions, and then examine the growth stages, including reproduction, metamorphosis, and migration of monarch butterflies, one of California’s widely-recognized insects. As students study the different life cycles they also explore the interdependent relationships between plants and animals, as well as examining how the food supply of humans depends on these relationships. Finally, they look at some familiar food products and identify the stages of the life cycle of different plants and animals that are important elements of California’s agricultural system.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade02/22ab/22abnextgen.pdf
18
323-LS1-1Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.Cycle of LifeCycle of Life focuses on pine trees and bald eagles as the basis for students discovering the common patterns found among the diverse life cycles of various plants and animals. They observe seeds and eggs to compare their structures and functions, and then examine the growth stages, including reproduction, metamorphosis, and migration of monarch butterflies, one of California’s widely-recognized insects. As students study the different life cycles they also explore the interdependent relationships between plants and animals, as well as examining how the food supply of humans depends on these relationships. Finally, they look at some familiar food products and identify the stages of the life cycle of different plants and animals that are important elements of California’s agricultural system.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade02/22ab/22abnextgen.pdf
19
222-LS4-1Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats. Alike and DifferentAlike and Different examines the inherited traits of several animals in and out of their usual habitats and discusses how human activity changes habitats and can influence an organism’s survival. Students explore several survival traits including camouflage, the care of offspring, and why animals can look different, even with the same parents. They look at variations in eye color and height among themselves. The students participate in a hands-on activity that models how traits may be passed from a parent to its offspring. They analyze quantitative data to predict which traits will be passed on to puppies from their parents.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade02/22cd/22cdnextgen.pdf
20
323-LS3-1Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence that plants and animals have traits inherited from parents and that variation of these traits exists in a group of similar organisms.Alike and DifferentAlike and Different examines the inherited traits of several animals in and out of their usual habitats and discusses how human activity changes habitats and can influence an organism’s survival. Students explore several survival traits including camouflage, the care of offspring, and why animals can look different, even with the same parents. They look at variations in eye color and height among themselves. The students participate in a hands-on activity that models how traits may be passed from a parent to its offspring. They analyze quantitative data to predict which traits will be passed on to puppies from their parents.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade02/22cd/22cdnextgen.pdf
21
323-LS3-2Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment.Alike and DifferentAlike and Different examines the inherited traits of several animals in and out of their usual habitats and discusses how human activity changes habitats and can influence an organism’s survival. Students explore several survival traits including camouflage, the care of offspring, and why animals can look different, even with the same parents. They look at variations in eye color and height among themselves. The students participate in a hands-on activity that models how traits may be passed from a parent to its offspring. They analyze quantitative data to predict which traits will be passed on to puppies from their parents.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade02/22cd/22cdnextgen.pdf
22
121-LS3-1Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.Alike and DifferentAlike and Different examines the inherited traits of several animals in and out of their usual habitats and discusses how human activity changes habitats and can influence an organism’s survival. Students explore several survival traits including camouflage, the care of offspring, and why animals can look different, even with the same parents. They look at variations in eye color and height among themselves. The students participate in a hands-on activity that models how traits may be passed from a parent to its offspring. They analyze quantitative data to predict which traits will be passed on to puppies from their parents.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade02/22cd/22cdnextgen.pdf
23
222-LS2-1Plan and conduct an investigation to determine if plants need sunlight and water to grow.Flowering Plants in our Changing EnvironmentFlowering Plants in our Changing Environment examines the diverse life cycle of plants in different ecosystems and explores the common features of their life cycles, including their reproductive processes. Students identify and locate the habitats of different plant species on a map allowing them to evaluate how the physical features of different plants are influenced by the environment. The evidence they gather prepares them to discuss and analyze how the traits plants inherit are influenced by the environments in which certain plants live. The data they gather prepares them to construct explanations about the interdependence of these organisms on ecosystems, as well as how their environment affects their growth and development. They identify, draw, and label the reproductive parts of different plants and discuss why plant reproduction matters to humans and other animals.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade02/22ef/22efnextgen.pdf
24
323-LS1-1Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles, but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.Flowering Plants in our Changing EnvironmentFlowering Plants in our Changing Environment examines the diverse life cycle of plants in different ecosystems and explores the common features of their life cycles, including their reproductive processes. Students identify and locate the habitats of different plant species on a map allowing them to evaluate how the physical features of different plants are influenced by the environment. The evidence they gather prepares them to discuss and analyze how the traits plants inherit are influenced by the environments in which certain plants live. The data they gather prepares them to construct explanations about the interdependence of these organisms on ecosystems, as well as how their environment affects their growth and development. They identify, draw, and label the reproductive parts of different plants and discuss why plant reproduction matters to humans and other animals.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade02/22ef/22efnextgen.pdf
25
323-LS3-2Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment.Flowering Plants in our Changing EnvironmentFlowering Plants in our Changing Environment examines the diverse life cycle of plants in different ecosystems and explores the common features of their life cycles, including their reproductive processes. Students identify and locate the habitats of different plant species on a map allowing them to evaluate how the physical features of different plants are influenced by the environment. The evidence they gather prepares them to discuss and analyze how the traits plants inherit are influenced by the environments in which certain plants live. The data they gather prepares them to construct explanations about the interdependence of these organisms on ecosystems, as well as how their environment affects their growth and development. They identify, draw, and label the reproductive parts of different plants and discuss why plant reproduction matters to humans and other animals.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade02/22ef/22efnextgen.pdf
26
222-PS1-1Plan and conduct an investigation to describe and classify different kinds of materials by their observable properties.The Earth RocksThe Earth Rocks draws students’ attention to the properties of rocks and minerals, how they influence the ways rocks and minerals function in natural and human systems, and how rock types and mineral content may change. Students have the opportunity to identify the different kinds of properties used by scientists to describe and classify rocks and minerals. They examine some of the factors in nature that physically and chemically change rocks, and identify how these changes can influence the ecosystems in which rocks are located. They discover that many of these processes take place over long periods of time by considering how the rock formations seen and described by the pioneers, who crossed the country, are much the same as they were over 150 years ago. Students also have the chance to discover the role of rocks in natural systems, such as filtering of water in springs and providing sites in which salmon can spawn. Finally, they investigate how rocks and minerals are used by humans to manufacture various products.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade02/23ab/23abnextgen.pdf
27
222-ESS1-1 Use information from several sources to provide evidence that Earth events can occur quickly or slowly.The Earth RocksThe Earth Rocks draws students’ attention to the properties of rocks and minerals, how they influence the ways rocks and minerals function in natural and human systems, and how rock types and mineral content may change. Students have the opportunity to identify the different kinds of properties used by scientists to describe and classify rocks and minerals. They examine some of the factors in nature that physically and chemically change rocks, and identify how these changes can influence the ecosystems in which rocks are located. They discover that many of these processes take place over long periods of time by considering how the rock formations seen and described by the pioneers, who crossed the country, are much the same as they were over 150 years ago. Students also have the chance to discover the role of rocks in natural systems, such as filtering of water in springs and providing sites in which salmon can spawn. Finally, they investigate how rocks and minerals are used by humans to manufacture various products.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade02/23ab/23abnextgen.pdf
28
333-LS4-3Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.Structures for Survival in a Health EcosystemStructures for Survival in a Healthy Ecosystem helps students learn about the ways in which species use their physical structures to survive. It also highlights the roles of healthy ecosystems in the survival of species. Students explore different ecosystems in California, examining the interconnected relationships of species within these systems, the natural cycles by which they function, and the ways in which ecosystem health affects this functioning. As a culminating activity, they plan a garden habitat for hummingbirds and describe how humans can help hummingbirds meet their survival needs.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade03/33a/33anextgen.pdf
29
434-LS1-1Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and adaptation.Structures for Survival in a Health EcosystemStructures for Survival in a Healthy Ecosystem helps students learn about the ways in which species use their physical structures to survive. It also highlights the roles of healthy ecosystems in the survival of species. Students explore different ecosystems in California, examining the interconnected relationships of species within these systems, the natural cycles by which they function, and the ways in which ecosystem health affects this functioning. As a culminating activity, they plan a garden habitat for hummingbirds and describe how humans can help hummingbirds meet their survival needs.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade03/33a/33anextgen.pdf
30
333-LS4-3Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.Living Things in Changing EnvironmentsLiving Things in Changing Environments, through a reader about the Sweetwater Marsh National Wildlife Refuge, introduces students to the effects that changes to habitats and ecosystems can have on the survival of particular organisms. Students discover that when a habitat undergoes change, the organisms are affected in different ways, which may be neutral, beneficial, or detrimental, but ultimately can influence their survival. By looking at a power plant that was built to provide electricity to Southern California, students think about how habitat changes can affect the types and distribution of organisms in an area. The unit also gives them an opportunity, to learn about California’s scrubland, chaparral, and mixed forest habitats. They find out how certain human activities have influenced the natural systems in these areas. Finally, they read about habitat restoration and brainstorm ideas about how human activities, such as this, can help certain organisms survive.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade03/33cd/33cdnextgen.pdf
31
333-LS4-4Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.Living Things in Changing EnvironmentsLiving Things in Changing Environments, through a reader about the Sweetwater Marsh National Wildlife Refuge, introduces students to the effects that changes to habitats and ecosystems can have on the survival of particular organisms. Students discover that when a habitat undergoes change, the organisms are affected in different ways, which may be neutral, beneficial, or detrimental, but ultimately can influence their survival. By looking at a power plant that was built to provide electricity to Southern California, students think about how habitat changes can affect the types and distribution of organisms in an area. The unit also gives them an opportunity, to learn about California’s scrubland, chaparral, and mixed forest habitats. They find out how certain human activities have influenced the natural systems in these areas. Finally, they read about habitat restoration and brainstorm ideas about how human activities, such as this, can help certain organisms survive.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade03/33cd/33cdnextgen.pdf
32
434-ESS3-1Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and their uses affect the environment.Living Things in Changing EnvironmentsLiving Things in Changing Environments, through a reader about the Sweetwater Marsh National Wildlife Refuge, introduces students to the effects that changes to habitats and ecosystems can have on the survival of particular organisms. Students discover that when a habitat undergoes change, the organisms are affected in different ways, which may be neutral, beneficial, or detrimental, but ultimately can influence their survival. By looking at a power plant that was built to provide electricity to Southern California, students think about how habitat changes can affect the types and distribution of organisms in an area. The unit also gives them an opportunity, to learn about California’s scrubland, chaparral, and mixed forest habitats. They find out how certain human activities have influenced the natural systems in these areas. Finally, they read about habitat restoration and brainstorm ideas about how human activities, such as this, can help certain organisms survive.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade03/33cd/33cdnextgen.pdf
33
545-PS3-1Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for repair, growth, motion and to obtain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.Plants: The Ultimate Energy ResourcePlants: The Ultimate Energy Resource, engages students in the study of energy flow through ecosystems by starting with a story about agriculture in California. It gives them an opportunity analyze multiple ecosystems and gather information that allows them to analyze and discuss the specialized structures which help plants and animals survive within the ecosystem where they live. This unit helps discover that plants derive their energy from the Sun and that plants are, in turn, the primary source of energy for living things. By participating in a food chain card game they discuss energy flow along a food chain and discuss that not all of a plant’s energy is available to an animal by which it is consumed. Students conduct an investigation and record data about their own activities and energy consumption over the course of one or more days, they then use this information by “following” the path back down the food chain to find the source(s) of the energy that keeps them going throughout a day. They end the unit by exploring the similarities between the survival needs of early California Indians and today’s California residents.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade04/42a/42anextgen.pdf
34
545-LS2-1Develop a model using an example to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environmentPlants: The Ultimate Energy ResourcePlants: The Ultimate Energy Resource, engages students in the study of energy flow through ecosystems by starting with a story about agriculture in California. It gives them an opportunity analyze multiple ecosystems and gather information that allows them to analyze and discuss the specialized structures which help plants and animals survive within the ecosystem where they live. This unit helps discover that plants derive their energy from the Sun and that plants are, in turn, the primary source of energy for living things. By participating in a food chain card game they discuss energy flow along a food chain and discuss that not all of a plant’s energy is available to an animal by which it is consumed. Students conduct an investigation and record data about their own activities and energy consumption over the course of one or more days, they then use this information by “following” the path back down the food chain to find the source(s) of the energy that keeps them going throughout a day. They end the unit by exploring the similarities between the survival needs of early California Indians and today’s California residents.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade04/42a/42anextgen.pdf
35
444-LS1-1Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.The Flow of Energy Through EcosystemsThe Flow of Energy Through Ecosystems gives students the opportunity to examine the flow of energy through ecosystems as they study the roles of plants and animals in different natural systems. They begin to recognize that organisms, including humans, can be classified by the sources of energy and matter (food) they consume. Based on this knowledge they study the potential consequences when components of an ecosystem are changed or eliminated, whether as a result of natural or human causes. Students explore the ways individual communities can use scientific ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment. As a culminating activity, they consider different events and discuss the effects that disruptions to the food web would have on the entire ecosystem, ultimately identifying the similarity of the effects of natural ecosystem changes and human activities.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade04/42b/42bnextgen.pdf
36
545-LS2-1Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.The Flow of Energy Through EcosystemsThe Flow of Energy Through Ecosystems gives students the opportunity to examine the flow of energy through ecosystems as they study the roles of plants and animals in different natural systems. They begin to recognize that organisms, including humans, can be classified by the sources of energy and matter (food) they consume. Based on this knowledge they study the potential consequences when components of an ecosystem are changed or eliminated, whether as a result of natural or human causes. Students explore the ways individual communities can use scientific ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment. As a culminating activity, they consider different events and discuss the effects that disruptions to the food web would have on the entire ecosystem, ultimately identifying the similarity of the effects of natural ecosystem changes and human activities.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade04/42b/42bnextgen.pdf
37
545-ESS3-1Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.The Flow of Energy Through EcosystemsThe Flow of Energy Through Ecosystems gives students the opportunity to examine the flow of energy through ecosystems as they study the roles of plants and animals in different natural systems. They begin to recognize that organisms, including humans, can be classified by the sources of energy and matter (food) they consume. Based on this knowledge they study the potential consequences when components of an ecosystem are changed or eliminated, whether as a result of natural or human causes. Students explore the ways individual communities can use scientific ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment. As a culminating activity, they consider different events and discuss the effects that disruptions to the food web would have on the entire ecosystem, ultimately identifying the similarity of the effects of natural ecosystem changes and human activities.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade04/42b/42bnextgen.pdf
38
545-LS2-1Develop a model using an example to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environmentLife and Death with DecomposersLife and Death with Decomposers focuses on decomposers and their role in breaking down carbon-based organic matter, materials that come from living things. This unit helps students learn that decomposers are actually part of a larger system that works to cycle chemicals such as carbon, nitrogen, water, and oxygen through complete food webs. They set up a composting lab and make predictions about the decomposition process. Students then explore the importance of decomposers to human waste management systems. Life and Death with Decomposers also helps them discover the role that decomposers play in the health of topsoil and the whole agricultural system.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade04/42b/42bnextgen.pdf
39
545-ESS3-1Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.Life and Death with DecomposersLife and Death with Decomposers focuses on decomposers and their role in breaking down carbon-based organic matter, materials that come from living things. This unit helps students learn that decomposers are actually part of a larger system that works to cycle chemicals such as carbon, nitrogen, water, and oxygen through complete food webs. They set up a composting lab and make predictions about the decomposition process. Students then explore the importance of decomposers to human waste management systems. Life and Death with Decomposers also helps them discover the role that decomposers play in the health of topsoil and the whole agricultural system.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade04/42b/42bnextgen.pdf
40
43-5-ETS1-2 Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.Life and Death with DecomposersLife and Death with Decomposers focuses on decomposers and their role in breaking down carbon-based organic matter, materials that come from living things. This unit helps students learn that decomposers are actually part of a larger system that works to cycle chemicals such as carbon, nitrogen, water, and oxygen through complete food webs. They set up a composting lab and make predictions about the decomposition process. Students then explore the importance of decomposers to human waste management systems. Life and Death with Decomposers also helps them discover the role that decomposers play in the health of topsoil and the whole agricultural system.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade04/42b/42bnextgen.pdf
41
555-ESS2-2Describe and graph the amounts and percentages of water and fresh water in various reservoirs to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.Earth's WaterEarth’s Water uses the relationship between the growth of cities and water as the basis for students gathering and analyzing information about the ways human communities use and manage their water supplies. The lessons give students the opportunity to explore the different types of water found on Earth’s surface and delve into issues related to the availability of fresh water for human consumption. They explore the pathways that freshwater follows from land to the ocean or underground aquifers while discovering the importance of watersheds. Analyzing the information they are presented, they learn how water management practices influence water quantity and quality in different ecosystems. Finally, they explore how water management practices can affect the overall water cycle.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade05/53a/53anextgen.pdf
42
555-ESS3-1Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.Earth's WaterEarth’s Water uses the relationship between the growth of cities and water as the basis for students gathering and analyzing information about the ways human communities use and manage their water supplies. The lessons give students the opportunity to explore the different types of water found on Earth’s surface and delve into issues related to the availability of fresh water for human consumption. They explore the pathways that freshwater follows from land to the ocean or underground aquifers while discovering the importance of watersheds. Analyzing the information they are presented, they learn how water management practices influence water quantity and quality in different ecosystems. Finally, they explore how water management practices can affect the overall water cycle.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade05/53a/53anextgen.pdf
43
53-5-ETS1-2 Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.Earth's WaterEarth’s Water uses the relationship between the growth of cities and water as the basis for students gathering and analyzing information about the ways human communities use and manage their water supplies. The lessons give students the opportunity to explore the different types of water found on Earth’s surface and delve into issues related to the availability of fresh water for human consumption. They explore the pathways that freshwater follows from land to the ocean or underground aquifers while discovering the importance of watersheds. Analyzing the information they are presented, they learn how water management practices influence water quantity and quality in different ecosystems. Finally, they explore how water management practices can affect the overall water cycle.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade05/53a/53anextgen.pdf
44
555-PS1-1
Develop a model to describe that matter is made of particles too small to be seen.
Changing States: Water, Natural Systems, and Human CommunitiesChanging States: Water, Natural Systems, and Human Communities provides students with the opportunity to explore two primary ways water moves through the water cycle, evaporation and condensation. Students examine salt farming on San Francisco Bay as a practical example of how evaporation can play an important role in the production of table salt, a resource they may use every day. They participate in experiments, discussions, and observe demonstrations, as they analyze the various processes involved in water moving through the water cycle. Through guided inquiry, they discover how wind, temperature, and humidity can affect rates of evaporation and transpiration. Students study the role of energy from the Sun and the force of gravity in driving the cycling of water through Earth’s systems. Through observing water vapor’s role in evaporation, condensation, and transpiration, students discover that matter is made of particles too small to be seen. Students also learn, from a model of the evaporation processes that occur during salt farming, that the mixing of two or more substances does not always result in a new substance. Finally, through a classroom demonstration and discussion they learn how different phases of matter, in this case water, can play a role in the functioning of natural systems and human communities.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade05/53b/53bnextgen.pdf
45
555-PS1-4Conduct an investigation to determine whether the mixing of two or more substances results in new substances.Changing States: Water, Natural Systems, and Human CommunitiesChanging States: Water, Natural Systems, and Human Communities provides students with the opportunity to explore two primary ways water moves through the water cycle, evaporation and condensation. Students examine salt farming on San Francisco Bay as a practical example of how evaporation can play an important role in the production of table salt, a resource they may use every day. They participate in experiments, discussions, and observe demonstrations, as they analyze the various processes involved in water moving through the water cycle. Through guided inquiry, they discover how wind, temperature, and humidity can affect rates of evaporation and transpiration. Students study the role of energy from the Sun and the force of gravity in driving the cycling of water through Earth’s systems. Through observing water vapor’s role in evaporation, condensation, and transpiration, students discover that matter is made of particles too small to be seen. Students also learn, from a model of the evaporation processes that occur during salt farming, that the mixing of two or more substances does not always result in a new substance. Finally, through a classroom demonstration and discussion they learn how different phases of matter, in this case water, can play a role in the functioning of natural systems and human communities.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade05/53b/53bnextgen.pdf
46
65MS-ESS2-4Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.Changing States: Water, Natural Systems, and Human CommunitiesChanging States: Water, Natural Systems, and Human Communities provides students with the opportunity to explore two primary ways water moves through the water cycle, evaporation and condensation. Students examine salt farming on San Francisco Bay as a practical example of how evaporation can play an important role in the production of table salt, a resource they may use every day. They participate in experiments, discussions, and observe demonstrations, as they analyze the various processes involved in water moving through the water cycle. Through guided inquiry, they discover how wind, temperature, and humidity can affect rates of evaporation and transpiration. Students study the role of energy from the Sun and the force of gravity in driving the cycling of water through Earth’s systems. Through observing water vapor’s role in evaporation, condensation, and transpiration, students discover that matter is made of particles too small to be seen. Students also learn, from a model of the evaporation processes that occur during salt farming, that the mixing of two or more substances does not always result in a new substance. Finally, through a classroom demonstration and discussion they learn how different phases of matter, in this case water, can play a role in the functioning of natural systems and human communities.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade05/53b/53bnextgen.pdf
47
555-ESS2-1Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact.Precipitation, People, and the Natural WorldPrecipitation, People, and the Natural World uses a study of the Sierra snowpack, the source of a great proportion of California’s fresh water supply, to engage students in a study of Earth’s hydrosphere and biosphere. They consider a wide array of maps, graphs, and statistics as they discover the importance of water in natural systems and for human use. Students examine different models that allow them to discover how California’s proximity to the Pacific Ocean and its topography influences the water cycle, cloud formation, and uneven distribution of precipitation throughout the state. Through this unit, they discover that the relatively small amount of fresh water on Earth is constantly cycling between the different water reservoirs in the hydrosphere; it also reinforces their knowledge of the water cycle. Students study different California ecosystems in order to determine that the amount of precipitation throughout California has a direct effect on the types of plants and animals that are able to survive within any given habitat. Finally, they examine evidence about the effects of human activities on precipitation patterns and local climates.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade05/53c/53cnextgen.pdf
48
555-ESS2-2Describe and graph the amounts and percentages of water and fresh water in various reservoirs to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.Precipitation, People, and the Natural WorldPrecipitation, People, and the Natural World uses a study of the Sierra snowpack, the source of a great proportion of California’s fresh water supply, to engage students in a study of Earth’s hydrosphere and biosphere. They consider a wide array of maps, graphs, and statistics as they discover the importance of water in natural systems and for human use. Students examine different models that allow them to discover how California’s proximity to the Pacific Ocean and its topography influences the water cycle, cloud formation, and uneven distribution of precipitation throughout the state. Through this unit, they discover that the relatively small amount of fresh water on Earth is constantly cycling between the different water reservoirs in the hydrosphere; it also reinforces their knowledge of the water cycle. Students study different California ecosystems in order to determine that the amount of precipitation throughout California has a direct effect on the types of plants and animals that are able to survive within any given habitat. Finally, they examine evidence about the effects of human activities on precipitation patterns and local climates.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade05/53c/53cnextgen.pdf
49
75MS-LS2-1 Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the
effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.
Precipitation, People, and the Natural WorldPrecipitation, People, and the Natural World uses a study of the Sierra snowpack, the source of a great proportion of California’s fresh water supply, to engage students in a study of Earth’s hydrosphere and biosphere. They consider a wide array of maps, graphs, and statistics as they discover the importance of water in natural systems and for human use. Students examine different models that allow them to discover how California’s proximity to the Pacific Ocean and its topography influences the water cycle, cloud formation, and uneven distribution of precipitation throughout the state. Through this unit, they discover that the relatively small amount of fresh water on Earth is constantly cycling between the different water reservoirs in the hydrosphere; it also reinforces their knowledge of the water cycle. Students study different California ecosystems in order to determine that the amount of precipitation throughout California has a direct effect on the types of plants and animals that are able to survive within any given habitat. Finally, they examine evidence about the effects of human activities on precipitation patterns and local climates.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade05/53c/53cnextgen.pdf
50
85MS-ESS3-4Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s systems.Precipitation, People, and the Natural WorldPrecipitation, People, and the Natural World uses a study of the Sierra snowpack, the source of a great proportion of California’s fresh water supply, to engage students in a study of Earth’s hydrosphere and biosphere. They consider a wide array of maps, graphs, and statistics as they discover the importance of water in natural systems and for human use. Students examine different models that allow them to discover how California’s proximity to the Pacific Ocean and its topography influences the water cycle, cloud formation, and uneven distribution of precipitation throughout the state. Through this unit, they discover that the relatively small amount of fresh water on Earth is constantly cycling between the different water reservoirs in the hydrosphere; it also reinforces their knowledge of the water cycle. Students study different California ecosystems in order to determine that the amount of precipitation throughout California has a direct effect on the types of plants and animals that are able to survive within any given habitat. Finally, they examine evidence about the effects of human activities on precipitation patterns and local climates.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade05/53c/53cnextgen.pdf
51
555-ESS3-1Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.Our Water: Sources and UsesOur Water: Sources and Uses examines the movement, availability, and treatment of California’s water as the basis for students examining the distribution of fresh water in both natural and human-designed reservoirs. They learn about methods of water treatment and they consider the ways individual humans and communities use scientific information to protect Earth’s resources and environment. As students examine the water cycle, underground aquifers, lakes, streams, and rivers, they gather scientific data that gives them the opportunity to analyze the role of energy from the sun and the force of gravity in the movement of water throughout California. The lessons provide students the opportunity to discover the impacts that humans have on the quantity and quality of fresh water in the hydrosphere, an Earth system on which all life depends.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade05/53d/53dnextgen.pdf
52
65MS-ESS2-4Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.Our Water: Sources and UsesOur Water: Sources and Uses examines the movement, availability, and treatment of California’s water as the basis for students examining the distribution of fresh water in both natural and human-designed reservoirs. They learn about methods of water treatment and they consider the ways individual humans and communities use scientific information to protect Earth’s resources and environment. As students examine the water cycle, underground aquifers, lakes, streams, and rivers, they gather scientific data that gives them the opportunity to analyze the role of energy from the sun and the force of gravity in the movement of water throughout California. The lessons provide students the opportunity to discover the impacts that humans have on the quantity and quality of fresh water in the hydrosphere, an Earth system on which all life depends.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade05/53d/53dnextgen.pdf
53
76MS-ESS2-1Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.The Dynamic Nature of RiversThe Dynamic Nature of Rivers examines how rivers function and gives students opportunities to learn about the flow and cycling of matter and how these Earth processes affect the planet’s surface. It also helps students consider some of the many ways humans benefit from and manipulate river systems. Early lessons introduce students to the roles of water in Earth’s surface processes and the principles of river system dynamics: how water moves, how water transports sediment, and how natural cycles of precipitation, flooding, and drought affect rivers and streams. Students discover how water’s movement on the land causes weathering and erosion which changes the land’s surface features. Through examining how the constantly shifting course of a river can affect human housing, students are introduced to some of the constraints influencing construction and engineering solutions.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/62b/62bnextgen.pdf
54
66MS-ESS3-3 Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.The Dynamic Nature of RiversThe Dynamic Nature of Rivers examines how rivers function and gives students opportunities to learn about the flow and cycling of matter and how these Earth processes affect the planet’s surface. It also helps students consider some of the many ways humans benefit from and manipulate river systems. Early lessons introduce students to the roles of water in Earth’s surface processes and the principles of river system dynamics: how water moves, how water transports sediment, and how natural cycles of precipitation, flooding, and drought affect rivers and streams. Students discover how water’s movement on the land causes weathering and erosion which changes the land’s surface features. Through examining how the constantly shifting course of a river can affect human housing, students are introduced to some of the constraints influencing construction and engineering solutions.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/62b/62bnextgen.pdf
55
86
MS-ESS3-4
Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s systems.The Dynamic Nature of RiversThe Dynamic Nature of Rivers examines how rivers function and gives students opportunities to learn about the flow and cycling of matter and how these Earth processes affect the planet’s surface. It also helps students consider some of the many ways humans benefit from and manipulate river systems. Early lessons introduce students to the roles of water in Earth’s surface processes and the principles of river system dynamics: how water moves, how water transports sediment, and how natural cycles of precipitation, flooding, and drought affect rivers and streams. Students discover how water’s movement on the land causes weathering and erosion which changes the land’s surface features. Through examining how the constantly shifting course of a river can affect human housing, students are introduced to some of the constraints influencing construction and engineering solutions.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/62b/62bnextgen.pdf
56
6,7,86MS-ETS1-1Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.The Dynamic Nature of RiversThe Dynamic Nature of Rivers examines how rivers function and gives students opportunities to learn about the flow and cycling of matter and how these Earth processes affect the planet’s surface. It also helps students consider some of the many ways humans benefit from and manipulate river systems. Early lessons introduce students to the roles of water in Earth’s surface processes and the principles of river system dynamics: how water moves, how water transports sediment, and how natural cycles of precipitation, flooding, and drought affect rivers and streams. Students discover how water’s movement on the land causes weathering and erosion which changes the land’s surface features. Through examining how the constantly shifting course of a river can affect human housing, students are introduced to some of the constraints influencing construction and engineering solutions.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/62b/62bnextgen.pdf
57
76MS-LS2-1 Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the
effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.
Energy: Pass It On!Energy: Pass it On! uses a study of the population of California wolverines as the basis for exploring the interactions within and dynamics of ecosystems, as well as energy flow through these systems. It explores how human activities have influenced populations of wolverines over the past 150 years. Using the relationship of the wolverine to its habitat, students learn about ecosystem functions, including energy flow through food pyramids. They construct a model food web based on the wolverine’s habitat and predator-prey relationships. Students review the resources that humans consume from natural systems, and discuss timber harvesting as an example of a human activity that can alter energy flow in an ecosystem. Using this as a model, they examine how human activities have affected the wolverine population in California. They discuss the cause and effect relationships between various examples of natural resource consumption and the effects of human decisions and practices on ecosystem function.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/65c/65cnextgen.pdf
58
76MS-LS2-3Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.Energy: Pass It On!Energy: Pass it On! uses a study of the population of California wolverines as the basis for exploring the interactions within and dynamics of ecosystems, as well as energy flow through these systems. It explores how human activities have influenced populations of wolverines over the past 150 years. Using the relationship of the wolverine to its habitat, students learn about ecosystem functions, including energy flow through food pyramids. They construct a model food web based on the wolverine’s habitat and predator-prey relationships. Students review the resources that humans consume from natural systems, and discuss timber harvesting as an example of a human activity that can alter energy flow in an ecosystem. Using this as a model, they examine how human activities have affected the wolverine population in California. They discuss the cause and effect relationships between various examples of natural resource consumption and the effects of human decisions and practices on ecosystem function.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/65c/65cnextgen.pdf
59
66MS-ESS3-3 Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.Energy: Pass It On!Energy: Pass it On! uses a study of the population of California wolverines as the basis for exploring the interactions within and dynamics of ecosystems, as well as energy flow through these systems. It explores how human activities have influenced populations of wolverines over the past 150 years. Using the relationship of the wolverine to its habitat, students learn about ecosystem functions, including energy flow through food pyramids. They construct a model food web based on the wolverine’s habitat and predator-prey relationships. Students review the resources that humans consume from natural systems, and discuss timber harvesting as an example of a human activity that can alter energy flow in an ecosystem. Using this as a model, they examine how human activities have affected the wolverine population in California. They discuss the cause and effect relationships between various examples of natural resource consumption and the effects of human decisions and practices on ecosystem function.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/65c/65cnextgen.pdf
60
86
MS-ESS3-4
Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s systems.Energy: Pass It On!Energy: Pass it On! uses a study of the population of California wolverines as the basis for exploring the interactions within and dynamics of ecosystems, as well as energy flow through these systems. It explores how human activities have influenced populations of wolverines over the past 150 years. Using the relationship of the wolverine to its habitat, students learn about ecosystem functions, including energy flow through food pyramids. They construct a model food web based on the wolverine’s habitat and predator-prey relationships. Students review the resources that humans consume from natural systems, and discuss timber harvesting as an example of a human activity that can alter energy flow in an ecosystem. Using this as a model, they examine how human activities have affected the wolverine population in California. They discuss the cause and effect relationships between various examples of natural resource consumption and the effects of human decisions and practices on ecosystem function.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/65c/65cnextgen.pdf
61
76MS-LS2-2Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.Playing the Same RolePlaying the Same Role uses a story about pigs, an animal that is very adaptable and lives on most of Earth’s continents, to introduce students to the patterns of interactions and commonalities among organisms that function similarly in different biomes and ecosystems. They examine Earth’s nine major terrestrial biomes to learn about the climate, latitude, elevation, and other factors that distinguish these biomes from one another. The unit has them assemble food webs for each of the nine biomes as the basis for sorting organisms according to their different ecological roles. This analysis allows students to discover that while organisms may differ throughout the world, the same ecological roles can be found in all of the ecosystems located within all of the biomes. This biomes-based analysis allows students to develop their own models that describe energy flow within ecosystems. Finally, they read and analyze four case stories involving examples in which humans introduced organisms from one ecosystem into another, discovering the unintended consequences of these non-native species on the local natural systems.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/65d/65dnextgen.pdf
62
76MS-LS2-3Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.Playing the Same RolePlaying the Same Role uses a story about pigs, an animal that is very adaptable and lives on most of Earth’s continents, to introduce students to the patterns of interactions and commonalities among organisms that function similarly in different biomes and ecosystems. They examine Earth’s nine major terrestrial biomes to learn about the climate, latitude, elevation, and other factors that distinguish these biomes from one another. The unit has them assemble food webs for each of the nine biomes as the basis for sorting organisms according to their different ecological roles. This analysis allows students to discover that while organisms may differ throughout the world, the same ecological roles can be found in all of the ecosystems located within all of the biomes. This biomes-based analysis allows students to develop their own models that describe energy flow within ecosystems. Finally, they read and analyze four case stories involving examples in which humans introduced organisms from one ecosystem into another, discovering the unintended consequences of these non-native species on the local natural systems.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/65d/65dnextgen.pdf
63
76MS-PS1-4 Develop a model that predicts and describes changes in particle motion, temperature, and state of a pure substance when thermal energy is added or removed.Energy: It’s Not All the Same to You!Energy: It’s Not All the Same to You! draws students’ attention to the importance of various forms of energy and the processes of energy conversion by exploring California’s statewide system of power generation. They examine the variety of energy sources used to generate electricity, looking at the availability of these sources and considering how these resources are limited and typically nonrenewable, as well as assessing how the distribution of different fuels influences their use in California. Students use power plants as models to study the release of energy during the conversion of fuels from one state to another, for example, the conversions that occur during the burning of coal and the operation of hydroelectric power plants. They examine California’s electricity generation systems as they assess which kinds of design and engineering solutions are feasible. The students then consider which designs might minimize the influence of power generation on natural systems. Since the role of petroleum-based energy is so substantial in California’s transportation systems, there is a supplemental lesson that explores this specific topic.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/66a/66anextgen.pdf
64
66MS-PS3- 5Construct, use, and present arguments to support the claim that when the kinetic energy of an object changes, energy is transferred to or from the object.Energy: It’s Not All the Same to You!Energy: It’s Not All the Same to You! draws students’ attention to the importance of various forms of energy and the processes of energy conversion by exploring California’s statewide system of power generation. They examine the variety of energy sources used to generate electricity, looking at the availability of these sources and considering how these resources are limited and typically nonrenewable, as well as assessing how the distribution of different fuels influences their use in California. Students use power plants as models to study the release of energy during the conversion of fuels from one state to another, for example, the conversions that occur during the burning of coal and the operation of hydroelectric power plants. They examine California’s electricity generation systems as they assess which kinds of design and engineering solutions are feasible. The students then consider which designs might minimize the influence of power generation on natural systems. Since the role of petroleum-based energy is so substantial in California’s transportation systems, there is a supplemental lesson that explores this specific topic.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/66a/66anextgen.pdf
65
76MS-ESS3-1 Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how the uneven distribution of Earth’s mineral, energy, and groundwater resources are the result of past and current geoscience processes.Energy: It’s Not All the Same to You!Energy: It’s Not All the Same to You! draws students’ attention to the importance of various forms of energy and the processes of energy conversion by exploring California’s statewide system of power generation. They examine the variety of energy sources used to generate electricity, looking at the availability of these sources and considering how these resources are limited and typically nonrenewable, as well as assessing how the distribution of different fuels influences their use in California. Students use power plants as models to study the release of energy during the conversion of fuels from one state to another, for example, the conversions that occur during the burning of coal and the operation of hydroelectric power plants. They examine California’s electricity generation systems as they assess which kinds of design and engineering solutions are feasible. The students then consider which designs might minimize the influence of power generation on natural systems. Since the role of petroleum-based energy is so substantial in California’s transportation systems, there is a supplemental lesson that explores this specific topic.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/66a/66anextgen.pdf
66
66MS-ESS3-3 Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.Energy: It’s Not All the Same to You!Energy: It’s Not All the Same to You! draws students’ attention to the importance of various forms of energy and the processes of energy conversion by exploring California’s statewide system of power generation. They examine the variety of energy sources used to generate electricity, looking at the availability of these sources and considering how these resources are limited and typically nonrenewable, as well as assessing how the distribution of different fuels influences their use in California. Students use power plants as models to study the release of energy during the conversion of fuels from one state to another, for example, the conversions that occur during the burning of coal and the operation of hydroelectric power plants. They examine California’s electricity generation systems as they assess which kinds of design and engineering solutions are feasible. The students then consider which designs might minimize the influence of power generation on natural systems. Since the role of petroleum-based energy is so substantial in California’s transportation systems, there is a supplemental lesson that explores this specific topic.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/66a/66anextgen.pdf
67
86
MS-ESS3-4
Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s systems.Energy: It’s Not All the Same to You!Energy: It’s Not All the Same to You! draws students’ attention to the importance of various forms of energy and the processes of energy conversion by exploring California’s statewide system of power generation. They examine the variety of energy sources used to generate electricity, looking at the availability of these sources and considering how these resources are limited and typically nonrenewable, as well as assessing how the distribution of different fuels influences their use in California. Students use power plants as models to study the release of energy during the conversion of fuels from one state to another, for example, the conversions that occur during the burning of coal and the operation of hydroelectric power plants. They examine California’s electricity generation systems as they assess which kinds of design and engineering solutions are feasible. The students then consider which designs might minimize the influence of power generation on natural systems. Since the role of petroleum-based energy is so substantial in California’s transportation systems, there is a supplemental lesson that explores this specific topic.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/66a/66anextgen.pdf
68
66MS-ESS3-5Ask questions to clarify evidence of the factors that have caused the rise in global temperatures over the past century.Energy: It’s Not All the Same to You!Energy: It’s Not All the Same to You! draws students’ attention to the importance of various forms of energy and the processes of energy conversion by exploring California’s statewide system of power generation. They examine the variety of energy sources used to generate electricity, looking at the availability of these sources and considering how these resources are limited and typically nonrenewable, as well as assessing how the distribution of different fuels influences their use in California. Students use power plants as models to study the release of energy during the conversion of fuels from one state to another, for example, the conversions that occur during the burning of coal and the operation of hydroelectric power plants. They examine California’s electricity generation systems as they assess which kinds of design and engineering solutions are feasible. The students then consider which designs might minimize the influence of power generation on natural systems. Since the role of petroleum-based energy is so substantial in California’s transportation systems, there is a supplemental lesson that explores this specific topic.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/66a/66anextgen.pdf
69
6,7,86MS-ETS1-1Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.Energy: It’s Not All the Same to You!Energy: It’s Not All the Same to You! draws students’ attention to the importance of various forms of energy and the processes of energy conversion by exploring California’s statewide system of power generation. They examine the variety of energy sources used to generate electricity, looking at the availability of these sources and considering how these resources are limited and typically nonrenewable, as well as assessing how the distribution of different fuels influences their use in California. Students use power plants as models to study the release of energy during the conversion of fuels from one state to another, for example, the conversions that occur during the burning of coal and the operation of hydroelectric power plants. They examine California’s electricity generation systems as they assess which kinds of design and engineering solutions are feasible. The students then consider which designs might minimize the influence of power generation on natural systems. Since the role of petroleum-based energy is so substantial in California’s transportation systems, there is a supplemental lesson that explores this specific topic.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/66a/66anextgen.pdf
70
76MS-LS2-4Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations. Energy and Material Resources: Renewable or Not?
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/66b/66bnextgen.pdf
71
76MS-LS2-5Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.Energy and Material Resources: Renewable or Not?Energy and Material Resources: Renewable or Not? engages students in a study of Earth’s natural resources and the importance of these resources to the survival of Californians. They learn a simple categorization of resources as either material resources or energy resources and, through the course of the unit, begin to recognize which of these resources are essential to human life. The unit offers multiple examples of each type of natural resource, and illustrates how human practices and rates of consumption affect the availability of these resources. The students learn to use an analytical tool, a decision flowchart, to explore some of the benefits of alternative choices and the outcomes that could result from changing human practices and consumption rates through, for example, conservation efforts. As part of this analysis, they discover how increases in human population and per capita consumption of natural resources influence Earth’s natural systems. Finally, they consider if and how human practices can influence the long-term availability and quality of different natural resources.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/66b/66bnextgen.pdf
72
76MS-ESS3-1 Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how the uneven distribution of Earth’s mineral, energy, and groundwater resources are the result of past and current geoscience processes.Energy and Material Resources: Renewable or Not?Energy and Material Resources: Renewable or Not? engages students in a study of Earth’s natural resources and the importance of these resources to the survival of Californians. They learn a simple categorization of resources as either material resources or energy resources and, through the course of the unit, begin to recognize which of these resources are essential to human life. The unit offers multiple examples of each type of natural resource, and illustrates how human practices and rates of consumption affect the availability of these resources. The students learn to use an analytical tool, a decision flowchart, to explore some of the benefits of alternative choices and the outcomes that could result from changing human practices and consumption rates through, for example, conservation efforts. As part of this analysis, they discover how increases in human population and per capita consumption of natural resources influence Earth’s natural systems. Finally, they consider if and how human practices can influence the long-term availability and quality of different natural resources.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/66b/66bnextgen.pdf
73
86
MS-ESS3-4
Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s systems.Energy and Material Resources: Renewable or Not?Energy and Material Resources: Renewable or Not? engages students in a study of Earth’s natural resources and the importance of these resources to the survival of Californians. They learn a simple categorization of resources as either material resources or energy resources and, through the course of the unit, begin to recognize which of these resources are essential to human life. The unit offers multiple examples of each type of natural resource, and illustrates how human practices and rates of consumption affect the availability of these resources. The students learn to use an analytical tool, a decision flowchart, to explore some of the benefits of alternative choices and the outcomes that could result from changing human practices and consumption rates through, for example, conservation efforts. As part of this analysis, they discover how increases in human population and per capita consumption of natural resources influence Earth’s natural systems. Finally, they consider if and how human practices can influence the long-term availability and quality of different natural resources.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/66b/66bnextgen.pdf
74
76MS-LS2-4Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations. Made from Earth: How Natural Resources Become Things We UseMade from Earth: How Natural Resources Become Things We Use engages students through a story about the manufacturing of surfboards in California as the starting point for students exploring the interactions between the natural resources humans use and the effects of related activities on ecosystem dynamics and interactions. Students engage in engineering practices as they design their own toys and then use what they have learned about the scientific principles of natural resource consumption and ecosystem dynamics to analyze the costs and benefits that may result from the consumption of different resources. In this process they examine the potential impacts on the natural environment of the resource extraction, harvesting, and transportation that would result from manufacturing the designs they have created. Finally, they create an input-output diagram related to the toys that they designed to evaluate the success of their design solution in relation to the effects on the natural environment.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/66c/66cnextgen.pdf
75
76MS-PS1-3Gather and make sense of information to describe that synthetic materials come from natural resources and impact society.Made from Earth: How Natural Resources Become Things We UseMade from Earth: How Natural Resources Become Things We Use engages students through a story about the manufacturing of surfboards in California as the starting point for students exploring the interactions between the natural resources humans use and the effects of related activities on ecosystem dynamics and interactions. Students engage in engineering practices as they design their own toys and then use what they have learned about the scientific principles of natural resource consumption and ecosystem dynamics to analyze the costs and benefits that may result from the consumption of different resources. In this process they examine the potential impacts on the natural environment of the resource extraction, harvesting, and transportation that would result from manufacturing the designs they have created. Finally, they create an input-output diagram related to the toys that they designed to evaluate the success of their design solution in relation to the effects on the natural environment.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/66c/66cnextgen.pdf
76
86
MS-ESS3-4
Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s systems.Made from Earth: How Natural Resources Become Things We UseMade from Earth: How Natural Resources Become Things We Use engages students through a story about the manufacturing of surfboards in California as the starting point for students exploring the interactions between the natural resources humans use and the effects of related activities on ecosystem dynamics and interactions. Students engage in engineering practices as they design their own toys and then use what they have learned about the scientific principles of natural resource consumption and ecosystem dynamics to analyze the costs and benefits that may result from the consumption of different resources. In this process they examine the potential impacts on the natural environment of the resource extraction, harvesting, and transportation that would result from manufacturing the designs they have created. Finally, they create an input-output diagram related to the toys that they designed to evaluate the success of their design solution in relation to the effects on the natural environment.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/66c/66cnextgen.pdf
77
6,7,86MS-ETS1-1Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.Made from Earth: How Natural Resources Become Things We UseMade from Earth: How Natural Resources Become Things We Use engages students through a story about the manufacturing of surfboards in California as the starting point for students exploring the interactions between the natural resources humans use and the effects of related activities on ecosystem dynamics and interactions. Students engage in engineering practices as they design their own toys and then use what they have learned about the scientific principles of natural resource consumption and ecosystem dynamics to analyze the costs and benefits that may result from the consumption of different resources. In this process they examine the potential impacts on the natural environment of the resource extraction, harvesting, and transportation that would result from manufacturing the designs they have created. Finally, they create an input-output diagram related to the toys that they designed to evaluate the success of their design solution in relation to the effects on the natural environment.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade06/66c/66cnextgen.pdf
78
87MS-LS4-4Construct an explanation based on evidence that describes how genetic variations of traits in a population increase some individuals’ probability of surviving and reproducing in a specific environment.Shaping Natural Systems Through EvolutionShaping Natural Systems through Evolution engages students in the study of biological evolution by introducing them to several species of pupfish, many of which live in extreme environments that challenge their survival and reproduction. Based on what they have learned about these fish, they create a class model of natural selection that allows them to predict the kinds of adaptations that would be selected in different environments. They analyze an example of evolutionary change observed in a California species of snail, and then to gain deeper insight into the mechanism of natural selection, the students evaluate four examples from current research in evolutionary biology. Students examine how a variety of environmental factors, such as climate and elevation, can influence evolution and how species adapt to the corresponding habitats. Finally, they analyze the influence of human activities on the pupfish’s survival and evolution.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade07/73a/73anextgen.pdf
79
87MS-LS4-5Gather and synthesize information about the technologies that have changed the way humans influence the inheritance of desired traits in organisms.Shaping Natural Systems Through EvolutionShaping Natural Systems through Evolution engages students in the study of biological evolution by introducing them to several species of pupfish, many of which live in extreme environments that challenge their survival and reproduction. Based on what they have learned about these fish, they create a class model of natural selection that allows them to predict the kinds of adaptations that would be selected in different environments. They analyze an example of evolutionary change observed in a California species of snail, and then to gain deeper insight into the mechanism of natural selection, the students evaluate four examples from current research in evolutionary biology. Students examine how a variety of environmental factors, such as climate and elevation, can influence evolution and how species adapt to the corresponding habitats. Finally, they analyze the influence of human activities on the pupfish’s survival and evolution.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade07/73a/73anextgen.pdf
80
87MS-LS4-6Use mathematical representations to support explanations of how natural selection may lead to increases and decreases of specific traits in populations over time.Shaping Natural Systems Through EvolutionShaping Natural Systems through Evolution engages students in the study of biological evolution by introducing them to several species of pupfish, many of which live in extreme environments that challenge their survival and reproduction. Based on what they have learned about these fish, they create a class model of natural selection that allows them to predict the kinds of adaptations that would be selected in different environments. They analyze an example of evolutionary change observed in a California species of snail, and then to gain deeper insight into the mechanism of natural selection, the students evaluate four examples from current research in evolutionary biology. Students examine how a variety of environmental factors, such as climate and elevation, can influence evolution and how species adapt to the corresponding habitats. Finally, they analyze the influence of human activities on the pupfish’s survival and evolution.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade07/73a/73anextgen.pdf
81
87
MS-ESS3-4
Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s systems.Shaping Natural Systems Through EvolutionShaping Natural Systems through Evolution engages students in the study of biological evolution by introducing them to several species of pupfish, many of which live in extreme environments that challenge their survival and reproduction. Based on what they have learned about these fish, they create a class model of natural selection that allows them to predict the kinds of adaptations that would be selected in different environments. They analyze an example of evolutionary change observed in a California species of snail, and then to gain deeper insight into the mechanism of natural selection, the students evaluate four examples from current research in evolutionary biology. Students examine how a variety of environmental factors, such as climate and elevation, can influence evolution and how species adapt to the corresponding habitats. Finally, they analyze the influence of human activities on the pupfish’s survival and evolution.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade07/73a/73anextgen.pdf
82
77MS-LS2-1 Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the
effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.
Responding to Environmental ChangeIn Responding to Environmental Change students examine a variety of empirical evidence about how the availability of resources affects the organisms in several ecosystems. They look at population growth in California as the basis for examining how human consumption of natural resources influences the populations of organisms. They also use information about human activity to predict environmental change and discuss its effects on the extinction of organisms.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade07/73e/73enextgen.pdf
83
77MS-LS2-4Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations. Responding to Environmental ChangeIn Responding to Environmental Change students examine a variety of empirical evidence about how the availability of resources affects the organisms in several ecosystems. They look at population growth in California as the basis for examining how human consumption of natural resources influences the populations of organisms. They also use information about human activity to predict environmental change and discuss its effects on the extinction of organisms.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade07/73e/73enextgen.pdf
84
87
MS-ESS3-4
Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s systems.Responding to Environmental ChangeIn Responding to Environmental Change students examine a variety of empirical evidence about how the availability of resources affects the organisms in several ecosystems. They look at population growth in California as the basis for examining how human consumption of natural resources influences the populations of organisms. They also use information about human activity to predict environmental change and discuss its effects on the extinction of organisms.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade07/73e/73enextgen.pdf
85
77MS-LS2-4Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations. Extinction: Past and PresentExtinction: Past and Present engages students in studying the history of the planet Earth and all of its life forms through a story of the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles. This gives them an opportunity to learn about the geological timeline and discuss the megafauna of North America during the Pleistocene. They examine a variety of biogeochemical data and the fossil record to help them distinguish between the effects of gradual versus rapid extinction events over the past 500 million years. By studying examples of eight California species, students begin to see that human activities can influence rates of extinction. Ultimately, they look at how the scope and scale of human alterations to the landscape are contributing to present-day extinction rates on a global scale. Through these comparisons they also have the opportunity to examine the dynamics, functioning, and resilience of ecosystems.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade07/74g/74gnextgen.pdf
86
87MS-LS4-1Analyze and interpret data for patterns in the fossil record that document the existence, diversity, extinction, and change of life forms throughout the history of life on Earth under the assumption that natural laws operate today as in the past.Extinction: Past and PresentExtinction: Past and Present engages students in studying the history of the planet Earth and all of its life forms through a story of the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles. This gives them an opportunity to learn about the geological timeline and discuss the megafauna of North America during the Pleistocene. They examine a variety of biogeochemical data and the fossil record to help them distinguish between the effects of gradual versus rapid extinction events over the past 500 million years. By studying examples of eight California species, students begin to see that human activities can influence rates of extinction. Ultimately, they look at how the scope and scale of human alterations to the landscape are contributing to present-day extinction rates on a global scale. Through these comparisons they also have the opportunity to examine the dynamics, functioning, and resilience of ecosystems.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade07/74g/74gnextgen.pdf
87
87MS-ESS1-4Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence from rock strata for how the geologic time scale is used to organize Earth’s 4.6-billion-year-old history.Extinction: Past and PresentExtinction: Past and Present engages students in studying the history of the planet Earth and all of its life forms through a story of the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles. This gives them an opportunity to learn about the geological timeline and discuss the megafauna of North America during the Pleistocene. They examine a variety of biogeochemical data and the fossil record to help them distinguish between the effects of gradual versus rapid extinction events over the past 500 million years. By studying examples of eight California species, students begin to see that human activities can influence rates of extinction. Ultimately, they look at how the scope and scale of human alterations to the landscape are contributing to present-day extinction rates on a global scale. Through these comparisons they also have the opportunity to examine the dynamics, functioning, and resilience of ecosystems.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade07/74g/74gnextgen.pdf
88
87
MS-ESS3-4
Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s systems.Extinction: Past and PresentExtinction: Past and Present engages students in studying the history of the planet Earth and all of its life forms through a story of the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles. This gives them an opportunity to learn about the geological timeline and discuss the megafauna of North America during the Pleistocene. They examine a variety of biogeochemical data and the fossil record to help them distinguish between the effects of gradual versus rapid extinction events over the past 500 million years. By studying examples of eight California species, students begin to see that human activities can influence rates of extinction. Ultimately, they look at how the scope and scale of human alterations to the landscape are contributing to present-day extinction rates on a global scale. Through these comparisons they also have the opportunity to examine the dynamics, functioning, and resilience of ecosystems.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/grade07/74g/74gnextgen.pdf
89
HSHSHS-LS3-2Make and defend a claim based on evidence that inheritable genetic variations may result from: (1) new genetic combinations through meiosis, (2) viable errors occurring during replication, and/or (3) mutations caused by environmental factors.High Tech Harvest: Genetic Engineering and the EnvironmentHigh Tech Harvest: Genetic Engineering and the Environment provides students with an in-depth look at the inheritance and variation among traits using both plants and animals. The unit explores these topics by examining “golden rice”, BT corn, bacteria that are used to produce biofuels, and other genetically modified organisms. Through this unit, students examine the history of genetic engineering in California, learn about both traditional and modern methods of genetic engineering, and discover how “human-directed” modification of plants and animals can influence both natural systems and human health. By studying the potential influence of “super rice” on natural systems, they ascertain how organisms that have been genetically modified by humans can affect biological evolution and biodiversity. Finally, students examine the factors that are considered while making decisions about engineering solutions, such as genetically modified organisms.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/biology/b5c/b5cnextgen.pdf
90
HSHSHS-LS4-5Evaluate the evidence supporting claims that changes in environmental conditions may result in: (1) increases in the number of individuals of some species, (2) the emergence of new species over time, and (3) the extinction of other species.High Tech Harvest: Genetic Engineering and the EnvironmentHigh Tech Harvest: Genetic Engineering and the Environment provides students with an in-depth look at the inheritance and variation among traits using both plants and animals. The unit explores these topics by examining “golden rice”, BT corn, bacteria that are used to produce biofuels, and other genetically modified organisms. Through this unit, students examine the history of genetic engineering in California, learn about both traditional and modern methods of genetic engineering, and discover how “human-directed” modification of plants and animals can influence both natural systems and human health. By studying the potential influence of “super rice” on natural systems, they ascertain how organisms that have been genetically modified by humans can affect biological evolution and biodiversity. Finally, students examine the factors that are considered while making decisions about engineering solutions, such as genetically modified organisms.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/biology/b5c/b5cnextgen.pdf
91
HSHSHS-ESS3-3Create a computational simulation to illustrate the relationships among management of natural resources, the sustainability of human populations, and biodiversity.High Tech Harvest: Genetic Engineering and the EnvironmentHigh Tech Harvest: Genetic Engineering and the Environment provides students with an in-depth look at the inheritance and variation among traits using both plants and animals. The unit explores these topics by examining “golden rice”, BT corn, bacteria that are used to produce biofuels, and other genetically modified organisms. Through this unit, students examine the history of genetic engineering in California, learn about both traditional and modern methods of genetic engineering, and discover how “human-directed” modification of plants and animals can influence both natural systems and human health. By studying the potential influence of “super rice” on natural systems, they ascertain how organisms that have been genetically modified by humans can affect biological evolution and biodiversity. Finally, students examine the factors that are considered while making decisions about engineering solutions, such as genetically modified organisms.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/biology/b5c/b5cnextgen.pdf
92
HSHSHS-ETS1-3Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and trade-offs that account for a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics, as well as possible social, cultural, and environmental impacts.High Tech Harvest: Genetic Engineering and the EnvironmentHigh Tech Harvest: Genetic Engineering and the Environment provides students with an in-depth look at the inheritance and variation among traits using both plants and animals. The unit explores these topics by examining “golden rice”, BT corn, bacteria that are used to produce biofuels, and other genetically modified organisms. Through this unit, students examine the history of genetic engineering in California, learn about both traditional and modern methods of genetic engineering, and discover how “human-directed” modification of plants and animals can influence both natural systems and human health. By studying the potential influence of “super rice” on natural systems, they ascertain how organisms that have been genetically modified by humans can affect biological evolution and biodiversity. Finally, students examine the factors that are considered while making decisions about engineering solutions, such as genetically modified organisms.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/biology/b5c/b5cnextgen.pdf
93
HSHSHS-LS2-6Evaluate the claims, evidence and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.Biodiversity: The Keystone to Life on EarthBiodiversity: The Keystone to Life on Earth uses California, one of Earth’s most biologically diverse regions, as a lens for learning about the biodiversity across the planet. This unit allows students to examine case studies showing how human actions can influence biodiversity and then study the implications of losing species. Finally, students read information and analyze maps related to the effects of human activities on the state’s biodiversity.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/biology/b6a/b6anextgen.pdf
94
HSHSHS-LS4-5Evaluate the evidence supporting claims that changes in environmental conditions may result in: (1) increases in the number of individuals of some species, (2) the emergence of new species over time, and (3) the extinction of other species.Biodiversity: The Keystone to Life on EarthBiodiversity: The Keystone to Life on Earth uses California, one of Earth’s most biologically diverse regions, as a lens for learning about the biodiversity across the planet. This unit allows students to examine case studies showing how human actions can influence biodiversity and then study the implications of losing species. Finally, students read information and analyze maps related to the effects of human activities on the state’s biodiversity.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/biology/b6a/b6anextgen.pdf
95
HSHSHS-ESS3-4Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural systems.Biodiversity: The Keystone to Life on EarthBiodiversity: The Keystone to Life on Earth uses California, one of Earth’s most biologically diverse regions, as a lens for learning about the biodiversity across the planet. This unit allows students to examine case studies showing how human actions can influence biodiversity and then study the implications of losing species. Finally, students read information and analyze maps related to the effects of human activities on the state’s biodiversity.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/biology/b6a/b6anextgen.pdf
96
HSHSHS-LS2-6Evaluate the claims, evidence and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.Ecosystem Change in CaliforniaEcosystem Change in California uses California’s extensive grasslands as a focus for the study of how complex sets of interactions within an ecosystem can keep its numbers and types of organisms relatively constant over long periods of time or varying under changing conditions. It looks at how extreme fluctuations in conditions or the size of any population, however, can challenge the functioning of ecosystems in terms of resources and habitat availability. “Ecosystem Change in California” looks at how changes in the physical environment, whether naturally occurring or human induced, have thus contributed to the expansion of some species, the emergence of new distinct species, and the decline—and sometimes extinction—of some species. The analysis of changes to California’s grasslands over the past century provides a context for considering the range of constraints, as well as social, cultural, and environmental impacts, that occur over time.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/biology/b6b/b6bnextgen.pdf
97
HSHSHS-LS4-5Evaluate the evidence supporting claims that changes in environmental conditions may result in: (1) increases in the number of individuals of some species, (2) the emergence of new species over time, and (3) the extinction of other species.Ecosystem Change in CaliforniaEcosystem Change in California uses California’s extensive grasslands as a focus for the study of how complex sets of interactions within an ecosystem can keep its numbers and types of organisms relatively constant over long periods of time or varying under changing conditions. It looks at how extreme fluctuations in conditions or the size of any population, however, can challenge the functioning of ecosystems in terms of resources and habitat availability. “Ecosystem Change in California” looks at how changes in the physical environment, whether naturally occurring or human induced, have thus contributed to the expansion of some species, the emergence of new distinct species, and the decline—and sometimes extinction—of some species. The analysis of changes to California’s grasslands over the past century provides a context for considering the range of constraints, as well as social, cultural, and environmental impacts, that occur over time.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/biology/b6b/b6bnextgen.pdf
98
HSHSHS-ETS1-3Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and trade-offs that account for a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics, as well as possible social, cultural, and environmental impacts.Ecosystem Change in CaliforniaEcosystem Change in California uses California’s extensive grasslands as a focus for the study of how complex sets of interactions within an ecosystem can keep its numbers and types of organisms relatively constant over long periods of time or varying under changing conditions. It looks at how extreme fluctuations in conditions or the size of any population, however, can challenge the functioning of ecosystems in terms of resources and habitat availability. “Ecosystem Change in California” looks at how changes in the physical environment, whether naturally occurring or human induced, have thus contributed to the expansion of some species, the emergence of new distinct species, and the decline—and sometimes extinction—of some species. The analysis of changes to California’s grasslands over the past century provides a context for considering the range of constraints, as well as social, cultural, and environmental impacts, that occur over time.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/biology/b6b/b6bnextgen.pdf
99
HSHSHS-LS2-6Evaluate the claims, evidence and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.Differential Survival of OrganismsDifferential Survival of Organisms starts with a study of the sea otter population along the coastline of Central California, giving students the opportunity to examine the process of evolution as it occurs through natural selection and the adaptation of populations. They have the chance to study a variety of marine organisms to determine which adaptations are essential for their survival. Students examine both the naturally-occurring biotic and abiotic factors that can influence the survival of each species. Using this information they learn about the differential survival of populations of organisms and examine the role of differential survival in evolutionary processes. Students are introduced to the concept of selection pressure and analyze how various adaptations can result from those evolutionary forces. Finally, the unit gives students an opportunity to evaluate the influence that human decisions and activities have had on the sea otter population off of California’s coast and evaluate particular solutions for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/biology/b8a/b8anextgen.pdf
100
HSHSHS-LS2-7Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts human activities have on the environment and biodiversity.Differential Survival of OrganismsDifferential Survival of Organisms starts with a study of the sea otter population along the coastline of Central California, giving students the opportunity to examine the process of evolution as it occurs through natural selection and the adaptation of populations. They have the chance to study a variety of marine organisms to determine which adaptations are essential for their survival. Students examine both the naturally-occurring biotic and abiotic factors that can influence the survival of each species. Using this information they learn about the differential survival of populations of organisms and examine the role of differential survival in evolutionary processes. Students are introduced to the concept of selection pressure and analyze how various adaptations can result from those evolutionary forces. Finally, the unit gives students an opportunity to evaluate the influence that human decisions and activities have had on the sea otter population off of California’s coast and evaluate particular solutions for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.
http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/eei/unitdocs/biology/b8a/b8anextgen.pdf
Loading...
Main menu