ABCDE
1
OUR TOWN AUDITIONS!
2
(Please do not edit time slots that have been filled. Thank you.)
3
TimeNameGradeEmailPhone #
4
3:25-3:30Mya
5
3:30-3:35Genevieve Dyches8thgendyches25@gmail.com8013692052
6
3:35-3:40Eva Pace12evapace@gmail.com385-200-1848
7
3:40-3:45abby johnson10abbyjohnsonlovessoccer@gmail.com8013720481
8
3:45-3:50Logan Hunsaker11thlogan.hunsaker3@gmail.com385-394-8491
9
3:50-3:55Bizzie Olsen10thbizzieolsen@gmail.com801-836-7420
10
3:55-4:00Lucia DeForest9thluciajoyd@gmail.com385-229-0447
11
4:00-4:05Ryan Mitchell 11thryanwmitchell4950@gmail.com 971-601-8015
12
4:05-4:10Caleb Randall10thobiwan.caleb78@gmail.com385-233-7651
13
4:10-4:15charlotte mellor10thcamellor3@gmail.com6197241372
14
4:15-4:20Mason Longhurst10thMasLonghurst24@gmail.com801-597-5057
15
4:20-4:25McKay Webb10thmckaywebb09@gmail.com385-535-4922
16
4:25-4:30Ariana Bellarianakbell@gmail.com407-943-4025
17
4:30-4:35Nancy Mellor10thflamingo801-450-2764
18
4:35-4:40Mya Holyoak11thhamilton4life000@gmail.com (801) 358-8879
19
4:40-4:45Laurelyn Bradford9thisabella@bradfordfamily.org801-785-8821
20
4:45-4:50Vivian Bradford9thisabella@bradfordfamily.org801-785-8821
21
4:50-4:55Isabella Bradford11thisabella@bradfordfamily.org801-785-8821
22
4:55-5:00Brynlee Murray10thbrynleemurray@gmail.com385-775-9255
23
5:00-5:05Sarah Ware12sarah@warefam.org385-207-4761
24
5:05-5:10Charity Ehlers12thcharity.ehlers@gmail.com 385-222-5504
25
5:10-5:15Sarah Riboldi 12seriboldi@gmail.com801-860-4296
26
5:15-5:20Emily Grow11thEmilygtgrow@gmail.com8013771231
27
5:20-5:25Catherine Howard12catherinequinnhoward@gmail.com385-482-9162
28
5:25-5:30Emily Fullmer8thrachelfullmer@gmail.com801-300-2506
29
5:30-5:35Emma Young10thtweenbooklover@gmail.com 801-960-6832
30
31
Parent Volunteers Needed
(can count towards school service hours)
32
Help with
Props /
Costumes
Name/Contact info:
33
Becca Barlow 801-471-4774 rebeccaqbarlow@gmail.com
34
Patricia Young 801-372-9479 crazyeightmom@yahoo.com
35
Thalea Longhurst 801-597-8047 ThaleaL@aol.com
36
37
AUDITION SIDES (Choose ONE)
38

The Stage Manager is the narrator of the entire show. Must be charismatic, sensitive, and great at memorizing! Can be either male or female:
This passage does NOT have to be memorized, but needs to show the ability to paint a picture with words.
STAGE MANAGER: This play is called "Our Town." It was written by Thornton Wilder. The name of the town is Grover's Corners, New Hampshire – just across the Massachusetts line: latitude 42 degrees 40 minutes; longitude 70 degrees 37 minutes. The First Act shows a day in our town. The day is May 7, 1901. The time is just before dawn. Well, I'd better show you how our town lies. Up here (that is: parallel to the back wall) – is Main Street. Way back there is the railway station; tracks go that way. Polish Town’s across the tracks, and some Canuck families. (Toward the left) Over there is the Congregational Church; across the street’s the Presbyterian. Methodist and Unitarian are over there. (off down right) Baptist is down in the holla’ by the river. Catholic Church is over beyond the tracks. Here’s the Town Hall and Post Office combined; jail’s in the basement. Bryan once made a speech from these steps here. Along here’s (Main Street, parallel with the back wall) a row of stores. Hitching posts and horse blocks in front of them. First automobile’s going to come along in about five years – belonged to Banker Cartwright, our richest citizen . . . lives in the big white house up on the hill. Here’s the grocery store and here’s Mr. Morgan’s drugstore. (Pointing right and left behind him) Most everybody in town manages to look into those two stores once a day. Public School’s over yonder. High School’s still farther over. Quarter of nine mornings, noontimes, and three o’clock afternoons, the hull town can hear yelling and screaming from those schoolyards. (He approach hes the table and chairs downstage right.) This is our doctor’ house,-Doc Gibbs’. This is the back door. (Two arched trellises, covered with vines and flowers, are pushed out, one by each proscenium pillar.) There’s some scenery for those who think they have to have scenery. This is Mrs. Gibbs’ garden. Corn . . . peas . . . beans . . . hollyhocks . . .heliotrope . . . and a lot of burdock. (Crosses the stage.) In those days our newspaper come out twice a week – the Grover’s Corners Sentinel – and this is Editor Webb’s house. And this is Mrs. Webb’s garden. Just like Mrs. Gibbs’, only it’s got a lot of sunflowers, too. (He looks upward, center stage.) Right here’s .. . a big butternut tree.



39
(Please do not edit time slots that have been filled. Thank you.)
40
TimeNameGradeEmailPhone #
41
4:00-4:10
42
4:10-4:20
43
4:20-4:30
44
4:30-4:40
45
4:40-4:50
46
4:50-5:00
47
5:00-5:10
48
5:10-5:20
49
5:20-5:30
50
5:30-5:40
51
5:40-5:50
52
5:50-6:00
53
6:00-6:10
54
6:10-6:20
55
6:20-6:30
56
6:30-6:40
57
6:40-6:50
58
6:50-7:00
59
WOMEN (choose ONE)

#1:

I don’t know why on earth I should be crying. I suppose there’s nothing to cry about. This morning at breakfast it came over me. There was Emily eating her breakfast as she’s done for seventeen years – and she’s going out of my house. I suppose that’s it – And Emily! She suddenly said, “I can’t eat another mouthful.” And she put her head on the table and she cried. Oh, I’ve got to say it – You know, there is something cruel about sending girls out into marriages like that. It’s – it’s cruel, I know; but I just couldn’t get myself to say anything – I went into it blind as a bat myself. The whole world’s wrong, that’s what’s the matter.

#2:

Oh, Mama, just look at me one minute as though you really saw me. Mama! Fourteen years have gone by! – I’m dead! – You’re a grandmother, Mama – I married George Gibbs, Mama! - Wally’s dead too. – Mama! His appendix burst on a camping trip to Crawford Notch. We felt just terrible about it, don’t you remember? – But, just for a moment now we’re all together – Mama, just for a moment let’s be happy – Let’s look at one another! I can’t! I can’t go on! It goes so fast. We don’t have time to look at one another. I didn’t realize. So all that was going on and we never noticed! Take me back – up the hill – to my grave. But first: Wait! One more look! Oh, earth you’re too wonderful for anyone to realize you! Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it – every, every minute?


#3:

I don’t know why on earth I should be crying. I suppose there’s nothing to cry about. This morning at breakfast it came over me. There was Emily eating her breakfast as she’s done for seventeen years – and she’s going out of my house. I suppose that’s it – And Emily! She suddenly said, “I can’t eat another mouthful.” And she put her head on the table and she cried. Oh, I’ve got to say it – You know, there is something cruel about sending girls out into marriages like that. It’s – it’s cruel, I know; but I just couldn’t get myself to say anything – I went into it blind as a bat myself. The whole world’s wrong, that’s what’s the matter.



60
MEN (choose ONE)

#1

I’m celebrating because I’ve got a friend who tells me all the things that ought to be told me. I’m glad you spoke to me like you did. But you’ll see. I’m going to change. And Emily, I want to ask you a favor. Emily, if I go away to State Agricultural College next year, will you write me a letter? The day wouldn’t come when I wouldn’t want to know everything about our town. Y’ know, Emily, whenever I meet a farmer I ask him if he thinks it’s important to go to Agricultural School to be a good farmer. And some of them say it’s even a waste of time. And like you say, being gone all that time – in other places, and meeting other people. I guess new people probably aren’t any better than old ones. Emily – I feel that you’re as good a friend as I’ve got. I don’t need to go and meet the people in other towns. Emily, I’m going to make up my mind right now – I won’t go. I’ll tell Pa about it tonight.


#2

George, I was remembering the other night the advice my father gave me when I got married. Yes, he said “Charles,” he said “start right off showin’ who’s boss. Best thing to do is to give an order about something, even if it doesn’t make sense, just so she’ll learn to obey,” he said. Then he said, “If anything about her irritates you, her conversation or anything, get right up and leave the house; that’ll make it clear to her.” And oh yes, he said “Never let your wife know about how much money you have, never.” So I took the opposite of his advice and I’ve been happy ever since.
61