Copy of Early Literacy Assessments
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Last Updated 9/19/2019
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DISCLAIMER: The assessments/screeners for dyslexia risk and early literacy milestones provided in this sheet are a compilation of "everything out there" that the research team could find. It is our best attempt at a comprehensive list. If you know of an early literacy assessment or screener that you think we should add to this list, or if you believe that any of the information in this sheet is inaccurate, please reach out to us at gaablab@childrens.harvard.edu. We are updating the list constantly.
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This table was created by the research teams at the Gaab lab at Boston Children's Hospital and the Gabrieli lab at MIT. (Thank you to Ola Ozernov-Palchik, Michelle Gonzalez, Lindsay Hillyer, Jeff Dieffenbach, John Gabrieli & Nadine Gaab)
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Please read the instructions and further resources below BEFORE you access the different tabs:
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There is not one screener that fits all schools or school districts. Here are a few criteria that are important to consider:
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a) Student population: Does your school/school district have many students from low socio-economic status (SES) backgrounds or students with language disabilities (e.g. expressive language delay; specific language impairments etc.)? If so, it is important to make sure that your screener contains oral language measures since some children (e.g from low SES families or with low language abilities) may develop poor reading skills because of their language environment at home/in their community or low oral language abilities.
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b) Oral Language Skills: (e.g. low vocabulary or low oral sentence comprehension). Does your school/district have many English language learners? For these students it will be important to consider screeners that assess oral language skills as well as pre-reading skills that are minimally biased by language skills (e.g. nonword repetition). Furthermore, the norms of most screeners (if normed at all) are from monolingual English speakers. ELL students can be compared to other ELL students but will often be 'at-risk' when compare to a non-ELL norm group. However, it is important that these students will be screened as well since ELL students with developmental dyslexia or reading impairments are often identified late (if at all).
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c) Personnel available for screening and interpretation: Some screeners require intensive training and a time-intensive one-on-one administration and/or scoring/interpretation protocol. This requires a significant training protocol and resources.
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d) Sensitivity/Specificity: No screener is perfect and will correctly identify all children at risk without false alarms (children who are identified as being at risk by the screener but who are not truly at-risk) and misses (children who are not identified by the screener but are in fact at-risk) .
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We further recommend eight key characteristics when determining an optimal screening battery for an individual classroom, school, or district. The first letters of these characteristics spell the acronym SCREENED:
For more information, please visit https://dyslexiaida.org/its-a-myth-that-young-children-cannot-be-screened-for-dyslexia/
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Short
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Comprehensive
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Resourceful
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Early
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ESL/Dialect Inclusion
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Neurobiology/Genetics
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Evidence-based response to screening
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Developmentally appropriate
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Online Resources:
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Also, please see this list by Yaacov Petscher that outlines important factors when considering a screener: https://psyarxiv.com/vukt2
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You can also find a great list of screener with evaluations on this website by the Center on response to intervention at the American Institues for Research https://www.rti4success.org/resources/tools-charts/screening-tools-chart?fbclid=IwAR0x1_iOVGKmU1S4AeMPfkKs8weR-cWfNEvlMTE10UlX3Cg_8m6O973H7Bs
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You can also find very helpful information about the screening process and how to select a screener in the Dyslexia Handbook by the Texas Education Agency: https://tea.texas.gov/academics/dyslexia/
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There is also helpful information on screening on the website of the international Dyslexia Association: https://dyslexiaida.org/universal-screening-k-2-reading/
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Please also take a look at the helpful info from National Center on Improving Literacy https://improvingliteracy.org/
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We will add more information on screening and best practices here at a later date
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